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The Observer view on the Afghanistan peace process | Observer editorial11h The Observer view on the Afghanistan peace process | Observer editorial
America has a duty to make sure that democracy does not fail When Donald Trump revealed a secret plan for a “peace summit” with Afghan Taliban chiefs at the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland earlier this month, the news caused a sensation. The idea that a group, officially designated as terrorists by the United States, was to be given the red-carpet treatment reserved for important allies shocked many in Washington. In fact, Trump had
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The Observer view on Labour’s lack of leadership over Brexit | Observer editorial11h The Observer view on Labour’s lack of leadership over Brexit | Observer editorial
Voters will not be fooled by Corbyn’s foolish prevarication Britain is gripped by political crisis. We have a prime minister bent on taking Britain out of the EU in just over a month, even if it means crashing out with no deal, with dreadful consequences for jobs and growth, for regional inequalities and for the union. Lacking any democratic mandate, Boris Johnson has shut down parliament for five weeks in an attempt to stop MPs from blocking him, a move whose legality the supreme court will rule on this week. Yet the Labour party is heading into its conference this weekend riven by splits over Brexit and sectarian attempts by Jeremy Corbyn’s allies to scrap the position of deputy leader. It represents a breathtaking failure of leadership by Corbyn. Never has Britain been in such desperate need of a leader of the opposition who can take on a prime minister who appears prepared to ride roughshod over the rule of law and who has shown such rank disregard for our democratically elected representatives. Yet Labour seems determined to show voters that it, too, is a hopelessly divided party that cannot reach consensus on its internal party structures, let alone a clear position on Brexit or a vision for the country.
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The Guardian view on transport emissions: the trouble with planes and automobiles | Editorial 20 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on transport emissions: the trouble with planes and automobiles | Editorial
The headline figure of a 44% cut in the UK’s total emissions conceals a multitude of failures, with motor traffic and aviation high on the listIf the success of an event like Friday’s school strike can be measured, it is in the extent to which it changes the climate of opinion. Individuals, unions and other organisations that took part in the strike must play their part in reducing emissions. But when it comes to limiting global heating, governments have far more levers than anyone else. Global cooperation by politicians is essential to tackling the climate emergency. Since states are the world’s most powerful organisations, many of the solutions will inevitably be national. In terms of their current and historic carbon emissions, and efforts to reduce them, there are huge differences between countries. There is no one-size-fits-all model of decarbonisation. In the UK, like everywhere else, progress is nowhere near fast enough. Carbon dioxide emissions have been falling for six years, and are at their
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The Guardian view on Thailand: intimidation can’t solve the problem | Editorial 20 Sep 1:25pm The Guardian view on Thailand: intimidation can’t solve the problem | Editorial
The military promised it would reconcile the country. But after a dubious election, divisions continue to growThe good news is that a coup-prone country is unlikely to experience yet another military takeover in the immediate future. The bad news is that the Thai army should no longer need such tactics. The junta laundered its power into a supposed democratic mandate this spring, through an electoral system rigged to ensure it would prevail, and a new constitution. Prayuth Chan-ocha, the 2014 coup leader, is the elected prime minister. Still, you can never be too careful. Despite all its advantages, the military needed weeks to
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The Guardian view on the school climate strike: protests that matter | Editorial 19 Sep 1:57pm The Guardian view on the school climate strike: protests that matter | Editorial
The youth climate movement has created a new sense of urgency. Adults, including politicians, must now focus on plotting a safer courseThis Friday’s school strike, which
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The Guardian view on Japan and South Korea: neither side will win | Editorial 19 Sep 1:54pm The Guardian view on Japan and South Korea: neither side will win | Editorial
The months-old dispute between the two countries is only growing. They may not be the only ones affectedPerhaps the most striking aspect of the
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The Guardian view on Israel’s elections: it could be worse | Editorial 18 Sep 2:00pm The Guardian view on Israel’s elections: it could be worse | Editorial
Netanyahu is unfit for his office, as some voters are acknowledging, but the problems are bigger than himBenjamin Netanyahu’s political magic has broken,
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The Guardian view on teacher workloads: big lessons to learn | Editorial 18 Sep 1:57pm The Guardian view on teacher workloads: big lessons to learn | Editorial
England’s teachers are now working as long hours as bankers, but without the banker payThe new secretary of state for education, Gavin Williamson, knows a lot about the heavy workloads piled on teachers. His wife used to teach in a primary school. Then she left the profession to become a teaching assistant partly because, he said this month, “there was always a big challenge in terms of workload, and this is one of the things we need to address”. Indeed. More than personal experience, hard figures back up the cabinet minister’s worry. A new report from
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The Guardian view on Iran and Saudi Arabia: maximum pressure, maximum risks | Editorial 17 Sep 1:32pm The Guardian view on Iran and Saudi Arabia: maximum pressure, maximum risks | Editorial
The attack on a key oil facility has increased the dangers – but US actions triggered this crisisDonald Trump’s remarks on foreign policy resemble a dot-to-dot designed by an abstract artist – individual points may stand out, and there are discernible lines between some of them, but to look for a coherent whole is a fool’s errand. His reaction to the
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The Guardian view on worker-ownership plans: firms for the many, not the few | Editorial 17 Sep 1:32pm The Guardian view on worker-ownership plans: firms for the many, not the few | Editorial
The left across the world is embracing the idea that soaring wealth inequality can be tackled by giving employees a stake in their companies – and a say over the profits and decisions of their employersThe rich really are different from you. While the pall of the financial crisis still hangs over the ordinary worker, whose income is
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The Guardian view on a Liberal Democrat revoke: a promise that won’t be redeemed| Editorial 16 Sep 1:53pm The Guardian view on a Liberal Democrat revoke: a promise that won’t be redeemed| Editorial
Jo Swinson’s offer is just to permanently polarise the electorate around Brexit. The Lib Dems still have no distinctive pitch for issues beyond leaving the EUDo gamblers know something that pollsters do not? Ever since the Liberal Democrats’ record European election
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The Guardian view on county lines: victims, villains and everything in between | Editorial 16 Sep 1:52pm The Guardian view on county lines: victims, villains and everything in between | Editorial
The use of modern slavery laws to target traffickers was a breakthrough. But the problems thrown up by modern drug gangs won’t be solved by criminal justice aloneThe once poorly understood phenomenon of county lines drug dealing is taking firmer shape in terms of public policy and also of awareness. The emerging picture is disturbing even to those familar with the most destructive consequences of illegal drugs. What is going on, as
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The Guardian view on the future of work: share out the benefits | Editorial 15 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on the future of work: share out the benefits | Editorial
A Californian court has ruled that gig economy workers should be treated as employeesCalifornia is one of the few economies large enough to set the rules in a globalised world. The state’s initiatives on car safety and emissions have in the past set an example that was followed by car manufacturers everywhere. In a less beneficial way, California was also the birthplace of the gig economy, and the widespread use of webs of casual labour tied together by algorithms to subvert labour laws and other regulations in all sorts of fields, ranging from taxi firms to B&Bs. So it’s an important development that the state’s senate has now turned decisively against the exploitation of casual workers. This week
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The Guardian view on David Cameron: the boy in the bubble | Editorial 15 Sep 1:24pm The Guardian view on David Cameron: the boy in the bubble | Editorial
When great power comes with great irresponsibilityThe publication of extracts from David Cameron’s memoirs casts a chill light on the flaws of the British political system. The interest lies not in the detail of who stabbed whose back or which
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The Observer view on the threat posed to Israel by another Benjamin Netanyahu victory | Observer editorial 15 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on the threat posed to Israel by another Benjamin Netanyahu victory | Observer editorial
The prime minister’s pre-election tactics underline why he must be ousted from office Benjamin Netanyahu’s bid to secure another term as Israel’s prime minister has grown more desperate and divisive as Tuesday’s elections approach. Bibi, as he is known, has never been afraid to fight dirty. Now he is at it again as his Likud party and its rightwing allies
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The Observer view: fewer rape claims come to court. That is alarming | Observer editorial 15 Sep 1:00am The Observer view: fewer rape claims come to court. That is alarming | Observer editorial
Sexual assault is being effectively decriminalised by the woefully low rate of prosecutions – and convictions – of attackers She was in the early stages of a relationship with a man who pretended to be a police officer. He was gradually more controlling and, at one point, he became jealous of photos on her phone. “He punched me in the back of the head, then he raped me… The second time he attacked me he had a huge kitchen knife.” Rebecca – not her real name – eventually reported her attacker to the police. It turned out that he was a prisoner released on licence, with a history of violence against women. He was initially charged with three counts of rape, as well as assault by beating and false imprisonment. But Rebecca was later informed that the
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The Guardian view on the rise in domestic killings: figures to shock politicians to act | Editorial 13 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on the rise in domestic killings: figures to shock politicians to act | Editorial
At the end of a week that saw Theresa May trash her reputation for taking domestic abuse seriously, the 32% rise in deaths must be a wake-up callIt has been a terrible week for everyone in the UK who is concerned about shockingly high levels of violence against women. First, the prorogation of parliament meant that a long-awaited domestic abuse bill, placing new statutory duties on councils among other measures, fell. Then Theresa May made the appalling decision to
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The Guardian view on Modi’s 100 days: trashing lives and the constitution | Editorial 13 Sep 1:25pm The Guardian view on Modi’s 100 days: trashing lives and the constitution | Editorial
The Indian prime minister is being feted in the west. But he is arbitrarily curbing the human rights and civil liberties of minorities on a vast scaleThis week India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi,
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The Guardian view on Yellowhammer: the ugly truth about a no-deal Brexit | Editorial 12 Sep 1:31pm The Guardian view on Yellowhammer: the ugly truth about a no-deal Brexit | Editorial
Ministers insist it is a worst-case scenario. But with no new deal in sight, the dangers set out in a document they wanted to hide must be taken seriouslyEven for a government that prides itself on high-handedness,
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The Guardian view on a children’s manifesto: families need more from ministers | Editorial 12 Sep 1:31pm The Guardian view on a children’s manifesto: families need more from ministers | Editorial
Opening schools at weekends for sports activities is one of a list of demands to which politicians should pay attentionChildren, says the government-appointed commissioner charged with representing their interests in England, lack a voice in politics. As a result, their interests are too often “subjugated to the interests of others”, or lost down the cracks between departments. The
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and the crown: a clear abuse of power | Editorial 11 Sep 1:48pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and the crown: a clear abuse of power | Editorial
