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If walking around JezFest is anything to go by, the Tories have little to fear | Martha Gill44h If walking around JezFest is anything to go by, the Tories have little to fear | Martha Gill
Yes, the Magic Numbers turned out for Corbyn on the big day. But politics isn’t about singing to the choirThere was a tussle over the last cardamom flapjack at the cake stall, there was some bitterness from those who had paid the full £35 for a ticket while others got in for free – but there was one thing everyone at this
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Martin Rowson on politics and the World Cup – cartoon 15 Jun 1:48pm Martin Rowson on politics and the World Cup – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2018/jun/15/martin-rowson-on-politics-and-the-world-cup-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Tories’ chaotic Brexit has lost the trust of business, and jobs will go | Aditya Chakrabortty 14 Jun 1:00am The Tories’ chaotic Brexit has lost the trust of business, and jobs will go | Aditya Chakrabortty
Theresa May’s desperate survival act within her party means companies are having to plan for worst-case scenarios. Thousands of workers will be hit Early summer, and Westminster politics is a glorified beach read. Will the former SAS (Reserve) hardman David Davis
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Who Unraveled the New World Order? 12 Jun 7:01pm Who Unraveled the New World Order?
It wasn’t Trump. The global economic consensus began falling apart years before he entered politics.
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The ‘bad boys of Brexit’ have some big questions to answer | Matthew d’Ancona 10 Jun 2:04pm The ‘bad boys of Brexit’ have some big questions to answer | Matthew d’Ancona
The sheer scale of contacts between Arron Banks, Andy Wigmore and Russian officials has been revealed. The implications for our politics could be hugeAs Verbal Kint says in
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Stella Creasy’s abortion law campaign showed practical politics at its bestt | Helen Lewis 10 Jun 7:00am Stella Creasy’s abortion law campaign showed practical politics at its bestt | Helen Lewis
Courteous, attentive and largely free of partisan posturing, the debate on Northern Ireland’s law was a triumph of cross-party collaborationThe most striking moment in politics last week was not David Davis’s fifth (unfulfilled) threat to resign. Nor was it Boris Johnson’s latest (unpunished) violation of collective responsibility. It wasn’t even the spectacle of hours of intense cabinet psychodrama finally resulting in a customs proposal that was instantly shot down by the EU’s chief negotiator. In Brexitland, a lot happens – but very little changes. No, the week’s most interesting political event came late on Monday, when the Speaker, John Bercow, asked if he had “the leave of the House” to grant Labour backbencher Stella Creasy an emergency debate on Northern Irish abortion law. In silence, the vast majority of the MPs present in the Commons stood up – and the debate was granted.
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We want to thrill to the beautiful game, but Fifa’s World Cup is toxic | Nick Cohen 9 Jun 1:00pm We want to thrill to the beautiful game, but Fifa’s World Cup is toxic | Nick Cohen
The tournament has never been so blighted by politics and the taint of corruptionLike the male gaze, football fans have eyes for just one thing. Nothing can turn them away from the pitch. When Fifa announced it was handing the World Cup first to kleptomaniac murderers who run Russia and then to the overseers of a serf economy in Qatar, even cynics thought Zurich’s masters of corruption had finally gone too far. Surely the world wouldn’t stand for it. Read the sporting press or examine your own conscience and you learn the world will not just stand for it but stand to attention and salute it. I am not claiming moral superiority. I will finish this righteous piece then purr over reports of how
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Trump is a useless negotiator, and Kim Jong-un will know that | Jonathan Freedland 8 Jun 12:30pm Trump is a useless negotiator, and Kim Jong-un will know that | Jonathan Freedland
The president’s desperation shows, and he has no eye for detail – flaws that have seen him suckered countless timesNext week will see tested one of the enduring fictions of current politics: the myth of Donald Trump, master negotiator. That the myth lives on was demonstrated afresh on Thursday with the
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7 Jun 4:11pm The Politics of Tax Cuts
A new poll shows strong support for the new law.
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Climate Change Has Run Its Course 4 Jun 6:54pm Climate Change Has Run Its Course
Its descent into social-justice identity politics is the last gasp of a cause that has lost its vitality.
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The Tories haven’t just popularised Islamophobia – they’ve gentrified it | Nesrine Malik 3 Jun 12:43pm The Tories haven’t just popularised Islamophobia – they’ve gentrified it | Nesrine Malik
The lack of pressure on Theresa May to act is an alarming indication of where rightwing politics is taking Britain The Conservative party has a problem with Muslims. It is not a few bad apples; not a few social media posts taken out of context. The problem has been growing unchecked for years, despite warnings by Muslim party members, and has now become so normalised that incidents are being reported with alarming frequency. Last week, the Muslim Council of Britain (MCB)
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The Year Politics Collapsed 30 May 7:19pm The Year Politics Collapsed
The class of 1968 included Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Donald J. Trump.
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The Gove-Davidson axis is a Tory dream ticket. But does it have legs? | Matthew d’Ancona 27 May 1:08pm The Gove-Davidson axis is a Tory dream ticket. But does it have legs? | Matthew d’Ancona
A scheme may be afoot to get the Scottish Tory leader into Westminster. But show me a leadership pact that has ever been a successIt is close to an iron rule of politics that leadership pacts and succession plans never succeed. Anthony Eden grew so frustrated waiting for Churchill to make way that his health suffered grievously. The briefly fashionable idea that Michael Heseltine would replace John Major, paving the way for Michael Portillo to take over, never came to pass. And as for the supposed “
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Letter: Josie Farrington obituary 27 May 10:27am Letter: Josie Farrington obituary
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/apr/06/lady-farrington-obituary" title="">Josie Farrington
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The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn and Ireland: all about the border | Editorial 24 May 1:29pm The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn and Ireland: all about the border | Editorial
Questions about the Labour leader’s republican views dominated his trip to Belfast. But Brexit is the key question for Northern Irish politics nowNorthern Ireland was a defining issue for
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Kendrick Lamar is right about white fans rapping. The N-word is off limits | Ellie Mae O’Hagan 23 May 9:00am Kendrick Lamar is right about white fans rapping. The N-word is off limits | Ellie Mae O’Hagan
Let’s move on from this fruitless discussion. It’s clear that white people using the N-word is offensive and unacceptable Earlier this year, I saw Kendrick Lamar live in London – something I now view as less a gig and more a religious experience. At one point, Lamar performed on an illuminated podium that rose up from underground and emerged in the middle of the audience. There, he got all ten thousand of us to rap along to a song that features several uses of the N-word. Watching a majority-white audience bellow this word at America’s most prominent, and politically outspoken, hip-hop artist was jarring – not least because I’d expected people who had coughed up the extortionate ticket price would be aware enough of Lamar’s politics to know he might not appreciate it. I was reminded of that moment again this week, after a news story broke of an incident during Lamar’s performance at the Hangout festival in Alabama. Lamar
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I had to travel abroad to end my doomed pregnancy. Ireland must change its abortion law | Siobhan Donohue 23 May 8:31am I had to travel abroad to end my doomed pregnancy. Ireland must change its abortion law | Siobhan Donohue
I feel scarred by the constitutional amendment that meant I had to travel to Britain for a termination I’ve never been involved in politics or campaigned for anything. If you’d told me 10 years ago that I would one day be stepping up and speaking in public about liberalising
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Rough Social Justice at Evergreen State 22 May 7:05pm Rough Social Justice at Evergreen State
The Washington college’s enrollment plummets as even the left sours on protest-mob politics.
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Suffer the Little Children 22 May 6:59pm Suffer the Little Children
Philadelphia sacrifices Catholic foster services to identity politics.
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Gove ‘identitarian’ speech shows how toxic he has become | Nesrine Malik 22 May 9:00am Gove ‘identitarian’ speech shows how toxic he has become | Nesrine Malik
His cynical US-style decrying of identity politics is proof the man who called for same-sex marriage in the Daily Mail is long goneI have always thought that the best thing ever to happen to Michael Gove was Boris Johnson. The latter’s obvious incompetence, buffoonery and inability barely to utter a complete sentence without
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How the Unfettered Fed Flattened the Phillips Curve 22 May 7:43am Updated How the Unfettered Fed Flattened the Phillips Curve
Insulating the central bank from politics made it possible to keep inflation and unemployment low.
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Ireland’s abortion referendum is revolutionary politics, whoever wins | Lizzie O’Shea 22 May 1:00am Ireland’s abortion referendum is revolutionary politics, whoever wins | Lizzie O’Shea
Women’s reproductive rights have been ill-served by top-down politics. The campaign to repeal the eighth should inspire us all No matter what happens in Ireland’s abortion referendum on Friday, the campaign should serve as an inspiration. For too long, women in Ireland and elsewhere have paid the price for the notion that abortion is electoral poison and no good will come of politicians campaigning on it. The
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Identity Politics Threatens the American Experiment 18 May 5:49pm Identity Politics Threatens the American Experiment
Increasingly we sort each other into groups, making sweeping assumptions based on binary labels.
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Funny Business at the Trump Labor Board 16 May 8:33pm Funny Business at the Trump Labor Board
How dubious backstage politics saved a pro-union Obama ruling.
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A warning to the Tories: Britain’s true-blue suburbs have turned liberal | John Harris 15 May 1:00am A warning to the Tories: Britain’s true-blue suburbs have turned liberal | John Harris
From Trafford to Kingston upon Thames, our affluent areas are becoming more diverse and progressive. Theresa May’s monochrome retro-politics has little appeal for them Two weeks ago there was a small earthquake on the southern edge of Greater Manchester. The
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Letter: Tessa Jowell obituary 14 May 11:48am Letter: Tessa Jowell obituary
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/may/13/the-people-politician-tessa-jowell-obituary" title="">Tessa Jowell
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The Guardian view on US religion: the Christian right is breaking up | Editorial 13 May 11:59am The Guardian view on US religion: the Christian right is breaking up | Editorial
The alliance between fundamentalist Protestants and Roman Catholics cannot survive the humiliations of evangelical support for President TrumpOne of the most interesting and important developments in the American culture wars, which is to say in American politics and self-understanding, is playing out inside the major Christian groupings there: evangelical Christianity and Roman Catholicism. The Southern Baptist Convention, the largest fundamentalist grouping,
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The rise of middle-aged renters exposes empty Tory promises | Owen Jones 11 May 6:24am The rise of middle-aged renters exposes empty Tory promises | Owen Jones
Policies like right to buy have boosted housing insecurity, not reduced it. This dogma-driven absurdity can’t go onYou can’t understand British politics without noting two facts: firstly, the worst squeeze in wages in the industrialised world other than Greece, and secondly, a housing crisis devouring the security of millions. We already knew that home ownership has collapsed for young Britons: for 25- to 34-year-olds on middle incomes, the rate has
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The couple who teach us to talk across the political divide | Simon Jenkins 11 May 1:00am The couple who teach us to talk across the political divide | Simon Jenkins
They are from opposite ends of the political spectrum, but they are happily married because they obey the oldest rule of politics – courtesy Caroline Sommerfeld is very right wing. Helmut Lethen is very left wing. Both are German academic writers. She regards him as fixated on hating Nazis. He regards her as a racist bigot. They are in the news because they love one another and are happily married.
