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The Guardian view on schools for the future: no thanks to more of the same | Editorial 6 Dec 1:30pm The Guardian view on schools for the future: no thanks to more of the same | Editorial
The Conservatives’ promise to replace lost funding should not be allowed to mask the paucity of their ideasSchool cuts proved to be an achilles heel for Theresa May in the 2017 election, and Boris Johnson learned from her mistake. In September, the Conservatives announced a £4.4 billion per year increase in funding for English schools (education is a devolved issue) that was calculated to neutralise Labour attacks. Polling suggests that
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The Guardian view on local theatres: the shows must go on | Editorial 6 Dec 1:25pm The Guardian view on local theatres: the shows must go on | Editorial
Theatres across the UK are struggling to provide the opportunities that actors and audiences needFrom the Ffwrnes in Llanelli to Eden Court in Inverness, the UK’s approximately 1,200 theatres will see larger than usual audiences in the next few weeks. Pantomimes are not just fun for families: with around 3 million tickets sold annually, they are one of the most reliable income streams for many venues. They are also crucial bonding exercises between arts organisations and the communities they serve. Strengthening this relationship, so that people pay more than one annual visit, is a challenge for all those who want local theatres to flourish. Cuts have lent such concerns a new urgency. Arts Council England capital grants have halved in eight years, while some local authorities have virtually stopped arts funding altogether. As a consequence, and even though overall audience figures are healthy, theatres across the UK are struggling to continue to present fresh work and maintain their buildings.
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s constitutional changes: he cannot be trusted | Editorial 5 Dec 1:30pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s constitutional changes: he cannot be trusted | Editorial
The Tory leader will not spell out what his manifesto means. But the threat to law and democracy from many of his ideas is immenseIn the context of one of the most worrying threats to liberty and the constitution in decades, the future of John Bercow may seem a petty matter. Yet if you seek a small indication of how a Boris Johnson majority government might behave more generally, then whether Mr Bercow is given a peerage might offer the public an insight. Ever since the 18th century, almost every Commons Speaker, good or bad, has been given a peerage when they step down. Mr Bercow has not yet been offered one but
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The Guardian view on Bolivia: respect the people | Editorial 5 Dec 1:25pm The Guardian view on Bolivia: respect the people | Editorial
Those who ousted Evo Morales insisted their priority was defending democracy. They should live up to those wordsThe crisis that toppled Bolivia’s president, Evo Morales, last month has – for now, at least – settled into a political conflict rather than a struggle on the streets. But Bolivia’s prospects depend upon the rightwing interim government’s swift delivery of free and fair elections and its willingness to reach out to all communities. Though the government has now pulled back to some degree, its initial actions instead made its leading figures and supporters look vindictive, ruthless and bigoted. Interim president Jeanine Áñez vowed to unify the country when she took power – but packed the cabinet with members of the conservative elites and boasted that “God has allowed the Bible back into the palace” of a secular country. She exempted the military from criminal prosecution when maintaining public order; at least 17 indigenous protesters died after
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The Guardian view on Trump and Johnson: a toxic alliance | Editorial 4 Dec 1:30pm The Guardian view on Trump and Johnson: a toxic alliance | Editorial
The prime minister kept a calculated distance from the US president at the Nato summit because he knows their similarities play badly with votersA US president’s low-key exit from a Nato summit, skipping the traditional press conference, would once have been perceived as a snub to the host government. But Donald Trump’s departure from London will come as a relief to Boris Johnson. Mr Trump is a fan of Brexit and praises the prime minister as the man to deliver it, but his presence in the country was an electoral hazard for the Conservatives. Some British voters admire Mr Trump, or find him entertaining, but more do not. It is no recommendation for the Tory leader to be liked by a man notorious for dishonesty, ignorance, narcissism and chauvinism.
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The Guardian view on looking back: in search of lost time | Editorial 4 Dec 1:25pm The Guardian view on looking back: in search of lost time | Editorial
The BFI’s much-loved film archives remind viewers that exploring the past can enhance the presentWhat is it about the past that so captivates, fascinates and moves us? Nostalgia has become associated with a misty-eyed desire to return, via Brexit, to a perfect England that never was. But looking back is not necessarily a backwards move. Our relationship with what has been is far subtler and more complex than a Nigel Farage speech. The BFI National Archive has just revealed
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s poverty plan: spread it widely? | Editorial 3 Dec 1:29pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s poverty plan: spread it widely? | Editorial
Mr Johnson once thought ‘destitution on a Victorian scale’ might be a good thing. With Tory policies he may yet deliver such a dystopiaDid Boris Johnson watch Channel 4’s documentary Growing Up Poor? He should have. The film is a seminal moment in television which has made people
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The Guardian view on Germany’s Social Democrats: turning left is a risky but necessary gamble | Editorial 3 Dec 1:29pm The Guardian view on Germany’s Social Democrats: turning left is a risky but necessary gamble | Editorial
The SPD’s participation in Angela Merkel’s coalition governments has coincided with a collapse in its support. The party’s new leaders can renew its appealAugust Bebel, one of the founders of the German SPD, liked to make a robust case for preserving clear blue ideological water between political parties. “If your opponent praises you, beware!” Bebel once said. “But if he gets stuck into you, you are usually on the right way.” Last weekend a narrow majority of members of one of the world’s oldest democratic parties appeared to judge that sound advice.
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The Guardian view on the climate election: reasons to be hopeful and fearful | Editorial 2 Dec 1:50pm The Guardian view on the climate election: reasons to be hopeful and fearful | Editorial
The world’s first TV climate debate of party leaders sent a strong signal. So did Boris Johnson’s refusal to take partLast week’s
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The Guardian view on Amazon’s football coup: beware tech giants bearing gifts | Editorial 2 Dec 1:49pm The Guardian view on Amazon’s football coup: beware tech giants bearing gifts | Editorial
The US experience of watching sport online should ring alarm bells for those who prize the Premier League’s ability to bring people togetherIn the late 1960s, the American author and tech seer Richard Brautigan wrote lyrically of “a cybernetic meadow / where mammals and computers / live together in mutually / programming harmony / like pure water / touching clear sky”. Mr Brautigan called his utopian cyberpastoral poem All Watched Over By Machines of Loving Grace. This week, his meadows will turn into football pitches, as millions in Britain and elsewhere commune with laptops and smartphones to access the first full round of Premier League matches to be streamed online. For the relatively modest sum of £90m,
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University strikes offer a lesson in principles, pay and pensions | Letter 2 Dec 1:36pm University strikes offer a lesson in principles, pay and pensions | Letter
Academics respond to coverage about the ongoing disruption and suggest ways to resolve the issuesYour editorial is right to emphasise the wider issues in the strike by university lecturers and support services (
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How the Guardian is moving on from a misjudged editorial | Paul Chadwick 1 Dec 2:00pm How the Guardian is moving on from a misjudged editorial | Paul Chadwick
New processes have been put in place after the publication of a leading article that caused complaintsIn approaching a newspaper’s editorial, readers can reasonably expect that it is more than the personal view of its author. Many readers think that the unsigned opinion, supported by the masthead, is the result of a systematic and deliberative process, and that the editorial is the considered view, if not of the owner, then of the editor. An editorial in any paper can be perceived as a corporate or institutional view. It is not necessarily a collective or representative one. Consciously or not, editorials, also known as leaders, are a way newspapers assert identity, attempt overt influence, and differentiate themselves in the marketplace, especially at election times.
