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The Guardian view on Putin and power: he’s not going anywhere | Editorial 16 Jan 1:43pm The Guardian view on Putin and power: he’s not going anywhere | Editorial
The Russian president is laying the groundwork to perpetuate his rule when his term ends in four yearsJust over a year ago, Vladimir Putin was asked how Russia would look after his presidential term expires in 2024. To little surprise, he turned the query upon the questioner: “Why are you in such a hurry? I’m not going anywhere yet.” There was no lack of warning about the intentions of Russia’s longest-serving leader since Stalin. A generation that has grown up
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Vladimir Putin’s naked power grab could have unexpected benefits | Yana Gorokhovskaia 16 Jan 12:28pm Vladimir Putin’s naked power grab could have unexpected benefits | Yana Gorokhovskaia
A weaker presidency and a stronger parliament must be good for Russia’s democracy, whatever the real intentionWednesday may prove to be one of the most important days in the political history of post-Soviet Russia. During the last 10 minutes of his annual state-of-the-nation speech,
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Britain needs its own Mueller report on Russian ‘interference’ | Glenn R Simpson and Peter Fritsch 12 Dec 2019, 6:17am Britain needs its own Mueller report on Russian ‘interference’ | Glenn R Simpson and Peter Fritsch
Conservative-leaning media in the UK and US see little mileage in exposing meddling that helped their own sideThe British political system has become thoroughly compromised by Russian influence. It’s high time its institutions – including the media – woke up to that fact. In 2016, both the United Kingdom and the United States were the targets of Russian efforts to swing their votes. The aim was to weaken the alliances that had constrained Vladimir Putin’s ambitions, such as the European Union and Nato. The efforts in both countries had much in common. They were aided by a transatlantic cast of characters loosely organised around the Trump and Brexit campaigns. Many of them worked in concert and interacted with Russians close to the Kremlin. The outcome in both countries was also eerily similar. Both countries have been at war with themselves in the three years since, pulling them back from the international stage at a time when Putin has consolidated his position in
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Angela Merkel must go – for Germany’s sake, and for Europe’s | Timothy Garton Ash 22 Nov 2019, 1:30am Angela Merkel must go – for Germany’s sake, and for Europe’s | Timothy Garton Ash
Hers is a government for undemanding times, with none of the ambition needed to face the giant challenges of todayIf Germany is the heart of Europe, then it is currently the slow-beating heart of a well-fed businessman resting on his office couch after an ample lunch. For Europe’s sake, and for Germany’s own, that heart needs to beat a little faster. It’s not that German elites don’t intellectually recognise the problems gathering all around them. Berlin, which is beginning to rival London as a thinktank hub, is pullulating with clever people who can tell you exactly why, faced with the challenges of Brexit, populism, Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin, climate change and AI – to name but a few – Europe needs more strategic autonomy, digital innovation and sustainable growth. What is missing is a sense of urgency and the ability to translate these abstract goals into dynamic policies that German voters will actually support. For now, Germany is effectively willing the ends but not the means.
