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Don’t blame the Irish: the Brexit chaos is all about England | Fintan O’Toole 19 Nov 12:03pm Don’t blame the Irish: the Brexit chaos is all about England | Fintan O’Toole
The rise of English nationalism has left Britain deeply uncertain about its identity and place in the worldBrexit has been derailed, as it was always going to be, by the Irish question. And, amid the chaos, there is something oddly comfortable about this. Isn’t that what the bloody Irish always do – disrupt an otherwise placid British polity with their hopelessly convoluted and unresolvable feuds? In 1922, reflecting on the way Ireland had dominated imperial politics even on the eve of the great catastrophe of the first world war, a rueful
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Theresa May: how dare you say we EU nationals ‘jumped the queue’? | Mimi Mollica 19 Nov 11:36am Theresa May: how dare you say we EU nationals ‘jumped the queue’? | Mimi Mollica
I used to love the fact I lived in a country that recognised how surreal Italian politics was. Now all I feel is disappointmentBritain is now in panic mode, held hostage by a foolish plan gone really really bad. Theresa May has been cornered by her own party, which is
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Mrs May has put her cards on the table. Now it’s everyone else’s turn | Andrew Rawnsley 18 Nov 3:00am Mrs May has put her cards on the table. Now it’s everyone else’s turn | Andrew Rawnsley
The prime minister has made her choices. Others will have to take responsibility for fateful decisions of their own The eye is supposed to be the calmest place in a storm. Weird as this may seem, the most tranquil person in British politics this weekend is probably Theresa May. This is not the same as saying that she is in a good place. Bits of her government keep falling off, like a decaying gothic folly shedding masonry. Even discounting for the tendency of the Brexit ultras to brag up their strength, a full-frontal attempt to oust her is more likely than at any time in her beleaguered premiership. A confidence ballot of Tory MPs could happen as early as this week.
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Switzerland has been a lab for toxic rightwing politics. We took that on | Flavia Kleiner 15 Nov 12:38pm Switzerland has been a lab for toxic rightwing politics. We took that on | Flavia Kleiner
The Swiss People’s party used referendums to deploy its anti-migrant, anti-EU rhetoric. That’s where our movement startedFour years ago, along with some friends, I started a grassroots liberal democratic movement in Switzerland called
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Brexit: Rees-Mogg calls for vote of no confidence in May as ministers resign – Politics live 15 Nov 12:21pm Updated Brexit: Rees-Mogg calls for vote of no confidence in May as ministers resign – Politics live
May addresses MPs amid resignations following cabinet’s decision to support draft version of Brexit deal
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Brexit: May hit by two cabinet resignations as Raab and McVey quit over plan – Politics live 15 Nov 8:35am Updated Brexit: May hit by two cabinet resignations as Raab and McVey quit over plan – Politics live
May addresses MPs amid resignations following cabinet’s decision to support draft version of Brexit deal
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Brexit: May hit by two cabinet resignations as Raab and McVey quit over plan - Politics live 15 Nov 7:55am Updated Brexit: May hit by two cabinet resignations as Raab and McVey quit over plan - Politics live
May addresses MPs amid resignations following cabinet’s decision to support draft version of Brexit deal
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May hit by two cabinet resignations as Raab and McVey quit over Brexit plan - Politics live 15 Nov 5:23am Updated May hit by two cabinet resignations as Raab and McVey quit over Brexit plan - Politics live
May will address MPs today after cabinet agreed to support draft version during tense five-hour meeting
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Russian trolls prey on the toxic way we do our politics | Rafael Behr 13 Nov 1:00am Russian trolls prey on the toxic way we do our politics | Rafael Behr
The Kremlin’s target is not the outcome of specific votes, such as for Brexit or the US presidency, but to divide the west To understand the current political frenzy on both sides of the Atlantic, it helps to know
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The Guardian view on May’s Brexit: a meaningless deal will not pass a meaningful vote | Editorial 12 Nov 1:45pm The Guardian view on May’s Brexit: a meaningless deal will not pass a meaningful vote | Editorial
The prime minister is inviting chaos with a Brexit proposal that cannot command a majority in parliamentIn the two years since the nation voted to leave the European Union, the Conservative party has consistently put politics before country by failing to come forward with a credible Brexit plan. The Tories have also failed to resolve the questions about inequality and powerlessness that were thrown up in too many parts of the country by the poll in June 2016. Instead we have had Theresa May conduct months of parallel negotiations – one set at home and one abroad – to get to a position where this country’s long-term post-Brexit relationship with the EU remains a riddle
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Why political books for kids are more popular than ever – and six you should definitely read 12 Nov 11:39am Why political books for kids are more popular than ever – and six you should definitely read
Children’s literature with a political message was once frowned upon, but now it’s everywhere, with authors writing about everything from eco-socialism to redistribution All children’s books are political, because everything is: to walk the under-fives through a gallery of girls in pink who are waiting for a prince is easily as strident as any of the more delicate messages about human intercourse you might find in a Michael Rosen book. Yet children’s literature with a progressive political bent was traditionally frowned upon – often held to be “politicising”, and thereby exploiting the malleable young mind. That has been turned on its head. It’s not so much that authors don’t recognise the politics in their own work; rather that they have decided, en masse, that the miniatures are ready for it. This is discernible both in newly bold, explicit messages – from eco-socialism to trade unionism to racial diversity – and in the cast of characters, fore and background: a recent US study found that, in 2017, a quarter of kids’ protagonists were not white, up from 14% the year before. It’s not new, of course – Dr Seuss was speaking for the trees before anyone even believed in climate change (The Lorax, anyone?) – but it is everywhere.
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The Guardian view on Mrs May’s Brexit: blocked by naysayers | Editorial 9 Nov 12:32pm The Guardian view on Mrs May’s Brexit: blocked by naysayers | Editorial
The prime minister has squandered opportunities to build bridges across parliament and is now paying a heavy priceIt is an unwritten rule of politics in Northern Ireland that everything proceeds from the word “no”. The establishment of trust in the dialogue that led eventually to the Good Friday agreement was a slow and meticulous business. The Democratic Unionist party never endorsed that deal, which is relevant to the difficulty Theresa May now has in persuading parliament to vote for any Brexit plan she might agree in Brussels. At the heart of the impasse is a historical fact that the leave campaign shamefully belittled: the Good Friday agreement was possible because both the UK and the Republic of Ireland were EU members. Brexit
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My kids have started school – and are giving me a lesson in class politics | Emma Brockes 9 Nov 10:12am My kids have started school – and are giving me a lesson in class politics | Emma Brockes
While the children usually resolve their disputes by the end of the day, we parents look at one another with murder in our eyesTwo and a half months ago, when my kids started school, I imagined the biggest challenge would be socialisation. At nursery they’d had “friends” in the way it might be imagined slow-moving animals in a field have friends – which is to say animals doing the same thing as them but several feet over there. At school, by contrast, they have to choose whom to sit with. And so the rigmarole of popularity begins. What I hadn’t realised was how much this process was going to involve me. The socialisation – or rather resocialisation of parents who experienced classroom politics approximately 300 years ago, and have to rapidly dust off the machinery – has been shocking. I am 42, and, like everyone else of that age, screen my calls, ignore my voicemail, use my children to get out of doing things I don’t want to do, and am extremely agile at avoiding those I dislike. Well, those days are over. In the interests of protecting my children’s social life, all of a sudden I have to play nice.
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Prince Charles is like a Shakespeare character – just not the one he thinks | Sian Cain 8 Nov 1:43pm Prince Charles is like a Shakespeare character – just not the one he thinks | Sian Cain
The Prince of Wales likened himself to Prince Hal, but he’s more like the high-rolling Richard IIJust as children like to pretend to be kings and queens, so royals love to flatter their own self-image. In the BBC’s documentary to mark his 70th birthday this week, Prince Charles invoked Shakespeare’s laddish take on Prince Hal to pooh-pooh the idea that as king he’d continue meddling in politics and bothering ministers with his thoughts. As an ageing prince, he has of course spent decades doing just that. “You can’t be the same as the sovereign if you’re the Prince of Wales or the heir,” Charles observed. “But the idea somehow that I’m going to go on in exactly the same way if I have to succeed is complete nonsense because the two situations are completely different. You only have to look at Shakespeare plays, Henry V or Henry IV Parts I and II, to see the change that can take place. Because if you become the sovereign then you play the role in the way that it is expected.”
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Populism, Trump and the US midterms – Politics Weekly podcast 8 Nov 11:53am Populism, Trump and the US midterms – Politics Weekly podcast
Pippa Crerar is joined by Gary Younge, Matthew Goodwin, Stephen Booth and Rafael Behr to discuss the results of the US midterms, and what the results mean for the tide of national populism around the world It was a tale of two chambers: in Tuesday’s US midterms the Democrats’ so-called ‘blue wave’ won the House of Representatives, while Republicans expanded their majority in the Senate. So how bad were the results for Donald Trump? And in the wake of the midterm results, we discuss whether national populism is on the wane. Is populism a last protest vote from an ageing electorate, or is it more than that?
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David Cameron, get back in your shepherd’s hut. Your legacy is done | Marina Hyde 2 Nov 12:42pm David Cameron, get back in your shepherd’s hut. Your legacy is done | Marina Hyde
The former prime minister was said to be planning a political comeback. The only possible response is hahahahahaha“David Cameron eyes return to frontline politics.” God, why couldn’t that sentence stop after the word frontline? Why does “politics” have to ruin everything? I suppose it’s because Cameron is more of the type who’d have been drinking wine back at the chateau in the first world war. “We’re right behind you!” brays General Melchett at Baldrick on the eve of
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David Cameron wants to return to politics. It’s a shame he has so little to offer | Owen Jones 2 Nov 8:04am David Cameron wants to return to politics. It’s a shame he has so little to offer | Owen Jones
The worst prime minister in 200 years has no talent or ability. But he does have a colossal sense of his own entitlement
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The Roots of Political Polarization 1 Nov 6:27pm The Roots of Political Polarization
Our politics seem to be degenerating because we no longer understand each other’s priorities.
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Finally, the Tories are discovering the state can be a force for good | Martin Kettle 1 Nov 2:00am Finally, the Tories are discovering the state can be a force for good | Martin Kettle
The party has been gripped by the ghost of Thatcher. But as this week’s budget shows, many MPs still believe in the role of government According to WH Auden, all good dramas consist of two contrasting acts: “First, the making of a mistake; then, the discovery that it was a mistake.” A similar corrective arc often also applies in politics. On the issue of the progressive role of the state, the late-20th-century Conservative party made a historic mistake. Now it is struggling with the dawning of discovery. The single most obvious thing to say about the Tory party in autumn 2018 is that it is split over
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The Many Faces of Jew-Hatred 31 Oct 6:38pm The Many Faces of Jew-Hatred
Anti-Semitism is a politics of misdirected blame. Today its most frequent target is the state of Israel.
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Merkel’s exit will leave a gaping hole in centrist politics | Rafael Behr 30 Oct 2:00am Merkel’s exit will leave a gaping hole in centrist politics | Rafael Behr
The German chancellor has been a torch-bearer for civilised values. Liberal democracy needs more figures like her
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The election hackers are back – and they’re starting with the US midterms | PW Singer and Emerson Brooking 26 Oct 8:03am The election hackers are back – and they’re starting with the US midterms | PW Singer and Emerson Brooking
The disrupters and their ‘like wars’ are more sophisticated than ever, as they target elections on both grand and local scalesWhether it is in the movies, media or politics, discussions of election security typically focus on the sexy story of
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The October Surprise Arrives 25 Oct 1:14pm Updated The October Surprise Arrives
The politics of the migrant caravan sound a lot like the Kavanaugh nomination fiasco.
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Trump Flunks Fed Politics 24 Oct 7:25pm Trump Flunks Fed Politics
Bashing Jay Powell makes it harder to keep interest rates low.
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The Politics of Pipe Bombs 24 Oct 7:21pm The Politics of Pipe Bombs
All those who choose violence need to be held accountable.
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Letters: Denzil Davies obituary 24 Oct 10:47am Letters: Denzil Davies obituary
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/oct/15/denzil-davies-obituary" title="">Denzil Davies
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My constituents backed Brexit. But I didn’t enter politics to make them poorer | Phil Wilson 23 Oct 4:30am My constituents backed Brexit. But I didn’t enter politics to make them poorer | Phil Wilson
Now we know what leaving means, let’s do the right thing and have a second referendumIn normal times and in all good faith, politicians at a general election present a manifesto they believe will improve people’s lives. Politicians of a like mind will largely agree with that manifesto, believing it to be better than the alternative. In government, with all good intentions, the manifesto is implemented – maybe not in its entirety and with compromises being made. That is politics, in normal times. But these are not normal times. Brexit is different. As an MP who campaigned for Remain during the EU referendum in June 2016, I do not believe I can, in all good faith and with all good intentions, tell my electorate that I have changed my mind. First, my constituents won’t believe me. And second, I did not enter politics to knowingly make my constituents poorer. This presents a moral dilemma for Remain-supporting MPs, especially those whose constituents voted to leave.