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The Guardian view on the Malaysian election: a second chance to put things right | Editorial 10 May 1:29pm The Guardian view on the Malaysian election: a second chance to put things right | Editorial
Modern Malaysia’s founding father should clean out the stables of sleaze in his country – but he will have to give up power to do soSecond acts in politics are not unknown. But the rise, fall and rise again of Mahathir Mohamad, the father of modern Malaysia, is a rare story where a historic figure gets a chance to right the wrongs that he was responsible for. Dr Mahathir is
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Trump’s folly over the Iran deal comes through loud and clear | Letters 9 May 12:49pm Trump’s folly over the Iran deal comes through loud and clear | Letters
Angry male voices are drowning out truth in politics, argues
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and Brexit: crazy is as crazy does | Editorial 8 May 1:41pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and Brexit: crazy is as crazy does | Editorial
Ministers are fighting among themselves over unrealistic customs union options. In doing so they increase the likelihood that MPs will vote for a soft Brexit alternativeIt is sometimes said that the first rule of politics is to learn to count the numbers. In a hung parliament, this is a particularly important lesson to grasp. When there is no automatic government majority, as at present, MPs in the House of Commons hold far more power. Last week, MPs used that muscle to defeat the government on a big issue: the transparency of tax havens, snubbing serious efforts by Theresa May behind the scenes to change the outcome. On Wednesday MPs
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The Brexit deal will be a mess. In the end its cheerleaders will abandon it | Rafael Behr 8 May 1:00am The Brexit deal will be a mess. In the end its cheerleaders will abandon it | Rafael Behr
Whatever the final agreement, leavers will cling to their grievances and MPs will have no desire to defend itAt some point, we will need new words for “remainers” and “leavers”. They are legacy terms from a one-off campaign that will, on Brexit day, become obsolete. Does remain then become rejoin? Will leavers turn into stay-outers? Or perhaps the labels will outlive their original function. It happens. People who describe politics in terms of “left” and “right” aren’t talking about seating arrangements in the French national assembly at the end of the 18th century, although that is
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Free-speech warriors mistake student protest for censorship | Adam Tickell 7 May 1:00am Free-speech warriors mistake student protest for censorship | Adam Tickell
Young people today should be free to stake out their politics the same way my peers did 35 years ago
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The Guardian view on the 2018 local elections: few changes but big lessons | Editorial 4 May 12:11pm The Guardian view on the 2018 local elections: few changes but big lessons | Editorial
The Conservatives were there for the taking in this week’s contests. Labour made important gains but British party politics remains a neck-and-neck contestIf traditional assumptions still mean anything at all in British politics, the Conservatives were there for the taking in this week’s
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Barnet did once surrender to Labour | Brief letters 3 May 11:54am Barnet did once surrender to Labour | Brief letters
Barnet politics | Breast-cancer screening | Trump’s health | Wildlife photography | Predictive textOwen Jones remarks that the London borough of Barnet is a Tory citadel, among others, that has never surrendered to Labour (
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These local elections matter: they could send a shockwave to Westminster | Polly Toynbee 30 Apr 1:00am These local elections matter: they could send a shockwave to Westminster | Polly Toynbee
Tory losses would send the message that council services must be protected, and that Britain demands an end to austerity The streets of London are not ablaze with posters or other signs there are local elections on this week, as in 150 councils around the country. Yet in a surprisingly optimistic report out today, Hansard says intention to vote is at an all-time high of 62%, with voter engagement with politics
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Politics hits all-time low with Amber Rudd and Windrush scandal | Letters 29 Apr 12:59pm Politics hits all-time low with Amber Rudd and Windrush scandal | Letters
Readers respond to the home secretary’s claims that she had no knowledge of immigrant removal targetsAs a long-standing civil servant, I worked with ministers (of all political persuasions) who fell into three distinct categories: those who read official briefings and followed up with incisive questions and challenges; those who delegated the reading and decision-making to their special advisers; and those who arranged “follow-up” meetings to find out from officials what these unread briefs actually said. What I never experienced was a minister (
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Trump can come. But let him know Britain won’t stand for his bigotry | Owen Jones 27 Apr 10:28am Trump can come. But let him know Britain won’t stand for his bigotry | Owen Jones
The president’s visit should not be a means to normalise his ugly politics. He must be greeted by mass street protestsThe normalisation of racism, bigotry and misogyny: this has always been one of the principal dangers of Donald Trump. Here is a man who
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The Guardian view on Macron in Washington: a need for results | Editorial 23 Apr 1:02pm The Guardian view on Macron in Washington: a need for results | Editorial
France’s president has forged a good relationship with Donald Trump. But he needs policy concessions as well as handshakes from his US visitA young European leader flies to Washington on an official visit. He is a modernising charmer from the progressive wing of politics, articulate and comfortable with the media. He arrives to meet an American president whose politics are emphatically not his, and whose election has dismayed US liberals, disrupted the transatlantic alliance and alienated European opinion. The new US president is an American exceptionalist. He is no respecter of human rights and international institutions. But the European leader has decided to hug him close in the hope of influencing his decisions. Washington rolls out the red carpet. It is captivated by the visitor’s eloquence and charisma, such contrasts to their own leader’s bombast. Improbably, the two men find themselves starting to make big plans together. For anyone whose memory goes back to the run-up to the Iraq war, this is a sobering vision. When Tony Blair
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Political platitudes have masked cruel policies – time to stop swallowing them 18 Apr 12:00pm Political platitudes have masked cruel policies – time to stop swallowing them
Rightwing politicians spout rhetoric with which no reasonable person would disagree, while we wait for a catastrophic injustice to expose the reality The politics of the platitude – the statement with which no reasonable person could disagree – has been dominant for at least the past 20 years. Who doesn’t want zero hunger? Who thinks education is bad? Who doesn’t want clean and sustainable energy or responsible, pro-social businesses? Who wants poverty entrenched, children from poor families to have no aspirations, opportunities for only some, inequality to thrive and some people to be treated as worth less than others? The language became so anodyne and meaningless that we had to look for the sense of it in the cracks, in the things that went unsaid. What did “lacking aspiration” really mean? Did it mean a person didn’t want a good life, or just that they weren’t middle-class enough? How was it that all unfortunate circumstances were driven by their hapless or feckless victims, and there were never any other factors? Why, when everybody was against inequality and for human rights, did equality get further away, and “human rights” become the new “red tape”, amorphous, troublesome, indistinct, someone else’s idea?
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Theresa May’s thuggish stance on migrants caused the Windrush scandal | Satbir Singh 18 Apr 10:57am Theresa May’s thuggish stance on migrants caused the Windrush scandal | Satbir Singh
The Home Office’s absurd obsession with cheap politics over sensible policy made this shameful fiasco inevitable
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Thatcher forecast to return in 2276 | Brief letters 17 Apr 1:35pm Thatcher forecast to return in 2276 | Brief letters
Plastic-eating enzymes | Class in the north | Brown cars | Spring politics | Female newsreaders | Comet ThatcherI hope the artificially created enzymes will begin to help clean up the exponential increase in plastic waste (
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Enoch Powell is gone, but his hateful tricks are still with us | Matthew d’Ancona 16 Apr 12:59am Enoch Powell is gone, but his hateful tricks are still with us | Matthew d’Ancona
Fifty years after the ‘rivers of blood’ speech, rhetoric on Brexit shows hard-right populism is still a force in British politics I was the last person to interview
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New party? New politics, more like | Letters 14 Apr 7:03pm New party? New politics, more like | Letters
The sin of British politics has always been its focus on immediate polices. We need to start grappling with real political philosophiesYour front-page story tells us that there is “
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Times move pretty fast! Rewatching 80s favourites in the age of #metoo 13 Apr 1:00am Times move pretty fast! Rewatching 80s favourites in the age of #metoo
Molly Ringwald’s reappraisal of The Breakfast Club has thrown an uneasy light on other 80s classics, with their casual treatment of rape and abuse, dodgy sexual politics and breezy paedophilia. We look at 10 of the worst with fresh eyes
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People want homes, jobs, a future: no wonder they distrust capitalism now | Larry Elliott 12 Apr 1:00am People want homes, jobs, a future: no wonder they distrust capitalism now | Larry Elliott
Post-cold war politics shifted to the right, and ordinary people suffered. Mainstream parties need to know what went wrongIt’s just like old times. Donald Trump has picked a 
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The Paul Ryan Difference 11 Apr 6:51pm The Paul Ryan Difference
The Speaker’s career shows the power of ideas in politics.
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A centrist party backed by the people who created this mess is pointless | Sophie Walker 10 Apr 5:30am A centrist party backed by the people who created this mess is pointless | Sophie Walker
We in the Women’s Equality party can see that the UK’s politics needs a radical shake-up. Simon Franks’ scheme isn’t itDear
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The Guardian view on Europe and nationalism: this must be a grassroots fight | Editorial 8 Apr 1:07pm The Guardian view on Europe and nationalism: this must be a grassroots fight | Editorial
Those in Europe who believe in liberal, tolerant, open politics must step up national efforts to defeat xenophobia and hate Awful though the deadly incident was
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The Observer view on addressing the chronic problems behind the London killings | Observer editorial 8 Apr 1:00am The Observer view on addressing the chronic problems behind the London killings | Observer editorial
There are many reasons for the recent spike in deaths in the capital. A nuanced response, not panic, is required Perspective is perhaps the most difficult aim to achieve in politics. And particularly so when dealing with emotive subjects. It is not surprising, therefore, that the first thing that has been lost in the debate about the current spate of youth killings in London is a sense of perspective. Let us begin with the numbers.
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Entebbe reminds us that we now live in a world without heroes | Nick Cohen 7 Apr 1:15pm Entebbe reminds us that we now live in a world without heroes | Nick Cohen
A drama about the 1976 Israeli raid to free hostages at Entebbe treats the politics with admirable nuance When
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The case for freedom of movement must not be abandoned | Owen Jones 30 Mar 7:54am The case for freedom of movement must not be abandoned | Owen Jones
The idea of free movement for EU citizens is politically toxic now. But we can change public perceptionsFreedom of movement in Europe has been all but abandoned as a cause in British politics. Brexit was far more about freedom of movement than our exact trading relationship with the EU, and the electorate rejected it. Even among remain voters, polling has suggested that
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We have six months to foil Brexit. And here’s how we can do it | Timothy Garton Ash 29 Mar 2:28pm We have six months to foil Brexit. And here’s how we can do it | Timothy Garton Ash
There’s a crucial vote this autumn. With our politics so unpredictable there’s a real chance to influence undecided MPsIf all goes according to the Brexiters’ plan, we will wake up exactly one year from today to find that Britain is no longer a member of the European Union. In practice, we anti-Brexiters have just six months to avert that outcome. For if, in its “meaningful vote” this autumn, the British parliament decides to accept whatever interim deal has been cobbled together by British and EU negotiators, that will be the
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Fifteen years on, the Iraq war is still poisoning our national life | Gary Younge 29 Mar 1:46pm Fifteen years on, the Iraq war is still poisoning our national life | Gary Younge
From Corbyn’s rise to Brexit and the collapse of trust in Westminster, this is Britain’s Vietnam: a conflict without end“You can tell a true war story by the way it never seems to end,” wrote Tim O’Brien in his novel about Vietnam, The Things They Carried. “Not then, not ever. In a true war story, if there’s a moral at all, it’s like the thread that makes the cloth. You can’t tease it out. You can’t extract the meaning without unravelling the deeper meaning.” For all the ways in which US politics
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Think you’re immune to advertising? It’s the greatest trick Facebook ever pulled | Suzanne Moore 26 Mar 12:46pm Think you’re immune to advertising? It’s the greatest trick Facebook ever pulled | Suzanne Moore
Now that digital ads are fragmented and microtargeted, we have no idea how minds are being changed – and that’s scary Unlike the rest of you mere mortals, I am immune to advertising. The billions of dollars, all the creativity poured into making me want certain things, it just doesn’t work on me. It is the same with politics. Nothing anyone says could change my mind; I will not waver from my innate good sense. In any survey I undertake, I am never a “don’t know”; I always know for sure. I am unseducible. This is clearly nonsense, but this position is being taken by many over the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Friends on Facebook boast of their impenetrability. They see themselves targeted and laugh. Plus, they are not losers who would buy any old thing online, so they will not be deleting this app. As I am 105 on Facebook and live in Kyrgyzstan – I was on to the robot detectives years ago – the ads I get are mostly for incontinence pads, funerals and jerk chicken. Is jerk chicken big in Kyrgyzstan?
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Most ministerial advisers are men. That doesn’t help equality in politics | Anne McElvoy 26 Mar 4:20am Most ministerial advisers are men. That doesn’t help equality in politics | Anne McElvoy
Special advisers wield huge power. The lack of women among them should embarrass Theresa May
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The poison in politics runs deeper than dodgy data | Gary Younge 22 Mar 1:20pm The poison in politics runs deeper than dodgy data | Gary Younge
Cambridge Analytica and Russia may have played a role in Donald Trump’s victory. But greater responsibility lies elsewhereDuring the 2016 presidential elections Bill Clinton believed his wife’s team had failed to learn one of the lessons of Brexit: working people felt alienated and there was an anti-establishment mood in the air. But his suggestions were politely acknowledged and then discreetly shelved by the number-crunchers in charge. “He’d report back from the field on what he was hearing at campaign events,”
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The Guardian view on fishing and Brexit: still on the hook | Editorial 20 Mar 2:47pm The Guardian view on fishing and Brexit: still on the hook | Editorial
Britain’s politicians have again been found out for making promises to fishing communities that they can’t deliverIn British politics, the fishing industry carries an emotional resonance matched by few others; mining and shipbuilding are the only obvious contenders. Perhaps this is because Britain is an island. Perhaps it is because deep sea fishing was always prodigiously dangerous and heroic. Perhaps it is because fishing communities are particularly tightly knit. Or perhaps it is because, unlike mining and merchant shipbuilding, UK fishing continues to survive.