A Scottish appeal court ruling exposes quite how little the prime minister can be trusted with the powers of his officeWhen Boris Johnson arrived in Downing Street, he brought with him a reputation for duplicity in matters personal and professional. Only his most credulous cheerleaders expected that to change when he became prime minister. The pessimists did not anticipate how swiftly and egregiously Mr Johnson’s worst attributes would be displayed. Even by his own shabby standards it is an achievement already to have corrupted the relationship between a prime minister and the monarch. A court has judged that parliament was unlawfully prorogued. Scottish appeal judges
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The Guardian view on Netanyahu’s land grab: a prison, not a peace | Editorial 11 Sep 1:47pm The Guardian view on Netanyahu’s land grab: a prison, not a peace | Editorial
The Israeli political leadership, with the help of Donald Trump, is making finding a way out of conflict with the Palestinians impossibleBenjamin Netanyahu’s
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The Guardian view on the Brexit economy: the UK risks recession | Editorial 10 Sep 2:04pm The Guardian view on the Brexit economy: the UK risks recession | Editorial
There is no good time to be leaving the European Union but this might be the worst – as a failure to learn the lessons of the 2008 crash leaves the country exposed to another downturnThere is more than a little truth in the idea that those who do not learn from history are condemned to repeat it. The global financial crisis was meant to lead to economic and political reckoning for neoliberals carried away with their
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The Guardian view on John Bolton: good riddance, but the problem is his boss | Editorial 10 Sep 2:03pm The Guardian view on John Bolton: good riddance, but the problem is his boss | Editorial
Many will rightly celebrate the departure of the US national security adviser. But however welcome the news, it reflects the deeper problems with this administrationNo sensible observer of international affairs could lament Donald Trump’s announcement that he has
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s Brexit breach: rift with EU could be here to stay | Editorial 9 Sep 1:45pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s Brexit breach: rift with EU could be here to stay | Editorial
In attempting to turn domestic weakness into a diplomatic asset, the prime minister risks poisoning the well of future EU-UK relations Boris Johnson’s attempt to get a deal with the European Union seems like a speeding car negotiating with a brick wall. The more solid and immovable the wall appears, the harder Mr Johnson charges towards it, claiming he is unable to swerve out of the way. The British prime minister reasons that as both the vehicle and the barrier have a part to play in a car crash, he can blame the collision on the wall because it is made of brick. Hence his
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The Guardian view on Pope Francis: a voice in the wilderness | Editorial 9 Sep 1:44pm The Guardian view on Pope Francis: a voice in the wilderness | Editorial
No other spiritual leader is speaking out so clearly for the poor and for the environment in the developing worldPope Francis has been visiting two of the poorest countries in the world, but on the way he took a moment
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The Guardian view on the world and Brexit: rue Britannia | Editorial 8 Sep 1:31pm The Guardian view on the world and Brexit: rue Britannia | Editorial
A project supposed to enhance Britain’s international stature has only served to diminish itThe case for
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The Guardian view on tourist taxes: travellers should pay their way | Editorial 8 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on tourist taxes: travellers should pay their way | Editorial
Levies won’t suit every destination, but they can help make sure that visitors are good news for all, not just the businesses that serve themNicola Sturgeon’s speech last Tuesday setting out the Scottish government’s
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The Observer view on the best way to defeat Boris Johnson | Observer editorial 8 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on the best way to defeat Boris Johnson | Observer editorial
The stakes have never been higher as Britain heads for an election “A no-deal Brexit could cause far more damage to our future economic success than a Corbyn government, the former chancellor Ken Clarke told the
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The Observer view on Putin’s ongoing corruption of democracy | Observer editorial 8 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on Putin’s ongoing corruption of democracy | Observer editorial
The Kremlin’s underhand scheming in municipal voting is a warning to Britain to protect a forthcoming election Vladimir Putin’s regime has done all in its power to skew and distort the results of Sunday’s nationwide regional elections in Russia. This is no surprise. The Kremlin has become notorious in recent years for its efforts, both brazen and underhand, to subvert democracy at home and abroad. With general elections approaching in Britain and the US, a close eye needs to be kept on Russia’s president. Recent events surrounding
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The Guardian view on demography and politics: nationalist narratives must be challenged | Editorial 6 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on demography and politics: nationalist narratives must be challenged | Editorial
Women’s autonomy and reproductive rights must be upheld as far-right ideas gain groundThe
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The Guardian view on Margaret Atwood and the Booker: a testament to fiction | Editorial 6 Sep 1:25pm The Guardian view on Margaret Atwood and the Booker: a testament to fiction | Editorial
The prize has come in for justified criticism, its rules are imperfect. But this year’s authors are an exciting prospectIt is easy to deride awards, especially if you haven’t won one. And good fun too. Edward St Aubyn, snubbed by Booker judges in 2006 for the finale to his Patrick Melrose series, At Last, took revenge with the 2014 satire Lost for Words. That novel depicted clownish judges deciding which book, from a terrible shortlist, should win a thinly veiled
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s cunning plan: winning by resigning | Editorial 5 Sep 2:17pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s cunning plan: winning by resigning | Editorial
The prime minister sees a route to a hard Brexit by resigning and forcing opponents to answer the question they have yet to find an answer for: who leads the rebel alliance?Perhaps the strangest unintended consequence of Boris Johnson’s decision to seek a snap election is that Jeremy Corbyn could be received at this month’s Labour party conference as the country’s prime minister. This would be quite a role reversal for the pair of duelling politicians. Mr Johnson’s misplaced optimism in his powers of persuasion would have meant that he risks being, at some 48 days, the
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The Guardian view on testing four-year-olds: wrong again | Editorial 5 Sep 2:16pm The Guardian view on testing four-year-olds: wrong again | Editorial
Accountability is important, but the new measuring stick being pushed on primary schools is blunt and unimaginativeAccountability in education is important. Politicians, acting on the public’s behalf, are right to seek evidence that schools are delivering a good service. So there is nothing wrong, in principle, with gathering information in order to track progress. The problem with the government’s new baseline assessment of four-year-olds – being trialled over the next six weeks in around half of English primary schools, and intended to replace the tests previously taken by seven-year-olds – is the idea’s execution. Ministers already have
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The Guardian view on Tory purges: a historic betrayal | Editorial 4 Sep 1:42pm The Guardian view on Tory purges: a historic betrayal | Editorial
By forcing sensible, moderate MPs into exile Boris Johnson is extinguishing a valuable Conservative tradition in British politicsThe intensity of the current political crisis can dull the impact of events that would, in quieter times, be explosive. Until recently it was hard to imagine Ken Clarke’s political affiliation as anything other than Conservative. He has served in government under four Tory prime ministers. But Mr Clarke and 20 parliamentary colleagues have been driven into exile from Boris Johnson’s party. Their offence was supporting a cross-party bill to prevent a no-deal Brexit. The bill passed its second Commons reading on Wednesday by a majority of 29. Mr Johnson’s aggressive tactics, withdrawing the whip from dissenters, emboldened their rebellion.
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The Guardian view on Sajid Javid’s spending review: please sir, can we have some more? | Editorial 4 Sep 1:41pm The Guardian view on Sajid Javid’s spending review: please sir, can we have some more? | Editorial
More money for schools, hospitals and police is welcome – but don’t be fooled by promises of the end of austerityThe roots of Wednesday’s extraordinary performance by the chancellor, Sajid Javid, stretch back at least two and a half years. In the 2017 general election, a nurse on Question Time asked Theresa May why her pay hadn’t gone up once in real terms since 2009. The then prime minister’s response? “
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s strategy: split party, divide country, win election | Editorial 3 Sep 5:36pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s strategy: split party, divide country, win election | Editorial
The prime minister intuitively understands that hard-Brexit chaos will sustain his premiership. He must be stopped
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The Guardian view on the decline of Marks & Spencer: trouble at tills | Editorial 3 Sep 1:59pm The Guardian view on the decline of Marks & Spencer: trouble at tills | Editorial
Public feeling towards M&S is stronger than for other retailers, but its current plight proves that it cannot trade on goodwill for everShops need shoppers, and if people want them to survive as bricks-and-mortar entities in the face of ferocious online competition, they will have to shop in them. So far so obvious, you might think. But the
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The Guardian view on Johnson’s campaign pitch: save my job | Editorial 2 Sep 2:36pm The Guardian view on Johnson’s campaign pitch: save my job | Editorial
The prime minister wants an election because he wants to stay in post. He is not doing it to deliver what’s best for the UKEvery government since 2016 has been driven mad by Brexit’s central contradiction – that there is an economic price to pay for the UK to take back control of its borders. Boris Johnson leads the most demented to date. He uses “the will of the people” to justify the replacement of parliamentary scrutiny with coercion and deceit. Mr Johnson won power because two-thirds of the Tory members preferred the
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The Guardian view on good business: profit is not enough | Editorial 2 Sep 2:33pm The Guardian view on good business: profit is not enough | Editorial
Companies have responsibilities that go beyond profit for their shareholders. These must be enforcedThe Oklahoma court that last week made
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The Guardian view on Johnson’s troll tactics: outrage critics, energise supporters | Editorial 1 Sep 1:28pm The Guardian view on Johnson’s troll tactics: outrage critics, energise supporters | Editorial
This government is bathing in negative publicity, using the storm of indignant fury to whip up the Tory grassroots and stoke the belief that a ‘remainer elite’ is against themWhen anti no-deal Conservative MPs
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The Guardian view on meat substitutes: guts without the gore | Editorial 1 Sep 1:23pm The Guardian view on meat substitutes: guts without the gore | Editorial
In the developed world we should take heart from people’s willingness to try new, vegan foodstuffs – and from the success of the companies that make themThe Seventh-day Adventist church in the US adheres historically to vegetarianism, in large part to the teachings of a co-founder of the church – Ellen G White – who
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The Observer view on the need for courage and unity to halt a no-deal Brexit | Observer editorial 1 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on the need for courage and unity to halt a no-deal Brexit | Observer editorial
MPs of all parties must unite and back an interim governmentParliamentary sovereignty is the fundamental tenet of Britain’s uncodified constitution. Parliament makes the laws of the land; it cannot be overruled by the prime minister or the courts. Yet Boris Johnson, a prime minister selected by the unrepresentative membership of the Conservative party, which does not even have a majority in the Commons, is seeking to stop parliament from doing its job by any means at his disposal. Johnson’s authority to govern is derived from parliament and parliament alone. The more a man who has faced no more than a day of parliamentary scrutiny, let alone a general election, acts as though he has some kind of extra-parliamentary mandate, the more British democracy dangles on a precipice. Johnson’s decision to prorogue parliament for five weeks at the moment of the most dangerous political crisis this country has witnessed in decades is outrageous. He claims he is doing it in order to set out his domestic agenda in a Queen’s speech, but this could have been achieved through a shorter shutdown. By preventing them from scrapping the three-week party conference recess, and taking up four days of Commons sittings with Queen’s speech debates, he has drastically reduced the time MPs have to block a no-deal Brexit. Johnson is trying to stop parliament expressing its will on the most important question postwar Britain has faced.