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The Guardian view on the Tories and Brexit: rage against the facts | Editorial 22 Oct 1:43pm The Guardian view on the Tories and Brexit: rage against the facts | Editorial
If Theresa May wants to deliver a Brexit deal, she must compromise with the EU and with the majority in the Commons. That’s why Tory rightwingers are so angryTo observe the Conservative party at Westminster on Monday was to watch a party that seems closer than ever to falling apart over Brexit. Paradoxically, however, nothing in the politics of Britain’s planned departure from the European Union had actually changed since last week. Theresa May still leads a minority government and a divided party, as she did before the weekend. Talks with the EU remain stalled over the
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The Guardian view on taming technology: it’s out of control | Editorial 21 Oct 1:02pm The Guardian view on taming technology: it’s out of control | Editorial
Technology’s power to manipulate minds and emotions may be too much for societyCan even a man with Nick Clegg’s record of unblemished political success rescue Facebook’s reputation? There is an awful symmetry in Sir Nick’s move from British politics to Facebook. In his earlier career, he stood for a posture of responsibility without power, of careless promises to which he was later held by an unforgiving electorate. In his new one there will be more of the same. Facebook too has a long record of cheap rhetoric about democracy and bringing people together – alongside a record of acting as a tool for destabilising democracies and in some cases for the encouragement of
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White identity is meaningless. Real dignity is found in shared hopes | Kenan Malik 21 Oct 1:00am White identity is meaningless. Real dignity is found in shared hopes | Kenan Malik
Demographics cannot make sense of unrest. Social context is key to understanding‘It’s dignity, stupid.” Where once economic wellbeing was seen as key to winning electoral support, there is now recognition that more intangible qualities matter too – the ability to be heard, to live in meaningful communities, to possess self-worth. The acceptance that values and social connectedness matter is welcome. The danger, though, is that concern with dignity is becoming as rigid as was that with economic security. In this age of identity politics, dignity is all too often reduced to the public affirmation of ethnic or cultural identity.
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I’m joining Facebook to build bridges between politics and tech | Nick Clegg 19 Oct 11:28am I’m joining Facebook to build bridges between politics and tech | Nick Clegg
It’s time we harnessed big tech to the cause of progress and optimism. I believe that Facebook can lead the wayNext week it will be
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The benefits ‘freeze’ is robbing our poorest families. Where’s the outrage? | James Ball 19 Oct 7:30am The benefits ‘freeze’ is robbing our poorest families. Where’s the outrage? | James Ball
The worst-off families in the UK face further hardship – yet no one in politics or the media has their cornerNext year, more than 10.4m UK households – more than one in three – will be left
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California Public Employees Vote Against Pension-Fund Activism 18 Oct 7:07pm California Public Employees Vote Against Pension-Fund Activism
Playing politics with other people’s savings is never popular.
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Populism is not the whole story – European politics is rewiring itself | Cas Mudde 18 Oct 9:40am Populism is not the whole story – European politics is rewiring itself | Cas Mudde
Don’t be distracted by ‘earthquakes’ in recent elections. Swings to the far right or left are only one part of the bigger pictureAfter months of speculation about a
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Has the time come for remainers to compromise? | Martin Kettle 17 Oct 1:41pm Has the time come for remainers to compromise? | Martin Kettle
While the focus has been on how Tory backbenchers will vote on a Brexit deal, pro-Europeans on the opposition benches will face a crucial dilemma tooFor politicians, compromise can be a surprisingly hard word. So it is today over the Brexit endgame. The talk is still of crashing out, no deals and blood red lines. But this is paradoxical. Politics, like life itself, is mostly built on compromises. That is why the Brexit sherpas are, in fact, still talking in Brussels and London. Even on Brexit, it remains likelier than not that the practical human instinct to compromise will eventually have its way. This is not, though, the certainty it ought logically to be. Brexit is not simply another political process to be settled through compromise. To many, it is also a series of absolutes. One is that Britain’s vote to leave the European Union was not just decisive but the immutable will of an entire people that cannot be questioned – or compromised. A second, never properly understood in Westminster, is that the EU sees leaving as a treaty process governed by rules that cannot be bent.
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MPs have forgotten the victims in the Commons bullying row | Rafael Behr 17 Oct 7:24am MPs have forgotten the victims in the Commons bullying row | Rafael Behr
In their unseemly haste to name and shame alleged bullies, too many politicians are ignoring those who have spoken outThere are always gaps in politics between what is known and what is declared. It is not a secret, for example, that many Conservative MPs despise John Bercow, the Commons Speaker. Bercow’s views on Brexit are not a mystery either. He dislikes it. It is also known, but theoretically unrelated, that some MPs are tyrants.
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How Donald Trump weaponised Pocahontas in a new identity war | Afua Hirsch 16 Oct 1:57pm How Donald Trump weaponised Pocahontas in a new identity war | Afua Hirsch
Senator Elizabeth Warren, a presidential hopeful, revealed that she has Native American roots. It was an unwise moveThe problem I have with “identity politics” is that it’s a phrase mostly used by people who don’t name their identities, against those who do. We all have identities, after all, and in racialised societies like this one it’s ethnic minorities who are guilty of playing “identity politics” for having the audacity to own, articulate or organise around that experience. Meanwhile the majority, who have the luxury of regarding their identities as normal, neutral and invisible, have always mobilised politically around class, region, and whiteness. But that’s not identity politics, that’s just politics, right?
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15 Oct 3:59pm Updated Did Elizabeth Warren Just Kill Identity Politics?
If the Massachusetts senator is now a person of color then the term has no meaning.
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What’s the point of growth if it creates so much misery? | Lynsey Hanley 15 Oct 1:00am What’s the point of growth if it creates so much misery? | Lynsey Hanley
Forget the ‘high-skill, hi-tech’ obsession: we should invest in everyday services to create a society run for collective goodThe late Prof Mick Moran, who taught politics and government at Manchester University for most of his professional life, had, according to his colleagues, once had “a certain residual respect for our governing elites”. That all changed during the 2008 financial crisis, after which he experienced an epiphany “because it convinced him that the officer class in business and in politics did not know what it was doing”. After his epiphany, Moran formed a collective of academics dedicated to exposing the complacency of finance-worship and to replacing it with an idea of running modern economies focused on maximising social good. They called themselves the Foundational Economy Collective, based on the idea that it’s in the everyday economy where there is most potential for true social regeneration: not top-down cash-splashing, but renewal and replenishment from the ground upwards.
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Three years of Labour under Jeremy Corbyn has changed British politics | Gary Younge 13 Oct 1:00am Three years of Labour under Jeremy Corbyn has changed British politics | Gary Younge
Those who call his leadership a cult fail to understand Labour’s invigorated base. The Tories could learn from this During May’s local elections, Ilford Conservative party printed and distributed a leaflet
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Universal credit? If Iain Duncan Smith is an architect of anything, it’s misery | Marina Hyde 12 Oct 1:11pm Universal credit? If Iain Duncan Smith is an architect of anything, it’s misery | Marina Hyde
Only a dangerous politician favours simple fixes to complex problems – they have a way of causing hardship to millionsIf you were looking for the most wantonly sarcastic epithet in British politics, you might well alight on “Iain Duncan Smith, the architect of universal credit”. It’s basically impossible to say out loud without putting “architect” in air quotes. I know we shouldn’t underestimate the determination of a
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Corbyn’s right. It’s not as simple as having ‘pride’ or ‘shame’ in our history | David Wearing 12 Oct 5:24am Corbyn’s right. It’s not as simple as having ‘pride’ or ‘shame’ in our history | David Wearing
From Brexit to military interventions, Britain’s empire casts a long shadow. It’s past time for a grownup conversation about itAt the root of so much that is poisonous in British politics and society lies a simple, common theme. Behind racism and xenophobia, the resurgence of the far right, the
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How would Corbynism work in government? Here’s a clue | Aditya Chakrabortty 10 Oct 1:00am How would Corbynism work in government? Here’s a clue | Aditya Chakrabortty
The small story of a battle over a market in the borough of Haringey has major lessons for anyone hoping for a radical alternativeWhat will a Corbyn government actually do? Brexit aside, British politics has no bigger known unknown. The prospect fills the rich with fear and the left with hope. Both sides assume that Prime Minister Jeremy Corbyn will be defined by his radicalism, yet in one corner of Britain an arm of the state is already ruling in his name. And the early results are sobering. In the north London borough of Haringey, the Blairite council leadership was
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We’ve launched a migrant rescue ship to resist the racist right in Italy | Michael Hardt and Sandro Mezzadra 9 Oct 5:05am We’ve launched a migrant rescue ship to resist the racist right in Italy | Michael Hardt and Sandro Mezzadra
This mission is not only about providing humanitarian aid but protesting against the toxic politics of Italy, Europe and the USWe are part of an activist project that launched the
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Pleased by a show of jazz hands (or boos) | Letters 7 Oct 1:11pm Pleased by a show of jazz hands (or boos) | Letters
Rise of populism | Identity politics | Clapping | Dating | Paying the ferrymanJohn Green (
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John Paul Schumer 5 Oct 1:11pm John Paul Schumer
The former Justice plays last-minute confirmation politics.
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It comes as no shock that the powerful hate ‘identity politics’ | Gary Younge 5 Oct 1:00am It comes as no shock that the powerful hate ‘identity politics’ | Gary Younge
The right denigrates equal rights campaigns as ‘grievances’ while cornering the market in victimhood Given the political volatility, economic precarity and environmental catastrophe that blight this current moment, there is every reason to be concerned about the durability of modern democracy. Donald Trump, Brexit, growing inequality, melting ice caps, stagnant wages, trade wars, actual wars, immigrants left to die in the sea, all while fascists and their sympathisers sit in government. The threats are everywhere. Some, however, are apparently more obvious than others. The last two weeks have produced the following headlines: “
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Banging your head over Brexit? Despite all the fury, we have to stay engaged | Simon Jenkins 4 Oct 1:56pm Banging your head over Brexit? Despite all the fury, we have to stay engaged | Simon Jenkins
If we really have to leave the EU, voters must force MPs to come together on the things that matterDear Mariella, I have a problem. I can’t stand any more Brexit. I tear up newspapers. I scream and dive for the TV off button. I have already smashed one radio. I crouch in a foetal position, banging my head against the wall. I fear my wife will leave me. And politics is my business. What can I do?
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This is insecurity Britain. Labour and the Tories are racing to connect with it | Phillip Blond 4 Oct 11:54am This is insecurity Britain. Labour and the Tories are racing to connect with it | Phillip Blond
People are crying out for economic justice and cultural security. Whoever grasps this will control the immediate political futurePolitical parties are governed by ideology. That ideology works when it offers the best explanation of reality to the party’s activists, members and voters. But when reality shifts – when the experience of people is no longer legitimated or explained by the politics they are offered – then that party and that ideology are in mortal danger. At the close of this autumn’s party conference season, it is clear we are in the middle of a significant reframing of our political reality. The shift is probably equal to, if not greater than, the 1945 moment that founded
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Our cult of personality is leaving real life in the shade | George Monbiot 3 Oct 1:00am Our cult of personality is leaving real life in the shade | George Monbiot
By reducing politics to a celebrity obsession – from Boris to Trump to Corbyn – the media misdirects and confuses us What kind of people would you expect the newspapers to interview most? Those with the most to say, perhaps, or maybe those with the richest and weirdest experiences. Might it be philosophers, or detectives, or doctors working in war zones, refugees, polar scientists, street children, firefighters, base jumpers, activists, writers or free divers? No. It’s actors. I haven’t conducted an empirical study, but I would guess that between a third and a half of the major interviews in the newspapers feature people who make their living by adopting someone else’s persona and speaking someone else’s words. This is such a bizarre phenomenon that, if it hadn’t crept up on us slowly, we would surely find it astounding. But it seems to me symbolic of the way the media works. Its problem runs deeper than fake news. What it offers is news about a fake world.
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A Few Steps Toward a Steadier U.S. Politics 2 Oct 6:37pm A Few Steps Toward a Steadier U.S. Politics
The Kavanaugh crisis shows the need to restore bipartisanship and lower the stakes.
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The Guardian view on Javid and Johnson: what’s the Conservative future? | Editorial 2 Oct 1:46pm The Guardian view on Javid and Johnson: what’s the Conservative future? | Editorial
Two men with ambitions for the leadership addressed the Tory party conference todayTwo of the biggest names in Conservative politics took to the stage today and presented contrasting views of the future of the Tory party. Neither was a liberal speech. Sajid Javid’s peroration at least had the virtue of being serious.