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Cambridge Analytica may be guilty of hype. But data mining poisons our politics | Gaby Hinsliff 20 Mar 9:12am Cambridge Analytica may be guilty of hype. But data mining poisons our politics | Gaby Hinsliff
Secret footage of executives boasting about psychological profiling is a red flag – our democracy really is under threatIt’s exactly the sort of conversation about politics that one would hope did not exist. Two suits, in a swanky restaurant,
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The bookies have won on betting terminals. But vulnerable people pay | Dawn Foster 20 Mar 2:00am The bookies have won on betting terminals. But vulnerable people pay | Dawn Foster
The Gambling Commission’s failure to recommend cutting stakes on FOBTs to £2 reflects the industry’s hold on UK politics It is the wisdom of the Gambling Commission that stakes on highly addictive roulette-style fixed-odds betting terminals (FOBTs) should be cut to below £30. That’s 15 times the £2 maximum stake sought by campaigners who believe these terminals have a destructive effect on people’s lives. This is a sorry turn of events. Swansea East MP Carolyn Harris, who chairs an all-party parliamentary group scrutinising FOBTs, admits she is disappointed. Tom Watson, the deputy Labour leader, accuses the commission of caving in to industry pressure.
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The Guardian view on data protection: informed consent needed | Editorial 19 Mar 2:07pm The Guardian view on data protection: informed consent needed | Editorial
When privacy becomes a commodity to be traded, the integrity of democratic politics is at riskThe outrage surrounding the activities of
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Boris Johnson’s miasma of evasion is straight out of the Putin playbook | Suzanne Moore 19 Mar 12:26pm Boris Johnson’s miasma of evasion is straight out of the Putin playbook | Suzanne Moore
We’re used to foreign powers manufacturing chaos and disguising mendacity with lies – but our own foreign secretary has also thrived despite his propensity for piffle In the swirl of disinformation that infects global politics, it is good to hold on to the truth, to ground ourselves slightly. This is a story we tell ourselves. There are places where no one bothers to differentiate between truth and lies; other places. Such as Russia, where there is the facade of a democratic election, but what matters is simply control of the narrative. We watch as various Russian diplomats deny any Russian connection to the poisoning of the Sergei Skripal and his daughter. We look at the US, where they have lost count of Donald Trump’s untruths. He lies as he breathes; the effect is numbing. He has told so many lies that the latest ones float by. This incessant lying wears the public down. Some Russians claim the
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The beautiful game is beginning to reflect all that is ugly in society | David Goldblatt 18 Mar 2:00am The beautiful game is beginning to reflect all that is ugly in society | David Goldblatt
Football is increasingly run by mediocre people infected by politics and commerce, yet fans still cling to it as a distraction from real lifeOn 27 June 2016, four days after the
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The Lesson From a Tariff Tale 9 Mar 5:35pm The Lesson From a Tariff Tale
‘Handle the economics,’ President George W. Bush told me, ‘and I’ll take care of the politics.’
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Meet Donald Trump’s twin: Benjamin Netanyahu | Jonathan Freedland 9 Mar 11:39am Meet Donald Trump’s twin: Benjamin Netanyahu | Jonathan Freedland
The embattled Israeli prime minister clings on to power despite being mired in scandal. Just like the man in the White HouseEach day brings a scandalous new revelation as investigators probe deep into the affairs of the leader and his inner circle. The inquiries range across multiple fronts, tangling politics and business and involving both the top man’s closest aides and his immediate family. On a really big news day, the investigative authorities announce they’ve arranged a plea bargain with one of the key players, coaxing them to turn state’s witness against the man they once served so loyally.
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A hundred years after the suffragettes, let’s end all barriers to women in politics | Letters 8 Mar 1:31pm A hundred years after the suffragettes, let’s end all barriers to women in politics | Letters
The Centenary Action Group calls for action against abuse and harassmentThe suffragettes were force-fed, beaten and imprisoned for calling for the right to vote. A hundred years on a global study of women MPs found that 82% experienced psychological violence. Among them, 44% said that they had received threats of death, rape, beatings or abduction during their parliamentary terms, including threats to kidnap or kill their children. Given these shocking levels of violence and abuse on and off-line and the disproportionate targeting and impact on poor, black and minority ethnic women, it is no surprise that women’s political participation remains so low.
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The far right hates vaginas. Why doesn’t this anger the left more? | Marina Prentoulis 8 Mar 8:08am The far right hates vaginas. Why doesn’t this anger the left more? | Marina Prentoulis
Identity politics ought to unite the left, not divide us. No progressive should be at ease while macho misogyny thrives From Donald Trump’s “
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The Tories never cared about eliminating the deficit. It was just a pretext to slash the state | Frances Ryan 8 Mar 3:00am The Tories never cared about eliminating the deficit. It was just a pretext to slash the state | Frances Ryan
David Cameron and George Osborne are celebrating this week. But their austerity programme has left lives in ruinsThey say that a picture looks different, depending on the viewers’ perspective. The same can be said for politics. The continuing, unprecedented cuts to Britain’s public services, for example, will appear quite different to a disabled person unable to get to the toilet because their social care has been halved than they will to, say, a former prime minister reading the news at his mansion. Two events from the past week display this stark contrast. In response to news that Britain has eliminated its day-to-day deficit budget, the delayed target originally set by George Osborne when he imposed austerity on public services in 2010,
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Momentum’s Laura Parker: ‘There’s a myth around the hard left’s dirty tactics – it’s not my experience’ 7 Mar 11:20am Momentum’s Laura Parker: ‘There’s a myth around the hard left’s dirty tactics – it’s not my experience’
​The Labour grassroots organisation is growing so fast it will be bigger than the Tories by 2020. What does its national coordinator make of claims that it is full of Trots and plotters?On the principle that these are views held by people with whom I tend to disagree, I have always thought Momentum members were probably not thugs and bullies; they were probably not intending to unseat 50 Labour MPs; and they probably did not want to wrest control of the largest leftwing party in western Europe. The lack of curiosity among many commentators – who would take the expertise of the Sunday Times on the inner workings of this satellite of the Labour party before they would do anything as rash as go to a Momentum meeting – has been quite salutary. Yet the principle itself isn’t watertight: it is possible for both a large number of people to lack curiosity and Momentum to be full of Trots and plotters. This is what has brought me to its office in Whitechapel, east London, which is temporary and cash-strapped, although festooned with hearts for its recent Valentine’s Day phone bank: an interview with Laura Parker, national coordinator, previously private secretary to Jeremy Corbyn. She is the natural poster-person for a different portrait of the organisation: calm, accomplished, amiable. Everybody likes her. The Blairites in her constituency Labour party (Vauxhall) like her. She is known to get on with Stephen Kinnock, which for someone not of his politics, should be listed on a CV under “special skills”. It is hard to establish hierarchies in Momentum, an organisation that both values the phrase “flat structured” and also understands it, but she is the highest ranking staff member, level with Jon Lansman, who leads it and about whom much more has been written.
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CEOs and Politics Are a Bad Mix 7 Mar 7:44am Updated CEOs and Politics Are a Bad Mix
BlackRock’s Larry Fink thinks he’s storing up indulgences. He’s wrong.
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It’s politics 2018 style, where banter matters more than competence | Jack Bernhardt 7 Mar 6:00am It’s politics 2018 style, where banter matters more than competence | Jack Bernhardt
Iain Duncan Smith’s incomprehensible nonsense at PMQs is just one example of how bombastic jingoism is fetedI’ve been wondering how I would describe the sound MPs make during prime minister’s questions to an alien. It’s not a natural human noise – too joyless for a laugh and yet too lacklustre for a jeer. If a Foley artist had to recreate it for a film’s soundtrack, they’d fill an old accordion with gin and throw it down a flight of stairs – it’s the only way to get that thudding braying noise, wheezing out malicious approval like a drunk uncle watching Benny Hill reruns. And yet the sound is also magic. When all MPs of a party make it together, like an oral conga line of partisan snarls, it can turn incomprehensible nonsense into a jolly good idea, a fine example of British wit. This has never been truer than on Monday, as it spun gold from one of the stupidest sentences ever uttered in parliament, when Iain Duncan Smith
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Poland’s nationalists are burying their antisemitic past – this is dangerous | Przemyslaw Wielgosz 6 Mar 7:55am Poland’s nationalists are burying their antisemitic past – this is dangerous | Przemyslaw Wielgosz
What is at stake in the row over links to the Holocaust is not Poland’s reputation, but Polish nationalist rightwing tradition A war is being fought over collective memory in Poland. In the absence of a convincing vision of the future, the ability to control definitions of the past has become one of the most important sources of legitimacy in Polish politics. But if the historicisation of policy is a game played by all sides, the conservative, nationalist right is the most consistent and effective player. Its strategy is well illustrated by the current conflict over the act that enshrines the legal status of the
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Voter ID is just the latest Tory ruse to deplete the Labour vote | Ellie Mae O’Hagan 6 Mar 6:46am Voter ID is just the latest Tory ruse to deplete the Labour vote | Ellie Mae O’Hagan
Voter fraud in the UK is a negligible problem. The only reason Tories want photo ID at the booths is to manipulate the ballotIf our current politics allowed us to talk about anything other than Brexit, we might have noticed the government surreptitiously
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Populist gains in Italy show the scale of Europe’s anger epidemic | Rafael Behr 5 Mar 2:10pm Populist gains in Italy show the scale of Europe’s anger epidemic | Rafael Behr
Other EU countries won’t imitate Brexit but the forces that created it are pan-EuropeanThere is no comfort for British pro-Europeans in the knowledge that the EU has worse problems than Brexit. In recent months, more sleep has been lost in Brussels over Italian politics than anything Theresa May’s government might do. That alarm was vindicated by
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We Greens aren’t uniting with Labour: small parties must stand firm | Jonathan Bartley and Caroline Lucas 5 Mar 4:00am We Greens aren’t uniting with Labour: small parties must stand firm | Jonathan Bartley and Caroline Lucas
Our party has its own identity and priorities and we won’t simply join forces with Labour, as some are calling for There’s been some debate recently, on these pages and elsewhere, about the Green party’s role in politics. Last week Owen Jones – a political ally of ours on many issues – suggested we should consider
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The tyranny of algorithms is part of our lives: soon they could rate everything we do | John Harris 5 Mar 1:00am The tyranny of algorithms is part of our lives: soon they could rate everything we do | John Harris
Credit scores already control our finances. With personal data being increasingly trawled, our politics and our friendships will be next For the past couple of years a big story about the future of China has been the focus of both fascination and horror. It is all about what the authorities in Beijing call “
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The absolutism of their culture war has made compromise impossible for Brexiters | Nick Cohen 3 Mar 7:05pm The absolutism of their culture war has made compromise impossible for Brexiters | Nick Cohen
Mocking liberals is easy for the Tory ultras but a workable plan for how to govern is far too boringCulture wars are endless because their participants enjoy them so. It’s fun, if you are on the right, to mock liberal double standards and break liberal taboos. So much fun, it becomes instinctive: a way of lashing out rather than a way of thinking. If the left is dominated by puritan preachers who denounce the faults of everyone but themselves, the right is dominated by a satirical “contrarian culture”, which is now so predictable there’s nothing contrary about it. Liberals and leftists are humourless hypocrites, the party line runs. At Oxfam or in Hollywood, they satisfy the brute desires they deplore in others. In the privacy of their Tuscan and Hampstead homes they show every indication of wanting to hoard rather than share their wealth. Worst of all they are elitists, who look down their dainty noses at the masses who voted for Brexit and Trump, and damn them as racist fools. The satirical right dominates the conservative web and newspapers because it delivers the occasional truth about liberal hypocrisy, which you do not have to be a conservative to appreciate. Satire worked as a counter-culture protest because from the 1990s until 2016 the “establishment” was politically correct, and most of us enjoy seeing the pomposity of the powerful punctured. As the contrarians head to power, however, outsiders can see the teeth behind the smirk. The label that has stuck to the demagogues who dominate British and American politics is “the alt-right”. But, as Brexit is proving, it is as much a “bullshit right”.
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A new ‘centrist’ partyis doomed - but it could keep Corbyn out of No 10| Owen Jones 1 Mar 1:00am A new ‘centrist’ partyis doomed - but it could keep Corbyn out of No 10| Owen Jones
Labour rightwingers could unite with discontented Conservative remainers and Lib Dems. But only hardcore Tory Brexiteers would benefit Is a spectre haunting British politics, the spectre of a new “centrist” party? A note on terms, first, if I may: centrism is a deeply misleading term, conferring an image of moderation on a party that would combine social liberalism and anti-Brexitism with support for cuts, privatisation and a pro-corporate agenda. A Labour breakaway party has been mooted since Jeremy Corbyn became odds-on favourite to become leader, two and a half years ago, and was revived as a nuclear option after a disastrous general election showing. After Labour at the last election achieved the greatest vote surge
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Trump Can Help Overcome Identity Politics 27 Feb 5:57pm Trump Can Help Overcome Identity Politics
Americans are divided in part by decades-old bureaucratic decisions the president could undo.