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The Observer view on Donald Trump’s plans to militarise space | Observer editorial 1 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on Donald Trump’s plans to militarise space | Observer editorial
Countries must join forces and sign a peace treaty or space will become a war-fighting domain The thought of Donald Trump as space commander-in-chief, whizzing around the Milky Way, zapping alien invaders and conquering new worlds, is both comical and terrifying. Before they began exchanging love letters, the US president ridiculed his North Korean counterpart, Kim Jong-un, as “little rocket man”. With his relaunch last week of
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The Guardian view on Trump v the US Fed: the bully pulpit | Editorial 30 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on Trump v the US Fed: the bully pulpit | Editorial
The US central bank spent $29tn to stop the last financial crash. Donald Trump now wants it to bail out his presidencyEarlier this month Donald Trump
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The Guardian view on genetics: diversity is destiny | Editorial 30 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on genetics: diversity is destiny | Editorial
Same sex attraction isn’t genetic. It’s humanThe argument that some behaviour is “in our genes” is distrusted by the left. Too often it is used to whitewash terrible injustices. Yet it cannot be entirely dismissed. Certain patterns of behaviour and thought, such as the faculty of language acquisition, are very clearly a part of our genetic inheritance as a species. The instinct for justice itself appears to arise spontaneously in small children. The escape from the idea that genes determine our fate is not to pretend that they have no influence, but to come to understand that they can have many different, often conflicting influences, even
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The Guardian view on Johnson v parliament: an unelective dictatorship | Editorial 29 Aug 1:46pm The Guardian view on Johnson v parliament: an unelective dictatorship | Editorial
The power, influence and relevance of the Commons have been put under threat by a prime minister with a populist touch pursuing a hard Brexit Boris Johnson has no public mandate and was chosen to be Tory party leader by just
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong: what next? | Editorial 29 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on Hong Kong: what next? | Editorial
After two and a half months, the clash between authorities and protesters appears further than ever from a peaceful resolutionThe length of
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The Guardian view on the collapse of Bury FC: a tragedy bigger than mere football | Editorial 28 Aug 1:40pm The Guardian view on the collapse of Bury FC: a tragedy bigger than mere football | Editorial
The fans of a small northern club deserved better than to witness their club destroyed by bad management and financial speculationFootball is about more than money, however much lucre has come to shape the beautiful game. Over this summer, English top-tier clubs had spent a
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The Guardian view on proroguing parliament: an affront to democracy | Editorial 28 Aug 12:42pm The Guardian view on proroguing parliament: an affront to democracy | Editorial
The prime minister’s action might adhere to the letter of the law but in spirit it is an act of wanton constitutional vandalismBoris Johnson has written many dishonest things in his life, but few as consequential as the letter sent on Wednesday to MPs explaining his decision
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The Guardian view on Johnson’s schools policies: spin over substance | Editorial 27 Aug 1:37pm The Guardian view on Johnson’s schools policies: spin over substance | Editorial
The prime minister says he wants pupils to succeed regardless of background. But a leak reveals policies whose main purpose is to score political points
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The Guardian view on the menopause at work: a healthy conversation | Editorial 27 Aug 1:34pm The Guardian view on the menopause at work: a healthy conversation | Editorial
From new employee entitlements to soap opera storylines, older women’s health needs a bigger profileConnected as it is with ageing, it is not surprising that the menopause has a bad reputation. Even for women who have generally found their periods to be a nuisance, the cessation of the monthly cycle of egg production often comes as a shock. As well as the psychological impact of what used to euphemistically be called “the change”, the menopause brings with it symptoms for which a lot of women find themselves alarmingly unprepared – as
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The Guardian view on the threat of Bolsonaro: tropical disaster is man-made | Editorial 26 Aug 1:36pm The Guardian view on the threat of Bolsonaro: tropical disaster is man-made | Editorial
Brazil’s far-right populist president has encouraged the wanton destruction of the world’s greatest forest. He has been humbled but not stoppedAs Donald Trump’s America retreats from global leadership, coalitions of like-minded nations are attempting to limit the damage. One such grouping at this weekend’s
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The Guardian view on the Ashes: triumph of a sporting hero with a little luck | Editorial 26 Aug 1:35pm The Guardian view on the Ashes: triumph of a sporting hero with a little luck | Editorial
Success for even the best players can depend on factors which can’t be foreseen or controlledBen Stokes’s batting to win England the third Test match of the current Ashes series was one of the most extraordinary demonstrations of sporting excellence of the last 50 years. After bowling 25 overs on Friday, something that in itself would drain most players, he batted for five and a half hours over the following two days to turn the match around. It was not just the athleticism on display, but the mental and moral toughness required to take on a challenge which looked entirely impossible and to maintain the necessary concentration for hours on end while the pressure on him grew. This really did set an example to every spectator of the kind of self-discipline necessary to make the most of talent. Yet, as the Australian papers have been quick to point out, he needed not just his own excellence, nor just the selfless and single-minded support of Jack Leach at the other end of the wicket; he also needed the assistance of the umpire, who made a wrong decision over an lbw appeal when Stokes was two runs away from winning the match (since Australia had used up both their reviews by this point, they were unable to call for the video evidence). The mistaken lbw decision is the second time this summer that an English cricketing triumph has been secured by Mr Stokes – and by an umpiring mistake. The similarly dramatic conclusion to the one-day Cricket World Cup, which saw England beat New Zealand in a super over, was also the result of
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The Guardian view on easier GCSEs at private schools: insult added to injury | Editorial 25 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on easier GCSEs at private schools: insult added to injury | Editorial
The government thought GCSEs should be overhauled; some private schools disagreed. The result is a deepening divideNew evidence showing that private-school pupils in England and Wales are not only taking easier qualifications than state-school ones, but
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The Guardian view on museum culture: take your time | Editorial 25 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on museum culture: take your time | Editorial
The crowds being hurried through galleries too often miss out on the experience they came for – but opportunities remainWhat is the place of art in a culture of inattention? Recent visitors to the Louvre report that
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The Observer view on Syria and the west’s shameful failure to act | Observer editorial 25 Aug 1:18am The Observer view on Syria and the west’s shameful failure to act | Observer editorial
The slaughter in Idlib is intensifying and millions have nowhere to go. The whole stability of the Middle East is at risk The crisis in Syria does not feature high on the agenda at this weekend’s G7 summit in Biarritz. The absence of two key players – Russia and Turkey – means any substantive initiatives are unlikely. Donald Trump has washed his hands of the conflict, although Pentagon chiefs are
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The Observer view on Jair Bolsonaro and the Amazon wildfires | Observer editorial 25 Aug 1:00am The Observer view on Jair Bolsonaro and the Amazon wildfires | Observer editorial
The ecological carnage we are witnessing will reverberate far beyond the borders of BrazilSmoke from the wildfires burning in the Amazon plunged São Paolo, 1,700 miles from the scenes of destruction, into an eerie darkness last Monday afternoon. The temporary blackout made it impossible for residents of Brazil’s largest city to ignore the ecological carnage taking place on the other side of their country. But the ruin of rainforest we are currently witnessing will reverberate far beyond the borders of Brazil in decades to come. Home to
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The Guardian view on the global economy: opportunities wasted | Editorial 23 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on the global economy: opportunities wasted | Editorial
The G7 summit in Biarritz this weekend will fail to rise to any of its urgent challengesRarely has there been more need of collective action on the world’s problems than at the G7 summit hosted by Emmanuel Macron in Biarritz this weekend. Rarely have the chances of success appeared so miserably low. The G7 is supposed to be the forum where the west’s leading nations get to grips with thorny economic and political issues, and even though life has moved on since a previous French president, Valéry Giscard d’Estaing, hosted the first get-together at Rambouillet in 1975, there is plenty to talk about. Three subjects scream out for attention: protectionism, Brexit and the climate emergency. As in the mid-1970s, the global economy is not in good shape. Growth is slowing and there is a hint of recession in the air. In two G7 members –
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The Guardian view on bank holidays: give us a break | Editorial 23 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on bank holidays: give us a break | Editorial
Governments should choose wisely what we should celebrate and when. They seldom doThere is an argument that bank holidays are more trouble than they are worth. In Northern Ireland, for instance, who could possibly contend that it was sensible to make 12 July –
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson in Europe: warmer words but a cold reality | Editorial 22 Aug 1:36pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson in Europe: warmer words but a cold reality | Editorial
If Angela Merkel’s 30-day deadline is to mean anything, parliament must sit through September to force the government’s handIn a world of political spin, a single smart soundbite can sometimes take over an
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The Guardian view on politicians and interviewers: it’s time to talk again | Editorial 22 Aug 1:35pm The Guardian view on politicians and interviewers: it’s time to talk again | Editorial
The Channel 4 boss is right to challenge party leaders over the sharp recent reduction in access granted to journalistsBritain’s television industry has found a new champion – or, rather, enabled an existing one to step forward. Dorothy Byrne is head of news and current affairs at Channel 4 and not someone who has cultivated a public profile. Her
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The Guardian view on 16-year-old soldiers: armies are for adults | Editorial 21 Aug 1:35pm The Guardian view on 16-year-old soldiers: armies are for adults | Editorial
With under-18s making up almost 30% of recent British army recruits, the UK is increasingly out of stepThat the British army has, over the past year, continued its energetic recruitment of 16- and 17-year-olds should surprise no one who is familiar with the ongoing argument about the UK’s
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The Guardian view on Trump and Greenland: no sale | Editorial 21 Aug 1:33pm The Guardian view on Trump and Greenland: no sale | Editorial
The great ice sheets are more valuable to the world than the oil that lies beneath themOne of the classic storylines of science fiction is the emergence of a mutant child, with powers far beyond those of adults and no understanding of their use. The theme is carried to its the extreme in Jerome Bixby’s story
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and the EU: he cannot be serious | Editorial 20 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and the EU: he cannot be serious | Editorial
The PM’s letter to Donald Tusk is a reckless and detail-free approach to the new deal with Europe that he claims to wantIf there is any fragile encouragement to be squeezed out of Boris Johnson’s
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The Guardian view on Gamergate: when hatred escaped | Editorial 20 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on Gamergate: when hatred escaped | Editorial
Five years after an online movement based on male rage started, its destructive effects have leached into our politics and daily livesFive years ago a young woman broke up with her boyfriend, who was so offended by this that he posted nearly 10,000 words of misery and self-justification to the internet – and set in motion a
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The Guardian view on preventing no deal: do whatever it takes | Editorial 19 Aug 1:24pm The Guardian view on preventing no deal: do whatever it takes | Editorial
Cabinet Office documents have laid bare the destructive impact of leaving the EU without a withdrawal agreementBoris Johnson has been prime minister less than four weeks. In the absence of parliament, he has made a spirited attempt to pretend that British exit from the European Union would be straightforward. Brexit will definitely take place on 31 October, he has insisted. It will either involve the EU abandoning the Irish backstop or there will be no deal. The difference scarcely matters to Mr Johnson, who insists Brexit will be a trouble-free exercise in whatever form it comes, whose dangers have been exaggerated and whose rewards underestimated. Every bit of this was false when Mr Johnson first concocted it. It is even more threadbare now – and getting more dangerous by the day. However, we may now be witnessing the first faint wisps of recognition from within the government that things are not going to work out as they pretend.
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The Guardian view on violence against public figures: the threat is growing | Editorial 19 Aug 1:24pm The Guardian view on violence against public figures: the threat is growing | Editorial
Donald Trump’s hostility to the press is so far unmatched in the UK. But the targeting of Owen Jones and others by far-right activists is deeply concerningAny unprovoked violent attack is disturbing. Thuggish behaviour is repellent, all the more so when an individual is targeted by a group. When a person is singled out because of their political beliefs, or due to their assailants’ hatred of a particular group or minority, the crime has additional significance. With a police investigation ongoing, it is too soon to draw conclusions about the motives of the men who
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The Guardian view on EU citizens’ rights: Johnson’s warm words are worthless | Editorial 18 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on EU citizens’ rights: Johnson’s warm words are worthless | Editorial
Many Brexiters, including the prime minister, are in denial about the cruelty that their choices have already inflicted on millions of peopleThe Conservative party is in the habit of seeing the European Union as something that was inflicted on Britain and Brexit as self-defence. Eurosceptics struggle to perceive any aggression in the act of leaving the EU. But for citizens of other European countries the referendum
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The Observer view on Jeremy Corbyn and stopping a no-deal Brexit | Observer editorial 18 Aug 1:00am The Observer view on Jeremy Corbyn and stopping a no-deal Brexit | Observer editorial
Dislike of the Labour leader should not be allowed to get in the way of Britain’s need for a national governmentNobody in life gets everything they want all of the time. We have to live with the cards we have been dealt and the decisions we have made, good or bad. So it is in politics. The majority of MPs who have expressed their opposition to a no-deal Brexit have to live with two realities they may find unacceptable. Jeremy Corbyn is a committed socialist, careless of division and widely distrusted. Boris Johnson is a prime minister steering Britain full tilt towards a moment of national peril propelled solely by the exigencies of extreme rightwing politics. Yet it is Corbyn who has tried to break the deadlock. It is against this background that MPs beyond the rightwing English nationalist laager into which Johnson has locked his party must assess Corbyn’s offer to create a
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The Observer’s view on China’s reaction to pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong | Observer editorial 18 Aug 1:00am The Observer’s view on China’s reaction to pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong | Observer editorial
The only way forward is to stop posturing and begin a dialogue In Hong Kong, China’s leaders are confronted by an old truth, familiar to more securely established governments, that with power comes responsibility. There is no doubt Beijing has the brute strength to crush pro-democracy protests in Britain’s former colony. Equally, there is no doubt it would be irresponsible and self-defeating to do so. Satellite images of motorised units of
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The Guardian view on A-levels: end the guesswork in university admissions | Editorial 16 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on A-levels: end the guesswork in university admissions | Editorial
Universities must now pick students without knowing their exam results. This is unfair and inefficient. It must changeThis week’s A-level results will have disappointed some students, but despite that there may in one sense never be a better time to be a UK teenager who wants to go on to higher education. It is true that unlike previous generations they will be saddled with debts and repayments of one type or another. But the recent massive expansion in higher education, unleashed by the government’s reforms in 2015 allowing unlimited recruitment, as well as the lack of alternatives and the decline in the number of school leavers, means that for now and the next two or three years, sixth formers clutching A-level certificates and equivalent qualifications will be in high demand. A symptom of that demand are the generous offers being made by institutions to attract students at all stages of the admissions process. Since cutting tuition fees puts off students fearing a cut-price education, universities are instead offering incentives in various forms, as well as offering bursaries to support those students whose family circumstances mean they would otherwise be unable to afford to go. Hence the record numbers of applicants from so-called low-participation neighbourhoods, to use the sector’s obscure proxy for measuring disadvantage.