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s fact-free claims: PM dodging responsibility for terror attack | Editorial 1 Dec 1:54pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s fact-free claims: PM dodging responsibility for terror attack | Editorial
Austerity has made it impossible to be tough on radicalisation in prisons and tough on the causes of radicalisation outside themBoris Johnson took his disinformation campaign to the BBC on Sunday with a
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The Guardian view on truth and art: fiction as a guide | Editorial 1 Dec 1:54pm The Guardian view on truth and art: fiction as a guide | Editorial
Ambiguity and complexity – Keats’s ‘negative capability’ – are missing from our world todayIn a letter of 1817, John Keats wrote: “It struck me what quality went to form a Man of Achievement, especially in Literature, and which Shakespeare possessed so enormously – I mean Negative Capability, that is, when a man is capable of being in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after fact and reason.” One thing in this quotation stands out: the notion that
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The Observer view: Tehran’s power is spreading, and with it comes violence | Observer editorial 1 Dec 2:03am The Observer view: Tehran’s power is spreading, and with it comes violence | Observer editorial
With the embattled prime minister set to step down, the tide appears to be turning against Iran’s influenceThe resignation of Iraq’s prime minister,
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The Observer view on the London Bridge attack: no place for populist posturing | Editorial 1 Dec 1:31am The Observer view on the London Bridge attack: no place for populist posturing | Editorial
Boris Johnson and Priti Patel are trying to make political capital out of a tragedy that has grown out of Tory cutsTerrorists seek to undermine our democratic norms and liberal values by sowing fear and hatred. The horrific scenes from
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The Guardian view on the Nato summit: the Watford credibility gap | Editorial 29 Nov 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Nato summit: the Watford credibility gap | Editorial
Donald Trump’s visit will grab the headlines. But in such an important election, the future of Europe’s defence is a much larger long-term challenge for BritainBritish political attention during next week’s
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The Guardian view on the Daphne Caruana Galizia investigation: the ministerial connection | Editorial 29 Nov 1:25pm The Guardian view on the Daphne Caruana Galizia investigation: the ministerial connection | Editorial
A fact-finding mission is not a sufficient response by the EU to the crisis engulfing Malta’s governmentThe resignation of Malta’s prime minister, Joseph Muscat,
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The Guardian view on China, Hong Kong and Xinjiang: will the truth hurt? | Editorial 28 Nov 1:43pm The Guardian view on China, Hong Kong and Xinjiang: will the truth hurt? | Editorial
It has been a bad week for Beijing, with new support for pro-democracy protesters and detailed evidence of the repression in the north-western regionBeijing was never going to welcome the news that the US had passed a law backing pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong. But its
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The Guardian view on Labour and Tories: radical economics now the norm | Editorial 28 Nov 1:43pm The Guardian view on Labour and Tories: radical economics now the norm | Editorial
Whoever wins the election is likely to make sure that their heretical gamble will be vindicatedIs this election turning out to be a Lutheran moment for the Church of Economics? If one listens to the high priests of the dismal science it might seem so. The Institute for Fiscal Studies says neither the Conservatives nor Labour have produced a “
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and the NHS: a problem of trust | Editorial 27 Nov 1:56pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and the NHS: a problem of trust | Editorial
The prime minister’s promise to protect the health service in trade talks is made worthless by his record of lies and broken pledgesWhether Conservatives can be trusted with the NHS is an old question at election time. Whether Boris Johnson can be trusted on anything is an issue for the current campaign. The two questions make a dangerous combination for the Tory leader, who is expecting the country to believe that he would protect the health service in a post-Brexit trade deal with Donald Trump. There is not much reason to believe that he would. On Wednesday Labour sought to probe that concern, revealing documents containing a full account of preliminary discussions between US and UK officials.
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The Guardian view on Italy’s ‘Sardine’ movement: politics with panache can defeat the hard right | Editorial 27 Nov 1:51pm The Guardian view on Italy’s ‘Sardine’ movement: politics with panache can defeat the hard right | Editorial
Spontaneous rallies opposing Matteo Salvini’s divisive rhetoric have captured imaginations. They offer a model that could be emulated elsewhereFor over a decade, the dominant theme in European politics has been the emergence of movements that seek to dramatise and exploit social divisions through crude and aggressive sloganeering. One of the trendsetters in this regard was the comedian Beppe Grillo, who in
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The Guardian view on antisemitism and Labour: a shadow over the body politic | Editorial 26 Nov 1:59pm The Guardian view on antisemitism and Labour: a shadow over the body politic | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn must tackle racism to make good on his promise to unify the countryThis is turning out to be an election like no other. There is a mood abroad in the UK in which personal feelings about politicians and perceptions about the state of the country are stretching traditional loyalties to breaking point. No one can miss the raw hostility from those in one party toward those in the others. The perceived stakes appear so high that they justify extreme measures. A decade of austerity opened up a debate about the divisions in British society; since 2016 the emotional pitch of arguments has been raised to an intensity not seen before. Brexit is a case in point. How we depart from the European Union will change this country for ever. Political identities have become shaped by the way people voted in 2016, hardened by a cultural divide. To capitalise on this Boris Johnson peddles a hard Brexit while disgracefully
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The Guardian view on Iran’s protests: unrest is crushed, unhappiness endures | Editorial 26 Nov 1:51pm The Guardian view on Iran’s protests: unrest is crushed, unhappiness endures | Editorial
The third outbreak of demonstrations in three years reflects deepening economic woes and a sense of hopelessnessThe cycle of protest and vicious repression is grimly familiar
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The Guardian view on university strikes: a battle for the soul of the campus | Editorial 25 Nov 2:00pm The Guardian view on university strikes: a battle for the soul of the campus | Editorial
The market model in higher education has created an intellectual precariat who are right to fight backIn his essay
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The Guardian view on Grace Millane’s murder: outlaw the ‘rough sex’ defence | Editorial 25 Nov 1:58pm The Guardian view on Grace Millane’s murder: outlaw the ‘rough sex’ defence | Editorial
Men who kill women must not be allowed to blame them in court for asking to be harmedThere are many reasons to be upset by the violent
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The Guardian view on the Tory manifesto: dangerous despite its caution | Editorial 24 Nov 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Tory manifesto: dangerous despite its caution | Editorial
The Conservative programme unveiled by Boris Johnson rests upon a central untruth: the promise to ‘Get Brexit Done’The Conservative manifesto
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The Guardian view on prisons and mothers: an injustice | Editorial 24 Nov 1:27pm The Guardian view on prisons and mothers: an injustice | Editorial
The shameful treatment of pregnant inmates and of the children of jailed women must be addressed. No babies should be born behind barsShock and outrage was the widespread reaction to the death of a newborn baby girl at Bronzefield prison in Surrey in September, after her mother (neither have been named) gave birth alone in her cell at night. How could a such a thing have happened in the UK in 2019? Eleven inquiries were launched. A justice minister, Lord Keen, declared the incident “distressing” and “rare”. So it was extraordinarily disturbing to learn, through a
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The BBC’s fabled impartiality was only ever an elite consensus | Tom Mills 24 Nov 12:57pm The BBC’s fabled impartiality was only ever an elite consensus | Tom Mills
A basic establishment orientation accounts for the crisis of legitimacy the corporation – and its journalists – now facesThe BBC’s friends are starting to worry about it. At a time when we urgently need public media to reinvent itself, its leadership seems insular and inert. The only real signs of life are during a reputational crises, when the management swings into action only to look both autocratic and anarchic. We saw this most recently with the Editorial Complaints Unit’s baffling ruling against
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The Observer view on Isis children stranded in Syria | Observer editorial 24 Nov 1:30am The Observer view on Isis children stranded in Syria | Observer editorial