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The words we use matter – just ask a teenager | Suzanne Moore 26 Feb 12:06pm The words we use matter – just ask a teenager | Suzanne Moore
From sexual politics to actual politics, language is changing fast and dividing us not only by generation but also by education. It’s easy to trip up, even if you mean well It had to happen, I suppose, in this era of self-identification. Lately, I have come to identify as the Duke of Edinburgh, a man famous for barging around the world insulting the locals. I also say the wrong things, although I try to avoid out-and-out racism. To a visually impaired woman with a guide dog, the Duke
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The Guardian view on the common good: more Hobbes than Calvin | Editorial 25 Feb 1:01pm The Guardian view on the common good: more Hobbes than Calvin | Editorial
How do we balance selfishness and community? A Christian tradition of ethical reasoning offers a helpful perspectiveThe belief that we are naturally and fundamentally selfish, from our genes upwards, may be the most powerful of all the acids eating at the foundations of the welfare state and of the wider postwar liberal order. It gains its power from the fact that it is half true. It gains its danger from being half a lie. Everyone but the most miserable knows from personal experience that people are full of goodness as well as of its opposite. We are fairly generous, unselfish, even sometimes thoughtful and trusting in our private lives, most of the time. Public life, however, is increasingly conducted as if universal selfishness defined human nature, and politics must be a zero-sum game. In countries where the economy is stagnating, as Britain’s has been for the past 10 years, this is horribly credible. Each pound in lower taxes for the rich is taken from health or education for the poor; security for the old (if they’re lucky) is funded by vastly inflated house prices and insecurity for the young. The interests of immigrants are set against those of the indigenous population. The interests of Britain are set against those of the EU. None of these oppositions are inevitable. Groups need not be selfish any more than individual people have to be. What most of all makes them so is mistrust. One of the motors of distrust and meanness in ourselves is the belief that others are cheating. The belief that the others are in it only for themselves is at the root of almost all assaults on the welfare state, and even on the ideology of welfare. It contributes to the gleeful trashing of the reputation of charities. Acts of breathtaking selfishness like the Republican tax cut – which has
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Tech Giants Are Less Powerful Than They Seem 23 Feb 6:36pm Tech Giants Are Less Powerful Than They Seem
A hallmark of companies cresting into middle age is a preoccupation with regulatory politics.
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Wine and dine democracy is now on trial – and about time | Simon Jenkins 23 Feb 1:00am Wine and dine democracy is now on trial – and about time | Simon Jenkins
The Westminster affair shows the potential power of the lobbying industry. Oversight is crucial for all Each time a US gunman goes berserk, the British media erupts in fury at the money the gun lobby can devote to its lethal interest. To be sure, big time lobbying is the occupational disease of American politics. In the US, it can have murderous consequences. Still, on matters of principle, Britons would do well to watch their hypocrisy. The sums spent by property companies on lobbying Westminster city council’s planning committee –
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Power, and why sexual relationships in politics are so problematic | Kate Maltby 20 Feb 1:00am Power, and why sexual relationships in politics are so problematic | Kate Maltby
It’s not that MPs are monsters. It’s that their workplace is devoid of normal boundaries, and makes them feel like godsA 25-year-old friend started a job working for an influential MP a few years ago. One day, a fellow parliamentarian popped his head round the door. He was there to see his colleague but cast an eye around the full office first, eyes alighting on the new young woman, then said: “If you’re not shagging this one, can I have a go?” Westminster is full of MPs sleeping with their researchers. And those who aren’t doing it are joking about doing it. Jokes are part of every workplace culture, but this culture signals to young women exactly their status in the ecosystem. It signals similarly to young men. Gay men, or those who seem particularly vulnerable to male-on-male harassment, experience significant unwanted attention in parliament. Young queer people are, as ever, objects of fascination.
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How to fix our universities – cap the number of students | Sonia Sodha 19 Feb 1:44pm How to fix our universities – cap the number of students | Sonia Sodha
Theresa May has finally diagnosed the problems in higher education, but she’s still reaching the wrong answersIt’s not news that Theresa May can’t do politics. So the prime minister railing against “one of the most expensive systems of university tuition in the world” – one engineered by her own government colleagues, which she
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The Guardian view on Northern Ireland talks collapsing: the lost language of power-sharing | Editorial 15 Feb 9:11am The Guardian view on Northern Ireland talks collapsing: the lost language of power-sharing | Editorial
Party politics in Northern Ireland remains a grim zero-sum game. But the Conservatives in London have made things even more difficultAt the start of this week the British and Irish prime ministers
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Leaders like Zuma may be doomed. But they fight every inch of the way | Martin Kettle 14 Feb 1:38pm Leaders like Zuma may be doomed. But they fight every inch of the way | Martin Kettle
From the ANC to Theresa May, there is something humanly compelling in the hand-to-hand combat of political survivalPolitical outcomes, even ones that may seem inevitable or even historically preordained, are always less clear in advance than they are in retrospect. Coleridge compares the problem to sailing on the ocean at night. Others invoke the fog of politics, likening it to the fog of war. Not to understand that politicians fear the unknown is not to understand politics. It’s why MPs mostly hate general elections. It’s why would-be leaders often bottle a contest they should win. It’s why those who have power try so hard to hold on to it, and why resignations are almost always messy and acrimonious. The mechanics and tactics of Zuma's attempt to negotiate a face- and cash-saving deal are electrifying
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Netanyahu’s shamelessness is corrupting Israel | Peter Beaumont 14 Feb 9:33am Netanyahu’s shamelessness is corrupting Israel | Peter Beaumont
Like Trump and Berlusconi, the Israeli leader knows our imperfect democracy is no match for his brazen and disingenuous politics A few weeks ago in Tel Aviv a noisy
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Jeffrey Bell 12 Feb 8:03pm Jeffrey Bell
The supply-side populist was prescient about American politics.
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The Guardian view on George Soros: the best of the 1% | Editorial 12 Feb 1:18pm The Guardian view on George Soros: the best of the 1% | Editorial
Many billionaires try to influence the politics of countries that aren’t their own. Most do so by stealth but George Soros is open – and usually rightGeorge Soros is hardly the first billionaire to spend some of his money trying to influence the policies of countries where he does not live or have a vote: the papers that have led the charge against his funding of anti-Brexit organisations are all owned by such men even if none is as rich as he is. And his decision to spend money campaigning for the remain cause should be welcomed. The
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Neo-fascism and the troubling third way | Letters 11 Feb 12:54pm Neo-fascism and the troubling third way | Letters
A new progressive politics is urgently needed in Italy and beyond, says
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Now we know what Brexit means, and it isn’t what the north-east voted for | Chi Onwurah 9 Feb 8:10am Now we know what Brexit means, and it isn’t what the north-east voted for | Chi Onwurah
I didn’t come into politics to make people poorer. But the leaked report on Brexit’s effects shows that’s what will happen in my region
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We can leave the EU, but not Europe. Isolation is no longer splendid | Simon Jenkins 8 Feb 1:45pm We can leave the EU, but not Europe. Isolation is no longer splendid | Simon Jenkins
History cries out for Britain not to abandon free trade. Once this led to colonies – now the European single market is the only optionGive history a vote, I say. In politics the past is always wiser than the present, but no one speaks up for it. Sometimes we need it badly, like now. Britain’s exit from the EU echoes centuries of aversion to continental involvement. At issue is not leaving the EU, which we will do, but how – whether it makes sense to abandon half a century of partnership with Europe for a dream of equally valuable trading deals with the outside world. This dream has no shred of evidential support. It appears to be an atavistic gesture of post-imperial self-harm. Does it make sense to abandon half a century of partnership with Europe for a dream with no shred of evidential support
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The Guardian view on local government: end austerity, reconnect voters | Editorial 8 Feb 1:21pm The Guardian view on local government: end austerity, reconnect voters | Editorial
For local democracy to work, Britain will have to abandon a politics which for 30 years has accrued power to markets and the financial sector at the expense of everyone elseNowhere is the Conservative party’s reckless embrace of austerity more evident than in English local government. This week a survey of town halls has found that
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Boris Johnson has put politics above principle in Bermuda | Jonathan Cooper 8 Feb 11:40am Boris Johnson has put politics above principle in Bermuda | Jonathan Cooper
It is troubling for the UK that its government has sanctioned the world’s first repeal of same-sex marriage rightsOne of the brightest legacies of David Cameron and George Osborne is that LGBT issues became non-party. They ceased to be political, and LGBT equality was recognised as the fundamental human rights issue it is. Cameron bestowed a real gift on the world when he stood firm in his support for, and commitment to, equal marriage. It therefore feels inconceivable that just five years after the passing of that momentous legislation that confirmed our equality, the current Conservative government has
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As a Labour Brexiter I say we should stay in the customs union | Nigel Willmott 8 Feb 6:38am As a Labour Brexiter I say we should stay in the customs union | Nigel Willmott
A brave commitment by Corbyn now will have the Tories floundering – and pave the way for a Labour governmentLabour and the Tories are locked in a duel over Brexit that is like one of those arcane cycle races where the two riders start as slowly as possible. Just as we have returned to two-party politics, with Labour and Conservatives continuing
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What goes on in the home is the business of the state. Here’s why | Sonia Sodha 8 Feb 1:00am What goes on in the home is the business of the state. Here’s why | Sonia Sodha
Economic shifts are being driven by austerity politics – and now crucial questions about family life are being settled by necessity rather than choiceWhen it comes to family, where does love stop and duty begin? Sometimes that’s easily answered: evolutionary instinct moulds a parent’s love for their children into something fierce and uncomplicated. Broaden out the focus to siblings, adult children, ageing parents, aunts and uncles, and the answer is less straightforward.
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Freemasonry, politics, the press and transparency | Letters 7 Feb 1:01pm Freemasonry, politics, the press and transparency | Letters
Readers respond to Guardian articles about Freemasons’ lodges for MPs and journalistsThe existence of two Freemasons’ lodges associated with staff and journalists based at the Palace of Westminster, New Welcome Lodge No 5139 and Gallery Lodge No 1928, has been widely known for many years (
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Guardian view on Germany’s grand coalition: continuity carries risks | Editorial 7 Feb 12:43pm Guardian view on Germany’s grand coalition: continuity carries risks | Editorial
A new government in Berlin is cause for relief, but not celebration when hard problems go unaddressedSince Brexit is the biggest problem facing the UK, it is easy from this side of the Channel to imagine it is also the greatest challenge facing the European Union. It is not. EU leaders have yet to find lasting fixes to structural weaknesses in the single currency. Continental politics is plagued by xenophobic nationalism, which is intimately connected to the absence of consensus on how to deal with mass migration from beyond Europe. This has all been complicated by the absence of a government in Berlin since
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To know Donald Trump’s faith is to understand his politics | Martyn Percy 6 Feb 2:04pm To know Donald Trump’s faith is to understand his politics | Martyn Percy
‘Make America great again,’ he says. If it doesn’t pan out, it won’t his fault: it will be yours, for doubtingThe only surprising feature of Donald Trump’s first year in office is that it has been entirely predictable. So when I mention to colleagues that I have been researching Trump’s religious faith, reactions vary from mild scoffing (“I thought he was his own religion”) to bafflement and surprise. But Trump has a faith. And if you want to know how the next few years of his presidency will pan out, understanding
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The Guardian view on trade with the EU: not just politics | Editorial 6 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on trade with the EU: not just politics | Editorial
How Britain trades with the rest of the world is much more important than the politics of the Tory partyThe
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My great-great-aunt was a terrorist: women’s politics went beyond the vote | Ash Sarkar 5 Feb 3:00am My great-great-aunt was a terrorist: women’s politics went beyond the vote | Ash Sarkar
Pritilata Waddedar fought the British in 1930s Bengal. Her actions reveal the diversity behind the suffrage storyMy great-great-aunt was a terrorist. I’m not talking about the sense in which the pacifist Mahatma Gandhi was branded a terrorist by the
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Charm, style and tousled hair: is it any surprise we lust after Tories? | Paris Lees 1 Feb 8:35am Charm, style and tousled hair: is it any surprise we lust after Tories? | Paris Lees
My fondness for rightwingers seemed odd at first, but the men I dated weren’t evil – people’s politics are shaped by the lives they’ve ledHow are you feeling? Still reeling from the news that
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The Big Brother house – an unlikely source for an LGBT history lesson | Shon Faye 1 Feb 5:00am The Big Brother house – an unlikely source for an LGBT history lesson | Shon Faye
Divisions among trans people, gay men and lesbians have been exposed by the celebrity TV show. But ultimately far more unites us than sets us apart Who could have predicted that in 2018 it would be Celebrity Big Brother that opened up the national conversation on gender and sexual politics? Transsexual? Transgender? Drag queen? Queer? Gay? Gender-fluid? Shane from Boyzone looked utterly baffled. The show took the uneasy divisions and distinctions of the LGBT community and revealed them to straight people. You know – the ones who think we’re basically all the same oddballs anyway. First there was the trans newsreader, India Willoughby, and her discomfort with the Britney Spears-esque drag queen Courtney Act, an alumnus of
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The Guardian view on the Brexit transition: wanted – a Labour alternative | Editorial 29 Jan 1:07pm The Guardian view on the Brexit transition: wanted – a Labour alternative | Editorial
Theresa May’s weakness fuels Conservative recklessness on Europe. Labour needs to set out a clear alternative on the transition period and beyondAt its core, Brexit is a formal process of laws, treaties, timetables and deadlines. But this formal process is a bit like a medieval castle surrounded by a shanty town of often raucous informal pressures from politics, the media, interest groups and civil society. This week there is
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Turkey’s attack on Syrian Kurds could overturn the entire region | Gareth Stansfield 27 Jan 7:03pm Turkey’s attack on Syrian Kurds could overturn the entire region | Gareth Stansfield
The new front is not just a local conflict: it could lead to a broader Kurdish revolt that redraws the map. The west must finally decide what it wants to achieve in the Middle East or other players will benefitIn whichever state they live, the Kurds endure a perilous existence. In Iran, the Kurdish people of the west have suffered significant persecution at the hands of the Islamic republic, while in Iraq, the Kurds of the north were confronted with a well-organised military operation. They also faced a diplomatic initiative that illustrated that, even in the fractious world of Middle East politics, Kurdish aspirations can manage to unify Iraq, Iran and Turkey in common opposition, following the independence referendum. Even more strikingly, western powers were also aligned against their Iraqi Kurdish allies who had been so valuable in the fight against Isis. The thinking of western governments was logical – coolly objective even – as they remained committed to their policy of protecting the territorial integrity of Iraq. But, from a Kurdish perspective, they seem to be useful proxies when needed – and friends to forget when not.