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The Guardian view on entry to Israel: a bar for Trump’s sake, not the country’s | Editorial 16 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on entry to Israel: a bar for Trump’s sake, not the country’s | Editorial
The US president has enlisted Benjamin Netanyahu in his campaign for re-election. That is an alarming development for both countriesBenjamin Netanyahu does not care for criticism, and his increasingly rightwing governments have sought to stifle it. But the decision to refuse entry to Ilhan Omar, and to offer Rashida Tlaib, who is of Palestinian descent, entry
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The Guardian view on MPs and no-deal Brexit: mobilise the majority | Editorial 15 Aug 1:45pm The Guardian view on MPs and no-deal Brexit: mobilise the majority | Editorial
Boris Johnson’s government is hastening towards a no-deal Brexit. All MPs who oppose this catastrophic national danger must cooperate in the cause of preventing itBritain’s exit from the European Union without a withdrawal deal would be an unequivocal national calamity. It must be stopped by parliament as soon and as decisively as possible. It is the duty of all MPs who oppose no deal to work together over the coming weeks, making necessary compromises, to ensure this outcome. The former chancellor Philip Hammond set out the case against no deal in a
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The Guardian view on Peterloo, 200 years on: a defining moment | Editorial 15 Aug 1:43pm The Guardian view on Peterloo, 200 years on: a defining moment | Editorial
The brutal attack on peaceful protesters in Manchester in 1819 still resonates todayWe are what we remember. The
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The Guardian view on Brexit and the economy: storm clouds on the horizon | Editorial 14 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on Brexit and the economy: storm clouds on the horizon | Editorial
It falls to a former chancellor to speak blunt truths from the backbenches because Boris Johnson employs only those willing to embrace denial and deceitFormer chancellors often criticise serving prime ministers but usually when they represent different parties.
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The Guardian view on treating Ebola: science is the start | Editorial 14 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on treating Ebola: science is the start | Editorial
Researchers have developed and trialled drugs that can cure this deadly disease. The problem now is to deliver themThis week has seen a heartening triumph of medical science: Ebola is now curable, doctors say. The announcement is also a timely one. The outbreak in the war-ravaged territories of the north-eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, which began over a year ago, has defied the sustained efforts to halt it. Last month, with the death toll above 1,600 people, the World Health Organization declared it an emergency of international concern. The even deadlier West African epidemic of 2014 killed more than 11,000 people before it was extinguished, having prompted fear around the world. The high death rate and agonising nature of the deaths all add to the virus’s terrors. So the news that two
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong: on the brink | Editorial 13 Aug 1:42pm The Guardian view on Hong Kong: on the brink | Editorial
The city is seeing new levels of violence. The authorities created this mess – how can it be ended?The memories of the bloody crackdown on Tiananmen Square’s pro-democracy protests 30 years ago are sharpening.
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The Guardian view on surveillance: Big Brother is not the only watcher now | Editorial 13 Aug 1:41pm The Guardian view on surveillance: Big Brother is not the only watcher now | Editorial
The problem is not that computers can recognise faces. It’s that they can’t forget themArguments about surveillance and privacy are usually framed around Big Brother – the overweening state. But the widespread use of facial recognition in private hands suggests a more urgent danger: that not just Big Brother but anyone in the family can watch, and profit from, our faces. The private landlords of the King’s Cross development in London are using facial recognition now in their CCTV surveillance. It is not clear
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s prison policy: a fantasy built on an invention | Editorial 12 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s prison policy: a fantasy built on an invention | Editorial
Overcrowded prisons have encouraged the use of alternative penal policies. But building new prisons must not mean longer sentencingWhen politicians make summer law and order announcements involving big round numbers, it is time to count your spoons and prepare for an autumn election. Boris Johnson is a serial offender. In July he announced 20,000 more police. Now he says he will provide
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The Guardian view on AI-enhanced noses: something smells off | Editorial 12 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on AI-enhanced noses: something smells off | Editorial
The tyranny of snobbery is bad enough when it comes to taste. Let’s not add the tyranny of computers tooWe have long enhanced our frail senses with prostheses. But while human vision has been improved with lenses, touch with prosthetic limbs, and hearing with microphones, taste and smell have proved trickier to upgrade. But not impossible. News that
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Caroline Lucas’s female cabinet plan – divisive or visionary? | Editorial 12 Aug 12:26pm Caroline Lucas’s female cabinet plan – divisive or visionary? | Editorial
Readers respond to the Green MP’s proposal to 10 female politicians to form a cabinet of national unity to stop a no-deal BrexitI vote for the Green party, oppose Brexit, teach and research women’s history, and consider myself to be a feminist, but I do not agree with Caroline Lucas that assembling a cabinet of women is the means by which to solve the problems of Brexit (
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The Guardian view on stop and search: not a solution | Editorial 11 Aug 1:41pm The Guardian view on stop and search: not a solution | Editorial
The prime minister is positioning himself as tough on crime. The government should address the root causes insteadEight years ago this month, when Boris Johnson was mayor of London, the worst rioting Britain had seen in decades broke out in the capital, before spreading across the country. An estimated 20,000 people were drawn in, and 4,000 arrested. A subsequent study by the Guardian and the London School of Economics
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The Guardian view on climate crisis: what can we do? | Editorial 11 Aug 1:41pm The Guardian view on climate crisis: what can we do? | Editorial
Curbing meat and dairy consumption is critical to tackling global heating. But the issue must not be reduced to solely a question of personal choices
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The Observer view on Britain’s blackout | Observer editorial 11 Aug 2:00am The Observer view on Britain’s blackout | Observer editorial
Last week’s widespread disruption illuminated the brittle nature of our infrastructureNearly a million people without power; parts of the rail network crippled; Newcastle airport plunged into darkness; a
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The Observer view on India’s aggression over Kashmir | Observer editorial 11 Aug 1:04am The Observer view on India’s aggression over Kashmir | Observer editorial
Narendra Modi’s high-handed action over the disputed territory is likely to revive conflict with PakistanThe crisis over Kashmir, triggered by the Indian government’s decision to impose direct rule from Delhi, has universal relevance. It says much about the times we live in and how we are ruled. Here is a semi-autonomous state, part of a federal union protected by a constitution, which has seen its
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The Guardian view on an early election: Johnson’s campaign has already begun | Editorial 9 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on an early election: Johnson’s campaign has already begun | Editorial
Downing Street is embracing constitutional outrage as a way to cast parliament as the obstacle to BrexitThe future of the United Kingdom might hang on the application of 13 fateful words in a statute that passed into law with little controversy less than a decade ago. According to section 2(7) of the
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The Guardian view on small change: take care of the pennies | Editorial 9 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on small change: take care of the pennies | Editorial
Many people these days don’t give a brass farthing for one and two pence pieces. But even if we use them less in purchases, they are still woven into our speechOur language is heavy with pennies, as our purses and pockets used to be. A penny for your thoughts. The penny drops. Penny dreadful. Pennies from heaven. The proverbial and idiomatic value of the penny has long since outstripped its real one. No 1p coins were produced last year by the Royal Mint
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The Guardian view on Labour and Scotland: a wound born of weakness | Editorial 8 Aug 1:33pm The Guardian view on Labour and Scotland: a wound born of weakness | Editorial
John McDonnell has left Labour facing both ways on a second Scottish referendum. But he thinks that is a price worth payingIf the shadow chancellor had planned a bombshell announcement that would create maximum havoc in the Scottish Labour party, it would look exactly like what he said this week. A second independence referendum is the hottest question in Scottish politics. Scottish Labour opposes it. Its leader Richard Leonard has repeatedly said that Labour would refuse permission to the Scottish nationalists to hold such a vote. Yet John McDonnell went to Edinburgh on Tuesday and, without consulting Mr Leonard, said
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The Guardian view on Hollywood: once (twice, thrice) upon a time | Editorial 8 Aug 1:31pm The Guardian view on Hollywood: once (twice, thrice) upon a time | Editorial
A new golden age of television has eclipsed Tinseltown’s reboots and sequels. Can America’s dream factory rise again?The UK release of Quentin Tarantino’s new film
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The Guardian view on British foreign policy: the lost art of diplomacy | Editorial 7 Aug 1:43pm The Guardian view on British foreign policy: the lost art of diplomacy | Editorial
Boris Johnson’s cabinet is sulking at Brussels and sycophantic in Washington. Neither approach advances Britain’s interests as it faces BrexitDuring the EU referendum campaign Barack Obama warned that Brexit put Britain at risk of relegation as a global trading power. Boris Johnson, then mayor of London, hit back, attributing the US president’s view to
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s protests: no end in sight, and little hope | Editorial 7 Aug 1:40pm The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s protests: no end in sight, and little hope | Editorial
Harsh policing and official intransigence are only inflaming the unrest spreading through the cityBeijing and Hong Kong’s protesters can agree on this much about the unrest now in its ninth week: the turmoil is growing and
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The Guardian view on Kashmir: danger ahead | Editorial 6 Aug 2:20pm The Guardian view on Kashmir: danger ahead | Editorial
India revoking the disputed region’s special status is incendiary and wrong. The impact could be felt throughout the regionThe warning signs were there. Hindu nationalists have long desired to end the semi-autonomous status of Kashmir, India’s only Muslim-majority state; the ruling Bharatiya Janata party has long said it would do so. Suspicions rose when thousands more security forces poured in around a week ago, and when pilgrims and tourists were
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The Guardian view on a Brexit deal: stop posturing and try talking | Editorial 6 Aug 2:19pm The Guardian view on a Brexit deal: stop posturing and try talking | Editorial
Both the EU and the British government say they want to avoid a 31 October crash-out. They must get around the table if they are seriousThe Boris Johnson government and the European Union loathe each other. They are far apart about Brexit. There is no secret about any of that. This week, though, they have also got themselves into a confrontation over whether they can even talk to one another about Brexit. That squabbling
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The Guardian view on the China-US trade wars: the global economy is at risk | Editorial 5 Aug 1:35pm The Guardian view on the China-US trade wars: the global economy is at risk | Editorial
Xi Jinping’s newfound readiness to let the yuan float sends a worrying message that there will be no deal by the end of August deadlineEvents have moved disturbingly swiftly since Donald Trump surprised everyone last week by announcing plans for a fresh wave of tariffs on Chinese imports. Beijing retaliated by targeting US agricultural products and allowing its currency to depreciate against the US dollar. Mr Trump duly fired off a tweet accusing the Chinese of currency manipulation, a clear sign that he is preparing to ratchet up the tension still further.