Priti Patel’s resistance to bringing back the British orphans is not only wrong but it could create a security threat in the futureWhat is Priti Patel so afraid of? Is it British children orphaned during the conflict with Islamic State who want to return home? Or is she scared that fellow rightwing Tories may accuse her of being “soft” on terrorism? The home secretary says the stranded children, about 60 in total, pose “security concerns”. As the
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The Observer view on the Labour manifesto: a bold vision, but is it less than the sum of its parts? | Observer editorial 24 Nov 1:29am The Observer view on the Labour manifesto: a bold vision, but is it less than the sum of its parts? | Observer editorial
Jeremy Corbyn has laid out his plans for a greener, fairer land. But will voters be convinced of his ability to deliver them?Britain goes into this general election a harsher country in which to live than it was 10 years ago. A decade of sweeping public spending cuts has destroyed any notion of a decent welfare safety net; services for the vulnerable have suffered eye-watering reductions in local government grants; schools and hospitals have been stretched beyond capacity. Meanwhile, a government more concerned with signalling its toughness on immigration than upholding basic standards of decency has wrongly deported people who have legally lived and paid taxes in this country for decades and in the name of the hostile environment has introduced policies that have been
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The Guardian view on election economics: there is an alternative | Editorial 22 Nov 12:56pm The Guardian view on election economics: there is an alternative | Editorial
Economics dominates public debate while being seen as an abstract authority over which people have little control. That must changeOn BBC Question Time on Thursday there was an
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The Guardian view on Venice: how to save it | Editorial 22 Nov 12:56pm The Guardian view on Venice: how to save it | Editorial
The city is sinking and time is running out for a solution that must go beyond flood preventionAfter the flood, the terrible reckoning: this week it emerged that
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The Guardian view on the Labour manifesto: bold pledges for anxious times | Editorial 21 Nov 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Labour manifesto: bold pledges for anxious times | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn has three weeks to win the argument with his strikingly radical tax and spending pledgesLabour’s 2019 general election
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The Guardian view on George Eliot: a novelist for now | Editorial 21 Nov 1:25pm The Guardian view on George Eliot: a novelist for now | Editorial
It is 200 years since the birth of George Eliot, and her artistic virtues – humanity, honesty, seriousness – are more necessary than everVirginia Woolf famously called Middlemarch “one of the few novels written for grown-up people”. George Eliot, its author (Mary Ann Evans until she chose her pen name), was born in Nuneaton, Warwickshire, 200 years ago, on 22 November 1819. For her, the work of the writer – of everyone – was to understand individuals despite their flaws. And not in isolation, but as part of a web of intertwined lives that together form society itself. Middlemarch, perhaps her masterpiece, has two central characters who make particular claims on the reader, the idealistic Dorothea Brooke and the talented doctor Tertius Lydgate. The novel’s grown-upness lies partly in the way that Eliot calmly offers the reader not fairytale endings but marriages beset by compromise and dissatisfaction, by talents left unfulfilled. This serious realism swerves earnestness through a skilled deployment of sly wit. Eliot’s first description of Dorothea – pious, verging on priggish, but brimming with an unacknowledged sexuality – is simply perfect. “Riding was an indulgence which she allowed herself in spite of conscientious qualms; she felt that she enjoyed it in a pagan sensuous way, and always looked forward to renouncing it.”
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The Guardian view on the Lib Dem manifesto: missing the moderate opportunity | Editorial 20 Nov 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Lib Dem manifesto: missing the moderate opportunity | Editorial
Jo Swinson’s commitment to revoke article 50 is a drastic measure that sits awkwardly with her party’s claim to the centre groundBritain’s electoral system is cruel to small parties. What prominence they achieve in mid-term local government ballots and byelections is lost in a general election, when cultural habit and constituency arithmetic see the traditional Labour-Conservative duopoly reassert itself in England. In a general election the identity of the next prime minister is also uppermost in voters’ minds. That person is unlikely to be
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The Guardian view on extraditing Julian Assange: don’t do it | Editorial 20 Nov 1:24pm The Guardian view on extraditing Julian Assange: don’t do it | Editorial
The US case against the WikiLeaks founder is an assault on press freedom and the public’s right to knowSweden’s decision to
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The Guardian view on the TV election debate: political theatre needs a new script | Editorial 19 Nov 5:06pm The Guardian view on the TV election debate: political theatre needs a new script | Editorial
The UK requires an alternative to the mean-spirited and sterile political conversations that have dominated political life since 2016Jeremy Corbyn rose to power on the back of the incontestable argument that Britain needed a kinder, more decent politics. Boris Johnson promised to be an inclusive “one nation” Conservative. There was little of either sentiment on display in the first televised election
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The Guardian view on Israeli settlements: still illegal | Editorial 19 Nov 2:10pm The Guardian view on Israeli settlements: still illegal | Editorial
The Trump administration’s declaration cannot change international law. But it will be seen as a green light for expansion and annexationThe secretary of state’s
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong: a city on the brink | Editorial 18 Nov 1:54pm The Guardian view on Hong Kong: a city on the brink | Editorial
The authorities’ repression has only fuelled the crisis. It is up to them to de-escalate, as others should tell themHong Kong is burning. The authorities continue to pour fuel on the fire. On Monday, the People’s Daily, the mouthpiece of the Communist party, warned that there is “absolutely no room for compromise”. But it is not merely that Beijing and the Hong Kong government will not take a step back; they continue to escalate the crisis. As the newspaper commentary was published, Hong Kong Polytechnic University was
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The Guardian view on British children in Syria: bring them back | Editorial 18 Nov 1:52pm The Guardian view on British children in Syria: bring them back | Editorial
The government’s decision to block the rescue of 60 children, including orphans and toddlers, was a terrible mistakeThe
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The Guardian view on Prince Andrew: entitled, obtuse and shamefully silent over Epstein’s victims | Editorial 17 Nov 1:29pm The Guardian view on Prince Andrew: entitled, obtuse and shamefully silent over Epstein’s victims | Editorial
The Duke of York’s interview with Emily Maitlis revealed a man lacking in empathy and moral discernmentThere was a moment towards the end of Emily Maitlis’s
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TThe Guardian view on political turbulence in Germany: can the centre hold? | Editorial 17 Nov 1:26pm TThe Guardian view on political turbulence in Germany: can the centre hold? | Editorial
The country’s traditional powerhouses on the centre-left and the centre-right face a moment of reckoningPostwar German politics has a reputation for being moderate, consensual and a touch on the dull side. But there have been moments of high drama. In November 1959, for example, the Social Democratic party (SPD)
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The Observer view on Evo Morales and Bolivia | Observer editorial 17 Nov 1:30am The Observer view on Evo Morales and Bolivia | Observer editorial
The former president was a victim of his own refusal to hand over power Broadly speaking,
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The Observer view on the 2019 election campaigns: bare-faced lies are undermining trust in democracy | Observer editorial 17 Nov 1:30am The Observer view on the 2019 election campaigns: bare-faced lies are undermining trust in democracy | Observer editorial
The more the truth falls by the wayside the less incentive there is for parties to give voters properly costed policiesDemocracy relies on accurate information. If voters are subjected to a cacophony of political claims between which it is almost impossible to sift fact from fiction, how can they be said to have made a meaningful choice? This is why the proliferation of “fake news” – false, fabricated or deliberately misleading information – poses such an existential threat to the legitimacy of the democratic process. This election campaign is highlighting the extent to which it is not just shadowy players in the background who are involved in spreading fake news. It is increasingly something that certain politicians, in particular, the Tory party under Boris Johnson, are themselves creating and propagating in an effort to discredit their rivals.