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The Observer view on the Tories starving schools of funding | Observer editorial 27 Jan 5:17pm The Observer view on the Tories starving schools of funding | Observer editorial
Six out of 10 of the biggest academy trusts have raised concerns over a lack of resourcesAnother week; another seven days in which the politics and substance of Brexit have dominated government business to the exclusion of everything else. It continues to be the black hole that sucks up any available political energy. It has become the issue through which the ongoing internecine Tory conflict must be understood. Other issues surface only as sideshows: solutions to the NHS funding crisis briefly featured in the run-up to Tuesday’s cabinet meeting, but only as a result of Boris Johnson using a call for more cash to try to undermine Theresa May politically. The Observer is the world's oldest Sunday newspaper, founded in 1791. It is published by Guardian News & Media and is editorially independent.
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Don’t mention the civil war: the English are still fighting it | Martin Kettle 25 Jan 1:00am Don’t mention the civil war: the English are still fighting it | Martin Kettle
The Charles I exhibition at the Royal Academy has a historical hole at its heart, as does our nation It is commonplace for writers on American politics to observe that, more than 150 years on, the United States is in various ways still fighting its civil war between the slavery-supporting south and the more liberal and urban industrial north. It is far less common for writers on British politics to make an equivalent observation about the enduring tenacity of the much older divides of England’s 17th-century civil conflict. Yet England’s civil war is still with us. The 1640s battles between authority and liberty may not have produced another civil war. But iterations of the divide have resonated down the centuries – from the Glorious Revolution of 1688-9, through the Whig-Tory rivalry of the 18th century, the advance of liberalism and reform in the 19th century, and of labourism and equalities in the 20th. It is not hard to see, in the contrast between a privileged and dissipated political figure such as Boris Johnson and a puritanical one such as Jeremy Corbyn, that there are 17th-century echoes in our own binary times too.
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Rees-Mogg to the DUP, Hoey to Ukip … we need a politicians’ hostage swap | Zoe Williams 23 Jan 7:00am Rees-Mogg to the DUP, Hoey to Ukip … we need a politicians’ hostage swap | Zoe Williams
The new political mood has unmasked the misfits of parliament, so I’m suggesting a way to make everyone happier“Deselection” is a dirty word in parliamentary politics, a signal of vindictive disunity. The Tories would never think of it and would prefer, if they’re to go down, to take the country with them. Labour talk about it but only in the sense of accusing each other of secretly wanting it. Personally, I’m agnostic. I can think of no good reason why representing your party should be a job for life, wherein only by voting against the party can your constituents remove you. They’re politicians, not mini-popes. Yet I can also see that the job of both governing and opposing should be considered pretty much full-time, and a party mired in savage infighting and interminable legal challenge might not be an outward-looking political force. Choosing a new candidate is like having a baby: there’s never a good time, but some times are a lot worse than others. So I’m going to suggest an alternative.
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The Guardian view on Germany’s social democrats: no easy options | Editorial 22 Jan 12:39pm The Guardian view on Germany’s social democrats: no easy options | Editorial
Germany’s main centre-left party has voted for more talks about going back into government with Angela Merkel. But the SPD’s acute divisions remainGermany has now been without a government for more than three months, and it could be at least the end of February before Angela Merkel can start her fourth term as chancellor – if she ever can. It is surely significant that two successive elections have each been followed by record-breaking difficulties in forming a government. It is a reminder that the once seemingly commanding large parties are dwindling in Germany, just as they have dwindled elsewhere in Europe. German party politics is fragmenting: there are now six different party groupings in the newly elected Bundestag or parliament. Following
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If Democrats think Trump is an authoritarian, why don’t they treat him like one? | Corey Robin 20 Jan 10:00am If Democrats think Trump is an authoritarian, why don’t they treat him like one? | Corey Robin
There is a wide gap between words and deeds in American politics – on both sides of the aisle, notes Corey Robin
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Does the Endangered Species Act Protect Pro-Life Democrats? 18 Jan 7:06pm Does the Endangered Species Act Protect Pro-Life Democrats?
Kristen Day marches for life and for ObamaCare, and there aren’t many like her in politics anymore.
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The Rule of Shutdown Politics 18 Jan 3:35pm Updated The Rule of Shutdown Politics
Democrats oppose a bill that reauthorizes children’s health care.
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The Guardian view on the private finance initiative: replace this failed model | Editorial 18 Jan 1:33pm The Guardian view on the private finance initiative: replace this failed model | Editorial
Forty years of increasingly dogmatic approaches to the financing of public services have led to the collapse of Carillion and a damning National Audit Office reportLong ago, in a political galaxy far away, privatisation and outsourcing in public services were not always dogmas but instead acts that could involve a degree of pragmatism and some balancing of interests. After the postwar Attlee government and before Margaret Thatcher’s long reign in British politics, decisions about the relationship between the public and private sectors were often practical compromises, not ideological fixations. Government’s role was always and necessarily central, but it could be flexible about forms of ownership and systems of regulation and governance. At first, even Mrs Thatcher only argued that it was reasonable for private companies to compete to provide public services. Since the Thatcher era, habits, assumptions and arguments have relentlessly ossified. Part of this is political – the post-Thatcher generation of politicians faced publics that could prefer private to public (in housing, notably), lower taxes to higher ones, and disliked overmighty trade unions. Part of it is economic – the decline of the industrially based, sometimes publicly owned, economy with strong collective bargaining and the growth, in its place, of a globalised and financially led service sector, often offshore, driven by shareholder value and characterised by hyper-rewards for management and low pay and insecurity for many employees. The upshot, nearly 40 years on, is that governments have behaved as though they are historically powerless to control the terms on which public goods are provided. In fact, only government is powerful enough to set those terms.
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Outsourcing and the Carillion collapse – Politics Weekly podcast 17 Jan 1:02pm Outsourcing and the Carillion collapse – Politics Weekly podcast
Anushka Asthana is joined by Andrew Adonis, Polly Toynbee, John Crace and Laura Parker to discuss the collapse of Carillion and the changes to Labour’s national executive committee. Plus James Murray, the deputy mayor of London, on getting to grips with the city’s housing crisis The collapse of Carrillion, one of Britain’s biggest outsourcing firms, has left thousands at risk of unemployment, roads and hospitals partially built and a pension fund half empty.
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Of Furries and Fascism at Google 16 Jan 6:22pm Of Furries and Fascism at Google
The company lets politics in the door and discovers it only breeds intolerance.
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Westminster Brexiters ignore Scotland at their peril | Gerry Hassan 15 Jan 12:28pm Westminster Brexiters ignore Scotland at their peril | Gerry Hassan
The will of the people cannot be respected on one issue only. Nicola Sturgeon could soon be calling for two referendums Brexit has turned British politics upside down. But to the UK government and Westminster political classes it is business as usual on the home front. It doesn’t matter for them that Brexit is nearly entirely an English revolt (with Welsh acquiescence), or that Scotland and Northern Ireland are being dragged along against majority sentiment in their territories.
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Here’s why Aziz Ansari’s behaviour matters | Emily Reynolds 15 Jan 11:27am Here’s why Aziz Ansari’s behaviour matters | Emily Reynolds
We need a profound cultural shift in our sexual politics – and that means recognising the small abuses of power too
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A second Brexit referendum would be more toxic and divisive than the first | Phil McDuff 15 Jan 5:05am A second Brexit referendum would be more toxic and divisive than the first | Phil McDuff
Remainers gleeful at Nigel Farage’s call for a second vote are foolish. Those who voted to leave the first time have been given no reason to change their minds Say what you like about Nigel Farage, he shows a knack for pure politics that, unfortunately, the remain campaign never has. His latest double reverse ferret – coming out in favour of a second referendum, while insisting that it’s “the last thing he wanted” – has for some reason been
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Stoke is on the up since Labour lost control of the city council | Letters 14 Jan 12:45pm Stoke is on the up since Labour lost control of the city council | Letters
After dominating local politics for most of the past 50 years, Labour were thrown out of power on the city council in 2015, writes Stoke South’s first Tory MP in 80 yearsIn your
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Trump, Oprah and the Art of Deflection 12 Jan 3:53pm Updated Trump, Oprah and the Art of Deflection
Will American politics return to normalcy in 2021 or 2025? I’m not betting on it.
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Inspired by Momentum, Labour can transform the heartlands – and itself | Laura Parker 12 Jan 2:59am Inspired by Momentum, Labour can transform the heartlands – and itself | Laura Parker
Ordinary people helping neglected communities – Corbyn’s vision spells the end of top-down New Labourism, and the start of a mass movement to power For too long, towns at the end of train lines and cities that once were bustling manufacturing hubs have been left behind by politics. In their glory days, places in my home county of Yorkshire such as Sheffield and Hull were heartlands of British industry. Building ships to protect the nation, making steel that was sold worldwide – these places thrived. Deindustrialisation and a lack of government investment have robbed these communities of well-paid jobs, opportunities and, for many, hope. They are scarred by job losses and unemployment; shops have fled from their high streets; and the lives of their young people are marred by uncertainty. These communities have been failed by politicians on both sides of parliament’s benches.
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Face facts. The west that won the cold war no longer exists | Rafael Behr 10 Jan 1:00am Face facts. The west that won the cold war no longer exists | Rafael Behr
Capitalism conquered the eastern bloc. That’s why liberal politics alone won’t defeat today’s populism Finnish TV and toilet paper did as much to undermine the USSR as the nuclear deterrent, an Estonian friend once explained to me. He grew up in Tallinn, under Kremlin rule but within antenna range of American soaps broadcast from Helsinki. What Dallas did for eyes that craved glamour, a smuggled supply of soft tissue did for bums rubbed raw by Soviet-issue bog roll. The Balts had too much exposure to what they were missing to be reconciled to the privations of communism.
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Don’t be fooled – these free-speech obsessives approve of no-platforming | George Monbiot 10 Jan 1:00am Don’t be fooled – these free-speech obsessives approve of no-platforming | George Monbiot
The establishment voices who vilify student ‘snowflakes’ are routinely excluding political ideas they don’t like. Socialism or environmentalism, for instanceWhen people obsess over a trivial issue, it usually means they are avoiding a more important one. The intense focus on student politics, and in particular no-platforming, by middle-aged journalists – columnists and leader writers at the Telegraph, Spectator, Times, Mail and Sun – suggests to me that there is something they would rather not see. As it happens, I agree with them: the no-platforming of people whom students find offensive is often wrong (though not in the case of direct hate speech towards minorities, or the incitement of violence). But I also believe that, on the scale of global importance, this issue ranks about 12,000th. This is student politics, for God’s sake. Daft ideas and failed experiments are its raison d’etre.