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The Guardian view on the end of Harland and Wolff: closed for business | Editorial 5 Aug 1:29pm The Guardian view on the end of Harland and Wolff: closed for business | Editorial
The Belfast shipyard was a sectarian icon. But its closure now speaks to Britain’s historic failure to adapt manufacturing to new marketsMany of the names will still resonate for older readers. All too few of them can have any associations for younger ones. They were the shipbuilding firms of Britain, the companies that, until the first world war and beyond, made the majority of the world’s ships. They were still big manufacturing concerns in the post-1945 era. They were firms like John Brown’s, Fairfield’s and Scott Lithgow on the Clyde, Swan Hunter on the Tyne, Short Brothers on Wearside and Smiths Dock on the Tees. One or two of these once fabled companies still survive, like Vickers in Barrow and Cammell Laird on the Mersey. Today, though, Britain is not a shipbuilding leviathan but a minnow. According to
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The Guardian view on no-deal Brexit plans: parliament must take back control | Editorial 4 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on no-deal Brexit plans: parliament must take back control | Editorial
This is a democratic emergency. MPs and other elected bodies must sit in August to stop Boris Johnson’s drive for a no-deal BrexitTo take Britain out of the European Union
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The Guardian view on Saudi Arabia’s reforms: not just a battle for women | Editorial 4 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on Saudi Arabia’s reforms: not just a battle for women | Editorial
Relaxation of the guardianship system is long overdue. But more change is needed, and the credit for these reforms should go to the women who have fought for them – not RiyadhThe jubilation of women in Saudi Arabia was real – and understandable. Last Friday, the kingdom
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The Observer view on how the left can thwart Johnson and Trump | Observer editorial 4 Aug 1:00am The Observer view on how the left can thwart Johnson and Trump | Observer editorial
Rightwing populism is a threat to democracy on both sides of the Atlantic, but ‘politics as usual’ won’t stop itMuch has been made in recent days of the supposed similarities between Boris Johnson and Donald Trump. On a personal level, it is said, both men are boastful braggarts, frequently untruthful and skilled at self-promotion, which is pretty much all they care about. In terms of policy, both are rightwing populists wedded to a recklessly destructive form of regressive, pseudo-nostalgic nationalism. Both Johnson and Trump inspire strong feelings, especially in their detractors. Max Hastings, who was Johnson’s boss at the
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The Observer view on immigration being the answer to falling birth rates | Observer editorial 4 Aug 1:00am The Observer view on immigration being the answer to falling birth rates | Observer editorial
Declining fertility rates are good for the planet but bad for countries with ageing populations. But encouraging women to have more children is not the answerThe Duke and Duchess of Sussex have become synonymous with a refreshing rejection of royal convention. Last week, Prince Harry dispensed with the royal predilection for larger than average families in an interview with the primatologist Jane Goodall. “
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The Guardian view on non-stop sports: just not cricket | Editorial 2 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on non-stop sports: just not cricket | Editorial
The football and cricket seasons have expanded beyond all reason. Spectators and players need a breakTo every thing there is a season; a time to bowl, a time to bat, a time to sweep, a time to block, a time to dribble, a time to pass, a time to shoot, a time to knock it over to the big lad in the middle and hope for the best. Or at least that used to be the case, until the cricket and football seasons blended into one and we reached the current sorry situation where the first Ashes Test and the football season started in the same week. Denis Compton, who in an age when the seasons were happily compartmentalised played 78 Tests for England and won the FA Cup with Arsenal, must be spinning in his grave. The opening salvo in
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The Guardian view on the Brecon and Radnorshire byelection: a vote to stop no-deal | Editorial 2 Aug 8:16am The Guardian view on the Brecon and Radnorshire byelection: a vote to stop no-deal | Editorial
The Lib Dem recovery continues. Labour’s slump goes on. And there was no Johnson bounce for Tory comfortIt is a mark of the recent reversals of expectation among Britain’s political parties that anything other than a Liberal Democrat victory in the
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The Guardian view on no-deal planning: stop this political lie | Editorial 1 Aug 1:31pm The Guardian view on no-deal planning: stop this political lie | Editorial
There is no economic case for crashing out of the European Union. MPs must stop the government’s plans in their tracksBrexit is both a political and an economic choice. But a no-deal Brexit would be an entirely political one. Boris Johnson’s blustering openness to no-deal derives from many things. Partly it stems from the fact that, to the keenest leavers, Brexit has always been an article of belief rather a policy programme. Partly it derives from the fear that only a decisive break will puncture the threat from the nationalist Brexit party. Partly it follows from the fact that he and many like him do not ultimately care about the Northern Ireland peace process, and are not bothered about the concerns of the devolved nations either. In the end, however, a no-deal Brexit is an act of faith-based politics and not a rational choice. It would also have very serious and perhaps destructive economic consequences. Some of those are becoming clearer by the day in response to the Johnson government’s prioritisation of politics. The most instantly destabilising is the fall in the
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The Guardian view on arms control treaties: how we started worrying again | Editorial 1 Aug 1:29pm The Guardian view on arms control treaties: how we started worrying again | Editorial
The end of the INF nuclear treaty is a bad step that could be followed by a worse oneRelief, however profound, can be quickly replaced by complacency. It is hard to remember how omnipresent the fear of nuclear war once was. Most teenagers
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The Guardian view on climate breakdown: an emergency for all, but especially the poor | Editorial 31 Jul 1:30pm The Guardian view on climate breakdown: an emergency for all, but especially the poor | Editorial
Record temperatures in Europe and the US have reinforced the danger of global heating for many inhabitants. But others are and will be far worse hitWe tend to learn better from experience than from what we have simply been told. So for many in Europe, sleepless nights and suffocating buses or workplaces have helped to make real the threat posed by global heating. Now statistics are reinforcing the message. Last week the UK had the
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The Guardian view on Afghanistan: war and peace talks | Editorial 30 Jul 1:38pm The Guardian view on Afghanistan: war and peace talks | Editorial
The government and its foreign allies have taken more civilian lives than the Taliban and others this year. A deal is needed to end America’s longest-running conflict – but not a botch jobAfter four decades of war, Afghan civilians have experienced many forms of suffering, at the hands of many actors. It is nonetheless horrifying that the Afghan government and its international allies
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The Guardian view on reality TV: show contestants some love | Editorial 30 Jul 1:36pm The Guardian view on reality TV: show contestants some love | Editorial
New rules to protect contestants in Love Island and programmes like it are needed, but must be designed with unintended consequences in mindThe morning after the finale of the latest series of Love Island must have brought a powerful sense of anticlimax to all those involved in making it – even if such feelings were mingled with relief. For the past eight weeks the participants and producers have occupied a cultural hotspot, their show the talk of water coolers and social media feeds across the land. Last year’s concluding episode won the
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and Scotland: state of disunion | Editorial 29 Jul 1:45pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and Scotland: state of disunion | Editorial
The prime minister has made visiting Scotland an early priority. But it is getting late to stop Brexit from breaking up the UKBoris Johnson is insouciantly reluctant to be seen travelling cap in hand to Berlin, Paris or Brussels in pursuit of new Brexit terms. He has not even bothered to make a phone call
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The Guardian view on the case for legalising drugs: time to be reasonable | Editorial 29 Jul 1:43pm The Guardian view on the case for legalising drugs: time to be reasonable | Editorial
Addiction, trafficking and incarceration cause enormous harm. The UK must learn from the countries that are trying to find solutionsDrug laws should be designed to minimise damage. This might sound obvious. But the UK’s drug laws – along with those of most other countries – arguably do not have this effect. Indeed there is a strong argument that in many respects the blanket prohibition, under criminal statutes, of substances from cannabis to heroin along with the myriad synthetic substances now widely used to mimic their effects, does more harm than good. This is not a novel point of view. Drug experts in the UK and around the world have been pointing out the flaws and inconsistencies in current policies for ages, with former Colombian president, Juan Manuel Santos, among those who have argued for a new approach focused on human rights and public health. In the UK, polls show a majority supports
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The Guardian view on Amazon deforestation: Europe must act to prevent disaster | Editorial 28 Jul 1:43pm The Guardian view on Amazon deforestation: Europe must act to prevent disaster | Editorial
We need rainforests to limit climate change, as well as protect biodiversity, and must do all we can to support Brazilian conservationIf there is a glimmer of light amid the darkness of recent reports from the Brazilian Amazon, where deforestation is accelerating along with threats to the indigenous people who live there, it could lie in the growing power of climate diplomacy, combined with increased understanding of the crucial role played by trees in our planet’s climate system. The deal agreed a month ago between the EU and the Mercosur bloc of Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay (Venezuela is suspended) enhances European leverage with its South American trading partners. Already, the prize of access to EU markets is credited with having convinced Brazil not to follow Donald Trump’s lead by withdrawing from the Paris climate deal. Now the EU must strengthen its environmental commitments, as a letter from 600
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The Guardian view on rendition and torture: a shame that Britain cannot erase | Editorial 28 Jul 1:38pm The Guardian view on rendition and torture: a shame that Britain cannot erase | Editorial
Boris Johnson’s decision to discontinue a necessary inquiry is immoral, and against the national interest tooA new prime minister, from the same party as his predecessors, cannot exactly wipe the slate clean. But the transition does at least allow the government to take out some of the more odiferous trash, as the flurry of statements and releases in the days before Theresa May’s departure and Boris Johnson’s arrival indicated. One of the
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s government: of the rich, for the rich? | Editorial 26 Jul 12:40pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s government: of the rich, for the rich? | Editorial
If the Conservative party wants to win over large sections of the poor then it will have to tackle the damagingly high levels of inequality in the UKOne the eve of the 2015 election, one that most pollsters thought David Cameron would not win, Boris Johnson
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The Guardian view on rape and the justice system: victims deserve more than this | Editorial 26 Jul 12:40pm The Guardian view on rape and the justice system: victims deserve more than this | Editorial
The number of reported rapes leading to a suspect being charged has fallen off a cliff, and boosting police numbers is not the solutionThe criminal justice system has been failing victims of rape for a long time. From the initial reporting of a crime, through to investigation and trial, for decades women could expect to be on the receiving end – from police, lawyers, judges, juries and the wider public – of some combination of disrespect, distrust and scorn. This doesn’t mean that sympathy was always with the accused, or that justice was never done. But sexual mores and sexist prejudice combined to make the process of seeking justice an impossibly hard one. To what extent we have left that world behind is not easy to say. The blame and shame attached to victims has lessened as attitudes to sexuality have become more liberal. Rape within marriage was made a crime in 1992. The number of recorded rapes has risen by 61% in four years – a change statisticians attribute to decreased stigma and better policing rather than a dramatic increase in crime. But when the proportion of such reports that lead to a suspect being charged is revealed to have plummeted to
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The Guardian view on youth jails: Feltham isn’t the only problem | Editorial 25 Jul 1:20pm The Guardian view on youth jails: Feltham isn’t the only problem | Editorial
With violence and self-harm at record levels, ministers should look for alternative ways to punish and rehabilitate the youngBad news about youth custody generally comes either in the form of a tragedy or a warning. This week’s is the latter: a
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The Guardian view on James Lovelock: Earth, but not as we knew it | Editorial 25 Jul 1:20pm The Guardian view on James Lovelock: Earth, but not as we knew it | Editorial
As he celebrates his centennial birthday, the scientist continues to rewrite our futureJames Lovelock, the scientist and writer, is 100 years old on Friday and remains a combination of environmental Cassandra and Old Testament prophet. Unlike them, though, he changes his mind about what the future holds. Foolish consistency, Emerson wrote, is the hobgoblin of little minds, and Mr Lovelock’s mind is not little. More than 10 years before the
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The Guardian view on Team Johnson: no room for compromise | Editorial 24 Jul 2:54pm The Guardian view on Team Johnson: no room for compromise | Editorial
The new prime minister promises national unity and declares himself ready to pursue a no-deal Brexit. Those are not compatible positionsFour years ago, when Boris Johnson contemplated running for the Conservative leadership, many Tory MPs made it clear they did not think him suitable to serve as prime minister and
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The Guardian view on Robert Mueller’s testimony: what will Democrats do next? | Editorial 24 Jul 2:53pm The Guardian view on Robert Mueller’s testimony: what will Democrats do next? | Editorial
The special counsel offered no startling new material, but his testimony was nonetheless valuableIs it possible to talk of political theatre when the star of the show refuses to take centre stage? The special counsel Robert Mueller was
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s leadership: the years of a clown | Editorial 23 Jul 1:46pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s leadership: the years of a clown | Editorial
If the UK’s new prime minister thinks he can sup with populists like Nigel Farage and Donald Trump over Brexit, he risks ending up as dessertThe Conservative party has finally got a leader it deserves. As the UK’s next prime minister, Boris Johnson won’t be able to outrun boring facts and hide from bad publicity. He faces the most daunting challenge – that of how the UK can leave the European Union – on entering No 10 since Winston Churchill in 1940. It is fitting because Mr Johnson is largely responsible for the mess he now has to clear up. The signs are not promising. His pledge that the UK will leave the EU on 31 October
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The Guardian view on violence in Hong Kong: an attack on the idea of democracy | Editorial 23 Jul 1:39pm The Guardian view on violence in Hong Kong: an attack on the idea of democracy | Editorial
Criminals may have launched the bloody assaults on rail passengers, but the incident is more likely to inflame than quell the anger at authoritiesWe are very unlikely to find out who arranged for thugs to