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The Guardian view on election 2019: it’s about Brexit above all | Editorial 31 Oct 2019, 2:28pm The Guardian view on election 2019: it’s about Brexit above all | Editorial
The retirement of so many centrist Tories is a reminder that theirs has now become the Brexit party in all but nameIf the leavers, the Conservative reactionaries, the neoliberals and the ranks of Britain’s rightwing press – to say nothing of their friends Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin – had had their way, Friday would have been Britain’s first day outside the European Union since 31 December 1972. But the Halloween deadline has come and gone. Instead, largely as a result of the ruthless parliamentary exposure of Boris Johnson’s shabby political quackery, Britain remains part of Europe. Friday is therefore a day for relief and a modest celebration, not for defeat or dejection. A place in Europe, for which so many have fought so hard over the last three and a half years, remains ours. But its future now rests on the result of the general election in six weeks’ time. Mr Johnson captured the prime ministership in July on a shamelessly false prospectus. He promised he could get Britain out by 31 October,
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Europe is failing to stand up to the bullies who threaten democracy | Luke Cooper 28 Oct 2019, 4:00am Europe is failing to stand up to the bullies who threaten democracy | Luke Cooper
From Brexit to the Balkans to the plight of the Kurds, EU leaders have refused to defend multilateralism The rise of nationalism and the historic threat to liberalism sweeping the global system poses big strategic questions for European democracies. Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin share an ideological belief in the language of race and nation combined with a winner-takes-all view of international diplomacy. By undermining the multilateral system the new authoritarians threaten a return to the assumptions of a previous era: a world of empires, not institutions. This makes Europe a central crucible for what happens next. As the Yale historian Timothy Snyder
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Trust is becoming the principal casualty of Britain’s raging political war | Nick Cohen 27 Oct 2019, 3:30am Trust is becoming the principal casualty of Britain’s raging political war | Nick Cohen
The electorate is fast losing trust in leaders happy to abuse our democratic heritage Britain is in a revolutionary crisis. Its economy, constitution, place in the international order and sense of who it is and what it can become will be battlefields at the next election. The high stakes alone will ensure that a red mist descends. To heighten the rage, the wilful failure of the Conservative government to prevent the corruptions of the electoral process brought by the age of Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin will sharpen every grievance. Put yourself in the place of Britain’s competing factions and you get a fair idea of how angry and desperate all sides will become. The leaders of the Brexit movement must know they are on borrowed time. They may
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Russia has been playing a canny game in the Middle East, but can it continue? | Olga Oliker 23 Oct 2019, 10:47am Russia has been playing a canny game in the Middle East, but can it continue? | Olga Oliker
Putin’s deal with Turkey is the latest in a smart power-broking strategy that will soon be tested to its limitsRecent events in Syria suggest that Russia isn’t just taking Washington’s place as the Middle East’s power broker – it seems to be doing a more effective job of it, too. The latest evidence came yesterday, when Vladimir Putin
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The Observer view on Putin’s ongoing corruption of democracy | Observer editorial 8 Sep 2019, 1:00am The Observer view on Putin’s ongoing corruption of democracy | Observer editorial
The Kremlin’s underhand scheming in municipal voting is a warning to Britain to protect a forthcoming election Vladimir Putin’s regime has done all in its power to skew and distort the results of Sunday’s nationwide regional elections in Russia. This is no surprise. The Kremlin has become notorious in recent years for its efforts, both brazen and underhand, to subvert democracy at home and abroad. With general elections approaching in Britain and the US, a close eye needs to be kept on Russia’s president. Recent events surrounding
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On the stage, Alexander Litvinenko gets the justice he was denied in life | Luke Harding 7 Sep 2019, 1:00am On the stage, Alexander Litvinenko gets the justice he was denied in life | Luke Harding
A Very Expensive Poison, about the dissident’s murder, shows how Putin and the Russian state twisted the truth The character is called Mr President. He’s a fussy little man who walks briskly down a red carpet. The Russian national anthem is a clue, as are the golden Kremlin doors. Yes, it’s Vladimir Putin, making an appearance on a London stage in
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Putin began by embracing the west. Now, he wants revenge | Angus Roxburgh 12 Aug 2019, 1:00am Putin began by embracing the west. Now, he wants revenge | Angus Roxburgh