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We can stop Brexit. But we’ll need some help from across the Channel | Timothy Garton Ash 5 Jan 1:00am We can stop Brexit. But we’ll need some help from across the Channel | Timothy Garton Ash
Nothing is impossible in modern politics. But if so many Europeans really want Britain to stay in the EU, they need to find their voices nowThis is the year to stop Brexit. There will not be another chance. If by the end of this year the British parliament has approved a transition agreement with the 27 other members of the EU, including the framework for a
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It’s a mistake to sneer at centrists. Adonis’s stand on Brexit shows why | Matthew d’Ancona 31 Dec 2017, 11:05am It’s a mistake to sneer at centrists. Adonis’s stand on Brexit shows why | Matthew d’Ancona
Liberal politics is out of fashion, but the former transport secretary’s trenchant intervention reminds us it has real muscle Bravo, Andrew Adonis: the final transformation of this mild-mannered policy wonk into battling anti-Brexiter is a fitting way to end a year no less defiant of prophecy than 2016. And rather a cheering one, as it happens. In truth, the former Labour transport secretary and No 10 policy chief has been steadily morphing from bookworm to kick-ass over the last 18 months, his interventions growing more trenchant, his cerebral manner increasingly matched by a taste for action.
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The political kaleidoscope has been shaken and will be again | Andrew Rawnsley 30 Dec 2017, 7:05pm The political kaleidoscope has been shaken and will be again | Andrew Rawnsley
Mrs May was undone by hubris. Labour risks repeating the Tory mistake of taking the electorate for grantedThe clear lesson from 2017 concerns what you should do if you are the conservative prime minister of a tea-drinking nation who is faced with divisive constitutional questions at the same time as the largest opposition party appears to be in total disarray. Obviously – this is a no-brainer really – you should exploit your advantage and call a snap election. Well, that was the lesson from the politics of Japan.
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In 2017, Markets Rose Above Politics 29 Dec 2017, 3:58pm Updated In 2017, Markets Rose Above Politics
In the face of crisis, Polish and Korean stocks soared more than 40%—even faster than in the U.S.
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‘Trumpism’ is ingrained in white America. When he goes, it will remain | Cas Mudde 28 Dec 2017, 7:16am ‘Trumpism’ is ingrained in white America. When he goes, it will remain | Cas Mudde
The Republican party’s radicalised base will outlast their current leader. The sooner we realise this, the sooner we can find a solutionThe author Tom Wolfe once wrote: “The dark night of fascism is always descending in the United States and yet lands only in Europe.” He was reflecting a consensus, shared by public and scholars alike, that far right politics is a European phenomenon, at odds with “American values”. It is a conviction so deeply held that it has left the US blind to reality. Any example of far-right politics is explained away as exceptional, not representative of the “real” America, from “lone wolf” terrorists such as the Oklahoma City bomber
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Remembering Those Who Died in 2017 27 Dec 2017, 6:18pm Remembering Those Who Died in 2017
We lost some greats from the worlds of politics, media, sports and the military.
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The Handmaid’s Tale held a mirror up to a year of Trump | Matthew d’Ancona 26 Dec 2017, 4:00am The Handmaid’s Tale held a mirror up to a year of Trump | Matthew d’Ancona
Margaret Atwood’s ingenious dystopia, serialised on TV this year, prefigured the US president’s misogyny – and the #MeToo fightbackIn politics and culture, the year 2017 was the opposite of Where’s Wally? The question, instead, was always Where Isn’t Trump? All roads – public debate, private argument, artistic endeavour – seemed eventually to lead in his squalid direction; his gravitational pull irresistible, his fleshy presence horribly ubiquitous.
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Next Year in Jerusalem 22 Dec 2017, 6:13pm Next Year in Jerusalem
The U.N. reveals the depth of its anti-U.S., anti-Israel politics.
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Damian Green’s fall shows that politics needs cleaning up, but so does the web | Martin Kettle 21 Dec 2017, 12:51pm Damian Green’s fall shows that politics needs cleaning up, but so does the web | Martin Kettle
The disgraced politician was sacked for lying about porn on his computer. But we would all be better off without access to such demeaning materialTo lose one cabinet minister in two months may be regarded as a misfortune. To lose two may look like carelessness. To lose three strongly suggests downright incompetence. Yet as
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May says she wants investigation into release of Damian Green information – Politics live 21 Dec 2017, 11:34am Updated May says she wants investigation into release of Damian Green information – Politics live
Prime minister flies to Poland after third cabinet departure in two months creates further headache for government
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Damian Green qualifies for £17,000 pay-off, Cabinet Office confirms – Politics live 21 Dec 2017, 9:55am Updated Damian Green qualifies for £17,000 pay-off, Cabinet Office confirms – Politics live
Prime minister flies to Poland after third cabinet departure in two months creates further headache for government
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Damian Green was sacked because he lied, says Jeremy Hunt – Politics live 21 Dec 2017, 8:49am Updated Damian Green was sacked because he lied, says Jeremy Hunt – Politics live
Prime minister flies to Poland after third cabinet departure in two months creates further headache for government
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Damian Green sacking prompts new trouble for Theresa May – politics live 21 Dec 2017, 3:24am Updated Damian Green sacking prompts new trouble for Theresa May – politics live
Prime minister flies to Poland after third cabinet departure in two months creates further headache for government
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Identity Politics Began in the American Revolution 15 Dec 2017, 6:51pm Identity Politics Began in the American Revolution
Can a politician represent constituents of drastically different backgrounds? It’s a very old question.
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After this week, I refuse to believe that Brexit is unstoppable | Martin Kettle 15 Dec 2017, 1:00am After this week, I refuse to believe that Brexit is unstoppable | Martin Kettle
The government’s Commons defeat opens up new and far-reaching possibilities – of a second referendum and of the leaving process coming off the rails Appearances matter a lot in politics. But in the end, the numbers matter more. On Brexit as on everything else, Theresa May has always behaved as if she is a prime minister with a clear parliamentary majority, a united party and a reconciled country behind her. But the reality is that she is none of these things, and
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Labour isn’t flip-flopping on Brexit – this is practical politics | Maya Goodfellow 12 Dec 2017, 7:58am Labour isn’t flip-flopping on Brexit – this is practical politics | Maya Goodfellow
While the prime minister has been muddying the EU waters, Jeremy Corbyn has been busy forming relationships in BrusselsFor some, Labour can do no right on Brexit. The party has a clear, adaptable position – but in recent days it has, somewhat predictably, been accused of being ambiguous. The party wants “
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Haringey council taken over by Momentum? It’s just locals taking back control | Aditya Chakrabortty 12 Dec 2017, 1:00am Haringey council taken over by Momentum? It’s just locals taking back control | Aditya Chakrabortty
This isn’t a hard left plot: Labour members simply opposed a council that handed its assets to private interests and turfed poor people out of their homes I’ve just been reading about the most terrifying place. For weeks, this “toxic” neighbourhood with its “poisonous” atmosphere has been all over the front pages and columns. It’s a land of revolutionary politics, of “ruthless attacks” and “purges”. Hordes of Trotskyists reportedly roam its high streets – like wildebeest, if they only swapped the majesty of the Serengeti for suburban pound shops. It sounds, frankly, dreadful. It also happens to be right next door to where I was born and raised. Indeed, it’s where I’ve spent much of the past year reporting, on exactly the local politics that now jostles news of Meghan and Harry’s engagement on the front page of the Times. Which is how I know that the fantasies generated by the Murdoch papers and others are just those: a purpose-built media onslaught.
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Just seven words are keeping a Brexit deal afloat for all sides | Gaby Hinsliff 11 Dec 2017, 3:12pm Just seven words are keeping a Brexit deal afloat for all sides | Gaby Hinsliff
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed, goes the latest meaningless mantra. But sometimes maddening ambiguity is what makes politics workNothing is agreed until everything is agreed. If
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‘Ladydata’ could help solve gender inequalities | Stella Creasy 9 Dec 2017, 7:05pm ‘Ladydata’ could help solve gender inequalities | Stella Creasy
There must be independent assessments of the impact of budget cuts on different groups Benjamin Franklin once argued nothing was certain except death and taxes. Certain they may be, but experience of both is very unequal. While women tend to live longer than men, their pockets are hit much harder when it comes to public revenues. And if one is a matter of physiology, the other is a question of politics. Without data to identify how and why, neither can be addressed. It is now devastatingly clear that seven years of austerity budgets have hindered equality in Britain. Raising the personal tax allowance and the higher rate threshold to £50,000 may be popular, but it helps older white men most of all.
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Steve Bell on Arlene Foster and Theresa May – cartoon 5 Dec 2017, 3:25pm Steve Bell on Arlene Foster and Theresa May – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/commentisfree/picture/2017/dec/05/steve-bell-on-arlene-foster-and-theresa-may-cartoon">Continue reading...
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Integrity in presidential politics? I think it’s extinct | Tim Dowling 5 Dec 2017, 3:24pm Integrity in presidential politics? I think it’s extinct | Tim Dowling
I’ve met Bill Clinton, and been thrown out of Gerald Ford’s elevator. But my favourite was John Anderson, a would-be candidate in 1979. He was my hero At some point in the summer of 1979, I was eating breakfast at a diner with my family, in northern Massachusetts or southern New Hampshire. I can’t be sure: we were halfway through a long drive to Maine, and had spent the night in a motel. A man with white hair and glasses walked up to our table and introduced himself. He asked if he could sit down. This overt display of friendliness, I could tell, alarmed my parents. When he claimed to be running for president, we all exchanged worried glances. But he had badges and stickers with his name on them. John Anderson,
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Shy Tory remainers must find the courage to mutiny too | Rafael Behr 5 Dec 2017, 2:39pm Shy Tory remainers must find the courage to mutiny too | Rafael Behr
Theresa May’s Brexit delusions need to be challenged. But that task shouldn’t all be left to Brussels and DublinEnacting the will of the people turns out to be rather tricky when there are lots of different people with incompatible wills. That is a banal truth of democratic politics that Theresa May avoided for months and finally bumped into in Brussels this week. Even after the opinions of millions who voted to stay in the EU were discounted, the chances of satisfying every one of the leavers’ preferences were nil.
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Martin Rowson on British efforts to get a Brexit-Irish border deal – cartoon 4 Dec 2017, 3:34pm Martin Rowson on British efforts to get a Brexit-Irish border deal – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/commentisfree/picture/2017/dec/04/martin-rowson-on-british-efforts-to-get-a-brexit-irish-border-deal-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on Labour and Brexit: fight for workers’ rights | Editorial 26 Nov 2017, 2:56pm The Guardian view on Labour and Brexit: fight for workers’ rights | Editorial
Social protections can best be upheld through international cooperation. Labour should clearly back the single market and the customs unionBritish politics is polarised on nearly every axis, so it is strange how little conflict there is between Labour and the Conservatives on the biggest issue: the terms of departure from the EU. Jeremy Corbyn’s challenges to Theresa May over Brexit negotiations
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We need new words to explain these curious times. How about ‘coffused’ or ‘procrastinetflix’? | Arwa Mahdawi 26 Nov 2017, 10:00am We need new words to explain these curious times. How about ‘coffused’ or ‘procrastinetflix’? | Arwa Mahdawi
Troubled by conflicting advice over how much coffee to drink, or putting off a deadline with a quick Stranger Things binge? Don’t worry I’ve got the neologisms for you. And plenty more where those came from These days, the world can be very confusing. Technology keeps disrupting everything and politics has become a fast-paced drama full of plot twists. It is no surprise, then, that this brave new world has spawned a bevy of brave new words. From Brexit to Regrexit, from
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A quick UK-US post-Brexit trade deal?Looking at Nafta, that seems unlikely | Randall Mark Wigle 24 Nov 2017, 8:55am A quick UK-US post-Brexit trade deal?Looking at Nafta, that seems unlikely | Randall Mark Wigle
Trump has promised a deal ‘very, very quickly’. If talks proceed as slowly as they are for a revised US agreement with Canada and Mexico, that won’t happenBeing a Canadian sabbatical visitor in the United Kingdom this year has allowed me to witness Brexit politics at close hand. As an economist, I’ve found it fascinating. Some Britons feel that Brexit sets the stage for a
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Cassowaries! Quandongs! Snitty the cassowary hosts the Queensland elections | First Dog on the Moon 24 Nov 2017, 1:42am Cassowaries! Quandongs! Snitty the cassowary hosts the Queensland elections | First Dog on the Moon
What are the issues Queenslanders should consider when voting - other than how terrible politics is and why won’t they all shut up?