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The Guardian view on a Conservative crisis: one of the Tories’ own making | Editorial 30 Sep 1:38pm The Guardian view on a Conservative crisis: one of the Tories’ own making | Editorial
The 2016 Brexit vote has exposed divisive contradictions at the heart of the ruling party. But its roots lie in the disruptive form of globalisation promoted by the Tories and New LabourThe Conservatives’ factional politics are now so monumentally petty that it cannot get a
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Conference will reveal whether the Tories still have the recipe for survival | Andrew Rawnsley 30 Sep 3:00am Conference will reveal whether the Tories still have the recipe for survival | Andrew Rawnsley
Unless the party can once again reinvent itself and produce some fresh ideas that resonate with the public, it is heading towards obsolescenceThis may be extremely hard to believe at the moment, but the British Conservative party is the most enduringly successful force in democratic politics anywhere. Love them, which not many do, or loathe them, as many always have, that is just a fact. The Conservatives have dominated the government of Britain. The party emerged in the 1830s, at a time when steam locomotives were the scary new thing and only very affluent chaps had the vote. Since then, the Conservative party has collided with economic and social movements so powerful that many people, including many Tories themselves, thought they were doomed to disappear. Yet this party originally rooted in reactionary privilege adjusted to universal male suffrage, to women securing the vote and to the transformation of an agrarian economy into an industrial one. It has survived world wars, the retreat from empire and the death of deference. Great winds of change have blown through Britain and there the old Tory party still stands, a gnarled and twisted ancient tree that no one has ever thought pretty, but no one has ever managed to uproot. The Tories are survivors, something that cannot be said for their rivals. Their competitor in the 19th century and early decades of the 20th was the Liberal party. That is now a party with just a dozen MPs, which has been reduced to advertising a vacancy for its leadership in the hope that someone from outside might be interested. With Labour as their main rival, the Tories have won many more times than they have lost. Since 1945, just three leaders of the Labour party – Clement Attlee, Harold Wilson and Tony Blair – have won a general election. Just five have been prime minister. Over the same period, nine Tory leaders have held the job.
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Kavanaugh has revealed the insidious force in global politics: toxic masculinity | Jonathan Freedland 29 Sep 1:00am Kavanaugh has revealed the insidious force in global politics: toxic masculinity | Jonathan Freedland
A swaggering machismo. A sense of male entitlement. But the instincts of the supreme court nominee stretch far beyond the partisan battles of WashingtonWhen Donald Trump speaks the truth, it’s usually by accident. A choice example came late on last night, after TV audiences in the US and around the world were riveted by the sight of Trump’s choice for the supreme court ranting and raving, his face twisted in fury, as he insisted he was innocent of the sexual assault that had just been detailed in calm, precise terms by Christine Blasey Ford. “Judge Kavanaugh showed America exactly why I nominated him,”
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Time to Put Down the Bong, Elon 28 Sep 7:00pm Time to Put Down the Bong, Elon
Tesla’s CEO needs to steer the car maker toward a future that doesn’t depend on green politics.
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Confirm Brett Kavanaugh 27 Sep 6:59pm Confirm Brett Kavanaugh
The Judge rightly called out the politics of ‘search and destroy.’
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The Guardian view on US politics: no hearing for women | Editorial 27 Sep 1:41pm The Guardian view on US politics: no hearing for women | Editorial
Christine Blasey Ford raised profound doubts over Brett Kavanaugh’s suitability for a lifetime seat on the US’s highest court. But these Republicans do not listen to womenCan you trust women? This is the question at the heart of Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the supreme court. It was evident long before Thursday’s
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Labour backing a second referendum shows democracy is working beautifully | Zoe Williams 25 Sep 1:00pm Labour backing a second referendum shows democracy is working beautifully | Zoe Williams
It was a messy process to get there. But the party’s new Brexit stance is the product of grassroots decision-makingPeople always say politics is ugly to watch up close, and they’re talking about the cynicism and manipulation, the treachery, the low cunning beneath the high rhetoric. Democracy in action is ugly in a different way, more like a jumble sale: mess, chaos, mountains of tedium, elbows everywhere. You have to stay alert because you know that underneath the polyester there’s something – not wishing to overextend an analogy, let’s call it
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The Politics of Destruction 24 Sep 7:31pm The Politics of Destruction
A second Kavanaugh accuser betrays the Democratic strategy of character assassination.
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The Guardian view on Labour: Brexit and the economy are the key tests | Editorial 23 Sep 1:35pm The Guardian view on Labour: Brexit and the economy are the key tests | Editorial
Labour is emphatically Jeremy Corbyn’s party, but shadow chancellor John McDonnell may make the most important speech of the weekAs the old political adage puts it: “Oppositions don’t win elections; governments lose them.” Many of the dynamics of British politics in 2018 would seem to bear this out. The Conservatives are bungling Brexit big time. The prime minister’s authority is shot. And the Tory conference next week could be a bloodbath. If the adage is right, therefore, then the Labour party may be tempted to spend the next three days in Liverpool avoiding needless mistakes and basking in the advent of a Jeremy Corbyn government. That would be a complacent mistake. For one thing, Commons arithmetic and the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act make an early election
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Whoops – there go the railways, says Westminster’s answer to Mr Bean | Ian Birrell 20 Sep 12:17pm Whoops – there go the railways, says Westminster’s answer to Mr Bean | Ian Birrell
With his history of bumbling ministerial ineptitude, the sooner Chris Grayling’s cabinet career hits the buffers the betterImagine you were running a business and one of your senior managers left a trail of disaster in their wake. First, you would investigate to see what had gone wrong in each case. And then, if you found the same person was responsible for repeated failures, you might either dismiss them or, if feeling generous, put them in charge of the paper clips. But as the hapless career of Chris Grayling proves, they do things differently in government. Grayling is a nice guy. No doubt he means well. But when it comes to politics, he seems utterly clueless and shamelessly incompetent as he lurches from job to job, leaving others to clear up his chaos.
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The Guardian view on clean air zones: cities must be bold | Editorial 18 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on clean air zones: cities must be bold | Editorial
As evidence about the harmful effects of pollution mounts, mayors need to take action to reduce emissions and improve healthThe slogan “Think global, act local”, popular among environmentalists since the 1970s, is apt when applied to the politics of air. While pollution by greenhouse gases, chiefly CO
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Liberalism needs to be rebuilt – just not by the Lib Dems | Rafael Behr 18 Sep 1:00am Liberalism needs to be rebuilt – just not by the Lib Dems | Rafael Behr
Insurgent forces of the far left and right have resulted in a hollowing-out of centre politics. But Vince Cable’s tribe is not up to filling the voidIf it is true that failure makes a great teacher, the Liberal Democrats must know a lot about British politics. Currently they are learning about Brexit by failing to capitalise on the votes of millions of remainers, despite being England’s most pro-European mainstream party. In 2016 support for EU membership was 48%, yet the Lib Dems struggle to reach double digits in opinion polls. That reflects another failure: at a time when Jeremy Corbyn has taken Labour radically to the left, and Theresa May’s agenda is dictated by the fanatical right, there must be room for a party of mainstream moderation. But
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Here’s the science behind the Brexit vote and Trump’s rise | Michele Gelfand 17 Sep 1:00am Here’s the science behind the Brexit vote and Trump’s rise | Michele Gelfand
My research shows that when people feel threatened they want ‘tighter’ social norms, with profound consequences for politics What is the essential dividing line between human beings around the world? The one between the haves and the have-nots? East and west, rural and urban, secular and religious? Or maybe globalists and nationalists – a split purported to explain Putin, Brexit and the rise of Trump? These divisions are all significant, but none provide a consistent way of understanding differences observed from antiquity to the present day, in everything from international relations to relations in our homes. My research across hundreds of communities suggests that the fundamental driver of difference is not ideological, financial or geographical – it’s cultural. Behaviour, it turns out, depends a lot on whether the culture in which we live is a “tight” or “loose” one.
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Shocked by Brexit, we launched the first pan-European progressive movement | Colombe Cahen-Salvador 5 Sep 1:00am Shocked by Brexit, we launched the first pan-European progressive movement | Colombe Cahen-Salvador
The vote to leave the EU made me take action. We now have Volt, a party offering a different kind of politics Before Brexit I never thought deeply about Europe. I benefited from the European Union, studied its shortcomings and achievements, yet it had always seemed to be a given. But 23 June 2016 changed everything. On the morning of Britain’s vote to leave the EU I was on the phone to my partner, Andrea Venzon, and felt devastated. I grew up in France and studied law in the UK. Andrea and I had always planned to move to London some day. It just made sense: I’m French, he’s Italian, and we’d first met there. We represent the generation who have been able to study across Europe as part of the
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Rough Social Justice at Evergreen State 22 May 7:05pm Rough Social Justice at Evergreen State
The Washington college’s enrollment plummets as even the left sours on protest-mob politics.
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Suffer the Little Children 22 May 6:59pm Suffer the Little Children
Philadelphia sacrifices Catholic foster services to identity politics.
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We can stop Brexit. But we’ll need some help from across the Channel | Timothy Garton Ash 5 Jan 1:00am We can stop Brexit. But we’ll need some help from across the Channel | Timothy Garton Ash
Nothing is impossible in modern politics. But if so many Europeans really want Britain to stay in the EU, they need to find their voices nowThis is the year to stop Brexit. There will not be another chance. If by the end of this year the British parliament has approved a transition agreement with the 27 other members of the EU, including the framework for a
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It’s a mistake to sneer at centrists. Adonis’s stand on Brexit shows why | Matthew d’Ancona 31 Dec 2017, 11:05am It’s a mistake to sneer at centrists. Adonis’s stand on Brexit shows why | Matthew d’Ancona
Liberal politics is out of fashion, but the former transport secretary’s trenchant intervention reminds us it has real muscle Bravo, Andrew Adonis: the final transformation of this mild-mannered policy wonk into battling anti-Brexiter is a fitting way to end a year no less defiant of prophecy than 2016. And rather a cheering one, as it happens. In truth, the former Labour transport secretary and No 10 policy chief has been steadily morphing from bookworm to kick-ass over the last 18 months, his interventions growing more trenchant, his cerebral manner increasingly matched by a taste for action.
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The political kaleidoscope has been shaken and will be again | Andrew Rawnsley 30 Dec 2017, 7:05pm The political kaleidoscope has been shaken and will be again | Andrew Rawnsley
Mrs May was undone by hubris. Labour risks repeating the Tory mistake of taking the electorate for grantedThe clear lesson from 2017 concerns what you should do if you are the conservative prime minister of a tea-drinking nation who is faced with divisive constitutional questions at the same time as the largest opposition party appears to be in total disarray. Obviously – this is a no-brainer really – you should exploit your advantage and call a snap election. Well, that was the lesson from the politics of Japan.
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In 2017, Markets Rose Above Politics 29 Dec 2017, 3:58pm Updated In 2017, Markets Rose Above Politics
In the face of crisis, Polish and Korean stocks soared more than 40%—even faster than in the U.S.
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‘Trumpism’ is ingrained in white America. When he goes, it will remain | Cas Mudde 28 Dec 2017, 7:16am ‘Trumpism’ is ingrained in white America. When he goes, it will remain | Cas Mudde
The Republican party’s radicalised base will outlast their current leader. The sooner we realise this, the sooner we can find a solutionThe author Tom Wolfe once wrote: “The dark night of fascism is always descending in the United States and yet lands only in Europe.” He was reflecting a consensus, shared by public and scholars alike, that far right politics is a European phenomenon, at odds with “American values”. It is a conviction so deeply held that it has left the US blind to reality. Any example of far-right politics is explained away as exceptional, not representative of the “real” America, from “lone wolf” terrorists such as the Oklahoma City bomber
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Remembering Those Who Died in 2017 27 Dec 2017, 6:18pm Remembering Those Who Died in 2017
We lost some greats from the worlds of politics, media, sports and the military.
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The Handmaid’s Tale held a mirror up to a year of Trump | Matthew d’Ancona 26 Dec 2017, 4:00am The Handmaid’s Tale held a mirror up to a year of Trump | Matthew d’Ancona
Margaret Atwood’s ingenious dystopia, serialised on TV this year, prefigured the US president’s misogyny – and the #MeToo fightbackIn politics and culture, the year 2017 was the opposite of Where’s Wally? The question, instead, was always Where Isn’t Trump? All roads – public debate, private argument, artistic endeavour – seemed eventually to lead in his squalid direction; his gravitational pull irresistible, his fleshy presence horribly ubiquitous.
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Next Year in Jerusalem 22 Dec 2017, 6:13pm Next Year in Jerusalem
The U.N. reveals the depth of its anti-U.S., anti-Israel politics.