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The Guardian view on Labour’s broadband nationalisation: radical and necessary | Editorial 15 Nov 1:30pm The Guardian view on Labour’s broadband nationalisation: radical and necessary | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn’s plan to offer free high-speed internet across Britain is canny politics and an economic idea whose time has comeBritain is in the slow lane when it comes to the internet. Fewer than one in 12 premises in Britain have access to full-fibre connections capable of delivering speeds greater than 1 gigabit per second. By comparison in Spain more than 70% can connect via such networks. In South Korea the figure is close to 100%. So Jeremy Corbyn’s promise to give every home and business in the UK
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The Guardian view on the NHS and the election: money talks | Editorial 15 Nov 1:25pm The Guardian view on the NHS and the election: money talks | Editorial
The health service is in crisis and Tory cuts are to blame. But bigger budgets are not the only answerThe health service is a big issue in any UK election. There are two main reasons why, this time round, the arguments are particularly fraught. One is the sense of crisis engulfing the system after a decade of cuts, with A&E waiting times in England the worst on record, and a
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The Guardian view on Donald Trump’s impeachment: a grave and necessary process | Editorial 14 Nov 1:28pm The Guardian view on Donald Trump’s impeachment: a grave and necessary process | Editorial
If the US president tried to enlist Ukraine to investigate his rivals he broke his oath of office and threatened America’s securityThere are multiple reasons why Donald Trump ought not to be the president of the United States. However, there are only two ways of removing him from the office he has occupied for the past three years. One is to vote him out at the ballot box, which Americans will have the opportunity to do in a year’s time. The other is for Congress to impeach him, a process that began on Capitol Hill
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The Guardian view on Sri Lanka’s election: danger ahead | Editorial 14 Nov 1:27pm The Guardian view on Sri Lanka’s election: danger ahead | Editorial
Voters choose a new president this weekend on the Indian Ocean island. If they opt for the Rajapaksa family it augurs badlyThere are worse things than disappointment, as Sri Lankans may find out when they go to the polls
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The Guardian view on trade after Brexit: a new cliff edge looms | Editorial 13 Nov 1:53pm The Guardian view on trade after Brexit: a new cliff edge looms | Editorial
Tesla’s decision not to locate a factory in the UK exposes a fatal flaw in Boris Johnson’s planThe pace of an election campaign tests the attention span of even the most committed observer. In a less frenzied climate, political debate might have dwelt, for example, on the declaration by Elon Musk, founder of carmaker Tesla, that Brexit has deterred him from
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The Guardian view on Steve McQueen’s Year 3 project: a portrait of hope | Editorial 13 Nov 1:50pm The Guardian view on Steve McQueen’s Year 3 project: a portrait of hope | Editorial
A new work consisting of class photographs of 76,000 London schoolchildren shows the way forward for public art with depth and dignityAn unashamedly joyful sign greets visitors at the entrance of Tate Britain in London. “The gallery is full of children!” it reads. The young people are here to see the fruits of a
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong: policing the crisis | Editorial 12 Nov 1:28pm The Guardian view on Hong Kong: policing the crisis | Editorial
Brutal treatment of protesters and a government that will not listen have inflamed a dangerous situationHong Kong is unrecognisable. In less than six months a global financial centre known for its efficiency and pragmatism has become consumed by rage and violence. On Tuesday, as police stormed a university campus to arrest students, and their teargas and rubber bullets were met by petrol bombs, parts of the campus looked
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The Guardian view on the floods: global heating and British soaking | Editorial 12 Nov 1:26pm The Guardian view on the floods: global heating and British soaking | Editorial
The drama and loss of recent days should focus minds on the urgent necessity of climate adaptationThe death of
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The Guardian view on the Brexit party offer: one the Tories cannot refuse | Editorial 11 Nov 1:44pm The Guardian view on the Brexit party offer: one the Tories cannot refuse | Editorial
In backing Boris Johnson’s deal Nigel Farage shows what it really is: a nationalist project that sacrifices economic, constitutional and social stability on the altar of cut-throat competition and deregulationNigel Farage has never won a seat in the UK parliament, nor has he sat at a cabinet table. Yet he has been one of the most effective British politicians of recent history. On Monday he made an announcement that showed why he cannot be discounted from exerting influence just because he cannot get elected. Mr Farage’s
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The Guardian view on Spain’s election: progressive parties must unite to defeat the far right | Editorial 11 Nov 1:39pm The Guardian view on Spain’s election: progressive parties must unite to defeat the far right | Editorial
The xenophobic nationalists of Vox made disturbing progress in Spain’s fourth election in as many yearsThere was one major beneficiary of Sunday’s inconclusive election in Spain, but it was not Pedro Sánchez, the Socialist prime minister. Mr Sánchez hoped a fourth poll in as many years might finally deliver him the numbers to break a debilitating deadlock in parliament. Instead,
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The Guardian view on reporting elections: the truth is out there | Editorial 10 Nov 1:34pm The Guardian view on reporting elections: the truth is out there | Editorial
By doctoring a video and attacking Labour with unfounded claims, the Conservatives have shown the importance of fact checks“Facts are sacred,” wrote the Manchester Guardian’s editor, CP Scott, in a
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The Guardian view on voter suppression: the battle for democracy | Editorial 10 Nov 1:33pm The Guardian view on voter suppression: the battle for democracy | Editorial
The practice is old, the tactics have evolved. The fight to vote will be critical in the upcoming US presidential electionDemocracy is, by definition, people power. But even now the question of who constitutes “the people” remains. The answer may determine whether Donald Trump remains president after 2020. Democracy in America faces many perils, from dark money to foreign interference, but one goes directly to its central promise of one person, one vote. Attempts to restrict the right to vote are as old as the struggle to expand it beyond wealthy white men. In the US, it took the civil rights movement to extend the franchise to all African Americans. Efforts to erode it have intensified in the last two decades – particularly since 2013, when a supreme court ruling gutted the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which required federal approval of changes to election laws and policies.
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The Observer view on the anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall | Observer editorial 10 Nov 1:00am The Observer view on the anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall | Observer editorial
Europe has squandered the thrilling spirit of 1989 It is hard to imagine now, but in early 1989, the heart of Berlin resembled what today could only be described as the set of a cold war spy movie. The abandoned, burned-out Reichstag, the East German border guards’ watchtowers, barbed wire and searchlights and the grim expanse of no-man’s-land were not a piece of make-believe. They were all dreadfully real. And at its centre, the
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The Observer view on all three parties promising a spending spree | Observer editorial 10 Nov 1:00am The Observer view on all three parties promising a spending spree | Observer editorial
Celebrate the end of austerity. But the new cash must be spent wisely If there was one welcome development from the first week of the election campaign, it was the general acceptance that Britain needs more investment and that the government should pay for it. More than that, the two main political parties now agree that much of this investment should by financed with borrowed money, taking advantage of the ultra-low interest rates that the UK pays on its debts. It is a moment to celebrate, following almost a decade of austerity, when the main aim of the Treasury was to bring down the government’s annual spending deficit at the expense of, among other things, public investment.
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The Guardian view on the fall of the Berlin Wall: history’s lessons | Editorial 8 Nov 1:30pm The Guardian view on the fall of the Berlin Wall: history’s lessons | Editorial
It was hailed as the definitive triumph of liberal democracy. Thirty years on, the lessons of 1989 look rather different“The owl of Minerva begins its flight only with the coming of the dusk,” wrote Hegel in the Philosophy of Right. This was a poetic way of saying that wisdom and understanding only come with hindsight, and history never ceases to play itself out in unanticipated ways. As
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The Guardian view on boosting maternity leave: from small beginnings | Editorial 8 Nov 1:25pm The Guardian view on boosting maternity leave: from small beginnings | Editorial
Increasing entitlements for mothers will not reduce gender inequality. What’s needed is a rebalancing between work and homeIt is a mark of how much society has moved on that a woman’s right to paid maternity leave, introduced in the UK in 1975, is now taken for granted. That fathers’ rights to time off lag so far behind, meaning that women continue to do the vast majority of unpaid domestic work and earn less money as a result, is a mark of how far we have still to go.