There’s little hope of an improvement in relations so long as the Russian president’s 20-year reign continues When Boris Yeltsin appointed Vladimir Putin prime minister on
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Vladimir Putin’s Russia is rehabilitating Stalin. We must not let it happen | Irina Sherbakova 10 Jul 2019, 1:00am Vladimir Putin’s Russia is rehabilitating Stalin. We must not let it happen | Irina Sherbakova
An archive of artefacts from Stalin’s brutal reign should stand as evidence against Putin’s vision of a ‘heroic’ Soviet past
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Liberalism is facing a crisis. But it’s not what Vladimir Putin thinks | Kenan Malik 30 Jun 2019, 1:00am Liberalism is facing a crisis. But it’s not what Vladimir Putin thinks | Kenan Malik
With the decline of the left, only populism seems to offer a sense of social solidarity‘What we may be witnessing is the end point of mankind’s ideological evolution and the universalisation of western liberal democracy as the final form of human government.” So wrote Francis Fukuyama in his 1989 essay, The End of History?, as he surveyed the collapse of the Soviet empire. Thirty years on, the argument seems to have been turned on its head. As Vladimir Putin, virtual tsar of the Russian nation that has emerged from the debris of the Soviet Union, declared on the eve of the G20 conference in Osaka, it’s not history but liberal democracy that seems to have “outlived its purpose”. Liberalism,
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The Observer view on Vladimir Putin and the defence of liberal values | Observer editorial 30 Jun 2019, 12:59am The Observer view on Vladimir Putin and the defence of liberal values | Observer editorial
The mask has finally slipped – and Putinism is infecting other world leaders. He must be confrontedVladimir Putin has many faces: Russian patriot, man of the people, macho sportsman, global power-broker. But the mask slipped last week. The world glimpsed the real Putin and it was an ugly sight. There is a meanness about him, a smallness of mind born of fear and anger. His world view, warped by the cold war and his KGB training, is twisted, resentful, defensive. He has almost nothing positive to say. Putin is an empty space where leadership and moral example should be. Why, then, should anybody care what he thinks? His remarks proclaiming western liberalism “
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Andrzej Krauze on continental power games – cartoon 26 Jun 2019, 1:00am Andrzej Krauze on continental power games – cartoon
Europe finds itself caught between pressure from Donald Trump – on trade, Iran, Brexit, the far right – and Vladimir Putin’s own aggressive policies
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The Observer view on Gavin Williamson’s Pacific blunder | Observer editorial 16 Feb 2019, 12:40pm The Observer view on Gavin Williamson’s Pacific blunder | Observer editorial
Talking tough to China is typical of Mrs May’s gaffe-prone defence secretaryGavin Williamson is a loose cannon. That would not matter so much if, as was the case until a couple of years ago, he was a government whip whose views were of little account. But Theresa May’s surprise decision to make Williamson defence secretary has given him an international platform, and a degree of responsibility, to which he appears ill-suited. Until now, his most publicised blunder concerned his schoolboy remarks following last year’s chemical weapons attack in Salisbury. Asked how he thought Vladimir Putin might respond to British sanctions, he replied: “Frankly, Russia should go away and it should shut up.” He was widely mocked.
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Why the Russian embassy to the UK should be on Boris Nemtsov Way | Vladimir Kara-Murza 4 Dec 2018, 3:00am Why the Russian embassy to the UK should be on Boris Nemtsov Way | Vladimir Kara-Murza
London should follow the lead of Washington, Vilnius and Kiev and remember the patriot Vladimir Putin prefers to forget
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The crown prince and the murderers | Letters 3 Dec 2018, 12:38pm The crown prince and the murderers | Letters
Readers ponder the appearance of Mohammed bin Salman at the G20 summit in Buenos AiresEveryone knows that there are serious allegations about Mohammed bin Salman’s knowledge regarding the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, but it didn’t seem to bother him or his alpha-male buddy Vladimir Putin at the Buenos Aires G20 summit (
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Putin is profiting from chaos in Ukraine – and the west is letting him | Natalia Antonova 27 Nov 2018, 7:57am Putin is profiting from chaos in Ukraine – and the west is letting him | Natalia Antonova
The Sea of Azov skirmish bolsters Putin at home while delivering a masterclass in despotism to any watching dictatorsWe’re often told that the reason the Russian president, Vladimir Putin, is so dangerous is that he is a brilliant political chess master, always thinking several moves ahead. Yet there is reason to believe that the real reason Putin is so dangerous is that he is no chess master at all. His latest skirmish with Ukraine, this time in the