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Damian Green’s fall shows that politics needs cleaning up, but so does the web | Martin Kettle 21 Dec 2017, 12:51pm Damian Green’s fall shows that politics needs cleaning up, but so does the web | Martin Kettle
The disgraced politician was sacked for lying about porn on his computer. But we would all be better off without access to such demeaning materialTo lose one cabinet minister in two months may be regarded as a misfortune. To lose two may look like carelessness. To lose three strongly suggests downright incompetence. Yet as
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May says she wants investigation into release of Damian Green information – Politics live 21 Dec 2017, 11:34am Updated May says she wants investigation into release of Damian Green information – Politics live
Prime minister flies to Poland after third cabinet departure in two months creates further headache for government
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Damian Green qualifies for £17,000 pay-off, Cabinet Office confirms – Politics live 21 Dec 2017, 9:55am Updated Damian Green qualifies for £17,000 pay-off, Cabinet Office confirms – Politics live
Prime minister flies to Poland after third cabinet departure in two months creates further headache for government
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Damian Green was sacked because he lied, says Jeremy Hunt – Politics live 21 Dec 2017, 8:49am Updated Damian Green was sacked because he lied, says Jeremy Hunt – Politics live
Prime minister flies to Poland after third cabinet departure in two months creates further headache for government
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Damian Green sacking prompts new trouble for Theresa May – politics live 21 Dec 2017, 3:24am Updated Damian Green sacking prompts new trouble for Theresa May – politics live
Prime minister flies to Poland after third cabinet departure in two months creates further headache for government
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Identity Politics Began in the American Revolution 15 Dec 2017, 6:51pm Identity Politics Began in the American Revolution
Can a politician represent constituents of drastically different backgrounds? It’s a very old question.
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After this week, I refuse to believe that Brexit is unstoppable | Martin Kettle 15 Dec 2017, 1:00am After this week, I refuse to believe that Brexit is unstoppable | Martin Kettle
The government’s Commons defeat opens up new and far-reaching possibilities – of a second referendum and of the leaving process coming off the rails Appearances matter a lot in politics. But in the end, the numbers matter more. On Brexit as on everything else, Theresa May has always behaved as if she is a prime minister with a clear parliamentary majority, a united party and a reconciled country behind her. But the reality is that she is none of these things, and
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Labour isn’t flip-flopping on Brexit – this is practical politics | Maya Goodfellow 12 Dec 2017, 7:58am Labour isn’t flip-flopping on Brexit – this is practical politics | Maya Goodfellow
While the prime minister has been muddying the EU waters, Jeremy Corbyn has been busy forming relationships in BrusselsFor some, Labour can do no right on Brexit. The party has a clear, adaptable position – but in recent days it has, somewhat predictably, been accused of being ambiguous. The party wants “
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Haringey council taken over by Momentum? It’s just locals taking back control | Aditya Chakrabortty 12 Dec 2017, 1:00am Haringey council taken over by Momentum? It’s just locals taking back control | Aditya Chakrabortty
This isn’t a hard left plot: Labour members simply opposed a council that handed its assets to private interests and turfed poor people out of their homes I’ve just been reading about the most terrifying place. For weeks, this “toxic” neighbourhood with its “poisonous” atmosphere has been all over the front pages and columns. It’s a land of revolutionary politics, of “ruthless attacks” and “purges”. Hordes of Trotskyists reportedly roam its high streets – like wildebeest, if they only swapped the majesty of the Serengeti for suburban pound shops. It sounds, frankly, dreadful. It also happens to be right next door to where I was born and raised. Indeed, it’s where I’ve spent much of the past year reporting, on exactly the local politics that now jostles news of Meghan and Harry’s engagement on the front page of the Times. Which is how I know that the fantasies generated by the Murdoch papers and others are just those: a purpose-built media onslaught.
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Just seven words are keeping a Brexit deal afloat for all sides | Gaby Hinsliff 11 Dec 2017, 3:12pm Just seven words are keeping a Brexit deal afloat for all sides | Gaby Hinsliff
Nothing is agreed until everything is agreed, goes the latest meaningless mantra. But sometimes maddening ambiguity is what makes politics workNothing is agreed until everything is agreed. If
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‘Ladydata’ could help solve gender inequalities | Stella Creasy 9 Dec 2017, 7:05pm ‘Ladydata’ could help solve gender inequalities | Stella Creasy
There must be independent assessments of the impact of budget cuts on different groups Benjamin Franklin once argued nothing was certain except death and taxes. Certain they may be, but experience of both is very unequal. While women tend to live longer than men, their pockets are hit much harder when it comes to public revenues. And if one is a matter of physiology, the other is a question of politics. Without data to identify how and why, neither can be addressed. It is now devastatingly clear that seven years of austerity budgets have hindered equality in Britain. Raising the personal tax allowance and the higher rate threshold to £50,000 may be popular, but it helps older white men most of all.
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Steve Bell on Arlene Foster and Theresa May – cartoon 5 Dec 2017, 3:25pm Steve Bell on Arlene Foster and Theresa May – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/commentisfree/picture/2017/dec/05/steve-bell-on-arlene-foster-and-theresa-may-cartoon">Continue reading...
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Integrity in presidential politics? I think it’s extinct | Tim Dowling 5 Dec 2017, 3:24pm Integrity in presidential politics? I think it’s extinct | Tim Dowling
I’ve met Bill Clinton, and been thrown out of Gerald Ford’s elevator. But my favourite was John Anderson, a would-be candidate in 1979. He was my hero At some point in the summer of 1979, I was eating breakfast at a diner with my family, in northern Massachusetts or southern New Hampshire. I can’t be sure: we were halfway through a long drive to Maine, and had spent the night in a motel. A man with white hair and glasses walked up to our table and introduced himself. He asked if he could sit down. This overt display of friendliness, I could tell, alarmed my parents. When he claimed to be running for president, we all exchanged worried glances. But he had badges and stickers with his name on them. John Anderson,
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Shy Tory remainers must find the courage to mutiny too | Rafael Behr 5 Dec 2017, 2:39pm Shy Tory remainers must find the courage to mutiny too | Rafael Behr
Theresa May’s Brexit delusions need to be challenged. But that task shouldn’t all be left to Brussels and DublinEnacting the will of the people turns out to be rather tricky when there are lots of different people with incompatible wills. That is a banal truth of democratic politics that Theresa May avoided for months and finally bumped into in Brussels this week. Even after the opinions of millions who voted to stay in the EU were discounted, the chances of satisfying every one of the leavers’ preferences were nil.
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Martin Rowson on British efforts to get a Brexit-Irish border deal – cartoon 4 Dec 2017, 3:34pm Martin Rowson on British efforts to get a Brexit-Irish border deal – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/commentisfree/picture/2017/dec/04/martin-rowson-on-british-efforts-to-get-a-brexit-irish-border-deal-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on Labour and Brexit: fight for workers’ rights | Editorial 26 Nov 2017, 2:56pm The Guardian view on Labour and Brexit: fight for workers’ rights | Editorial
Social protections can best be upheld through international cooperation. Labour should clearly back the single market and the customs unionBritish politics is polarised on nearly every axis, so it is strange how little conflict there is between Labour and the Conservatives on the biggest issue: the terms of departure from the EU. Jeremy Corbyn’s challenges to Theresa May over Brexit negotiations
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We need new words to explain these curious times. How about ‘coffused’ or ‘procrastinetflix’? | Arwa Mahdawi 26 Nov 2017, 10:00am We need new words to explain these curious times. How about ‘coffused’ or ‘procrastinetflix’? | Arwa Mahdawi
Troubled by conflicting advice over how much coffee to drink, or putting off a deadline with a quick Stranger Things binge? Don’t worry I’ve got the neologisms for you. And plenty more where those came from These days, the world can be very confusing. Technology keeps disrupting everything and politics has become a fast-paced drama full of plot twists. It is no surprise, then, that this brave new world has spawned a bevy of brave new words. From Brexit to Regrexit, from
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A quick UK-US post-Brexit trade deal?Looking at Nafta, that seems unlikely | Randall Mark Wigle 24 Nov 2017, 8:55am A quick UK-US post-Brexit trade deal?Looking at Nafta, that seems unlikely | Randall Mark Wigle
Trump has promised a deal ‘very, very quickly’. If talks proceed as slowly as they are for a revised US agreement with Canada and Mexico, that won’t happenBeing a Canadian sabbatical visitor in the United Kingdom this year has allowed me to witness Brexit politics at close hand. As an economist, I’ve found it fascinating. Some Britons feel that Brexit sets the stage for a
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Cassowaries! Quandongs! Snitty the cassowary hosts the Queensland elections | First Dog on the Moon 24 Nov 2017, 1:42am Cassowaries! Quandongs! Snitty the cassowary hosts the Queensland elections | First Dog on the Moon
What are the issues Queenslanders should consider when voting - other than how terrible politics is and why won’t they all shut up?
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Don’t be fooled by the ‘economicky’ words: this budget is all politics | Victoria Waldersee 23 Nov 2017, 8:03am Don’t be fooled by the ‘economicky’ words: this budget is all politics | Victoria Waldersee
The dominant school of economics has long marketed itself as value-free. But the chancellor should be honest about the ideological nature of his decisionsYou’d think that a leading figure giving their most important speech of the year on what exactly they’re planning on doing with the nation’s money would try to avoid inductive leaps, questionable stats, and a stubborn inability to be open about the fact that their actions are a choice, not a necessity. But when it’s the budget, and your job title is chancellor of the exchequer, it seems like anything goes. It’s not Philip Hammond’s fault (though given he uses “
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Martin Rowson on Brexit developments – cartoon 20 Nov 2017, 2:33pm Martin Rowson on Brexit developments – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/picture/2017/nov/20/martin-rowson-on-brexit-developments">Continue reading...
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What does Germany’s political crisis mean for Brexit? | Martin Kettle 20 Nov 2017, 8:41am What does Germany’s political crisis mean for Brexit? | Martin Kettle
With coalition talks collapsing, Angela Merkel has problems at home to sort. The idea she could magic a Brexit solution favourable to the UK is simply for the birdsThe British political class, like much of the British media, remains foolishly obsessed with America to the exclusion of all other foreign countries. As a result, both refuse to pay consistent attention to German politics, or indeed to the internal politics of any other European country at all. So the news that Angela Merkel may not, after all,
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The Guardian view on climate talks: Brexit’s heavy weather | Editorial 17 Nov 2017, 2:14pm The Guardian view on climate talks: Brexit’s heavy weather | Editorial
If Brexit goes ahead, Britain will need to shape a green politics with devolution and social justice at its core. And make sure that politicians cannot renege on our international obligationsThe tragedy of climate change, as the governor of the Bank of England has put it,
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‘Putting politics above prosperity’ – wait, isn’t that what the Brexiteers are doing? | Christian Odendahl 17 Nov 2017, 11:17am ‘Putting politics above prosperity’ – wait, isn’t that what the Brexiteers are doing? | Christian Odendahl
David Davis’s ill-advised remark to an audience of German businessmen reveals an alarming ignorance about the way in which the EU is conducting negotiationsPutting
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May needed to master the new politics that Brexit demands. But she’s failed | Simon Jenkins 16 Nov 2017, 1:00am May needed to master the new politics that Brexit demands. But she’s failed | Simon Jenkins
Britain needed a prime minister to fight for what the public truly wants. Instead, she has driven all sides to extremesBastards, mutineers, saboteurs, enemies of the people. As the Brexit debate approaches climax, it is
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Russia is meddling in western politics as it has nothing to lose | Robert Service 15 Nov 2017, 9:40am Russia is meddling in western politics as it has nothing to lose | Robert Service
Putin knows Russia is no longer a superpower, but he can bolster his standing at home by destabilising the westFrom the Brexit referendum to the American and French presidential elections, Russia has been causing serious mischief in the western democracies. Just yesterday it emerged that
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As Trump fawns over Xi, global politics is now a ‘strong man’ game | Will Hutton 11 Nov 2017, 7:05pm As Trump fawns over Xi, global politics is now a ‘strong man’ game | Will Hutton
Trade agreements are being torn up in a brutal exercise of economic force by the most powerfulIt was an extraordinary moment, so small wonder there was an audible intake of breath from the huge audience in Beijing’s Great Hall of the People. Here was Donald Trump, visibly flattered by the pomp and magnificence of the welcome mounted by the Chinese Communist party, saying in his big speech
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A Media Merger Is Mugged by Bureaucrats, Not Donald Trump 10 Nov 2017, 7:24pm A Media Merger Is Mugged by Bureaucrats, Not Donald Trump
A shocking possibility: Partisan politics will save the AT&T and Time Warner deal.