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The Guardian view of the new Lib Dem leader: the vision thing | Editorial 22 Jul 1:42pm The Guardian view of the new Lib Dem leader: the vision thing | Editorial
To wrest the mantle of progressive change from other rivals in Westminster will need Jo Swinson to find her voice and a new set of attractive policies beyond BrexitJo Swinson
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The Guardian view on NHS privatisation: the £9.2bn question | Editorial 22 Jul 1:42pm The Guardian view on NHS privatisation: the £9.2bn question | Editorial
Facts on the ground, such as private companies’ 44% share of child mental health spending, make a mockery of ministers’ promisesThe gap between what the government is saying about the NHS and what is actually happening is growing. When the health secretary, Matt Hancock, declared in January that there would be “no privatisation on my watch”, he was not announcing a change in policy but a continuation. Andrew Lansley’s 2012 reorganisation is recognised by Theresa May’s government as a failure, and ministers support NHS England’s goal of abolishing the
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The Guardian view on Iran’s seizure of a British tanker: dangerous waters ahead | Editorial 21 Jul 1:40pm The Guardian view on Iran’s seizure of a British tanker: dangerous waters ahead | Editorial
The immediate issue is protecting vessels; the most important issue is where the post-Brexit UK positions itselfThe British-flagged
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The Guardian view on housing inequality: the young are paying | Editorial 21 Jul 1:36pm The Guardian view on housing inequality: the young are paying | Editorial
The promise of a property-owning democracy is laughable when so many millennials cannot afford to buy – and will struggle to rent in old ageThe UK’s dysfunctional housing market – or more accurately, markets – is a problem affecting people of all ages. But the plight of millennials, born between the early 1980s and mid-1990s, deserves special attention. These people, now in their 20s and 30s, are far less likely than previous cohorts to be able to access a socially rented home or afford to buy one – particularly in London, Edinburgh, Oxford or any of the country’s other hotspots. Those who went to university, particularly since 2010 when tuition fees rose to £9,000 annually, have large debts. This week a parliamentary report said a chronic lack of affordable housing means that 630,000 of them are on course for an
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The Observer view: now the fight starts to stave off a disastrous no-deal Brexit | Observer editorial 21 Jul 1:00am The Observer view: now the fight starts to stave off a disastrous no-deal Brexit | Observer editorial
Only MPs can stop Boris Johnson, who has demonstrated repeatedly that he cannot be trustedOn Wednesday, a new prime minister will move into Downing Street. He will assume office at a time of burgeoning crisis. While the political system remains gridlocked over Brexit, the west’s deteriorating relations with Iran are fraught with the risk of global conflict. No prime minister has faced as challenging a set of circumstances since the Second World War. And the man who looks almost certain to be making his entrance through that famous door is Boris Johnson. It’s hard to think of a senior Conservative MP less qualified to assume the premiership in such times. The
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The Observer view: fifty years on, the real meaning of the lunar landing is becoming clear | Observer editorial 21 Jul 1:00am The Observer view: fifty years on, the real meaning of the lunar landing is becoming clear | Observer editorial
Within a few years, a manned space station will orbit the moon and later a colony could be built on its surfaceWhen Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin took their first careful steps on
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson: bad actor, dishonest script | Editorial 19 Jul 1:30pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson: bad actor, dishonest script | Editorial
‘Boris’ is a stage persona that Britain’s likely next prime minister uses to mask serious character flawsThe most insightful contribution to the Conservative leadership contest was made this week by a smoked fish. That does not reflect well on the human candidates, one of whom brandished a kipper as a prop to facilitate a rhetorical point. Boris Johnson
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The Guardian view on moon landings: a new race for space | Editorial 19 Jul 1:25pm The Guardian view on moon landings: a new race for space | Editorial
The Apollo 11 mission inspired the world. What has happened in the ensuing half-century? When Neil Armstrong
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The Guardian view on Ebola in the DRC: help needed – and dialogue too | Editorial 18 Jul 1:27pm The Guardian view on Ebola in the DRC: help needed – and dialogue too | Editorial
The second largest outbreak of the disease has already sickened thousands. WHO’s declaration of an emergency of international concern should prompt more and better supportAre we able to learn the right lessons when disaster strikes? Five years ago, a devastating outbreak of
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The Guardian view on lawns and verges: go wild | Editorial 18 Jul 1:25pm The Guardian view on lawns and verges: go wild | Editorial
Front gardens and roadsides reimagined as meadows offer a glimpse of the greener future we all must aim forIt was a startling picture. An eight-mile river of colour flows where once a dry bed of stubby grass grew – all because a local authority rewilding strategy brought country life back to an urban landscape. The stretch of roadside verges in and around Rotherham, South Yorkshire, planted with wild flowers for the third year running, created
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s farewell speech: she threw away her shot | Editorial 17 Jul 1:30pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s farewell speech: she threw away her shot | Editorial
The prime minister had the opportunity to tell her party some hard truths about the Brexit choices it is making, and she missed itBritish culture reserves affection for failure if it is heroic, or even dogged, and in that spirit it is possible that history will not be as unkind to Theresa May as politics has been. The prime minister’s tenure in Downing Street ends next week with few policy accomplishments to her name and the single most important task – Brexit – messily incomplete. There is no evidence that the nation thinks warmly of her, although there is respect for her tenacity, stamina and probity. It is easy to find critics of her judgment, but no one thinks she has been venal. Critics who think her principles were the wrong ones acknowledge at least the aspiration to be principled. The contrast with her successor could hardly be starker.
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The Guardian view on Xinjiang: speak out, or be complicit | Editorial 17 Jul 1:25pm The Guardian view on Xinjiang: speak out, or be complicit | Editorial
An estimated 1 million Uighurs and other minorities are held in China’s camps. But Beijing’s power has silenced many of those who one might expect to criticise itWhat does it take to make people speak out? A growing number of Uighurs overseas are
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What role can religion play in modern Britain? | Letters 17 Jul 12:56pm What role can religion play in modern Britain? | Letters
Guardian readers respond to our editorial on the decline of organised mainstream ChristianityYour editorial (
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The Guardian view on Donald Trump: a racist in substance and style | Editorial 16 Jul 1:59pm The Guardian view on Donald Trump: a racist in substance and style | Editorial
The US president’s bigotry has a political purpose: to distract voters and energise his base. He doesn’t care about the damage he might inflict in the processDonald Trump’s agenda is to turn the clock back in the United States half a century, to a time when elected leaders spoke the language of white supremacy. Like Mr Trump, they did not use dog whistles. Until 1967, 17 states had laws banning interracial marriage. Mississippi did not vote to
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The Guardian view on Scottish drug deaths: put health and safety first | Editorial 16 Jul 1:35pm The Guardian view on Scottish drug deaths: put health and safety first | Editorial
With Scotland’s death rate the highest in the EU, political disagreements must not get in the way of an effective responseBetter ways must be found to protect drug users. That can be the only humane response to the terrible news that drug deaths in Scotland have
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Boris Johnson is the epitome of what’s worst about the English ruling class | Jean Quatremer 16 Jul 12:59am Boris Johnson is the epitome of what’s worst about the English ruling class | Jean Quatremer
In Brussels, people recall an amusing buffoon devoid of principle or political belief – but not a Eurosceptic hardliner The scene, Cardiff. The date, 16 June 1998. The European summit of heads of state and government has just ended, rounding off the UK’s six-month EU presidency. Tony Blair, who has chaired the summit, is holding a press conference. The EU correspondent for the Daily Telegraph puts up his hand and launches into a tirade that is not so much question as full-blown editorial. Blair, a product of the same
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The Guardian view on policing youth violence: knives are a public health issue | Editorial 15 Jul 1:37pm The Guardian view on policing youth violence: knives are a public health issue | Editorial
Ministers and the mayor of London have embraced a new approach. But breaking the cycle will take resources as well as ideasWhen the Guardian embarked on a project to investigate the rising number of children and teenagers being stabbed in 2017, our reporters expected to encounter people traumatised by extreme violence. The loss of a child or young person is always hard to bear, but when they have died as the result of deliberate aggression, the anger and regret of those left behind can be overwhelming. The series,
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The Guardian view on atheism: good without God | Editorial 15 Jul 1:37pm The Guardian view on atheism: good without God | Editorial
If organised mainstream Christianity is on the way out, what will replace it?The latest
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The Guardian view on private schools: the rich secede from the rest | Editorial 14 Jul 1:53pm The Guardian view on private schools: the rich secede from the rest | Editorial
Boris Johnson might be the UK’s 20th prime minister from one school, Eton. Time to ask why the elite are blossoming in an anti-elite eraThe United Kingdom is a few months away from crashing out of the European Union, the main opposition party is engaged in political fratricide and the country faces the highest risk of
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The Guardian view on the creative self: it needs more than 15 minutes | Editorial 14 Jul 1:53pm The Guardian view on the creative self: it needs more than 15 minutes | Editorial
Britons need time and space to release their imagination. It would be good for them and for their country“My goodness, we need empathetic intelligent creative people today.” So said the new children’s laureate, Cressida Cowell, in
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As rudderless Britain drifts, the predators start to circle | Observer editorial 14 Jul 1:00am As rudderless Britain drifts, the predators start to circle | Observer editorial
A crisis of confidence at the heart of the country’s institutions allows predators to circle in preparation for rich pickings The government’s decision to send a
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The Observer view: Labour leadership is complicit in antisemitism | Observer editorial 14 Jul 1:00am The Observer view: Labour leadership is complicit in antisemitism | Observer editorial
The Panorama programme revealed a toxic culture that merely reforming the party’s processes will not solve‘It absolutely breaks my heart to say, but I do not think the Labour party is a safe space for Jewish people any more.” Thus spoke Izzy Lenga, a Labour member interviewed in last week’s
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The Guardian view on Britain and Iran: a game for losers | Editorial 12 Jul 1:30pm The Guardian view on Britain and Iran: a game for losers | Editorial
Britain is being drawn into the confrontation between Washington and Tehran“This is a dangerous game,” an Iranian foreign ministry official
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The Guardian view on English cricket: a game in need of urgent attention | Editorial 12 Jul 1:25pm The Guardian view on English cricket: a game in need of urgent attention | Editorial
Winning the World Cup would be intoxicating, but the future health of the sport is far from guaranteedCricket will at last get its day in the sun at Lord’s on Sunday when England play New Zealand in the World Cup final. The whole country will be able to watch, too, because Sky has reached an
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The Guardian view on abortion in Northern Ireland: standing up for women’s rights | Editorial 11 Jul 1:35pm The Guardian view on abortion in Northern Ireland: standing up for women’s rights | Editorial
With devolution still on hold, the decision by a huge majority of MPs to vote in favour of equal marriage and abortion should be welcomedThe law on abortion in Northern Ireland is an anomaly that should have been dealt with long ago. The near-total ban, dating back to 1861 and including abortion in cases of rape, incest and fatal foetal abnormality, is among the most restrictive in the world. It is also an affront to the rights of women – as both
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The Guardian view on the Lib Dem leadership contest: it’s not just about Brexit | Editorial 11 Jul 1:34pm The Guardian view on the Lib Dem leadership contest: it’s not just about Brexit | Editorial
Ed Davey and Jo Swinson are fighting a more polite leadership contest than the Conservatives. But they need to talk about vision tooMidway through the week after next, and amid massive publicity, the Conservative party will choose a new leader who will become, though perhaps not for as long as they hope, the next prime minister. In the same week, but with only a fraction of the same ballyhoo, the Liberal Democrats
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The Guardian view on Kim Darroch’s resignation: a grim portent | Editorial 10 Jul 1:29pm The Guardian view on Kim Darroch’s resignation: a grim portent | Editorial
Boris Johnson’s failure to support the UK’s ambassador in Washington is a sinister indication of his priorities and characterDonald Trump was not yet elected US president when the UK voted to leave the European Union but those two ballot-box shocks of 2016 have become historically intertwined. For Conservative Eurosceptics, quitting the EU was inseparable from the ambition to strike a trade deal with Washington, and the arrival in the White House of a maverick economic protectionist did not change that calculation. On the contrary, the pro-Brexit side of British politics was soon captured by a Trumpian ethos, marked by contempt for international institutions, democratic norms and diplomatic protocol. The
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The Guardian view on the climate emergency: a dangerous paralysis | Editorial 10 Jul 1:29pm The Guardian view on the climate emergency: a dangerous paralysis | Editorial
The closer the prospect of disaster becomes, the less the government manages to doThe difference between speed limits and speed cameras is that speed cameras work. They arouse fear and frustration, but they are in the end obeyed. Speed limits, on the other hand, are generally treated as moralistic exhortations which no one ought to take literally. The distinction between exhortation and enforcement is fundamental to understanding what governments intend when they announce a policy; and
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The Guardian view on undiplomatic language: don’t pander to Donald Trump | Editorial 9 Jul 1:41pm The Guardian view on undiplomatic language: don’t pander to Donald Trump | Editorial
The US president is angry at the British ambassador’s frank assessment. His reaction reinforces Kim Darroch’s verdict on his administrationThough the president of the United States has fired off
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The Guardian view on childhood: hope needed | Editorial 9 Jul 1:32pm The Guardian view on childhood: hope needed | Editorial
Austerity and a pervasive insecurity darken the lives of British childrenThings can’t only get better. We have travelled a very long way from the optimism of the 90s. The
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Labour’s Brexit stance: is the fog really clearing? | Letters 9 Jul 1:30pm Labour’s Brexit stance: is the fog really clearing? | Letters
Readers respond to the latest moves by the party and unions on the EU, an editorial about Labour’s position and, and a letter calling for a confirmatory vote on any Brexit decisionThe latest union-agreed stance on how Labour should in future campaign on the issue of Brexit is yet another “ifs and buts” policy (