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The Guardian view on electoral pacts | Editorial 7 Nov 1:43pm The Guardian view on electoral pacts | Editorial
The election agreement between the Lib Dems, Greens and Plaid Cymru stems from an unfair voting system and the policy failure of the big partiesElectoral pacts remain rare in UK politics; but they are not new. The first Labour MPs arrived in parliament in 1906 after a pact with the Liberals. During the world wars, the main parties observed non-aggression byelection deals. In 1983 and 1987, Liberals and the Social Democratic party struck a general election seats pact. And there have been notable individual constituency deals too. These range from the Oxford byelection in 1938 over the appeasement of Hitler to the Batley and Spen byelection in 2016 after the murder of Jo Cox. In Northern Ireland, tactical withdrawals to give a nationalist or a unionist a clearer run at the other remain commonplace to this day. A slew of new arrangements of this kind are likely to have a big impact in
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The Guardian view on alternative medicines: handle with care | Editorial 7 Nov 1:42pm The Guardian view on alternative medicines: handle with care | Editorial
Seekers after unconventional treatments should do so on the understanding that they have not been proven to workHuman health is complicated, and while the history of medicine is often represented as a triumphant march from darkness into light, for many people it doesn’t feel like that. Partly this is because we take so much for granted. It’s hard to imagine a time when infection and childbirth were serious threats to life. But it’s also true that as life expectancy has extended and lifestyles have changed, new illnesses and conditions have taken the place of old ones. Dementia, obesity and anxiety disorders are among them. Sometimes a visit to the doctor doesn’t make us, or our loved ones, feel better. There is nothing wrong with looking beyond conventional medicine for activities or remedies that may help. But people should understand that such “alternatives” are not tested in the same way as the drugs or exercises prescribed by doctors. While manufacturers, practitioners and users of treatments including herbs and osteopathy may make claims about their effectiveness, the public should treat such claims with healthy scepticism: try something by all means, but do not mistake heartfelt testimonies or lengthy appointments for evidence-based medicine.
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The Guardian view on Tory election plans: the mask is slipping already | Editorial 6 Nov 1:30pm The Guardian view on Tory election plans: the mask is slipping already | Editorial
Boris Johnson promises to lead a ‘one-nation’ Conservative government, but events of the past week expose the improbability of that claimAn early casualty of any general election campaign is perspective. News cycles accelerate, the volume goes up and it becomes difficult to detect a clear signal about what is happening amid the noise. Those caveats must accompany the observation that the Conservative campaign has had an inauspicious start. Among the items making headlines: Downing Street
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The Guardian view on academia and autocracies: stand firm | Editorial 6 Nov 1:25pm The Guardian view on academia and autocracies: stand firm | Editorial
Universities are hungry for international students and funding. But they must not compromise their fundamental values Education is one of Britain’s most successful exports, bringing in
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The Guardian view on Amlo and Mexico’s murders: no quick fix | Editorial 5 Nov 1:30pm The Guardian view on Amlo and Mexico’s murders: no quick fix | Editorial
Poverty and aggressive anti-kingpin tactics have fuelled the violence, as the president has recognised – but there is no easy solutionGunmen
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The Guardian view on Britain’s broken politics: a people’s assembly can heal the wounds | Editorial 5 Nov 1:25pm The Guardian view on Britain’s broken politics: a people’s assembly can heal the wounds | Editorial
The next government should act upon calls for a constitutional convention to reform our flawed democracy“The world needs a wash and a week’s rest,” wrote WH Auden in his 1947 poem
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The Guardian view on Labour’s radical plans: fix the economy and democracy | Editorial 4 Nov 1:55pm The Guardian view on Labour’s radical plans: fix the economy and democracy | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn’s plans are required to repair the damage caused by a system that is being run in favour of privileged individuals whose market and political power allows them to extract cash from everyone elseWhen the Office for Budget Responsibility produces its economic forecasts later this week they will show that Conservative chancellors since 2010 have peddled a mistruth: that government must
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The Guardian view on the age of criminal responsibility: raise it now | Editorial 4 Nov 1:46pm The Guardian view on the age of criminal responsibility: raise it now | Editorial
By criminalising children at a lower age than any other EU country, the UK shows itself to be stuck in the pastThe number of 10-year-olds cautioned or convicted of crimes in England and Wales has fallen steeply, from 710 in 2010 to 47 last year. This forms part of a bigger trend that has seen arrests of children fall from 200,000 in 2011 to 87,000 in 2016, and the child custody population decline from 2,541 a decade ago to
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The Guardian view on the history of slavery: much to be learned | Editorial 3 Nov 1:30pm The Guardian view on the history of slavery: much to be learned | Editorial
The appointment of Bristol’s new professor of the history of slavery is a small but encouraging step towards understanding a painful pastSpeaking at the British Museum last week,
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The Guardian view on Indonesia’s president: after the hope | Editorial 3 Nov 1:25pm The Guardian view on Indonesia’s president: after the hope | Editorial
Joko Widodo rode to power on a wave of optimism. Supporters gave him a second term – but there are already concerns about how he is using itA second and final term can free a leader, as Joko Widodo has acknowledged. The question is how he will use his new liberty. Five years ago, he was widely hailed as
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The Observer view on the risk the Tory party poses to the NHS | Observer editorial 3 Nov 1:30am The Observer view on the risk the Tory party poses to the NHS | Observer editorial
The US pharmaceutical industry is desperate to raise the price of its drugs and the hardline Tory right is eager to help itIt is little wonder that the NHS takes centre stage in election campaign after election campaign: it commands an extraordinary level of public support. We are
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The Observer view on Iraq protests and western indifference| Observer editorial 3 Nov 1:30am The Observer view on Iraq protests and western indifference| Observer editorial
Iran’s determination to shore up Iraq’s unpopular government does not augur well for democracy in the Middle EastIran’s leaders say they have no wish to recreate the Persian empire in the present-day Middle East. Unlike the US, they say, Iran is not an imperialist power. That is not how it looks to many people in Lebanon, where Iran’s close financial and military links to the country’s leading Shia political organisation, Hezbollah, became the focus of
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The Guardian view on political advertising: time to regulate it, Mr Zuckerberg | Editorial 1 Nov 2:30pm The Guardian view on political advertising: time to regulate it, Mr Zuckerberg | Editorial
Facebook’s power over what users see gives it potential for immense influence on politics. Democratic oversight must be strengthenedThe
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The Guardian view on His Dark Materials on the BBC: a perfect match | Editorial 1 Nov 2:25pm The Guardian view on His Dark Materials on the BBC: a perfect match | Editorial
The lavish pleasures of the new TV adaptation should not blind us to the dangers that lie ahead for public service broadcastersYou can tell you are in another world because there, in that wild universe, the master of the Oxford college is black. (In our world, the first black head of house at Oxford, Lady Amos,
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The Guardian view on election 2019: it’s about Brexit above all | Editorial 31 Oct 2:28pm The Guardian view on election 2019: it’s about Brexit above all | Editorial
The retirement of so many centrist Tories is a reminder that theirs has now become the Brexit party in all but nameIf the leavers, the Conservative reactionaries, the neoliberals and the ranks of Britain’s rightwing press – to say nothing of their friends Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin – had had their way, Friday would have been Britain’s first day outside the European Union since 31 December 1972. But the Halloween deadline has come and gone. Instead, largely as a result of the ruthless parliamentary exposure of Boris Johnson’s shabby political quackery, Britain remains part of Europe. Friday is therefore a day for relief and a modest celebration, not for defeat or dejection. A place in Europe, for which so many have fought so hard over the last three and a half years, remains ours. But its future now rests on the result of the general election in six weeks’ time. Mr Johnson captured the prime ministership in July on a shamelessly false prospectus. He promised he could get Britain out by 31 October,
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The Guardian view on ‘pagan idols’ in the Vatican: church culture wars should concern us all | Editorial 31 Oct 2:28pm The Guardian view on ‘pagan idols’ in the Vatican: church culture wars should concern us all | Editorial
A row over Amazonian ‘Mother Earth’ statues, displayed during a prayer service in the pope’s gardens, is a depressing sign of the timesThe roots of the word “catholic” go back to the Greek adjective