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Who’ll win the Tory biathlon of cabinet chaos? They all will | Marina Hyde 10 Nov 2017, 1:15pm Who’ll win the Tory biathlon of cabinet chaos? They all will | Marina Hyde
If we think of the week as a contest to prove ministerial stupidity and ineptitude, a single winner is impossible to pickAnother edifying week on the Mount Olympus of British politics, as the Tory gods continue to operate on a
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May must pay up and clear out the Brexit rebels. All else is madness | Simon Jenkins 10 Nov 2017, 4:25am May must pay up and clear out the Brexit rebels. All else is madness | Simon Jenkins
Hardcore Brexiteers are in the minority – the prime minister must stand up to them. Talk of ‘no deal’ is illiterate, playing politics with other people’s lives.Why does Theresa May keep telling us what we already know? She
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Tories can take being hated. But not being laughed at | Gaby Hinsliff 10 Nov 2017, 1:00am Tories can take being hated. But not being laughed at | Gaby Hinsliff
Voters needn’t love Theresa May, they just have to believe she’s more competent than Labour. How many think that now?What a shambles. What an undignified, mortifying mess British politics is in right now. Two cabinet ministers have gone in a week and the foreign secretary keeps his job only because it’s so awkward to move him. The prime minister has been embarrassed at home and abroad by the behaviour of her colleagues, all the more so because these scandals are so avoidably stupid. Sexual and financial transgressions are shocking enough, although they happen in real life as well as in politics. But
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The budget will show whether the Tories really care about ‘just managing’ families | Frances Ryan 9 Nov 2017, 3:00am The budget will show whether the Tories really care about ‘just managing’ families | Frances Ryan
The 2015 benefit freeze has been far more destructive than the government thought. Will the Tories take the chance to lift it?In politics, there are some ideas that are good in theory but don’t work in practice. Then there are those that were always going to cause harm but turn out to be more damning than even the policy’s architects could have imagined. Increasingly, the benefit freeze is the poster child for the latter category. The government is rightly coming under increasing pressure to halt the roll-out of universal credit. But lifting this freeze in benefit levels should be as much of priority. In the 2015 budget, then chancellor George Osborne put in motion a freeze on most working-age benefits for four years, from housing benefit and tax credits, to employment support allowance and child benefit. In other words, on the “top-up wage” for the mum working all hours as a care assistant but still struggling to pay the rent, or the safety net for the cancer patient temporarily too ill to hold down a job.
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Selfie Politics 8 Nov 2017, 7:01pm Selfie Politics
Trump, in fact, tweets as the Everyman of America’s new politics: Embrace Me!
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The Guardian view on Priti Patel’s sacking: no alternative for Theresa May | Editorial 8 Nov 2017, 2:52pm The Guardian view on Priti Patel’s sacking: no alternative for Theresa May | Editorial
The former international development secretary ran her own foreign policy and defied the prime minister. Downing Street had to show who was boss In the end Theresa May did not force out Priti Patel because she wanted to. She did it because she had to. At the weekend, the prime minister was presented with serious reasons to dismiss the international development secretary. Ms Patel’s freelance but secret Middle East foreign policy – notably the 12 private meetings this summer with senior Israeli politicians and officials without first informing the Foreign Office or No 10 – was institutionalised insubordination. Yet in spite of these major breaches of trust and collective responsibility, Mrs May bent over backwards not to fire Ms Patel. She preferred to have her colleague stay, especially so soon after Michael Fallon’s resignation. Ms Patel was given a ticking-off on Monday but she was cleared to fulfil a pre-arranged visit to Africa at the start of the week. The initial failure to sack Ms Patel reflected the weakness of Mrs May’s premiership, which has deepened since June’s humiliating general election. Paradoxically, the same thing is true of Wednesday’s reverse decision to give Ms Patel the sack. If nothing else, the two contrasting responses illustrate Talleyrand’s cynical dictum that, in politics, treachery is all a matter of dates. In between the decisions not to sack and then to sack, it became clear that Ms Patel had again been economical with the facts when she told Mrs May about her recent meetings with senior Israelis. The decisive revelation concerned a meeting at the House of Commons in September with the Israeli public security minister, which Ms Patel continued to conceal at the weekend. Although some of the facts concerning this meeting, and another in New York with the head of Israel’s foreign service, were in dispute on Wednesday, it added up to a deception too far for No 10.
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What can we learn about politics from Gordon Brown’s memoir? 7 Nov 2017, 10:20am What can we learn about politics from Gordon Brown’s memoir?
He doesn’t rate Corbyn, didn’t like ‘touchy-feely’ politics, and still hates Tony Blair – a roundup of all the hot revelations from the former prime minister’s new bookFor reasons now lost to me, I read Gordon Brown’s previous book, Beyond the Crash, in which he revealed precisely nothing about himself, except for that fascinating quirk of the unusual mind. He’d say a big thing with no explanation at all (“that’s what an economy is for, to create jobs”), then explain a small, obvious thing at the most tremendous length. Imagine the surprise, therefore, to find his latest work,
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Trump, ISIS and the Crisis of Meaning 6 Nov 2017, 6:46pm Trump, ISIS and the Crisis of Meaning
When politics limits itself to the material, people seek spiritual purpose elsewhere.
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I know how demeaning harassment is. But weaponising the past is not the answer | Anne Perkins 6 Nov 2017, 6:55am I know how demeaning harassment is. But weaponising the past is not the answer | Anne Perkins
Groping and innuendo were seen as something to be tolerated in late 20th century politics. Now culture has changed – and this must drive the futureThe world that matters most, the one that shapes who you are, exists in your head. It is a shifting, slippery, elusive mix of perception and experience, constrained by very few rules. Those that endure are, in the main, the outcome not of rational intellectual argument but of visceral response. What is right, what is wrong, what must be endured and what must be fought. The first two don’t change. The other two have changed radically. I worked as a political correspondent at Westminster from the early 1980s to the early 2000s. I have been chased round the banquettes of a restaurant that seemed to have been designed for grubby old men who wanted you to feel them up. I have been stalked by the notorious lecher Alan Clark, and endlessly sized up by backbench MPs with an inexhaustible sense of entitlement. I’ve had breathy phone calls in hotel rooms and discreet taps on my door at night … as with all my female colleagues, the list is pretty well inexhaustible, and of course it didn’t only happen at Westminster – it happened at work and travelling, in foreign studios as much as in London offices.
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The evidence is mounting – a man’s place is in the home 4 Nov 2017, 5:00am The evidence is mounting – a man’s place is in the home
This isn’t about a single industry, a few bad apples here and there. This is about men. Men harassing women, men dismissing women “Oh, that’s just Fox News,” people said when Roger Ailes and Bill O’Reilly were exposed as revolting sexual harassers. “Oh, that’s just the movie business,” people said when the Weinstein scandal unrolled. “Oh, that’s just the fashion industry,” people said when Terry Richardson was blacklisted by Condé Nast International a decade after women started speaking out about him. By the time harassment stories were emerging from journalism, politics, the arts, it felt like maybe this wasn’t about a single industry, a few bad apples here and there. This is about men. Men harassing women, men dismissing women who say they’ve been harassed and now men bleating that they don’t know how to behave around women today, because not inserting sexualised banter into every conversation they have with women is apparently too difficult a concept for them to handle. So I’d like to make A Modest Proposal: men need to be banned from the workplace.
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Cradle of democracy? Westminster is more like Goodfellas without the guns | Marina Hyde 3 Nov 2017, 2:10pm Cradle of democracy? Westminster is more like Goodfellas without the guns | Marina Hyde
Gropes, plots and blackmail as standard: this week revealed a politics far removed from societal norms The Conservatives seem to have been staging the last scene of Hamlet for over a year now. I’m not quite sure how everyone isn’t dead yet, but it now wouldn’t be remotely out of place if someone announced: “Following a number of allegations about their behaviour on the trip to England, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are suspended.”
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If Fallon-style scandal drives our politics, Theresa May cannot survive | Martin Kettle 2 Nov 2017, 4:16pm If Fallon-style scandal drives our politics, Theresa May cannot survive | Martin Kettle
The former defence secretary’s exit sets a perilous benchmark for a shaky government that can’t afford to lose more ministersIn one of his many invaluable books on British politics, the great Sir David Butler – 93 last month and still following politics like a hawk – lists every significant ministerial resignation from British governments since the end of the Victorian era, along with a note of the reason for the minister’s departure. The roll call marks some of the great divisive events of the last century – entry into the first world war, the Irish rebellion, Munich, prescription charges, Suez, the Falklands invasion, Iraq. It is not until 1958 that the first resignation due to a “private scandal” rather than a public issue is noted – the Conservative foreign office minister, charged with gross indecency after being caught in a gay sexual encounter, then illegal, in the bushes in St James’s Park. It is not, of course, that the first half of the 20th century was scandal-free – merely that the public knew nothing of such scandals, and so there were no demands that “something must be done”.
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We’re suckers for conspiracy theories – and it’s a sign of a deep social malaise | Hugo Drochon 1 Nov 2017, 5:10am We’re suckers for conspiracy theories – and it’s a sign of a deep social malaise | Hugo Drochon
It’s easy to be flippant about JFK and the moon landings. But the fake news and assumed truths that pervade our politics tell of something more worryingLast Thursday Donald Trump authorised the release of almost 3,000
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We can’t assume Britain is immune from Trump’s toxic politics | Rafael Behr 1 Nov 2017, 2:00am We can’t assume Britain is immune from Trump’s toxic politics | Rafael Behr
Given the president’s attack on liberal democracy, with Kremlin interference his cult of personal power could spread across the AtlanticThe friendliest polling station I have visited was in Grozny, Chechnya. Separatist rebellion had been crushed by the Russian army, and a referendum was being held to confirm the republic’s loyalty to Moscow. Journalists were bussed in to witness democracy reborn amid the ruins of war. Officials were cheerful, as were our military minders. The
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The victims of sexual abuse are the only voices that matter | Gaby Hinsliff 31 Oct 2017, 4:51pm The victims of sexual abuse are the only voices that matter | Gaby Hinsliff
Different women react in different ways. Don’t jump in to judge them, just listen to their storiesThere comes a point in every genuinely big political scandal when it becomes hard to see the wood for the trees. So here, in no particular order, is a far from exhaustive list of what the sexual harassment scandal now sweeping parliament is not about. It’s not about the self-righteous conviction that any gropers and grabbers in your own preferred party are a one-off or a regrettable failure of candidate vetting, while all the really awful predators sit on the other side. Everyone involved in politics now needs to face the fact that
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The Guardian view on Robert Mueller’s investigation: this says it’s serious for Trump | Editorial 31 Oct 2017, 3:25pm The Guardian view on Robert Mueller’s investigation: this says it’s serious for Trump | Editorial
The US president may ignore the rules of politics, but he cannot ignore the rule of law and the special counselDonald Trump reacted with
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We MPs must act quickly on sexual abuse or politics will fall into disrepute | Rupa Huq 31 Oct 2017, 12:17pm We MPs must act quickly on sexual abuse or politics will fall into disrepute | Rupa Huq
Having suffered unwanted attention from a male MEP with wandering hands, I know that workplace sexual harassment happens at all levels of governmentThe role of MP is unlike any other job; it’s a seven-days-a-week rollercoaster ride. One minute, you might be grilling the prime minister to jeers from the other side in the bearpit of the House of Commons chamber. The next, you will be at a crumbling community centre in your constituency, dealing with emergency-rehousing an evicted mother and her kids, who have turned up at your advice surgery with nowhere to sleep for the night. Not only is the job unique, but parliament is like no other place of employment on Earth. It can be a peculiarly work-hard, play-hard environment, so revelations of workplace sexual abuse probably came as no surprise to many of the 4,000 people who work on the parliamentary estate.