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The Guardian view on the doctors’ pensions dispute: symptoms of a deeper malaise | Editorial 8 Jul 1:43pm The Guardian view on the doctors’ pensions dispute: symptoms of a deeper malaise | Editorial
Last year’s funding boost did not begin to solve the NHS’s problems, as the latest row between consultants and ministers showsThat a
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The Guardian view on religious liberty: the freedom to be wrong | Editorial 8 Jul 1:43pm The Guardian view on religious liberty: the freedom to be wrong | Editorial
You can believe what you like if you do not act to harm othersConservative religious believers, of whom there are perhaps 4 billion in the world today, mostly Christians and Muslims, still suppose that homosexuality is sinful. Sometimes their belief is an expression of genuine hatred; sometimes it is an unconsidered expression of belonging in a prejudiced society. In countries where this is a generally accepted prejudice, they probably don’t think about it much. In countries where gay people are accepted and affirmed as equals, fundamentalists have to think more carefully. Some retain their beliefs but place them in a context where homosexuality becomes merely one sin among many others – most of which the believer shares – and nothing to get worked up about. Others turn homophobia into a central point of doctrine, and fight against equality for gay people. In Britain, Christian Concern is a pressure group which has brought numerous lawsuits in an attempt to establish a right for its members to discriminate against gay people. Almost all of these have been lost. Last week, though, it won a partial victory in
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The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn: new deeds and words needed | Editorial 7 Jul 1:30pm The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn: new deeds and words needed | Editorial
Given the politics of today the Labour leader cannot tackle the issues of antisemitism and Europe with yesterday’s argumentsA general who fights the previous war usually loses. When French commanders built the Maginot Line in the 1930s it was with the first world war in their minds. They proved that leaders who think they can win by imagining today’s battles can be fought on yesterday’s terrain will find themselves outflanked. But what can one say of a leader who thinks that victory can be secured by repeating a strategy from the last war that brought defeat? That is what Jeremy Corbyn is in danger of doing. Labour’s leader is coming under fire for sticking to his guns on antisemitism and
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The Guardian view on a Libyan crisis: made worse by outsiders | Editorial 7 Jul 1:25pm The Guardian view on a Libyan crisis: made worse by outsiders | Editorial
Coddling a warlord and preventing refugees from fleeing conflict is no way to foster stability in north AfricaTwin tragedies, within hours of each other, have finally returned attention to the vulnerable migrants desperate enough to seek a better and safer life in Europe via
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The Observer view on the behaviour of populists in public office | Observer editorial 7 Jul 1:00am The Observer view on the behaviour of populists in public office | Observer editorial
Around the world, disenchanted voters have been let down by anti-establishment politicians whose behaviour is shamefulAs the US columnist Frank Bruni has noted, Ivanka Trump’s gauche intrusion at last weekend’s G20 summit of global leaders in Japan added a new dimension to Take Your Daughter to Work Day. It was not an entirely positive learning experience for Trump, who was cold-shouldered by Emmanuel Macron and Christine Lagarde in icy French fashion. She was also
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The Guardian view on the climate emergency: forests can help to save us | Editorial 5 Jul 1:30pm The Guardian view on the climate emergency: forests can help to save us | Editorial
Restoring and enlarging the world’s woodlands won’t be enough on its own but it’s an essential startThere is so much bad news about the climate emergency that it is easy to sink into a heatstruck daze and suppose that we can do nothing to prevent catastrophic global change over the next 50 years. This would be a mistake. There are still things to be done which will diminish future damage and – more hopefully still – undo the effects of some of our past crimes against the environment.
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The Guardian view on women’s football: winning on and off the pitch | Editorial 5 Jul 1:25pm The Guardian view on women’s football: winning on and off the pitch | Editorial
Broadcasting women’s football games live on the BBC would help the sport make the most of the momentWhen England face Sweden tomorrow in the third-place play-off of the eighth Women’s World Cup, the nation will be justly proud of the players’ achievements. The Lionesses have provided at times breathless and exciting football, scoring more goals in France than at any previous World Cup. Phil Neville, the team’s manager, has an enviable record of just four defeats in 23 matches. England’s semi-final loss to the United States this week was the biggest UK television
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The Guardian view on Theresa May: she should have thought about the UK all along | Editorial 4 Jul 1:34pm The Guardian view on Theresa May: she should have thought about the UK all along | Editorial
The prime minister is right to be concerned about threats to national cohesion. But the damage has been done on her watch because of BrexitTheresa May’s
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The Guardian view on classical music: art or status symbol? | Editorial 4 Jul 1:25pm The Guardian view on classical music: art or status symbol? | Editorial
While the Proms will bring joy, Beethoven and Bach are too often heard for the wrong reasonsWhat is classical music for? This month, the
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The Guardian view on Europe’s top jobs: the good, the bad and the compromise | Editorial 3 Jul 1:43pm The Guardian view on Europe’s top jobs: the good, the bad and the compromise | Editorial
The nominees for senior roles are sensible choices but the horse-trading that gets them into post reveals tensions at the heart of the European projectThe method for filling the senior roles in the apparatus of the European Union is not an obvious advertisement for the project. National leaders go into conclave and emerge with nominees whose connection to citizens of member states feels tenuous. The outcome inevitably represents a complex, multilateral compromise. The new European commission president,
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The Guardian view on assisted dying: the law is flawed | Editorial 3 Jul 1:42pm The Guardian view on assisted dying: the law is flawed | Editorial
MPs need to look again at legislation which currently allows no humane option for the families of a terminally ill patient “The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilised community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others,” wrote John Stuart Mill in his essay
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s protests: the mood hardens | Editorial 2 Jul 1:51pm The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s protests: the mood hardens | Editorial
The storming of the Legislative Council building may alienate ordinary residents, but reflects a growing sense of despair as Beijing tightens its gripFive years ago, when Hong Kong residents flooded the streets to demand true democracy, the movement was named Occupy Central With Love and Peace. On Monday, as a group of protesters overran the region’s legislature, a banner hung outside carried a harsher, more pessimistic message borrowed from the Hunger Games films: “If we burn, you burn with us.” Half a million had peacefully marched against the extradition bill that day. Even the splinter group who broke into the building, spray-painted slogans and hung the British colonial-era flag had their limits. They put up signs urging others not to damage antiques and left cash for drinks from the cafe. Force was directed at property rather than people. But the angry, destructive scenes nonetheless reflect a hardening of feeling.
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The Guardian view on the social care impasse: hurting people and politics | Editorial 1 Jul 1:30pm The Guardian view on the social care impasse: hurting people and politics | Editorial
New rules and extra funding are urgently needed, but years of inaction show no sign of endingSomeone is going to have to pay for the social care that older people need and English councils cannot afford to buy.
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The Guardian view on Facebook’s Libra: funny money | Editorial 1 Jul 1:25pm The Guardian view on Facebook’s Libra: funny money | Editorial
This audacious attempt to launch a privately controlled currency may come to nothing. We should hope it doesFacebook’s proposed digital currency, the
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The Guardian view of devolution since 1999: still grappling with who we are | Editorial 30 Jun 1:32pm The Guardian view of devolution since 1999: still grappling with who we are | Editorial
Twenty years ago, the start of devolution was supposed to bring the UK together. But it hasn’t worked out that wayTwenty years ago on Monday, the newly devolved Scottish parliament met in Edinburgh for the first time. It heard a speech from
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The Guardian view on Trump and Kim: an unsatisfactory sequel | Editorial 30 Jun 1:27pm The Guardian view on Trump and Kim: an unsatisfactory sequel | Editorial
The US president’s meeting with the North Korean leader is a stunt, not a breakthroughHollywood loves sequels. However, audiences who applaud spectacular but shoddy movies have only themselves to blame. Their reward is further-diminished versions, in which the original’s flaws are more glaringly apparent. On Sunday, Donald Trump launched the third instalment of his
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The Observer view on the urgent need to reform the water industry | Observer editorial 30 Jun 1:00am The Observer view on the urgent need to reform the water industry | Observer editorial
If the private sector cannot develop a water system fit for a dry future it could be time to reconsider the business modelA smelly sewage works in Southampton was the least of
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The Observer view on Vladimir Putin and the defence of liberal values | Observer editorial 30 Jun 12:59am The Observer view on Vladimir Putin and the defence of liberal values | Observer editorial
The mask has finally slipped – and Putinism is infecting other world leaders. He must be confrontedVladimir Putin has many faces: Russian patriot, man of the people, macho sportsman, global power-broker. But the mask slipped last week. The world glimpsed the real Putin and it was an ugly sight. There is a meanness about him, a smallness of mind born of fear and anger. His world view, warped by the cold war and his KGB training, is twisted, resentful, defensive. He has almost nothing positive to say. Putin is an empty space where leadership and moral example should be. Why, then, should anybody care what he thinks? His remarks proclaiming western liberalism “
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The Guardian view on Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe: Iran must free her | Editorial 28 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe: Iran must free her | Editorial
A British-Iranian family has become the victims of superpower politics. Their suffering must end
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The Guardian view of the Osaka G20 summit: bad as he is, Trump is not the only problem | Editorial 27 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view of the Osaka G20 summit: bad as he is, Trump is not the only problem | Editorial
The climate crisis underlines the need for effective global economic leadership. The US president makes this harder, but so do China and several othersEver since the G20 of leading global economies was founded, its summits have mostly been convergent occasions, marked by attempts to find common ground and remembered for nothing more unseemly than a bit of
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The Guardian view on summer festivals: we need our visiting artists | Editorial 27 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on summer festivals: we need our visiting artists | Editorial
Britain needs to look outwards to other cultures, not damage its reputation with a hostile visa systemHeralded by this weekend’s
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The Guardian view on Labour and Brexit: lead the debate | Editorial 26 Jun 1:48pm The Guardian view on Labour and Brexit: lead the debate | Editorial
The Tory leadership contest is closing down space for compromise. The opposition must make the case for Britain’s European allianceIn their race to become prime minister, the two Conservative leadership candidates are licensing wishful thinking on an industrial scale. Boris Johnson tells Tory members what they want to hear: that a great, new Brexit deal is available and that leaving the EU without any deal
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The Guardian view on censoring music: hitting the wrong note | Editorial 26 Jun 1:47pm The Guardian view on censoring music: hitting the wrong note | Editorial
Blaming drill for fomenting violence is a distraction from looking at the causes of crimeLast year, YouTube
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The Guardian view on social immobility: time to rebalance | Editorial 25 Jun 1:43pm The Guardian view on social immobility: time to rebalance | Editorial
As a new report shows elite jobs are still dominated by the privately educated, it’s clear an approach focused on justice, not only mobility, is needed“For old progressives, reducing snapshot income inequality is the ultimate goal. For new progressives, reducing the barriers to mobility is.” So said
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The Guardian view on Trump and Israel-Palestine: the reality behind Kushner’s fantasy | Editorial 25 Jun 1:42pm The Guardian view on Trump and Israel-Palestine: the reality behind Kushner’s fantasy | Editorial
The derisive reception for the first stage of the US “peace plan” for the Middle East is deservedSome political performances illuminate an issue; others, like this week’s charade in Manama, Bahrain, are meant to conceal. After all the Trump administration’s grand talk of “the deal of the century” in the Middle East, the launch of its first, economic aspect has been both absurd and bathetic. The Palestinian refusal to attend has meant that Israel is also absent. This is a play missing its stars and half the cast as well; the Arab states involved have sent lower-tier officials. Even its instigator, Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, talked of a workshop rather than a conference; of a vision rather than a plan. Economy-first approaches have been tried before, and failed even with realistic roadmaps and more trusted interlocutors. The gap between Mr Kushner’s illusion and the realities of this seven-decade conflict could hardly be starker. It is encapsulated by the Peace for Prosperity document – more brochure than blueprint – and the fact that several of its photos are images of programmes
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The Guardian view on Tory leadership: politics may not survive Brexit | Editorial 24 Jun 1:56pm The Guardian view on Tory leadership: politics may not survive Brexit | Editorial
The Brexit virus that is running through the Conservatives may end up shutting down both the party and the electoral system that supports itThe
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The Guardian view on female voice assistants: not OK, Google | Editorial 24 Jun 1:55pm The Guardian view on female voice assistants: not OK, Google | Editorial
When computer assistants reply in female voices, are they saying that women lack power in their world?Within two years there will be more voice assistants on the internet than there are people on the planet. Another, possibly more helpful, way of looking at these statistics is to say that there will still be only half a dozen assistants that matter: Apple’s Siri, Google’s Assistant, and Amazon’s Alexa in the west, along with their Chinese equivalents, but these will have billions of microphones at their disposal, listening patiently for sounds they can use. Voice is going to become the chief way that we make our wants known to computers – and when they respond, they will do so with female voices. This detail may seem trivial, but it goes to the heart of the way in which the spread of digital technologies can amplify and extend social prejudice. The companies that program these assistants want them to be used, of course, and this requires making them appear helpful. That’s especially necessary when their helpfulness is limited in the real world: although they are getting better at answering queries outside narrow and canned parameters, they could not easily ever be mistaken for a human being on the basis of their words alone.