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The Guardian view on the Grenfell Tower report: bringing justice closer | Editorial 30 Oct 2:56pm The Guardian view on the Grenfell Tower report: bringing justice closer | Editorial
The significant and striking finding that building regulations were broken should not distract from the mistakes of the London fire brigadeThe families and friends who mourn the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire have waited two years and four months for the first
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The Guardian view on a volatile electorate: disunited and unpredictable | Editorial 30 Oct 2:54pm The Guardian view on a volatile electorate: disunited and unpredictable | Editorial
This fractured election will leave no one party speaking for the nationThe fanfare at the launch of a general election tends to obscure the reality that Britain’s voting system involves hundreds of very particular local elections. That constituency variation, combined with unusual volatility in party identification, makes the poll due on 12 December highly unpredictable. Brexit has shuffled conventional loyalties, forcing the Conservatives in particular to seek support on unfamiliar terms. A recent
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The Guardian view on a snap election: a reckoning the voters may not want | Editorial 29 Oct 4:28pm The Guardian view on a snap election: a reckoning the voters may not want | Editorial
Boris Johnson has got the poll he wanted but he might be making the same mistake as Theresa May in 2017General elections must be about the issues. The 1997 election was about 18 “wasted” years of Tory government, with Tony Blair’s manifesto saying “
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The Guardian view on Lebanon and Chile: too little, too late for protesters | Editorial 29 Oct 3:25pm The Guardian view on Lebanon and Chile: too little, too late for protesters | Editorial
Mass unrest has seized both countries. The long-term causes will not be resolved quickly or easilyThe events which have brought two countries to the brink were precipitated by apparently small policy shifts that proved emblematic of the ruling elite’s inability to answer or even understand their people’s basic needs while enriching themselves. Chile’s biggest political crisis since the return of democracy almost 30 years ago was triggered by a 3% rise in metro fares, the protests which have engulfed and paralysed
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The Guardian view on Baghdadi’s death: not enough to destroy Islamic State | Editorial 28 Oct 2:19pm The Guardian view on Baghdadi’s death: not enough to destroy Islamic State | Editorial
The sociology of violence espoused by Isis will only be defeated by a political project that transcends the religious, nationalist and ethnic schisms in the regionAt the end of June 2014
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The Guardian view on the politics of ageing: don’t let our towns grow old | Editorial 28 Oct 2:19pm The Guardian view on the politics of ageing: don’t let our towns grow old | Editorial
The average age in UK cities is getting younger, while in smaller places the opposite is true. This could create an unwelcome new divideBritain is ageing badly. Or at least without paying due care and attention to a demographic revolution that may be more destabilising than is generally understood. The fact that we are living longer is common knowledge. According to
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The Guardian view on special needs education: restore confidence in a failing system | Editorial 27 Oct 3:52pm The Guardian view on special needs education: restore confidence in a failing system | Editorial
MPs have rightly criticised a poor set of reforms but have not come up with a solution for vulnerable children Are England’s
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The Guardian view on general election calls: stay and finish the Brexit job | Editorial 27 Oct 2:30pm The Guardian view on general election calls: stay and finish the Brexit job | Editorial
Boris Johnson wants to get rid of this House of Commons because it stands in the way of an even harder Brexit than he is letting on
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The Observer view on Boris Johnson undermining British politics | Observer editorial 27 Oct 1:30am The Observer view on Boris Johnson undermining British politics | Observer editorial
The prime minister’s behaviour is doing a grave disservice to democracy All the laws, rules and procedures that govern our politics cannot disguise a simple truth. Democracy can’t simply be enforced by the courts, imposed with ballot boxes, fulfilled by the marking of a cross. It relies on an honour code: the tacit agreement by those who take part that they will cherish and abide by its principles; that the majority, if not all, of its participants will act in good faith, criticising their opponents on points of substance but not seeking to undermine democracy’s constitutional underpinnings. What is happening in Britain today shows how extraordinarily quickly the rot can set in. Our political honour code is breaking down, unleashing a race to the bottom that the good men and women who sit in parliament can only watch unfold with horror. The most frightening thing is that we do not yet know where this road ends; it is entirely conceivable that things will get worse before they get better. What started with the 2016 European referendum campaign, which unleashed a decades-long Conservative civil war into the open, has culminated in that party imposing a prime minister on Britain who thinks nothing of adopting the delegitimisation of our sovereign parliament as a political campaign strategy.
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The Observer view on Franco’s reburial and partial closure for Spain’s civil war victims | Observer editorial 27 Oct 1:00am The Observer view on Franco’s reburial and partial closure for Spain’s civil war victims | Observer editorial
Many countries could do with a dose of Spanish-style candour about their history, Britain included In the early summer of 1975, thousands of people lining an avenue in central Madrid witnessed an extraordinary moment of history. Propped up in the rear seat of an open, horse-drawn carriage, surrounded by trotting cavalry, sat a gaunt, wizened old man wearing military uniform and a too-big hat. His appearance was greeted by clapping and cheers. But he seemed unable, or unwilling, to respond to the crowd. Perhaps Francisco Franco, civil war general, fascist dictator, collaborator with Hitler and Mussolini and the all-powerful caudillo of Spain for the preceding 36 years, felt it was beneath him. Or perhaps he felt unwell. Only months later, Franco was dead and the Spanish people began another long march, towards democratic rule and an uncertain, slow-motion reckoning with a terrible past.
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The Guardian view on General Franco’s exhumation: a Spanish lesson in memory | Editorial 25 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on General Franco’s exhumation: a Spanish lesson in memory | Editorial
Eighty years after the civil war, Spain has faced up to the delicate but necessary task of ending its official veneration of the country’s fascist leaderBriefly, fog threatened to disrupt General Francisco Franco’s final, unscheduled journey . Then the sky cleared and
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The Guardian view on the healthy state of poetry: a reprimand to Trump and Johnson | Editorial 25 Oct 1:25pm The Guardian view on the healthy state of poetry: a reprimand to Trump and Johnson | Editorial
English-language poetry is in great health – and has much to tell us about our fragile, fraught timesIn 2014, the chair of the judges of the Forward prizes for poetry, broadcaster
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s election demand: MPs should call his bluff | Editorial 24 Oct 2:16pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s election demand: MPs should call his bluff | Editorial
There is no good reason to commit to an early general election when parliament has not yet considered the withdrawal agreement bill in detail. First things firstBoris Johnson is the playground bully of British politics. He acts as if he is prime minister with a majority in parliament when in fact he has no majority. Because he cannot govern in that way with parliament, he has tried instead to govern against parliament. The delusion that he can do as he pleases led him to try to prorogue parliament this autumn – a bluff that was called by the supreme court. It then led him to concoct a fantasy legislative agenda by commissioning a Queen’s speech, though none of its measures will ever become law. Now he is trying to make his Brexit withdrawal bill conditional on the Commons agreeing to
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The Guardian view on the migrant tragedy in Essex: a border crackdown is not the way forward | Editorial 24 Oct 2:14pm The Guardian view on the migrant tragedy in Essex: a border crackdown is not the way forward | Editorial
An international response is required to the global migration crisis, and Britain has a responsibility to play its partThe known facts about how 39 people died in a lorry in Essex this week remain sparse, stark and shocking. The 31 male and eight female victims were all adults and, it became clear on Thursday, all were Chinese nationals. They arrived in Britain from Belgium by sea, in a refrigerated container, shortly after midnight on Wednesday morning. The container was then attached to the back of a lorry that had come from Northern Ireland via Holyhead and was driven to an industrial estate in Essex, where it was discovered about an hour later. There were no survivors. Fundamental parts of the story remain unclear and are under active investigation. The most important of these is to discover who the victims were and to tell their stories. Did they enter the container willingly or under duress? Who was responsible for loading them into the container? By what route did they reach Essex? Were they being trafficked or were they migrants entering the country illegally? Answers to all these questions are essential. For this appears to amount to mass murder.