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Complicity in the sexual abuse of women is built in to the heart of our politics | Suzanne Moore 30 Oct 2017, 8:25am Complicity in the sexual abuse of women is built in to the heart of our politics | Suzanne Moore
Certain men have taken advantage of this sexist setup for a long time. But it’s crunch time nowIn an enormous effort to enter the modern age, Westminster and much of the sycophantic media that buoys it up appears to have progressed to the 1970s. While the rest of us are discussing rape, sexual assault and sexual harassment in every workplace following the Weinstein “revelations”, in the parallel world of politics there is talk of
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Irony used to define the English. In Brexit Britain, it’s self-importance | Zoe Williams 30 Oct 2017, 2:00am Irony used to define the English. In Brexit Britain, it’s self-importance | Zoe Williams
The Tory rampage in this divided island has warped our national identity, giving birth to a politics with no sense of the absurdIt’s important not to romanticise the past, otherwise you end up like a cut-price, leftist Nigel Farage marching to a whinier, less exhilarating drumbeat. But I distinctly remember, this time 20 years ago, it being normal to object to Halloween: not because it was satanic, but because it was American. It was the festival of consumerism and excess, unmoored from any deeper significance, but most of all – being expressly conceived as fun for children, and entailing talking to strangers and asking for things – it was un-English. Nationalism has taken a depressing turn, this past year and a half. The suspicion of foreigners and alienation of former allies are the greatest practical threats to the country’s wellbeing and prosperity. The
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The Catalan dream will not be extinguished by force | Matthew d’Ancona 29 Oct 2017, 1:35pm The Catalan dream will not be extinguished by force | Matthew d’Ancona
Secession from Spain would unwise for many reasons. But in this age of hectic change, the search for identity cannot simply be dismissedIt’s remarkable what you can learn in Slovenia. At a conference on politics, security and development in Bled earlier this year, I was lucky enough to chat to the Catalan delegates, proudly representing the interests and wisdom of their ancient principality. With considerable poise and dignity, they seemed to me to be channelling Pericles on the Athenians: we do not imitate, but are a model to others. So I am not surprised that Madrid is as frightened as it evidently is by Catalonia’s unilateral
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The rise of the robots need not spell downfall for humans | Chi Onwurah 29 Oct 2017, 12:28pm The rise of the robots need not spell downfall for humans | Chi Onwurah
We shouldn’t be afraid of the technological revolution. A politics that engages with it, rather than playing catch-up, can ensure it benefits us allThe robots are coming. They’re going to
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The Guardian view on Chinese politics: an age of ambition | Editorial 24 Oct 2017, 1:56pm The Guardian view on Chinese politics: an age of ambition | Editorial
The incorporation of Xi Jinping’s thinking into the party constitution indicates his extraordinary power – but also his breadth of visionMoney isn’t everything. That is Xi Jinping’s central message – even if he takes rather longer to say it. When the 2,300 delegates to the Communist Party of China’s congress unanimously
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I want to stand for Labour’s national executive committee. Here’s why | Eddie Izzard 23 Oct 2017, 5:00pm I want to stand for Labour’s national executive committee. Here’s why | Eddie Izzard
We need to bring an end to the ‘politics as usual’ that makes LGBT, minority ethnic and other members feel excluded from the party I
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Steve Bell’s If … Theresa May calls the universal credit helpline 23 Oct 2017, 2:00am Steve Bell’s If … Theresa May calls the universal credit helpline
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/picture/2017/oct/23/steve-bells-if-theresa-may-calls-the-universal-credit-helpline">Continue reading...
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Nobody minds a gentle nudge, except in the wrong direction | Andrew Rawnsley 21 Oct 2017, 7:05pm Nobody minds a gentle nudge, except in the wrong direction | Andrew Rawnsley
The past decade has demonstrated when behavioural politics can succeed and when it doesn’t workWe live in a time when government seems to have the Sadim touch: everything politicians lay their hands on turns into the opposite of gold. So it is a pleasant surprise when a significant piece of policy affecting the futures of millions of people is working as intended. Many folk park pensions in that segment of the brain where they keep things they know to be important, but find boring. Many folk would prefer to spend any surplus income today rather than save it for tomorrow. As a result, Britain has a serious problem. Its citizens are saving far too little for their retirement. Five years ago, the government did something to try to remedy this. It changed the way in which workers make pension decisions by introducing auto-enrolment. Where previously employees had to take a series of steps to opt into a company pension, now you are automatically signed up unless you actively choose to opt out. This subtle-sounding switch has had a rather dramatic result. More than eight million people have started
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What Harvey Weinstein tells us about the liberal world | Thomas Frank 21 Oct 2017, 6:00am What Harvey Weinstein tells us about the liberal world | Thomas Frank
Harvey Weinstein seemed to fit right in. This is a form of liberalism that routinely blends self-righteousness with upper-class entitlement Let us now consider the peculiar politics of Harvey Weinstein, the disgraced movie producer. Today Weinstein is in the headlines for an astonishing array of alleged sexual harassment and assaults, but once upon a time he was renowned for something quite different: his generous patronage of liberal politicians and progressive causes. This leading impresario of awful was an enthusiastic supporter of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. He was a strong critic of racism, sexism and censorship. He hosted sumptuous parties to raise money for the fight against Aids.
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Give MPs basic rights at work, or Britain’s gender gap will never close | Clare Phipps 18 Oct 2017, 11:01am Give MPs basic rights at work, or Britain’s gender gap will never close | Clare Phipps
Parental leave isn’t enough: job-sharing is the only way to make parliament more representative – and the only way someone like me can become an MPAdmitting I am “in politics” is not something I do casually. Why would I want people to associate me with
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Referendums get a bad press – but to fix Britain, we need more of them | George Monbiot 18 Oct 2017, 1:00am Referendums get a bad press – but to fix Britain, we need more of them | George Monbiot
Voting once every five years alienates us from politics. Participatory rather than representative democracy would allow us more say in how we run the countryYou lost, suck it up: this is how our politics works. If the party you voted for lost the election, you have no meaningful democratic voice for the next five years. You can go through life, in this “representative democracy”, unrepresented in government, while not being permitted to represent yourself. Even if your party is elected, it washes its hands of you when you leave the polling booth. Governments assert a mandate for any policy they can push through parliament. While elections tend to hinge on one or two issues, parties will use their win to claim support for all the positions in their manifestos, and for anything else they decide to do during their term in office.
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Who’s to blame for Brexit’s fantasy politics? The experts, of course | Aditya Chakrabortty 17 Oct 2017, 1:00am Who’s to blame for Brexit’s fantasy politics? The experts, of course | Aditya Chakrabortty
Magical thinking about the future is not confined to the cabinet. Just ask the Office for Budget ResponsibilityPolitics, runs the cliche, is the art of the possible. The compromise. The curbed expectation. Not any more. Not in the age of Brexit and Trump. In 2017, politics is the art of the impossible. Of writing blank cheques and scattering them to the wind. Of peddling fantasies and promising the voters they will be made flesh by tomorrow.
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Fiercest of rivals, best of friends: cross-party pals in Parliament 15 Oct 2017, 3:30am Fiercest of rivals, best of friends: cross-party pals in Parliament
At a time when British politics is riven by bitterness, friendships across the divide might seem like a miracle. But odd couples - from Shami Charkrabarti and Sayeeda Warsi to Frank Field and Nicholas Soames - can be what makes parliament work best
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How Labour could lead the global economy out of the 20th century | George Monbiot 11 Oct 2017, 1:00am How Labour could lead the global economy out of the 20th century | George Monbiot
The rupture of 2008 presents a chance to throw out our iniquitous system that busts the planet – here are some ideasWe are still living in the long 20th century. We are stuck with its redundant technologies: the internal combustion engine, thermal power plants, factory farms. We are stuck with its redundant politics: unfair electoral systems, their capture by funders and lobbyists, the failure to temper representation with real participation. And we are stuck with its redundant economics:
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If feminist Linda Bellos is seen as a risk, progressive politics has lost its way | Claire Heuchan 6 Oct 2017, 1:00am If feminist Linda Bellos is seen as a risk, progressive politics has lost its way | Claire Heuchan
Women and trans people alike are the targets of male violence – but gender issues are now so fraught that we’re losing sight of what we have in commonProgressive politics has seriously lost its way. When feminists who have spent decades challenging sexism, racism, and homophobia are viewed as a risk to the wellbeing of students, something has gone very wrong indeed. Linda Bellos became the most recent feminist whose invitation to speak was withdrawn for raising questions about the direction in which modern-day gender politics is heading. Bellos, who is responsible for establishing Black History Month in Britain, was
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Boris Johnson has wrecked the Tories. He should own the wreckage | Ian Birrell 4 Oct 2017, 2:36pm Boris Johnson has wrecked the Tories. He should own the wreckage | Ian Birrell
Handing Johnson the poisoned chalice would be a despairing act, but at least he would no longer be able to hide from his actionsIt was a dismal end to a strange, sombre conference. Last year Theresa May said she wanted a new approach to politics; this year she certainly delivered it, with the most
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Sideshows and psychodramas: Conservative party conference – Politics Weekly podcast 4 Oct 2017, 10:43am Sideshows and psychodramas: Conservative party conference – Politics Weekly podcast
Anushka Asthana is joined in Manchester by Rowena Mason, Matthew d’Ancona, John Crace and Kate McCann at the Conservative party conference. Plus we hear from MPs, ministers and members as Theresa May makes her keynote speech Theresa May called for party unity at the end of a Conservative party conference filled with leadership intrigue. As she spluttered and coughed through her keynote speech and was interrupted by a prankster with a mock P45, she faced new calls to sack her foreign secretary, Boris Johnson. Joining
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How Politics Stalls Wireless Innovation 1 Oct 2017, 4:19pm How Politics Stalls Wireless Innovation
The FCC unveiled its National Broadband Plan in 2010—but couldn’t stick to it.
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The Guardian view on Theresa May: struggling to survive | Editorial 1 Oct 2017, 2:24pm The Guardian view on Theresa May: struggling to survive | Editorial
The prime minister’s authority is broken. Yet the Tory party has little confidence that anyone else would do the job betterTory party politics, says a leftwing character in James Graham’s new West End play,
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Lauren Stocks: ‘My family say I’ll be PM one day, and I’m just: No!’ 1 Oct 2017, 5:00am Lauren Stocks: ‘My family say I’ll be PM one day, and I’m just: No!’
The Manchester schoolgirl on becoming the talk of the Labour party conference after giving an impassioned speech about education that went viralLauren Stocks, a 16-year-old schoolgirl from Greater Manchester, went viral last week with a passionate speech to the Labour party conference, claiming new GCSE exams are putting teenagers under intolerable stress. She won a standing ovation from delegates as she warned of classrooms full of “spaced-out, stressed-out, depressed kids in a battlefield where they can’t afford pens and paper”. Lauren, who joined the Labour party two years ago, is now doing A-levels in history, sociology and politics at a sixth-form college in Rusholme, Manchester.
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The Observer view on the future of work | Observer editorial 30 Sep 2017, 7:05pm The Observer view on the future of work | Observer editorial
We must focus our energies on helping those whose jobs will be removed by automationIn his speech at Labour’s conference in Brighton last week, Jeremy Corbyn made an astute observation: “2017 may be the year when politics finally caught up with the crash of 2008.” The financial crisis not only sent shockwaves rippling through the global economy: it sounded a warning bell that all was not well with a weakly regulated economic model powered by consumer debt bubbles and rapid house price growth. Yet the political response has been utterly inadequate. Despite promises to the contrary, we have returned to the same old growth model of debt-fuelled spending and the stark intergenerational divide has got worse, not better. Almost a decade on, there are signs of a growing public appetite for change, from the rejection of the status quo in the Brexit referendum to the surge in support for Labour that denied Theresa May a majority in June’s general election. Both parties have acknowledged there are fundamental problems in Britain’s economic model and have committed to reform it. But Britain now stands on the cusp of an ideological choice: compare and contrast Corbyn’s challenge with May’s robust defence of free markets last week.
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Labour’s nightmare: what if Brexit empties the coffers? | Jonathan Freedland 29 Sep 2017, 2:34pm Labour’s nightmare: what if Brexit empties the coffers? | Jonathan Freedland
The Corbynite dream of public investment needs a healthy economy. That seems less and less likelyIt’s hardly thrilling, and an unlikely bestseller, but if you were to attempt to render Britain’s current politics, especially those at play in the Labour party, as a page-turning blockbuster in the style of Robert Ludlum, it could only have one title: The Brexit Paradox.
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From Brexit to Catalonia, referendums get a bad rap – but we need them | Richard Russell 28 Sep 2017, 8:41am From Brexit to Catalonia, referendums get a bad rap – but we need them | Richard Russell
Referendums are often divisive and unpleasant, but without them, anger bottles up and politics gets stuckReferendums seem to be everywhere at the moment, Kurdish people voting on independence: the Irish getting a say on abortion, and there are still calls for another vote on the EU and Scottish independence. But do such binary choices ever result in anything more than discord? When I moved to Barcelona I thought I’d had a lucky escape from such divisive political battles at home. How wrong I was. As I sit writing this, the taps of my keyboard and howls of my dog are drowned out by a cacophony of pans being banged together. It’s 10pm and thousands of people are leaning out of their windows, drumming their cookware to take part in a traditional
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Corbyn’s man of the future act is hooked on dogmas of the past | Simon Jenkins 28 Sep 2017, 1:00am Corbyn’s man of the future act is hooked on dogmas of the past | Simon Jenkins
Look behind the slogans and Labour’s new project reeks of pre-Blair revivalism, not the radicalism of the left Jeremy Corbyn’s passage from antihero to premier-in-waiting is the phenomenon of modern politics. Three months ago the idea was absurd that a gauche, accident-prone backbench grump might plausibly stand before cheering supporters and declare himself “
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Going mainstream: Labour party conference – Politics Weekly podcast 27 Sep 2017, 11:40am Going mainstream: Labour party conference – Politics Weekly podcast
Rowena Mason at the Labour party conference in Brighton is joined by Anushka Asthana, Rafael Behr, Beth Foster-Ogg and John Crace. Plus we hear from Emily Thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, on how this year’s conference shows Labour is ready for power Jeremy Corbyn rounded off the Labour party’s annual conference in Brighton with a keynote speech in which he claimed Labour was now the party of the mainstream opinion in British politics. Joining Rowena Mason at the conference centre are political editor Anushka Asthana, political sketchwriter John Crace, Momentum’s Beth Foster-Ogg and columnist Rafael Behr.