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson: a question of character | Editorial 23 Jun 1:41pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson: a question of character | Editorial
Conservative members will choose the next prime minister. The rest of us need to know whom they are pickingWho trusts Boris Johnson? Not, apparently, his team. The paradox of the race to lead the Conservative party, and therefore Britain, is that those convinced that Mr Johnson is an irresistible, unstoppable electoral force at the same time appear terrified that he may encounter meaningful scrutiny. His conversations in Westminster are reportedly shadowed by an MP acting as minder. The televised debates to which he has agreed will take place only after members have received their ballot papers: “If you want the job, you have to turn up for the interviews,” goaded Jeremy Hunt, adding later that his rival “needs to show he can answer difficult questions”. Perhaps Mr Johnson will formulate answers soon. But at the hustings in Birmingham he was evasive when pressed repeatedly about why
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The Guardian view on Heathrow expansion: stop it to save the planet | Editorial 23 Jun 1:37pm The Guardian view on Heathrow expansion: stop it to save the planet | Editorial
Aviation efficiency gains and innovation will not be enough to limit emissions growth. Demand for air travel needs to be damped“Come on, stop calling us polluters.” That was the shocking
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The Observer view on heightened US tensions with Iran | Editorial 23 Jun 1:00am The Observer view on heightened US tensions with Iran | Editorial
Donald Trump’s White House farce once again takes the world to the brink of war Donald Trump was repeatedly warned that his aggressive policy of escalating military and economic “maximum pressure” on Iran risked triggering war by accident. Last week, the long-predicted miscalculations duly occurred and, for a few scary hours, the world tottered on the brink. Both sides in the Gulf made mistakes, although US commanders appear more at fault. But the biggest mistake of all was made in 2016, when Americans picked a dangerous fool for president. The sequence of events that led Trump to order airstrikes on Thursday evening, then
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The Observer view on Boris Johnson’s Brexit fantasies | Observer editorial 23 Jun 1:00am The Observer view on Boris Johnson’s Brexit fantasies | Observer editorial
A no-deal outcome will destroy this country, though neither candidate will admit as much When politicians can spread untruths with little accountability and few electoral consequences, an irreversible rot starts to set into the political system. There’s no greater indicator that this is happening in Britain today than the fact that a man within spitting distance of Downing Street is getting away with deploying utterly misleading information about what might happen in the aftermath of a no-deal Brexit, in order to strengthen his leadership bid. In a leadership debate last Tuesday, Boris Johnson said that if Britain were to crash out of the EU without a deal,
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The Guardian view on Iran and Trump: the risks remain | Editorial 21 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view on Iran and Trump: the risks remain | Editorial
The US president’s decision to call off action is a relief, but does nothing to resolve the stand-offThe UN secretary general, António Guterres, sometimes
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The Guardian view on Mark Field at Mansion House: playing the thug | Editorial 21 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on Mark Field at Mansion House: playing the thug | Editorial
The minister’s decision to overpower a climate protester, rather than listen to her, is a worrying sign of the timesFootage of a UK government minister,
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Constitutional crisis, cakeism and the Conservatives’ crazy thinking | Letters 21 Jun 12:41pm Constitutional crisis, cakeism and the Conservatives’ crazy thinking | Letters
Readers on the race to be prime minister, as Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt go through to a vote of Tory party membersYour editorial (
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The Guardian view on the Tory leadership election: things fall apart | Editorial 20 Jun 1:48pm The Guardian view on the Tory leadership election: things fall apart | Editorial
Britain’s next premier is likely to be a committed Brexiter. This would mean the leavers having to own the mess they createdOn Thursday evening, after five ballots in eight days among Conservative MPs, the 10 original would-be successors to Theresa May were finally reduced to two: Boris Johnson and, trailing a distant second, the foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt. The two will now face the Tory membership before one of them emerges next month in a postal ballot as the new party leader. For the first time, a prime minister of the UK will be chosen by party grassroots activists. This means the new leader will
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The Guardian view on buses: power to the passengers | Editorial 20 Jun 1:43pm The Guardian view on buses: power to the passengers | Editorial
Ever since they were deregulated, profits have come first. Manchester mayor Andy Burnham must now push backBritish attitudes to buses are infected with snobbery. Whether urban or rural local services, or long-distance coaches, these vehicles lack the charisma of planes, trains and automobiles. It’s not hard to see why. Air travel is associated with leisure and exotic destinations. Railways are a cherished part of our heritage. Cars have strong associations with individual freedom and are the most valuable object that most people own apart from their home. Buses, by contrast, are not viewed as technologically exciting. Not coincidentally, they are disproportionately relied on by
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The Guardian view on Tory leadership and the constitution: a crisis in the making | Editorial 19 Jun 1:32pm The Guardian view on Tory leadership and the constitution: a crisis in the making | Editorial
Theresa May’s already flimsy mandate is now being handed to a successor chosen only by party membersFor a country that takes pride in the venerable stability of its democracy, Britain is strangely prone to constitutional improvisations. For example, if the current
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The Guardian view on Jamal Khashoggi’s murder: Saudi Arabia and its friends | Editorial 19 Jun 1:32pm The Guardian view on Jamal Khashoggi’s murder: Saudi Arabia and its friends | Editorial
One way to honour Khashoggi is to celebrate his life. Another is to recognise the lessons of his deathThe UN report into October’s murder of Jamal Khashoggi at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul is the fullest account yet of events and as horrifying as one would expect. Agnes Callamard, the special rapporteur,
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The Guardian view on parental rights: parliamentarians need them too | Editorial 18 Jun 1:41pm The Guardian view on parental rights: parliamentarians need them too | Editorial
A 21st-century parliament should not force any woman to choose between being a mother and an MPAlmost a third of parliamentarians in the House of Commons are women, an all-time
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The Guardian view on Morsi’s death in Egypt: shocking because foreseen | Editorial 18 Jun 1:33pm The Guardian view on Morsi’s death in Egypt: shocking because foreseen | Editorial
The former president played his part in destroying the hopes of the revolution. But his treatment speaks volumes about the regime which ousted himReal-life events can bear a remarkable symbolic power. The advent of Egypt’s first and only democratically elected president in 2012 was one of them. His
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The Guardian view on a Brexit election: the unicorns are back | Editorial 17 Jun 1:40pm The Guardian view on a Brexit election: the unicorns are back | Editorial
The frontrunner in the race to be the next prime minister is trading in Trumpian fantasy and his peers are following his lead. When their words catch up with them, the nation will payThe eccentric and extreme nature of Brexit has led to some bizarre outcomes. Perhaps the strangest is that the departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union has been downgraded from a national emergency to a party one. Instead of discussing ways out of the political,
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s crisis: the people have spoken | Editorial 17 Jun 1:39pm The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s crisis: the people have spoken | Editorial
The extradition bill and its mishandling have sparked such outrage that the process has been paused. What now?
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The Guardian view on impoverished schools: charity is not the answer | Editorial 16 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view on impoverished schools: charity is not the answer | Editorial
Headteachers are being forced to beg for donations. It makes a mockery of ministers’ talk of fair fundingThe contraction of school budgets over the past three years is one of many grave errors of judgment by this government, and has compounded the mistakes of the previous one. That departing prime minister Theresa May now appears to recognise this, and is reportedly seeking a three-year,
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The Guardian view on the latest crackdown in Turkey: investigate real violence against women, not fiction | Editorial 16 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on the latest crackdown in Turkey: investigate real violence against women, not fiction | Editorial
The Turkish authorities are investigating Elif Shafak’s novels for ‘crimes of obscenity’. It’s another twist in Turkey’s tale of paranoia and repressionAs she sat on the train to the Hay festival late last month, the London-based Turkish novelist Elif Shafak received a chilling telephone call from her editor in Istanbul. She was told that police officers had entered the publishing house and taken copies of her books to a prosecutor, who planned to scour them for evidence of her having committed a “crime of obscenity” by writing about, for example, sexual harassment or child abuse. At the same time, the writer witnessed an avalanche of abusive and misogynist messages directed at her on social media – digital intimidation to accompany harassment by the authorities. The targeting of novelists in this way marks a new nadir in the Turkish government’s persecution of journalists, intellectuals, writers and academics. As Shafak has pointed out, the supreme irony is that real-life violence against women and girls is a desperately serious problem in Turkey.
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The Observer view on the Conservative leadership campaign | Observer editorial 16 Jun 12:59am The Observer view on the Conservative leadership campaign | Observer editorial
Those hoping to succeed May are offering nothing but foolish promises and even greater inequality For three years now, one imperative above all else has shaped the government’s approach to Brexit. Not the essential task of healing a divided nation, or the critical need to negotiate in the nation’s long-term strategic interest, but Theresa May’s increasingly desperate attempts to keep her party’s hardline Eurosceptics onside. The
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The Observer view on the Tory vendetta against the BBC | Observer editorial 16 Jun 12:59am The Observer view on the Tory vendetta against the BBC | Observer editorial
Rather than attacking the broadcaster, they should take responsibility for pensioners’ licences The Conservative right has become the enemy within, a force bent on destroying not only our relationship with Europe but with much else that this country holds dear. The shredding of collective bargaining and the ambition to excuse our privatised utilities from their public-interest obligations were early objectives. Now there is
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The Guardian view on the BBC: a broadcaster, not a welfare agency | Editorial 14 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view on the BBC: a broadcaster, not a welfare agency | Editorial
If the government wants to give over-75s a free TV licence, then it should be the state’s responsibility to pay for themThis week the BBC
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The Guardian view on loneliness: speak up, reach out | Editorial 14 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on loneliness: speak up, reach out | Editorial
An initiative to get people talking on public transport is aimed at a serious problemFriday was “Chatty Bus day”
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The Guardian view on the US and Iran: on a collision course | Editorial 13 Jun 1:21pm The Guardian view on the US and Iran: on a collision course | Editorial
The attack on oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman is an ominous development. Can the escalation be halted?Before the long plume of black smoke from the
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The Guardian view on Grenfell, two years on: the survivors’ campaign deserves results | Editorial 13 Jun 1:21pm The Guardian view on Grenfell, two years on: the survivors’ campaign deserves results | Editorial
Ministers should take more notice of the disaster’s survivors, who are right to say a new, proactive social housing regulator is requiredThe scars of traumatic bereavement never go away. This is especially the case when people have been killed as a result of negligence or poor decision-making by others. But the wounds of survivors, and other people directly affected by calamities such as the
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