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The Guardian view on the Trump impeachment inquiry: he isn’t the only one lowering standards | Editorial 23 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Trump impeachment inquiry: he isn’t the only one lowering standards | Editorial
Testimony on the US president’s dealings with Ukraine reminds us that his enablers are just as culpable for the diminishment of the highest office in the landRepublicans push the bar ever lower. This president still cannot clear it. Even a month ago, Democrats were at pains to stress that a request for foreign interference in domestic politics was impeachable in and of itself, whether or not
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The Guardian view on drug policy: rethink it without taboos | Editorial 23 Oct 1:28pm The Guardian view on drug policy: rethink it without taboos | Editorial
It is easier to find fault with prohibition than to design a perfect system, but there is clear evidence that the current methods are failingMuch of the harm caused by illegal drugs is caused by their illegality. Prohibition helps to turn users into criminals, and the justice system is poorly equipped to help addicts recover. This is not a controversial opinion in the fields of public health and policing – services on the frontline of the problem – but it is far from orthodoxy in Westminster. Many politicians still yield to taboos around liberal drug laws, even as social norms change and the failure of punitive methods becomes harder to ignore.
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The Guardian view on the Brexit votes: parliament must not waste the precious time it has won | Editorial 22 Oct 3:39pm The Guardian view on the Brexit votes: parliament must not waste the precious time it has won | Editorial
Boris Johnson’s bullying dash for the line has been blocked. Now opposition MPs need finally to unite around a planThe House of Commons last night successfully put the brakes on the prime minister’s attempt to deliver Brexit at breakneck speed. Parliament must now attempt to steer Britain away from the rocks of a Brexit deal which was hastily conceived and which, if enacted, would leave the country to repent at leisure. Boris Johnson will claim, with justification, that the backing by MPs of a second reading for his withdrawal bill, by a majority of 30, was a significant victory. After all, Theresa May never managed as much. But the defeat of the government’s programme motion by 322 votes to 308 means that the prime minister will not be able to force MPs to vote on it by Thursday evening. Having failed to rush his legislation through parliament, Mr Johnson has announced his intention to pause it, while the EU considers the request that he was forced to send for an extension beyond the 31 October deadline for Brexit. The prime minister will urge Brussels to make that extension short. Whatever its length, MPs who oppose his version of Brexit, which pushes the country towards a deregulated, disunited and poorer future, must now use the time to devise a coherent cross-party plan to achieve a better outcome. The Labour MPs who voted for a second reading of Mr Johnson’s bill will receive fierce criticism. But most did so not because they back Mr Johnson’s deal, but with the intention of amending and softening it, perhaps through a customs union. All options and potential compromises must now be explored by the opposition parties, because Mr Johnson’s version of Brexit cannot be allowed to stand.
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The Guardian view on the Canadian election: a win for Trudeau, but not a triumph | Editorial 22 Oct 1:36pm The Guardian view on the Canadian election: a win for Trudeau, but not a triumph | Editorial
The prime minister did himself more damage in this contest than his opponent. While Justin Trudeau’s defeat of the Conservatives is welcome, closer scrutiny of his record is overdueFour years ago, Justin Trudeau promised his country “sunny ways”. This time there was no euphoria; simply relief, as the Liberals lost the popular vote but
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Literary pilgrims to James Joyce’s grave | Brief letters 22 Oct 12:24pm Literary pilgrims to James Joyce’s grave | Brief letters
Harold Pinter | Manchester | Translation errors | Dominic Cummings | Deborah OrrHarold Pinter and I once paid a visit to James Joyce’s grave in Zurich, since James Joyce was his hero: two of the “pilgrim tourists” to which your editorial refers (
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The Guardian view on Extinction Rebellion: numbers alone won’t create change | Editorial 21 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on Extinction Rebellion: numbers alone won’t create change | Editorial
People being in the streets isn’t effective without a strategy, and XR needs a clearer one for what could be years of non-violent struggleThe speed and size of the Extinction Rebellion (XR) protests over the past year add weight to the idea that people in this decade were in revolt before they had any clear idea what form a revolution might take. Politically it has long looked like a whole generation was up for grabs. In the beginning of the decade this anger veered leftwards with movements like
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The Guardian view on repatriating James Joyce’s remains: Dublin should tread carefully | Editorial 21 Oct 1:25pm The Guardian view on repatriating James Joyce’s remains: Dublin should tread carefully | Editorial
The literary exile’s complicated relationship with Ireland inspired works of genius. Wherever he rests, that intimate connection is what counts“Do you know what Ireland is? Ireland is the old sow that eats her farrow.” So says Stephen Dedalus in James Joyce’s semi-autobiographical novel A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Joyce made sure he escaped that fate by abandoning Dublin for Trieste in 1904, rejecting a world he thought suffocated by Catholic piety, censorious morals and narrow nationalism. He came to be viewed with deep suspicion
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xxx | Editorial 20 Oct 1:30pm xxx | Editorial
‘Brexit fatigue’ is no reason to back a vision of Britain which fulfils the ambitions of the radical rightIn the lead-up to parliament’s historic Saturday sitting, the airwaves resounded to Conservative cries of “get this done”, “let’s move on” and “lift this cloud”. The Tory hope was that understandable Brexit fatigue could become a trump card for Boris Johnson, as he sought to rush through a
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The Guardian view on Xinjiang, China: forced labour and fashion shows | Editorial 20 Oct 1:25pm The Guardian view on Xinjiang, China: forced labour and fashion shows | Editorial
Repression in the north-western region takes many forms. They all deserve scrutinyWhen a million Uighurs and other Muslims have been locked up in
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The Observer view: a week that shows us why Donald Trump is unfit for high office | Observer editorial 20 Oct 1:00am The Observer view: a week that shows us why Donald Trump is unfit for high office | Observer editorial
The half-real, half-fake impresario president was apparently the only one blind to disaster being heaped upon disasterRoger Ailes, the ogre-like head of Fox News who resigned following allegations of
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The Observer view on Boris Johnson’s sorry Brexit deal | Observer editorial 19 Oct 4:00pm The Observer view on Boris Johnson’s sorry Brexit deal | Observer editorial
Parliament must act to ensure that voters have the final say on our departure from the European Union Boris Johnson is a prime minister without a mandate. He has never faced an election and has lost every vote he has put to the House of Commons. Yet time and again he has proved his willingness to ride roughshod over parliament in order to get his way. Yesterday was no different: MPs were disgracefully given just a few hours to scrutinise the terms of the most important decision the country has faced in decades. But he miscalculated badly. Parliament reasserted its sovereignty, voting to withhold approval of his EU deal until MPs have a chance to scrutinise the relevant legislation, effectively forcing him by law to request an extension from the EU.
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The Guardian view on the Brexit vote: bin this bad deal | Editorial 18 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Brexit vote: bin this bad deal | Editorial
Boris Johnson’s plan is far removed from the promises of the leave campaign and would be bad for the country. MPs must reject it“Brexit means Brexit”, Theresa May’s catchphrase, helped the former prime minister navigate a profound political problem: there was no model of a future relationship with the EU that could satisfy all leave voters, and none was specified on the 2016 ballot paper. The meaning of Brexit then evolved over three years, eventually becoming the deal that Boris Johnson has placed before parliament. This definition is a shrivelled facsimile of the product that was offered by the leave campaign. Pro-Brexit politicians never confronted the trade-offs involved in severing European ties that have developed over four decades. Instead, they dissembled and deceived, wielding the referendum result as a bludgeon to stifle debate.