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Vladimir Putin’s plan to divide Europe is backfiring | Natalie Nougayrède 9 Oct 2018, 2:06pm Vladimir Putin’s plan to divide Europe is backfiring | Natalie Nougayrède
As the truth of the Skripal poisoning unravels, Russia finds itself creating some unlikely allies across EuropeThe former Russian prime minister Viktor Chernomyrdin once famously quipped: “We wanted the best, but it turned out as always.” When Dutch, British and US officials last week issued coordinated denunciations of Russia’s cyber-operations – whose targets ranged from sports anti-doping bodies to the international chemical weapon watchdog – it felt like Chernomyrdin’s saying had been given new meaning. For all the efforts the Kremlin put into staging the World Cup earlier this year as a demonstration of Russia’s openness, news seems to keep pouring in about the blunders of its not-so-secret services. In the latest instalment yesterday, Bellingcat, an investigative website,
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May I have a word… about rotters, twerps and scumbags | Jonathan Bouquet 7 Oct 2018, 1:00am May I have a word… about rotters, twerps and scumbags | Jonathan Bouquet
Some derogatory words should be treasured and nurtured. Others – Vladimir Putin, take note – should notOnly last week, a colleague was bemoaning the fact that the word “rotter” had disappeared from common usage. I couldn’t help but agree. And then glory be – at lunch on Sunday, one of the other guests described a colleague at another newspaper as an “absolute rotter”. Suffice it to say the man who used the joyous phrase was of a certain vintage and knew the withering worth of the word. Such was the venom with which he uttered it that it was abundantly clear that the guilty party was of the very lowest order. I was only disappointed that he didn’t go on to describe his erstwhile workmate as a cad, a bounder and an absolute shower,
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Britain lets Putin move his dark money with impunity. That has to stop | Oliver Bullough 20 Sep 2018, 7:41am Britain lets Putin move his dark money with impunity. That has to stop | Oliver Bullough
The Danske bank money-laundering scandal was only possible thanks to Britain’s opaque corporate laws Vladimir Putin’s global power is inseparable from his mastery of dark money, which he moves secretly to buy assets and influence. We know he’s doing it, because we can see the effects – the convulsions in Ukraine, the scandal in the United States – but it is far harder to know the precise mechanics. Thanks to a gigantic money-laundering news story, which
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The US sanctions bill is a timebomb for Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin | Natalie Nougayrède 28 Nov 2017, 1:00am The US sanctions bill is a timebomb for Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin | Natalie Nougayrède
Congress now controls a process that is dangerous to both presidents – and the oligarchs, fearing targeted personal sanctions, are getting desperateIn Russia, propaganda-generated hope springs eternal, and no more so than at the news agency Tass. Europe is wising up to the fact that its sanctions policy against Russia is “senseless and futile”,
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Putin’s Russia can’t celebrate its revolutionary past. It has to smother it | Catherine Merridale 3 Nov 2017, 2:00am Putin’s Russia can’t celebrate its revolutionary past. It has to smother it | Catherine Merridale
The Russian Revolution was a fight against the excesses of the rich. No wonder Vladimir Putin wants to ignore the centenaryNovember always brings a welcome holiday for Russians. The day off work is about some great historical event, but most use it to catch up with their families. On 7 November 2017, it will be exactly 100 years since
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It’s the Russian Revolution’s centenary, but don’t expect Ukrainians to celebrate | Serhii Plokhy 19 Oct 2017, 12:19pm It’s the Russian Revolution’s centenary, but don’t expect Ukrainians to celebrate | Serhii Plokhy
Ukraine’s under-reported conflict continues to rage while Vladimir Putin still looks to expand his federation’s borders
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George Foreman fighting Steven Seagal in Vegas? It’s the least we deserve 5 Oct 2017, 12:18pm George Foreman fighting Steven Seagal in Vegas? It’s the least we deserve
The noted countertop-grill retailer and ex-heavyweight champion has issued a challenge to Vladimir Putin’s best friend. If it ever happens, it will be a cultural event worthy of our troubled times It has become a cliche of the era to say we are getting what we deserve. We get the politicians we deserve, we get the presidents we deserve, we get the world we deserve. Without getting overly L’Oreal advert about it all, surely we deserve a respite from these just deserts? Can’t something hilarious and magical come along that we can all welcome with open arms, realising that we are, without question, getting the thing that we deserve – and that it is good? Yes. Yes it can.