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Don’t let the rich get even richer on the assets we all share | George Monbiot 27 Sep 2017, 1:00am Don’t let the rich get even richer on the assets we all share | George Monbiot
It’s time for communities to seize back control of resources upon which their prosperity dependsAre you a statist or a free marketeer? Do you believe that intervention should be minimised or that state ownership and regulation should be expanded? This is our central political debate. But it is based on a mistaken premise. Both sides seem to agree that state and market are the only sectors worth discussing: politics should move one way or the other along this linear scale. In fact, there are four major economic sectors: the market, the state, the household and the commons. The neglect of the last two by both neoliberals and social democrats has created many of the monstrosities of our times.
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What is Labour’s position on Brexit? It’s time Corbyn told us | Richard Angell 26 Sep 2017, 4:48am What is Labour’s position on Brexit? It’s time Corbyn told us | Richard Angell
On this vital issue, the leader must decide whether to stand with his old Bennite, Eurosceptic colleagues, or his younger, pro-EU supportersThere is a truism in politics that “when you decide, you divide”. The row about
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Trump Helps Kaepernick Drag the NFL Into Politics 25 Sep 2017, 7:17pm Trump Helps Kaepernick Drag the NFL Into Politics
The league will no longer be allowed to present football as an escape from America’s divisions.
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How smearing a student’s reputation was irresistible for the media | Nick Cohen 25 Sep 2017, 6:28am How smearing a student’s reputation was irresistible for the media | Nick Cohen
Many news organisations published Robbie Travers’ claims to have been victim of a PC stitch-up. If only they had dug a little deeper into the murky racial politics behind the story On 12 May, Robbie Travers sent Esme Allman, a fellow student at Edinburgh University, a Facebook message. “Hey Esme, just to let you know multiple news agencies have been delivered [sic] your comments on calling black men trash. You might want to think about saying that in future, some have been linked it [sic] to neo-Nazism.”
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The Guardian view of the Labour conference: Corbyn’s party | Editorial 24 Sep 2017, 3:00pm The Guardian view of the Labour conference: Corbyn’s party | Editorial
The Labour leader needs an idea at least as attractive as the vision his detractors have been asked to rejectIt is not an understatement to say that Jeremy Corbyn has revolutionised the politics of the British left. Rather than triangulating around the centre, Mr Corbyn demonstrated that the Labour party can succeed by standing for what it says it believes in. Mr Corbyn argued the country was sick of austerity and inequality and prescribed the sugary medicine of “tax and spend” policies to heal it. His unexpectedly good showing at the June election, when he was written off by the pollsters and dismissed by his opponents, has ensured the Labour party now belongs to Mr Corbyn. The 68-year-old has proved an unlikely political entrepreneur. His policies spotted a gap in the market – young voters who had been electorally orphaned by mainstream policies – and he produced ideas designed to appeal to them, such as scrapping university tuition fees, wrapped up in a message of hope: that of a new kind of politics. Mr Corbyn advanced a participatory model of politics, which argued that party members in groups such as Momentum should be on equal footing with Labour MPs.
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22 Sep 2017, 6:36pm Clinton Pollster Explains Clinton Loss
Another Democrat admits the failure of identity politics.
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Steve Bell’s If ... Vince Cable, the elephant man of British politics 21 Sep 2017, 1:10am Steve Bell’s If ... Vince Cable, the elephant man of British politics
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/sep/21/steve-bells-if-vince-cable-the-elephant-man-of-british-politics">Continue reading...
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The real saboteurs are the Tory fantasists backing hard Brexit | Rafael Behr 20 Sep 2017, 1:00am The real saboteurs are the Tory fantasists backing hard Brexit | Rafael Behr
Faced with the serious work and compromise that exiting the EU requires, many leavers are opting for fantasy, bombast and obstruction insteadEverything in politics is harder than it looks. Theresa May is not the first person to reach high office, only to discover that the skills used for getting a job are insufficient for doing it well. Boris Johnson – unlike his boss in most ways – is in a similar bind. He is a more gifted performer than the prime minister, but loquacity isn’t competence. The foreign secretary’s talent for bombastic phraseology and self-aggrandising frivolity is the opposite of what is required of a chief diplomat. Johnson isn’t good at his current job and is bored with it. The proof is in the
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Ta-Nehisi Coates and the Politics of Contempt 19 Sep 2017, 7:30pm Ta-Nehisi Coates and the Politics of Contempt
The polemicist attributes Trump’s election to ‘white supremacy,’ and liberals can’t get enough.
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In a society too short of common goals, identity politics are an imperfect answer | Kenan Malik 16 Sep 2017, 7:05pm In a society too short of common goals, identity politics are an imperfect answer | Kenan Malik
Liberal politics have taken a narcissistic turn according to an explosive new book. Is its analysis right?Last November, Columbia University historian Mark Lilla published a comment piece in the
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Cookery courses for obese people are pointless, and ministers know it | Hugh Muir 15 Sep 2017, 10:12am Cookery courses for obese people are pointless, and ministers know it | Hugh Muir
Ministers know the solution to the obesity crisis, it’s the same as how they weaned Britain off smoking. They have to dare to be a ‘nanny state’Let’s not be unreasonable: governments can’t control everything. Systems fail. Events creep up. But it’s a matter of legitimate concern when risks are known, quantified and still inadequately addressed. As a society we have a complex relationship with risk, straddling the law, politics and commerce. Many will say the risks taken by individuals with their own health and safety is their own affair; indeed, that the right to take risks is our liberal, democratic birthright. But one might argue just as reasonably that when an individual gambles unsuccessfully, it is society that suffers the repercussions – the health costs, the opportunity costs, the resources expended – and that communities, represented by government, have the right to limit their exposure.
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Labour’s members saved the party. Now give them the power they deserve | Owen Jones 15 Sep 2017, 1:00am Labour’s members saved the party. Now give them the power they deserve | Owen Jones
A bottom-up renaissance has re-energised Labour. But we need to focus even more on campaigning, and switch more power to the grassrootsNew Labour was too often defined by its fear of the party’s members. They were, went the thinking, a delusional rabble, a hotbed of dangerously unelectable ideas. They had to be neutralised, penned in, institutionally ostracised, reduced to an army of leaflet deliverers and voter ID collectors. Labour’s annual conference was stripped of many of its powers and functions, relegated to a US-style political rally peppered with sharp-suited corporate lobbyists. Parliamentary selections were stitched up: the role of unions in choosing candidates was stripped back, favoured special advisers were parachuted into safe seats, and dangerous lefties – like socialist Labour councillor Liz Davies – were forbidden from standing as MPs. Machine politics was deployed to try to prevent undesirables such as Ken Livingstone standing as London mayor and Rhodri Morgan as Wales’s first secretary.
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The financial system is still blinking red. We need reform more than ever | Rana Foroohar 14 Sep 2017, 9:57am The financial system is still blinking red. We need reform more than ever | Rana Foroohar
Fixing our financial system will be the key not only to stable growth, but also to stable politics It’s an amazing fact that a decade on from the financial crisis, Americans are still arguing about how to reform our financial system. Even as the Trump administration
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Sexual Politics 13 Sep 2017, 6:50pm Sexual Politics
The DeVos revision of sexual-abuse rules will reveal who stands where on due process.
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Britain is a country where elections can still be bought | Polly Toynbee 12 Sep 2017, 1:00am Britain is a country where elections can still be bought | Polly Toynbee
A new report shows parties are dodging electoral law. Under first-past-the-post they always willThe law has always lagged behind politics, slow to stop elections being bought and sold. Ever since the days of Old Sarum, the rotten borough that changed hands for huge sums for the value of its two parliamentary seats, the law has tried to reduce the electoral power of money.
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Happy birthday, Scottish parliament. You’ve given us independence of the mind | Gerry Hassan 11 Sep 2017, 1:00am Happy birthday, Scottish parliament. You’ve given us independence of the mind | Gerry Hassan
Holyrood is still a work in progress, but after 20 years, we regard that assembly – not Westminster – as our pre-eminient political institution Twenty years ago today Scotland voted 3:1 for the establishment of a Scottish parliament. It was a very different political time: Diana’s death, Britpop and Bill Clinton in the White House. It was clear the old Westminster system of governing Scotland was discredited. Voters recognised it was undemocratic, and produced bad politics and legislation. The case for change had become a consensus – “the settled will” in John Smith’s description – that the referendum merely validated.
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What the pope should tell Jacob Rees-Mogg: ‘You ain’t no Catholic, bruv’ | Zoe Williams 10 Sep 2017, 11:12am What the pope should tell Jacob Rees-Mogg: ‘You ain’t no Catholic, bruv’ | Zoe Williams
Politicians use their faith to defend misogynist, homophobic views. Co-religionists shouldn’t let them get away with itThe problem with people who bring religion to their politics is that they’re obsessed with sex. It’s never “I’m a devout Anglican, therefore I couldn’t possibly vote for a cap on social security payments (
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MPs need to take a new approach over Brexit | Stephen Gethins 9 Sep 2017, 5:30pm MPs need to take a new approach over Brexit | Stephen Gethins
The Scottish National Party foreign affairs spokesman argues for consensus politics Monday marks the 20th anniversary of the
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Trump’s fascist contagion gives the anti-Brexit cause what it lacked: an emotional heart | Jonathan Freedland 8 Sep 2017, 2:56pm Trump’s fascist contagion gives the anti-Brexit cause what it lacked: an emotional heart | Jonathan Freedland
With his war talk and support for illiberal regimes, the US president is reminding us what the European Union is forTo the remainer, and even to the neutral, our current politics contains a big mystery. Put simply, where is the sentiment
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Arnold Schwarzenegger’s PPI ad proves it: the end is nigh for western civilisation | Jack Bernhardt 8 Sep 2017, 3:23am Arnold Schwarzenegger’s PPI ad proves it: the end is nigh for western civilisation | Jack Bernhardt
Saatchi’s campaign is the latest nostalgia ad to wrench a pop-culture figure from their fantastic world and force them to submit to the drudgery of our ownYears from now, when people look back on the 2010s they will be confused and scared. They will look at our angry politics, our monochrome Marvel cinema, our weird obsession with
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Plots, leaks and Brexit tweaks – Politics Weekly podcast 7 Sep 2017, 11:52am Plots, leaks and Brexit tweaks – Politics Weekly podcast
Heather Stewart is joined by Owen Jones, Rowena Mason, Anand Menon and Alan Travis to discuss a leaked government document on how to manage post-Brexit EU migration. Plus we hear from Alison McGovern on her campaign to keep Britain in the single market and from Jessica Elgot on how Brexit has brought a new breed of rebellious MPs After a summer of tetchy exchanges between the government and Brussels, parliament returns with masses of complex Brexit legislation and not much time to pass it. This week
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Britain can control immigration. What drives this debate is nasty politics | Simon Jenkins 6 Sep 2017, 2:26pm Britain can control immigration. What drives this debate is nasty politics | Simon Jenkins
Appearances, not reality, have dominated policy in this country. Social neglect caused the Brexit vote – when will Theresa May address that?In politics, optics trump metrics. Tuesday’s
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The Dreamer Debacle 6 Sep 2017, 2:09pm Updated The Dreamer Debacle
Cynical politics by both parties puts thousands of young adults in jeopardy.
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Can’t talk about Muslims? It seems we do little else in the UK | Nesrine Malik 5 Sep 2017, 1:00am Can’t talk about Muslims? It seems we do little else in the UK | Nesrine Malik
We’re told criticism of the religion is censored – but in reality it’s the right, not the left, that tries to gag any debate There’s an awful lot we can’t talk about in Britain these days. We can’t talk about immigration, we can’t talk about gender, about race, and most of all we can’t talk about Muslims and Islam. We just can’t talk about the hijab or the niqab, and we certainly can’t talk about child abuse by men of Pakistani origin. If you dare pipe up about any of these taboos you will be gagged, sacked and shunned. If you ask a question about immigration on BBC Question Time, for instance, a member of staff will rugby-tackle you and bundle you out of the studio. Politics, the media and polite society have become dominated by a powerful cabal, a liberal league that has so stifled debate for fear of offence that it has become an act of immense bravery to merely suggest that there is a religious or racial issue to any political or social problem.