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Don’t be fooled by the ‘economicky’ words: this budget is all politics | Victoria Waldersee 23 Nov 2017, 8:03am Don’t be fooled by the ‘economicky’ words: this budget is all politics | Victoria Waldersee
The dominant school of economics has long marketed itself as value-free. But the chancellor should be honest about the ideological nature of his decisionsYou’d think that a leading figure giving their most important speech of the year on what exactly they’re planning on doing with the nation’s money would try to avoid inductive leaps, questionable stats, and a stubborn inability to be open about the fact that their actions are a choice, not a necessity. But when it’s the budget, and your job title is chancellor of the exchequer, it seems like anything goes. It’s not Philip Hammond’s fault (though given he uses “
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Martin Rowson on Brexit developments – cartoon 20 Nov 2017, 2:33pm Martin Rowson on Brexit developments – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/picture/2017/nov/20/martin-rowson-on-brexit-developments">Continue reading...
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What does Germany’s political crisis mean for Brexit? | Martin Kettle 20 Nov 2017, 8:41am What does Germany’s political crisis mean for Brexit? | Martin Kettle
With coalition talks collapsing, Angela Merkel has problems at home to sort. The idea she could magic a Brexit solution favourable to the UK is simply for the birdsThe British political class, like much of the British media, remains foolishly obsessed with America to the exclusion of all other foreign countries. As a result, both refuse to pay consistent attention to German politics, or indeed to the internal politics of any other European country at all. So the news that Angela Merkel may not, after all,
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The Guardian view on climate talks: Brexit’s heavy weather | Editorial 17 Nov 2017, 2:14pm The Guardian view on climate talks: Brexit’s heavy weather | Editorial
If Brexit goes ahead, Britain will need to shape a green politics with devolution and social justice at its core. And make sure that politicians cannot renege on our international obligationsThe tragedy of climate change, as the governor of the Bank of England has put it,
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‘Putting politics above prosperity’ – wait, isn’t that what the Brexiteers are doing? | Christian Odendahl 17 Nov 2017, 11:17am ‘Putting politics above prosperity’ – wait, isn’t that what the Brexiteers are doing? | Christian Odendahl
David Davis’s ill-advised remark to an audience of German businessmen reveals an alarming ignorance about the way in which the EU is conducting negotiationsPutting
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May needed to master the new politics that Brexit demands. But she’s failed | Simon Jenkins 16 Nov 2017, 1:00am May needed to master the new politics that Brexit demands. But she’s failed | Simon Jenkins
Britain needed a prime minister to fight for what the public truly wants. Instead, she has driven all sides to extremesBastards, mutineers, saboteurs, enemies of the people. As the Brexit debate approaches climax, it is
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Russia is meddling in western politics as it has nothing to lose | Robert Service 15 Nov 2017, 9:40am Russia is meddling in western politics as it has nothing to lose | Robert Service
Putin knows Russia is no longer a superpower, but he can bolster his standing at home by destabilising the westFrom the Brexit referendum to the American and French presidential elections, Russia has been causing serious mischief in the western democracies. Just yesterday it emerged that
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As Trump fawns over Xi, global politics is now a ‘strong man’ game | Will Hutton 11 Nov 2017, 7:05pm As Trump fawns over Xi, global politics is now a ‘strong man’ game | Will Hutton
Trade agreements are being torn up in a brutal exercise of economic force by the most powerfulIt was an extraordinary moment, so small wonder there was an audible intake of breath from the huge audience in Beijing’s Great Hall of the People. Here was Donald Trump, visibly flattered by the pomp and magnificence of the welcome mounted by the Chinese Communist party, saying in his big speech
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A Media Merger Is Mugged by Bureaucrats, Not Donald Trump 10 Nov 2017, 7:24pm A Media Merger Is Mugged by Bureaucrats, Not Donald Trump
A shocking possibility: Partisan politics will save the AT&T and Time Warner deal.
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Who’ll win the Tory biathlon of cabinet chaos? They all will | Marina Hyde 10 Nov 2017, 1:15pm Who’ll win the Tory biathlon of cabinet chaos? They all will | Marina Hyde
If we think of the week as a contest to prove ministerial stupidity and ineptitude, a single winner is impossible to pickAnother edifying week on the Mount Olympus of British politics, as the Tory gods continue to operate on a
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May must pay up and clear out the Brexit rebels. All else is madness | Simon Jenkins 10 Nov 2017, 4:25am May must pay up and clear out the Brexit rebels. All else is madness | Simon Jenkins
Hardcore Brexiteers are in the minority – the prime minister must stand up to them. Talk of ‘no deal’ is illiterate, playing politics with other people’s lives.Why does Theresa May keep telling us what we already know? She
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Tories can take being hated. But not being laughed at | Gaby Hinsliff 10 Nov 2017, 1:00am Tories can take being hated. But not being laughed at | Gaby Hinsliff
Voters needn’t love Theresa May, they just have to believe she’s more competent than Labour. How many think that now?What a shambles. What an undignified, mortifying mess British politics is in right now. Two cabinet ministers have gone in a week and the foreign secretary keeps his job only because it’s so awkward to move him. The prime minister has been embarrassed at home and abroad by the behaviour of her colleagues, all the more so because these scandals are so avoidably stupid. Sexual and financial transgressions are shocking enough, although they happen in real life as well as in politics. But
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The budget will show whether the Tories really care about ‘just managing’ families | Frances Ryan 9 Nov 2017, 3:00am The budget will show whether the Tories really care about ‘just managing’ families | Frances Ryan
The 2015 benefit freeze has been far more destructive than the government thought. Will the Tories take the chance to lift it?In politics, there are some ideas that are good in theory but don’t work in practice. Then there are those that were always going to cause harm but turn out to be more damning than even the policy’s architects could have imagined. Increasingly, the benefit freeze is the poster child for the latter category. The government is rightly coming under increasing pressure to halt the roll-out of universal credit. But lifting this freeze in benefit levels should be as much of priority. In the 2015 budget, then chancellor George Osborne put in motion a freeze on most working-age benefits for four years, from housing benefit and tax credits, to employment support allowance and child benefit. In other words, on the “top-up wage” for the mum working all hours as a care assistant but still struggling to pay the rent, or the safety net for the cancer patient temporarily too ill to hold down a job.
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Selfie Politics 8 Nov 2017, 7:01pm Selfie Politics
Trump, in fact, tweets as the Everyman of America’s new politics: Embrace Me!
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The Guardian view on Priti Patel’s sacking: no alternative for Theresa May | Editorial 8 Nov 2017, 2:52pm The Guardian view on Priti Patel’s sacking: no alternative for Theresa May | Editorial
The former international development secretary ran her own foreign policy and defied the prime minister. Downing Street had to show who was boss In the end Theresa May did not force out Priti Patel because she wanted to. She did it because she had to. At the weekend, the prime minister was presented with serious reasons to dismiss the international development secretary. Ms Patel’s freelance but secret Middle East foreign policy – notably the 12 private meetings this summer with senior Israeli politicians and officials without first informing the Foreign Office or No 10 – was institutionalised insubordination. Yet in spite of these major breaches of trust and collective responsibility, Mrs May bent over backwards not to fire Ms Patel. She preferred to have her colleague stay, especially so soon after Michael Fallon’s resignation. Ms Patel was given a ticking-off on Monday but she was cleared to fulfil a pre-arranged visit to Africa at the start of the week. The initial failure to sack Ms Patel reflected the weakness of Mrs May’s premiership, which has deepened since June’s humiliating general election. Paradoxically, the same thing is true of Wednesday’s reverse decision to give Ms Patel the sack. If nothing else, the two contrasting responses illustrate Talleyrand’s cynical dictum that, in politics, treachery is all a matter of dates. In between the decisions not to sack and then to sack, it became clear that Ms Patel had again been economical with the facts when she told Mrs May about her recent meetings with senior Israelis. The decisive revelation concerned a meeting at the House of Commons in September with the Israeli public security minister, which Ms Patel continued to conceal at the weekend. Although some of the facts concerning this meeting, and another in New York with the head of Israel’s foreign service, were in dispute on Wednesday, it added up to a deception too far for No 10.
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What can we learn about politics from Gordon Brown’s memoir? 7 Nov 2017, 10:20am What can we learn about politics from Gordon Brown’s memoir?
He doesn’t rate Corbyn, didn’t like ‘touchy-feely’ politics, and still hates Tony Blair – a roundup of all the hot revelations from the former prime minister’s new bookFor reasons now lost to me, I read Gordon Brown’s previous book, Beyond the Crash, in which he revealed precisely nothing about himself, except for that fascinating quirk of the unusual mind. He’d say a big thing with no explanation at all (“that’s what an economy is for, to create jobs”), then explain a small, obvious thing at the most tremendous length. Imagine the surprise, therefore, to find his latest work,
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Trump, ISIS and the Crisis of Meaning 6 Nov 2017, 6:46pm Trump, ISIS and the Crisis of Meaning
When politics limits itself to the material, people seek spiritual purpose elsewhere.
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I know how demeaning harassment is. But weaponising the past is not the answer | Anne Perkins 6 Nov 2017, 6:55am I know how demeaning harassment is. But weaponising the past is not the answer | Anne Perkins
Groping and innuendo were seen as something to be tolerated in late 20th century politics. Now culture has changed – and this must drive the futureThe world that matters most, the one that shapes who you are, exists in your head. It is a shifting, slippery, elusive mix of perception and experience, constrained by very few rules. Those that endure are, in the main, the outcome not of rational intellectual argument but of visceral response. What is right, what is wrong, what must be endured and what must be fought. The first two don’t change. The other two have changed radically. I worked as a political correspondent at Westminster from the early 1980s to the early 2000s. I have been chased round the banquettes of a restaurant that seemed to have been designed for grubby old men who wanted you to feel them up. I have been stalked by the notorious lecher Alan Clark, and endlessly sized up by backbench MPs with an inexhaustible sense of entitlement. I’ve had breathy phone calls in hotel rooms and discreet taps on my door at night … as with all my female colleagues, the list is pretty well inexhaustible, and of course it didn’t only happen at Westminster – it happened at work and travelling, in foreign studios as much as in London offices.
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The evidence is mounting – a man’s place is in the home 4 Nov 2017, 5:00am The evidence is mounting – a man’s place is in the home
This isn’t about a single industry, a few bad apples here and there. This is about men. Men harassing women, men dismissing women “Oh, that’s just Fox News,” people said when Roger Ailes and Bill O’Reilly were exposed as revolting sexual harassers. “Oh, that’s just the movie business,” people said when the Weinstein scandal unrolled. “Oh, that’s just the fashion industry,” people said when Terry Richardson was blacklisted by Condé Nast International a decade after women started speaking out about him. By the time harassment stories were emerging from journalism, politics, the arts, it felt like maybe this wasn’t about a single industry, a few bad apples here and there. This is about men. Men harassing women, men dismissing women who say they’ve been harassed and now men bleating that they don’t know how to behave around women today, because not inserting sexualised banter into every conversation they have with women is apparently too difficult a concept for them to handle. So I’d like to make A Modest Proposal: men need to be banned from the workplace.
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Cradle of democracy? Westminster is more like Goodfellas without the guns | Marina Hyde 3 Nov 2017, 2:10pm Cradle of democracy? Westminster is more like Goodfellas without the guns | Marina Hyde
Gropes, plots and blackmail as standard: this week revealed a politics far removed from societal norms The Conservatives seem to have been staging the last scene of Hamlet for over a year now. I’m not quite sure how everyone isn’t dead yet, but it now wouldn’t be remotely out of place if someone announced: “Following a number of allegations about their behaviour on the trip to England, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are suspended.”
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If Fallon-style scandal drives our politics, Theresa May cannot survive | Martin Kettle 2 Nov 2017, 4:16pm If Fallon-style scandal drives our politics, Theresa May cannot survive | Martin Kettle
The former defence secretary’s exit sets a perilous benchmark for a shaky government that can’t afford to lose more ministersIn one of his many invaluable books on British politics, the great Sir David Butler – 93 last month and still following politics like a hawk – lists every significant ministerial resignation from British governments since the end of the Victorian era, along with a note of the reason for the minister’s departure. The roll call marks some of the great divisive events of the last century – entry into the first world war, the Irish rebellion, Munich, prescription charges, Suez, the Falklands invasion, Iraq. It is not until 1958 that the first resignation due to a “private scandal” rather than a public issue is noted – the Conservative foreign office minister, charged with gross indecency after being caught in a gay sexual encounter, then illegal, in the bushes in St James’s Park. It is not, of course, that the first half of the 20th century was scandal-free – merely that the public knew nothing of such scandals, and so there were no demands that “something must be done”.