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8 Jul 2017, 7:05pm The Observer view on leadership qualities on the world stage | Observer editorial
Expectations of our political figureheads are unrealistically high. But instead of preening and posing, they should listen, learn and inspire The leaders of the G20 countries gathered for the traditional group photograph in Hamburg on Friday. As is usual on such occasions, the pictures were scrutinised for signs of who’s up and who’s down. Angela Merkel, the summit host, stood out in a red jacket and grey trousers amid the ranks of dark-suited men. France’s newly elected president, Emmanuel Macron, was all smiles. In jolly mood, too, were Canada’s Justin Trudeau and Japan’s Shinzo Abe. In contrast, Vladimir Putin of Russia, Xi Jinping of China and Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey stood grim faced on the far right of the group. Putin always looks miserable on these occasions, standing straight, his shoulders squared, trying to appear taller than he actually is. Xi looked slightly bemused. Behind them hovered Theresa May, with her usual worried look, possibly wondering whether any of these foreign johnnies want a trade deal.
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7 Jul 2017, 2:51pm Updated The Biggest Loser?
Shirtless or not, Vladimir Putin leads a struggling country.
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The Guardian view on Trump and Putin: mind games and the risk of a misstep | Editorial 6 Jul 2017, 3:02pm The Guardian view on Trump and Putin: mind games and the risk of a misstep | Editorial
The US and Russian presidents are expected to hold their first meeting as leaders on Friday. Vladimir Putin is a master of detail and adept in manoeuvres. Donald Trump had better read his briefing notesDonald Trump is expected to hold
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From Russia With Chaos 12 Jun 2017, 7:14pm From Russia With Chaos
Vladimir Putin doesn’t support Donald Trump. He supports American political paralysis.
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10 Jun 2017, 2:30pm Updated The Power of the Russian State vs. a Librarian
Vladimir Putin’s Russia has fallen prey to the old Soviet notion that any deviation from the position of the state is liable to be prosecuted....
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So has Oliver Stone unpicked the mystery of pin-up Putin? | Mary Dejevsky 8 Jun 2017, 2:01pm So has Oliver Stone unpicked the mystery of pin-up Putin? | Mary Dejevsky
With unprecedented access to the bare-chested macho man and tiger hunter, the Putin Interviews gazes approvingly on the manufacturing of a modern tsarWhy does he do it? Why does Vladimir Putin cavort bare-chested on a horse, have himself filmed hunting a Siberian tiger, dive for ancient (pre-positioned) artefacts, allow publication of a
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Bragging about our intel to Russia? Trump is too needy to be president | Richard Wolffe 16 May 2017, 3:41pm Updated Bragging about our intel to Russia? Trump is too needy to be president | Richard Wolffe
So desperate is Trump to impress the Russians, it seems he’s giving away our most classified information. The only winner here is Vladimir Putin There is nothing Donald Trump loves more than a great superlative. He builds the tallest hotels. He is the most successful businessman. His inaugural crowds were the biggest ever. None of these claims are remotely true, no matter how exaggerated the adjective nor how emphatic the delivery. But after his alleged blabbing of highly classified intelligence to the Russians, Trump can now lay claim to the greatest superlative of any sitting president: he is the biggest bozo of them all. Bigger than the Bush who thought invading Iraq would be easy. Bigger than the biggest
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9 May 2017, 2:18pm Updated A Syrian Plan Worth a Look
President Trump should consider Russia’s flawed cease-fire plan without too eagerly seeking common cause with Vladimir Putin....