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We have the power to create the economy we want – let’s use it | Tom Kibasi 2 Sep 2017, 7:06pm We have the power to create the economy we want – let’s use it | Tom Kibasi
This week, the IPPR Commission on Economic Justice delivers a new vision for the UK economy, one that joins prosperity with justice and builds the common goodToday, the unclear prospects of Brexit loom large over our economy and our politics. The vote to leave was, by definition, a vote against the status quo. A majority of British people felt they had little to lose and perhaps something to gain from a radical shake-up of the economy. “Take back control” resonated because it was an expression of a feeling of powerlessness in the globalised economy. The general election that was ostensibly called on the question of Brexit rapidly focused on the state of the country at home – schools funding, NHS deficits, public sector pay, reductions in police numbers. And the increase in voting by people in their 20s and 30s revealed the depth of frustration among younger generations, so many of whom are unable to access decent housing and are weighed down by mounting student debt. This generation expect that they will be poorer than their parents because they will be.
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Identity Politics Are Tearing America Apart 30 Aug 2017, 7:08pm Identity Politics Are Tearing America Apart
Political leaders should focus on the common good. Floodwaters and rotting bridges don’t discriminate.
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Diana showed that we need emotion, but it’s had a downside | Matthew d’Ancona 28 Aug 2017, 1:00am Diana showed that we need emotion, but it’s had a downside | Matthew d’Ancona
The princess helped put feeling into our politics, but as we’ve seen from Brexit to the rise of Trump, this has too often taken the place of reason‘I walked through the crowds in St James’s, and realised this was no longer a country I truly understand.” So a former member of John Major’s cabinet lamented to me 20 years ago this week. As the nation mourned Diana, Princess of Wales, makeshift shrines sprang up all over the country, and a
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Can Labour’s change of course over Brexit change Britain’s fate? | Andrew Rawnsley 26 Aug 2017, 7:05pm Can Labour’s change of course over Brexit change Britain’s fate? | Andrew Rawnsley
The party has realised that most of its supporters don’t want to crash out of Europe. Now to persuade some ToriesThere are two kind of battles in politics: the noisy ones and the stealthy ones. The high-decibel clashes grab all the attention because they generate visible mayhem and buckets of gore. So eyes have been on the Conservatives over the summer weeks as the
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Piece by piece, the case for severing Britain’s ties to Europe is falling apart | Martin Kettle 24 Aug 2017, 2:12pm Piece by piece, the case for severing Britain’s ties to Europe is falling apart | Martin Kettle
With Brexiteers’ migration claims exposed as false, politicians must embrace the ‘Norway option’ of single market membership without delayThose who switched off with a sigh of relief in July may not have noticed. But something big is slowly stirring in the undergrowth of British politics. Fact by fact, announcement by announcement, the case for Britain to remain in the European Union’s single market and customs union is growing stronger and more irresistible by the day. Such an outcome is most definitely not this government’s policy. But, this autumn, something will have to give.
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When CEOs Play Politics, Shareholders Can Take Them to Court 17 Aug 2017, 7:19pm When CEOs Play Politics, Shareholders Can Take Them to Court
After Target established an ‘inclusive’ restroom policy, its share price plummeted by 40%.
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The Politics of Pointlessness 17 Aug 2017, 3:40pm Updated The Politics of Pointlessness
Charlottesville may be a prototype of a politics drifting away from normalcy.
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Republicans Play Politics on Yucca Mountain 15 Aug 2017, 6:31pm Republicans Play Politics on Yucca Mountain
Nuclear waste is all over the U.S. Is Heller’s seat worth it?
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Instead of strengthening Scottish politics, Alex Salmond plays the funny man | Gerry Hassan 15 Aug 2017, 9:03am Instead of strengthening Scottish politics, Alex Salmond plays the funny man | Gerry Hassan
The SNP and the independence movement both need major reappraisals in these unsure times. But is their former leader becoming a problem?Alex Salmond is one of the big beasts not just of Scottish, but British politics, and the defining figure of modern Scottish nationalism and the SNP. He has been leader of the SNP for a total of 20 years (between 1990-2000 and 2004-2014), first minister of Scotland for seven years, and in 2014 took the SNP closer than any of its opponents thought possible to the party’s ultimate goal of independence. Yet he now finds himself bereft of a major public role, after
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The Poison of Identity Politics 14 Aug 2017, 4:40pm Updated The Poison of Identity Politics
The return of white nationalism is part of a deeper ailment.
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Jacob Rees-Mogg’s pose is fake. The contempt is real | Polly Toynbee 14 Aug 2017, 2:42pm Jacob Rees-Mogg’s pose is fake. The contempt is real | Polly Toynbee
The Tory backbencher’s disingenuous pitch for party leadership is a measure of how rightwing fanaticism has captured the ConservativesIn a world grown weary of politics as usual, anyone peculiar is in with a shout; if they can sound funny-peculiar, all the better. Even a weak joke or two these days is worth a shed-load of worthy policies for improving people’s lives. In the decadent politics of entertainment, maybe the one who draws the widest smile wins.
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Put identity politics aside. The left’s priority has to be saving the planet | Matthew Todd 14 Aug 2017, 5:00am Put identity politics aside. The left’s priority has to be saving the planet | Matthew Todd
You expect to find climate change denial on the right. But from the left too, there is a strange silence about the single most pressing issue facing humanitySomeone writes a memo about his views on
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We could all learn something from the royal touch | Kevin McKenna 12 Aug 2017, 7:05pm We could all learn something from the royal touch | Kevin McKenna
Crossing social classes can be done, even in Glasgow The tale was buried deep inside the Scottish satellite edition of a London newspaper, but it startled me all the same: “Britons afraid to talk politics with those from another class or race.” It wasn’t the revelation that we were queasy about the subject of politics that jolted me, you understand, but the casual use of the word “class”.
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Tory Brexit policy is chaotic. The fightback must begin at once | David Miliband 12 Aug 2017, 4:30pm Tory Brexit policy is chaotic. The fightback must begin at once | David Miliband
Democracy did not end in June last year. It is essential MPs have a say on the future or the country may be driven off a cliffFor many years Britons and Americans have been proud of the quality of their governance. Yet today our politics and government are setting new standards for dysfunction. Rather than stability and global leadership there is confusion. The US is suffering from a serious inability to legislate. There is a genuine risk of the country defaulting on its debts. Jeb Bush called Donald Trump the “chaos candidate”, but as the American writer
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We know what causes poverty. The point is to do something about it | Simon Jenkins 11 Aug 2017, 5:33am We know what causes poverty. The point is to do something about it | Simon Jenkins
Endless leftwing research into Britain’s growing gap between rich and poor is a waste of time. We need to set aside partisan politics and actMen from poor families are more likely to be single. So says the
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We desperately needed change in Kenya’s politics. And we didn’t get it | Daniel Wesangula 10 Aug 2017, 8:29am We desperately needed change in Kenya’s politics. And we didn’t get it | Daniel Wesangula
Voters allied to neither Kenyatta nor Odinga hoped the election would reflect a new Kenya, shunning old rivalries. But the politics of tribe and patronage persistAfter a gruelling campaign Kenya’s anticipated election has come to an end with
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Emmanuel Macron is right to want Brigitte to be France’s first lady | Anne Perkins 8 Aug 2017, 3:04pm Emmanuel Macron is right to want Brigitte to be France’s first lady | Anne Perkins
In our era of personalised politics, creating a formal office for a leader’s consort would be a recognition of the unique demands on the power behind the throneIn an early series of
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The end of child poverty? Not with the Tories in power | Polly Toynbee 8 Aug 2017, 1:00am The end of child poverty? Not with the Tories in power | Polly Toynbee
A decade of progress has been swiftly undone. Closing Sure Start centres only makes things worse This hurts. This almost makes me despair of politics. Why invest such emotion, such hope in what a well-intentioned new government can do, only to see it all torn from the roots and trashed at the next roll of the electoral dice?
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Northern Ireland’s politics is fixated on the past – but young people want change | Kylie Noble 7 Aug 2017, 6:30am Northern Ireland’s politics is fixated on the past – but young people want change | Kylie Noble
My generation want outward-looking, liberalising policies, not tired obsessions with the border. Our leaders need to move with the times Protestants in Northern Ireland
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Let’s restrict the number of privately educated people in Britain’s elite | Ellie Mae O’Hagan 7 Aug 2017, 3:00am Let’s restrict the number of privately educated people in Britain’s elite | Ellie Mae O’Hagan
A quota system would redress the woeful under-representation of state-educated people in our establishment, and improve the quality of our governmentBritish politics have seen many intriguing subplots in recent years, none more striking than the terrifying mediocrity of our establishment. Consider the facts: most commentators have been fantastically wrong about every major political event; we could end up with three prime ministers in the space of three years; and nobody thought it might be a good idea to put a plan in place in the event of Britain voting to leave the EU. And these are just the first things that spring to mind. Sure, Britain isn’t uniquely awful in this regard – Emmanuel Macron, France’s robot prince, is also
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Amid fears of election violence, Kenyans seek a way past inter-ethnic conflict | Murithi Mutiga 4 Aug 2017, 9:40am Amid fears of election violence, Kenyans seek a way past inter-ethnic conflict | Murithi Mutiga
Ethnic divisions behind the 2007 bloodletting still disfigure Kenya’s politics. The young generation – and a vibrant economy and civil society – point to a new way
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Why the Young Tune Politics Out 3 Aug 2017, 6:48pm Why the Young Tune Politics Out
The reasons for staying informed are being outweighed by the desire to be left alone.
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Universities stop spying on their students? Now that’s a radical idea | Giles Fraser | Loose canon 3 Aug 2017, 10:48am Universities stop spying on their students? Now that’s a radical idea | Giles Fraser | Loose canon
Talking radical nonsense – and generally learning in the end that it is radical nonsense – is partly what higher education is for. Snooping on Muslims isn’tIn his biography of Tony Blair, John Rentoul tells the story of a young Blair being summoned to the dean of his college in Oxford to explain the presence of a lipstick that a cleaner had found in his room. “Oh, that’s mine,” said Blair, dismissing what the cleaner had taken to be evidence of female guests. Whether or not Blair was telling the truth about the lipstick Rentoul does not say. But what this story does illustrate is the sort of thing nosey college cleaners were encouraged to look out for back in the 70s. They were interested in his sex life, not his politics. London South Bank University (LSBU), on the edge of my parish at the Elephant and Castle, has
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The Observer view on Donald Trump’s unfitness for office | Observer editorial 29 Jul 2017, 7:10pm The Observer view on Donald Trump’s unfitness for office | Observer editorial
The incompetence and infighting at the White House dismay America’s allies and encourage its enemies The sense of things falling apart in Washington is palpable – and a matter of growing, serious international concern. Donald Trump’s latest asinine act of gesture politics, the
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Why Not a Day of Rest From Politics? 27 Jul 2017, 6:08pm Why Not a Day of Rest From Politics?
Mainline Protestant pastors are more left-leaning than their parishioners.
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Corbyn is a hard-right Brexiter. Progressives must fight back, not follow | Vince Cable 27 Jul 2017, 11:25am Corbyn is a hard-right Brexiter. Progressives must fight back, not follow | Vince Cable
The Labour leader’s 1970s-style thinking on Europe has no place in today’s politics. Brexit is too important to be dictated by tribalism
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Brexit and the Disunited Kingdom 25 Jul 2017, 6:48pm Brexit and the Disunited Kingdom
‘I’ve never seen British politics as chaotic as it is now,’ says an expert.
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Corbynmania isn’t dangerous – there’s irony in those chants | Rachel Shabi 20 Jul 2017, 8:40am Corbynmania isn’t dangerous – there’s irony in those chants | Rachel Shabi
A marrow-growing, manhole cover enthusiast isn’t exactly cult material. His supporters aren’t blind to Labour’s pitfalls, but fed up with remote, dreary politics
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Politics has gone beyond satire – can the Mash Report catch up? | Jack Bernhardt 18 Jul 2017, 8:47am Politics has gone beyond satire – can the Mash Report catch up? | Jack Bernhardt
The Daily Mash’s new satirical TV show has a hard challenge ahead as the web spews out gags with lightning speed – it needs to find a distinctive voice
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The Guardian view on politics and the Proms: worth listening | Editorial 17 Jul 2017, 2:16pm The Guardian view on politics and the Proms: worth listening | Editorial
The Proms have attracted political argument in the past. Brexit has fuelled the processOn the first night of the 2017 BBC Proms, the pianist
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