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We’re suckers for conspiracy theories – and it’s a sign of a deep social malaise | Hugo Drochon 1 Nov 2017, 5:10am We’re suckers for conspiracy theories – and it’s a sign of a deep social malaise | Hugo Drochon
It’s easy to be flippant about JFK and the moon landings. But the fake news and assumed truths that pervade our politics tell of something more worryingLast Thursday Donald Trump authorised the release of almost 3,000
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We can’t assume Britain is immune from Trump’s toxic politics | Rafael Behr 1 Nov 2017, 2:00am We can’t assume Britain is immune from Trump’s toxic politics | Rafael Behr
Given the president’s attack on liberal democracy, with Kremlin interference his cult of personal power could spread across the AtlanticThe friendliest polling station I have visited was in Grozny, Chechnya. Separatist rebellion had been crushed by the Russian army, and a referendum was being held to confirm the republic’s loyalty to Moscow. Journalists were bussed in to witness democracy reborn amid the ruins of war. Officials were cheerful, as were our military minders. The
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The victims of sexual abuse are the only voices that matter | Gaby Hinsliff 31 Oct 2017, 4:51pm The victims of sexual abuse are the only voices that matter | Gaby Hinsliff
Different women react in different ways. Don’t jump in to judge them, just listen to their storiesThere comes a point in every genuinely big political scandal when it becomes hard to see the wood for the trees. So here, in no particular order, is a far from exhaustive list of what the sexual harassment scandal now sweeping parliament is not about. It’s not about the self-righteous conviction that any gropers and grabbers in your own preferred party are a one-off or a regrettable failure of candidate vetting, while all the really awful predators sit on the other side. Everyone involved in politics now needs to face the fact that
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The Guardian view on Robert Mueller’s investigation: this says it’s serious for Trump | Editorial 31 Oct 2017, 3:25pm The Guardian view on Robert Mueller’s investigation: this says it’s serious for Trump | Editorial
The US president may ignore the rules of politics, but he cannot ignore the rule of law and the special counselDonald Trump reacted with
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We MPs must act quickly on sexual abuse or politics will fall into disrepute | Rupa Huq 31 Oct 2017, 12:17pm We MPs must act quickly on sexual abuse or politics will fall into disrepute | Rupa Huq
Having suffered unwanted attention from a male MEP with wandering hands, I know that workplace sexual harassment happens at all levels of governmentThe role of MP is unlike any other job; it’s a seven-days-a-week rollercoaster ride. One minute, you might be grilling the prime minister to jeers from the other side in the bearpit of the House of Commons chamber. The next, you will be at a crumbling community centre in your constituency, dealing with emergency-rehousing an evicted mother and her kids, who have turned up at your advice surgery with nowhere to sleep for the night. Not only is the job unique, but parliament is like no other place of employment on Earth. It can be a peculiarly work-hard, play-hard environment, so revelations of workplace sexual abuse probably came as no surprise to many of the 4,000 people who work on the parliamentary estate.
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Complicity in the sexual abuse of women is built in to the heart of our politics | Suzanne Moore 30 Oct 2017, 8:25am Complicity in the sexual abuse of women is built in to the heart of our politics | Suzanne Moore
Certain men have taken advantage of this sexist setup for a long time. But it’s crunch time nowIn an enormous effort to enter the modern age, Westminster and much of the sycophantic media that buoys it up appears to have progressed to the 1970s. While the rest of us are discussing rape, sexual assault and sexual harassment in every workplace following the Weinstein “revelations”, in the parallel world of politics there is talk of
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Irony used to define the English. In Brexit Britain, it’s self-importance | Zoe Williams 30 Oct 2017, 2:00am Irony used to define the English. In Brexit Britain, it’s self-importance | Zoe Williams
The Tory rampage in this divided island has warped our national identity, giving birth to a politics with no sense of the absurdIt’s important not to romanticise the past, otherwise you end up like a cut-price, leftist Nigel Farage marching to a whinier, less exhilarating drumbeat. But I distinctly remember, this time 20 years ago, it being normal to object to Halloween: not because it was satanic, but because it was American. It was the festival of consumerism and excess, unmoored from any deeper significance, but most of all – being expressly conceived as fun for children, and entailing talking to strangers and asking for things – it was un-English. Nationalism has taken a depressing turn, this past year and a half. The suspicion of foreigners and alienation of former allies are the greatest practical threats to the country’s wellbeing and prosperity. The
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The Catalan dream will not be extinguished by force | Matthew d’Ancona 29 Oct 2017, 1:35pm The Catalan dream will not be extinguished by force | Matthew d’Ancona
Secession from Spain would unwise for many reasons. But in this age of hectic change, the search for identity cannot simply be dismissedIt’s remarkable what you can learn in Slovenia. At a conference on politics, security and development in Bled earlier this year, I was lucky enough to chat to the Catalan delegates, proudly representing the interests and wisdom of their ancient principality. With considerable poise and dignity, they seemed to me to be channelling Pericles on the Athenians: we do not imitate, but are a model to others. So I am not surprised that Madrid is as frightened as it evidently is by Catalonia’s unilateral
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The rise of the robots need not spell downfall for humans | Chi Onwurah 29 Oct 2017, 12:28pm The rise of the robots need not spell downfall for humans | Chi Onwurah
We shouldn’t be afraid of the technological revolution. A politics that engages with it, rather than playing catch-up, can ensure it benefits us allThe robots are coming. They’re going to
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The Guardian view on Chinese politics: an age of ambition | Editorial 24 Oct 2017, 1:56pm The Guardian view on Chinese politics: an age of ambition | Editorial
The incorporation of Xi Jinping’s thinking into the party constitution indicates his extraordinary power – but also his breadth of visionMoney isn’t everything. That is Xi Jinping’s central message – even if he takes rather longer to say it. When the 2,300 delegates to the Communist Party of China’s congress unanimously
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I want to stand for Labour’s national executive committee. Here’s why | Eddie Izzard 23 Oct 2017, 5:00pm I want to stand for Labour’s national executive committee. Here’s why | Eddie Izzard
We need to bring an end to the ‘politics as usual’ that makes LGBT, minority ethnic and other members feel excluded from the party I
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Steve Bell’s If … Theresa May calls the universal credit helpline 23 Oct 2017, 2:00am Steve Bell’s If … Theresa May calls the universal credit helpline
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/picture/2017/oct/23/steve-bells-if-theresa-may-calls-the-universal-credit-helpline">Continue reading...
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Nobody minds a gentle nudge, except in the wrong direction | Andrew Rawnsley 21 Oct 2017, 7:05pm Nobody minds a gentle nudge, except in the wrong direction | Andrew Rawnsley
The past decade has demonstrated when behavioural politics can succeed and when it doesn’t workWe live in a time when government seems to have the Sadim touch: everything politicians lay their hands on turns into the opposite of gold. So it is a pleasant surprise when a significant piece of policy affecting the futures of millions of people is working as intended. Many folk park pensions in that segment of the brain where they keep things they know to be important, but find boring. Many folk would prefer to spend any surplus income today rather than save it for tomorrow. As a result, Britain has a serious problem. Its citizens are saving far too little for their retirement. Five years ago, the government did something to try to remedy this. It changed the way in which workers make pension decisions by introducing auto-enrolment. Where previously employees had to take a series of steps to opt into a company pension, now you are automatically signed up unless you actively choose to opt out. This subtle-sounding switch has had a rather dramatic result. More than eight million people have started
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What Harvey Weinstein tells us about the liberal world | Thomas Frank 21 Oct 2017, 6:00am What Harvey Weinstein tells us about the liberal world | Thomas Frank
Harvey Weinstein seemed to fit right in. This is a form of liberalism that routinely blends self-righteousness with upper-class entitlement Let us now consider the peculiar politics of Harvey Weinstein, the disgraced movie producer. Today Weinstein is in the headlines for an astonishing array of alleged sexual harassment and assaults, but once upon a time he was renowned for something quite different: his generous patronage of liberal politicians and progressive causes. This leading impresario of awful was an enthusiastic supporter of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. He was a strong critic of racism, sexism and censorship. He hosted sumptuous parties to raise money for the fight against Aids.
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Give MPs basic rights at work, or Britain’s gender gap will never close | Clare Phipps 18 Oct 2017, 11:01am Give MPs basic rights at work, or Britain’s gender gap will never close | Clare Phipps
Parental leave isn’t enough: job-sharing is the only way to make parliament more representative – and the only way someone like me can become an MPAdmitting I am “in politics” is not something I do casually. Why would I want people to associate me with
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Referendums get a bad press – but to fix Britain, we need more of them | George Monbiot 18 Oct 2017, 1:00am Referendums get a bad press – but to fix Britain, we need more of them | George Monbiot
Voting once every five years alienates us from politics. Participatory rather than representative democracy would allow us more say in how we run the countryYou lost, suck it up: this is how our politics works. If the party you voted for lost the election, you have no meaningful democratic voice for the next five years. You can go through life, in this “representative democracy”, unrepresented in government, while not being permitted to represent yourself. Even if your party is elected, it washes its hands of you when you leave the polling booth. Governments assert a mandate for any policy they can push through parliament. While elections tend to hinge on one or two issues, parties will use their win to claim support for all the positions in their manifestos, and for anything else they decide to do during their term in office.
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Who’s to blame for Brexit’s fantasy politics? The experts, of course | Aditya Chakrabortty 17 Oct 2017, 1:00am Who’s to blame for Brexit’s fantasy politics? The experts, of course | Aditya Chakrabortty
Magical thinking about the future is not confined to the cabinet. Just ask the Office for Budget ResponsibilityPolitics, runs the cliche, is the art of the possible. The compromise. The curbed expectation. Not any more. Not in the age of Brexit and Trump. In 2017, politics is the art of the impossible. Of writing blank cheques and scattering them to the wind. Of peddling fantasies and promising the voters they will be made flesh by tomorrow.
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Fiercest of rivals, best of friends: cross-party pals in Parliament 15 Oct 2017, 3:30am Fiercest of rivals, best of friends: cross-party pals in Parliament
At a time when British politics is riven by bitterness, friendships across the divide might seem like a miracle. But odd couples - from Shami Charkrabarti and Sayeeda Warsi to Frank Field and Nicholas Soames - can be what makes parliament work best
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How Labour could lead the global economy out of the 20th century | George Monbiot 11 Oct 2017, 1:00am How Labour could lead the global economy out of the 20th century | George Monbiot
The rupture of 2008 presents a chance to throw out our iniquitous system that busts the planet – here are some ideasWe are still living in the long 20th century. We are stuck with its redundant technologies: the internal combustion engine, thermal power plants, factory farms. We are stuck with its redundant politics: unfair electoral systems, their capture by funders and lobbyists, the failure to temper representation with real participation. And we are stuck with its redundant economics:
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If feminist Linda Bellos is seen as a risk, progressive politics has lost its way | Claire Heuchan 6 Oct 2017, 1:00am If feminist Linda Bellos is seen as a risk, progressive politics has lost its way | Claire Heuchan
Women and trans people alike are the targets of male violence – but gender issues are now so fraught that we’re losing sight of what we have in commonProgressive politics has seriously lost its way. When feminists who have spent decades challenging sexism, racism, and homophobia are viewed as a risk to the wellbeing of students, something has gone very wrong indeed. Linda Bellos became the most recent feminist whose invitation to speak was withdrawn for raising questions about the direction in which modern-day gender politics is heading. Bellos, who is responsible for establishing Black History Month in Britain, was
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Boris Johnson has wrecked the Tories. He should own the wreckage | Ian Birrell 4 Oct 2017, 2:36pm Boris Johnson has wrecked the Tories. He should own the wreckage | Ian Birrell
Handing Johnson the poisoned chalice would be a despairing act, but at least he would no longer be able to hide from his actionsIt was a dismal end to a strange, sombre conference. Last year Theresa May said she wanted a new approach to politics; this year she certainly delivered it, with the most
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Sideshows and psychodramas: Conservative party conference – Politics Weekly podcast 4 Oct 2017, 10:43am Sideshows and psychodramas: Conservative party conference – Politics Weekly podcast
Anushka Asthana is joined in Manchester by Rowena Mason, Matthew d’Ancona, John Crace and Kate McCann at the Conservative party conference. Plus we hear from MPs, ministers and members as Theresa May makes her keynote speech Theresa May called for party unity at the end of a Conservative party conference filled with leadership intrigue. As she spluttered and coughed through her keynote speech and was interrupted by a prankster with a mock P45, she faced new calls to sack her foreign secretary, Boris Johnson. Joining
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How Politics Stalls Wireless Innovation 1 Oct 2017, 4:19pm How Politics Stalls Wireless Innovation
The FCC unveiled its National Broadband Plan in 2010—but couldn’t stick to it.
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The Guardian view on Theresa May: struggling to survive | Editorial 1 Oct 2017, 2:24pm The Guardian view on Theresa May: struggling to survive | Editorial
The prime minister’s authority is broken. Yet the Tory party has little confidence that anyone else would do the job betterTory party politics, says a leftwing character in James Graham’s new West End play,
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