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The Guardian view on Syria: Trump’s unpredictability demands European steadiness | Editorial 11 Apr 2017, 3:01pm The Guardian view on Syria: Trump’s unpredictability demands European steadiness | Editorial
The shifting and contradictory stances of the US administration are concerning – but all the more reason for other western nations to work togetherRex Tillerson’s plane touched down in Moscow on Tuesday amid a smoky haze caused by a fire at a nearby rubbish dump. More than one observer found the metaphor irresistible. The US approach to Syria – the term “policy” would dignify it with a coherence it does not deserve – is more opaque, contradictory and confusing than ever. Its stance on Russia, once so cosy but now confrontational in tone at least, is arguably even less clear. Its ability to work with other western nations to present a united front to Vladimir Putin and Bashar al-Assad is similarly foggy. The secretary of state had hoped to carry a unified and resonant message from the meeting of G7 foreign ministers in Italy. Those present in Lucca condemned the chemical attack
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Defend Gibraltar? Better condemn it as a dodgy tax haven | Oliver Bullough 8 Apr 2017, 7:05pm Defend Gibraltar? Better condemn it as a dodgy tax haven | Oliver Bullough
It sets its own taxes, makes its own rules and undermines Britain as much as the rest of the EUIn 1999, Vladimir Putin was angling to become president, a complex task considering the amount of money and violence in Russian politics at the time. He needed to talk to all the players and needed to do so somewhere unobtrusive, so he convened a meeting at an oligarch’s Mediterranean villa. This, however, caused a problem: how could he travel to southern Spain without alerting the Spanish, who might monitor the conversations and learn what was going on? Fortunately, there was a solution: Gibraltar. The then-FSB chief flew into the British territory, hopped on a boat and entered Spain illegally, on perhaps as many as five occasions. Russian spooks are not the only thing Gibraltar has smuggled across the border. According to media reports quoting a confidential EU investigation,
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Will Trump unleash a slow-motion Cuban Missile Crisis? | Robert Anderson and Martin J Sherwin 5 Apr 2017, 7:00am Will Trump unleash a slow-motion Cuban Missile Crisis? | Robert Anderson and Martin J Sherwin
The saber-rattling rhetoric of Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin has brought brinksmanship out of cold war storage The Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962 nearly ignited WWIII. For 13 harrowing days, what the Soviet premier, Nikita Khrushchev, called the “smell of burning” hung in the air. To Jackie Kennedy’s mind, avoiding the hecatomb of humankind came down to the difference between big men and little men.
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Russia is the house that Vladimir Putin built – and he’ll never abandon it | Dmitri Trenin 27 Mar 2017, 2:00am Russia is the house that Vladimir Putin built – and he’ll never abandon it | Dmitri Trenin
By co-opting the masses against the elite, the president has shaped a country to echo his values and grievances. And now he’s working to secure his legacyWhen Vladimir Putin was asked about his job, two years after becoming master of the Kremlin on New Year’s Eve, 1999, he said something about being a hired manager elected by the Russian people for a term of office. When he is asked about his job now, he calls it “fate”. Yesterday saw thousands joined the biggest since anti-government demonstrations in many years to protest against Putin and his prime minister/protégé Dmitry Medvedev. Even so the Russian people, Putin is above all a symbol of stability after a decade and a half of turmoil that included the misguided and botched reform of the Soviet communist system; its abrupt end and the sudden advent of freedom that often looked like a free-for-all; the painful dissolution of the Soviet Union; market reforms, often dubbed “shock without therapy”; virtually instant crass inequality; the end of ideology and the collapse of morals.
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In the broken-down heart of Siberia, Putin is still Russia’s ‘good tsar’ | Shaun Walker 23 Mar 2017, 5:01pm In the broken-down heart of Siberia, Putin is still Russia’s ‘good tsar’ | Shaun Walker
Irkutsk struggles with poverty and the authorities do little to help. But I found a puzzling disconnectLife for many Russians has become harder since 2014, and yet Vladimir Putin, who has effectively been in charge of the country for 17 years, has approval ratings that have not dipped below 80% since
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Why is Russia still in love with Putin? – video 23 Mar 2017, 7:13am Why is Russia still in love with Putin? – video
Established politicians the world over are facing crises of confidence with their electorates. But 17 years after he took charge of Russia, Vladimir Putin’s approval ratings are still high. Shaun Walker visits Irkutsk in Siberia to investigate why, despite their lives being tough and thankless, Russians still believe in Putin
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How annexing Crimea allowed Putin to claim he had made Russia great again | Sophie Pinkham 22 Mar 2017, 3:00am How annexing Crimea allowed Putin to claim he had made Russia great again | Sophie Pinkham
The show of force in Ukraine was played as Russia’s greatest moment since the second world war. But it’s a risky strategyMuch of the current tension between Russia and the west is a consequence of Vladimir Putin’s decision to
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Donald Trump isn’t the only villain – the Republican party shares the blame | Jonathan Freedland 3 Mar 2017, 2:27pm Donald Trump isn’t the only villain – the Republican party shares the blame | Jonathan Freedland
The US president’s links to Russia reflect the depth of the political crisis. This is a scandal of the entire American rightWho’s the villain here? Naturally our rage focuses on Donald Trump, a pantomime baddie drawn, as he would put it, from central casting. But behind him stand many others, and it’s about time they shared in the opprobrium. Start with the unfolding scandal over Trumpworld’s links with Vladimir Putin’s Russia, and the increasingly close parallel with the Watergate affair that toppled Richard Nixon. Both episodes, then and now, began with an election-year break-in at Democratic party headquarters. In 1972, that involved burglars with torches. In 2016, it was hackers and passwords. But in each case, real and virtual, the apparent objective was the same: the acquisition of damaging political intelligence. In 1972, the culprits were taking their orders from the American president. In 2016, at least according to
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3 Mar 2017, 3:21am Vladimir Putin Comes Half Clean on Olympic Doping
he Russian president’s continuing denial of government involvement in athlete doping casts disgrace and doubt on the fairness of the Olympic Games.
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Russia Convicts a Democrat 8 Feb 2017, 6:53pm Russia Convicts a Democrat
Vladimir Putin bars his main electoral rival from running.
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The Real Vladimir Putin 8 Feb 2017, 10:22am Updated The Real Vladimir Putin
The era of covering up may at last be coming to an end in Western relations with Russia.
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Americans can spot election meddling because they’ve been doing it for years | Owen Jones 5 Jan 2017, 1:00am Americans can spot election meddling because they’ve been doing it for years | Owen Jones
If Vladimir Putin intervened to help Donald Trump, that’s an outrage. But then so is the long US record of foreign interferenceAs I write, president-elect Donald Trump – soon to become the most powerful individual on Earth – is having a tantrum on
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31 Dec 2016, 2:30pm Can Russia Make Peace as Well as War?
Vladimir Putin may look like a master tactician now for his role in the Syrian truce, but issues that derailed past cease-fires remain unresolved.
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The Observer view on the Middle East and Vladimir Putin | Observer editorial 17 Dec 2016, 7:14pm The Observer view on the Middle East and Vladimir Putin | Observer editorial
The west seems impotent in the face of Russia’s cynical exploitation of the catastrophe that is Syria Say what you like about Barack Obama, but he has a way with words. At his final White House
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We said never again, but let Aleppo happen | Letters 13 Dec 2016, 2:52pm We said never again, but let Aleppo happen | Letters
I write to do something that too often does not come easy for politicians; offer an apology. Back in 2013 I backed the decision of the leader of my party, Ed Miliband, not to support the bombing of President Assad in response to his use of chemical weapons on rebel-held districts in Syria. I made this decision as a new councillor ambitious to stand for parliament, but also with memories of Iraq, which I had opposed. I now realise this was wrong. While the action proposed in 2013 was flawed and perilous, it turns out that not acting is worse. By not acting, we gave a green light for all of the war crimes we have witnessed since. By doing nothing, we told Assad and his backer, Vladimir Putin, that they could act with impunity (
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4 Nov 2016, 3:01pm The Guardian view on the US election: Hillary Clinton is the world’s best hope | Editorial
The former secretary of state has the experience to tackle pressing challenges. A Donald Trump victory would be dangerous for everyoneThe US election matters as much to the world as it does to Americans. The overriding reason is that an immense and present danger hangs over multilateralism and the notion of a rules-based global order. A Donald Trump victory would immediately make the world more worrying and unsettled than it already is. The US may no longer be seen as the world hegemon, whether benign or threatening, but it is still the single most important power. Its behaviour has unique potential to either make solutions possible or to add to areas of chaos. A Trump presidency would be bad for the US and dangerous for the world. A vote for Hillary Clinton is the most effective way of preventing it. Domestic politics and the clash of personalities have dominated this campaign. But the little that Mr Trump has said is enough to know where the foreign policy risks and promises lie in the 8 November vote. A Trump victory would severely damage US standing almost everywhere. His strongman antics are a liability, not an asset. They are as distressing as they are ridiculous. Believing a man-to-man approach with Vladimir Putin will instantly dissolve Russia’s aggressive revisionism reflects more ignorance than it does bravado. Mrs Clinton has a reputation for a hawkish outlook, but this will be tempered by war-weary public opinion in the US. She recognises that in the 21st century, US power has more chances of attaining goals if it acts inclusively, and not with go-it-alone reckless tactics. She has already applied much of this as secretary of state – playing a key role in the historic deal with Iran, in pushing
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2 Nov 2016, 4:45pm If the west is weak, Putin’s Russia is a much greater threat | Natalie Nougayrède
The crisis in our liberal democracies is strengthening the Kremlin’s hand, making it the dangerous foe of MI5’s and Nato’s warningsLenin once said: “The capitalists will sell us the rope with which we will hang them.” Vladimir Putin is no Lenin, nor can his regime – run by an elite that enjoys offshore accounts and oligarchic privileges – quite be described as anti-capitalist. Yet in Russia’s new confrontation with the west, the Kremlin’s strategy is to exploit western weaknesses and confusion as much as it is geared towards showing a bellicose face, whether in Ukraine, Syria or cyberspace. Perhaps this is why the head of MI5 has warned of the need to
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29 Oct 2016, 3:00pm Opinion: America, Your Election Is Not Rigged
If Donald Trump wants to know what a fake democracy is, he should visit his friend Vladimir Putin in Russia.
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14 Oct 2016, 2:33pm If they really wanted to Stop the War in Syria, they’d target Russia | Jonathan Freedland
If the United States were bombing Aleppo, peace protesters would be besieging its embassy. So why let Vladimir Putin off the hook?Pity the luckless children of Aleppo. If only the bombs raining down on them, killing their parents, maiming their friends, destroying their hospitals – if only those bombs were British or, better still, American.
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1 Oct 2016, 11:30pm Is despair and disbelief all we can offer to the savagery being visited on Aleppo? | Samir Puri
As Russia and Bashar al-Assad seek to play out a deadly endgame, other world powers seem incapable of stopping the destruction of Syria’s second city, leaving an indelible and shameful stain on the global conscienceOutrage is the only conceivable reaction to the devastation wrought on Aleppo. A relentless aerial assault by Syrian and Russian forces has targeted hospitals, the water supply and facilities of White Helmet emergency workers, let alone the UN humanitarian convoy that was struck on 19 September. The images, of corpses pulled out from beneath collapsed masonry, to a bloodied underground emergency room floor, are simply appalling. Disbelief follows. How, in this day and age, could such tragedy come to pass? The use of airpower to devastate a city had seemingly been consigned to history. Where on earth, in the 21st century, are the legal mechanisms and the accountability to halt such devastation? The powerlessness of the UN and its associated bodies is palpable. This is especially the case when it is confronted with regimes such as those of Bashar al-Assad and Vladimir Putin that feel no compunction over a scorched-earth response to insurgency and do so with calculation.
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29 Sep 2016, 3:21am Editorial: Vladimir Putin’s Outlaw State
Mr. Putin’s behavior in Ukraine and Syria violates not only rules designed to promote peace but common human decency.
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21 Sep 2016, 3:21am Op-Ed Columnist: Two Ex-Spies and Donald Trump
An old K.G.B. hand, Vladimir Putin, would be happy to see his admirer elected, but a former C.I.A. director, Robert Gates, sees Trump as unfit.
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17 Sep 2016, 7:05pm Information is a potent weapon in the new cold war
Loss of public trust killed the USSR and it can bring down Western elites tooAsked by Bloomberg this month about Russian involvement in the hacking of the US Democratic national committee, Vladimir Putin issued a non-denial denial. Basically, his answer boiled down to this: whoever did it did a good thing. This response only added to the stir created by the initial accusation that Russia was behind the activities of the “Fancy Bears”. The fear of Russia manipulating presidential elections in the world’s mightiest democracy has been spreading across the United States. Getting to the real perpetrators of hacking attacks is notoriously difficult. Yet seen from the Kremlin hackers perform a valuable public service by revealing secrets – not to foreign intelligence services, but to the western public. The political power of these revelations was first demonstrated by WikiLeaks, which broke the confidentiality of US diplomatic cables. The effect was much enhanced by the Snowden files, which exposed,
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