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The Guardian view on creativity in schools: a missing ingredient | Editorial 18 Oct 1:25pm The Guardian view on creativity in schools: a missing ingredient | Editorial
Imagination should infuse teaching of science as well as the arts. Children are not pitchers to be filled with factsYou can’t see it, smell it, hear it. People disagree on how, precisely, to define it, or where, exactly, it comes from. It isn’t a school subject or an academic discipline, but it can be learned. It is a quality that is required by artists. But it is also present in the lives of scientists and entrepreneurs. All of us benefit from it: we thrive mentally and spiritually when we are able to harness it. It is a delicate thing, easily stamped out; in fact, it flourishes most fully when people are playful and childlike. At the same time, it works best in tandem with deep knowledge and expertise. This mysterious – but teachable – quality is creativity, the subject of a
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The Guardian view on the IMF and World Bank: back a global Green New Deal | Editorial 17 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on the IMF and World Bank: back a global Green New Deal | Editorial
At 75, the Bretton Woods institutions face an identity crisis. It’s time for them to chart a fresh courseThe International Monetary Fund and the World Bank have their 75th birthday this year, but the organisations that emerged from the Bretton Woods conference in 1944 are in no real mood to celebrate at their annual meetings this week. In Washington the mood is decidedly downbeat. Global growth
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The Guardian view on the BBC: watch closely – change is coming | Editorial 17 Oct 1:27pm The Guardian view on the BBC: watch closely – change is coming | Editorial
There is no immediate threat to the licence fee. But the corporation must update the case for its place in Britain’s national lifeAs the current BBC charter agreement still has eight years to run, the culture secretary’s remarks about the future of the licence fee should not be blown out of proportion – particularly as they came on a day when ministers may have been keen to shift attention away from the decision to scrap an age verification system for online pornography. Responding to a question from a Conservative MP, Nicky Morgan said on Wednesday that she is “open-minded” on the subject of how the corporation should be funded in future, and will listen to arguments from all sides. A policy of switching to a Netflix-style voluntary subscription service is unlikely to form part of the Conservatives’ next general election manifesto, since the royal charter guarantees the licence fee’s maintenance until 2027. But the BBC’s longer-term future nonetheless deserves attention. The “
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The Guardian view on the dash for a deal: Johnson’s Brexit is more dangerous than Theresa May’s | Editorial 16 Oct 1:34pm The Guardian view on the dash for a deal: Johnson’s Brexit is more dangerous than Theresa May’s | Editorial
The prime minister ran out of time playing political games, and he wants British workers to pay the price for his bunglingFor Boris Johnson, 31 October is a sacred date, beyond which Britain must not still be a member of the EU. But before 31 October, there was 12 April, and 29 March before that. The approach of a Brexit deadline in confusion and crisis is a sadly familiar feeling. The urgency driving Mr Johnson to strike
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The Guardian view on the economics Nobel: worthy winners | Editorial 16 Oct 1:33pm The Guardian view on the economics Nobel: worthy winners | Editorial
The work of Esther Duflo, Abhijit Banerjee and Michael Kremer on poverty deserved this accolade, but both the prize and the discipline need reformReaders of this paper on 6 June 2011 may have spotted an editorial titled
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The Guardian view on automating poverty: OK computers? | Editorial 15 Oct 2:00pm The Guardian view on automating poverty: OK computers? | Editorial
The use of AI and ‘welfare robots’ by governments around the world presents moral as well as technical challengesAcross the world, governments are investing in machines that they hope will run their social security systems and other services more cheaply and effectively than humans. The Guardian’s
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The Guardian view on racism and football: time for Uefa to step up | Editorial 15 Oct 1:49pm The Guardian view on racism and football: time for Uefa to step up | Editorial
England’s footballers behaved with dignity and discipline on a shameful night of racial abuse in Bulgaria. European football’s governing body must now impose sanctions that biteLong before the footballers of Bulgaria and England walked on to the pitch of Sofia’s Stadion Vasil Levski on Monday evening, their Euro 2020 qualifying match had become a test of something far more important than sporting prowess. Parts of the stadium had been closed off after previous incidents of racist abuse at international games. Yet
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The Guardian view on the Queen’s speech: show without substance | Editorial 14 Oct 1:44pm The Guardian view on the Queen’s speech: show without substance | Editorial
The government talks up the UK’s bright, post-Brexit future but its populist policies threaten to take the country backwardsRarely has the elaborately costumed pageant of the state opening of parliament looked less in keeping with the status of the legislative programme on offer. This was pomp in bizarre circumstances. From the off,
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The Guardian view on Scottish nationalism: a warning from Catalonia | Editorial 14 Oct 1:40pm The Guardian view on Scottish nationalism: a warning from Catalonia | Editorial
Spain is shamed by its jailing of independence leaders. But the SNP is wise not to follow the illegal Catalan approachNicola Sturgeon will put independence front and centre in
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The Guardian view on John Bercow’s departure: parliament needs a bold Speaker | Editorial 13 Oct 1:21pm The Guardian view on John Bercow’s departure: parliament needs a bold Speaker | Editorial
Bercow has been rightly criticised, but whoever takes over from him should emulate his reforms and radicalismWhen parliament returns on Monday,
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The Guardian view on Syria and Trump: a disaster, still being made | Editorial 13 Oct 1:17pm The Guardian view on Syria and Trump: a disaster, still being made | Editorial
The US president was warned about the consequences of betraying the Kurds. Now he can see them, and he still doesn’t care“Total disaster,”
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The Observer view on Syria: Syria’s new horror was foretold. It shames us all | Observer editorial 13 Oct 1:00am The Observer view on Syria: Syria’s new horror was foretold. It shames us all | Observer editorial
Turkey’s invasion of north-east Syria, faciliated by the withdrawal of US forces, could lead to a resurgence of Islamic State The conflict engulfing north-east Syria is a wholly avoidable disaster. It was widely foreseen. It could, and should, have been prevented. Responsibility lies principally with Turkey’s bellicose president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. But many others share the blame, including a criminally incompetent Donald Trump, Islamic State jihadists, who previously destabilised the area, and the international community, which has failed, over the course of eight bloody years, to halt Syria’s civil war. The terrifyingly indiscriminate Turkish artillery barrages and air strikes directed at towns and villages in Kurdish-held areas along the border shame those who ordered them. Erdoğan’s claim that his forces are only targeting terrorists is given the lie by the
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The Observer view on the Stirling prize-winning Goldsmith Street | Observer editorial 13 Oct 12:30am The Observer view on the Stirling prize-winning Goldsmith Street | Observer editorial
We must build more council homes like the low-energy, impressive estate in Norwich The award of the Stirling prize to
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The Guardian view on the polluters: days of reckoning | Editorial 11 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on the polluters: days of reckoning | Editorial
Fossil fuel companies have worked for decades to shape attitudes and undermine science. The crisis dictates that they must now be confrontedThe huge differences in the voting records of MPs on climate issues,
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The Guardian view on Abiy Ahmed’s Nobel peace prize: so far, so good | Editorial 11 Oct 1:25pm The Guardian view on Abiy Ahmed’s Nobel peace prize: so far, so good | Editorial
The decision to honour the Ethiopian prime minister recognises the astonishing changes he has pushed through. But the country’s progress remains precariousThe list of
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The Guardian view on Extinction Rebellion protests: of course they’re an inconvenience | Editorial 10 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on Extinction Rebellion protests: of course they’re an inconvenience | Editorial
Critics complain that the civil disobedience campaign is unrealistic and disruptive. But its tactics are forcing the public and politicians to confront the climate emergencyThe predictable complaints began as soon as
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The Guardian view on China and basketball: power games | Editorial 10 Oct 1:25pm The Guardian view on China and basketball: power games | Editorial
A boycott sparked by comments on Hong Kong’s protests has highlighted how China is exporting its controls on speech by economic meansSport is a serious business. Ping-pong diplomacy sped US detente with China; Richard Nixon followed the path of American table tennis players. Now some
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The Guardian view on Johnson’s choice: rule of law or misrule | Editorial 9 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on Johnson’s choice: rule of law or misrule | Editorial
The prime minister has imported a wrecking campaign style to Downing Street that is incompatible with good governmentIn light of everything that was known about Boris Johnson before becoming prime minister, his inability to resolve Brexit once installed in Downing Street was to be expected. Only the manner of his failure was unpredictable. Mr Johnson was lazy in his assessment of the EU negotiating position, arrogant in his handling of parliament, and complacent about the strength of opposition there. But perhaps the prime minister’s most damaging error has been to confuse campaign rhetoric with the reality of government. Mr Johnson believed the arguments he used to persuade Tory members to elect him as their leader. He said that Theresa May’s deal was obsolete and that a better deal would be available if the UK listened less to Brussels. That proposition has now been tested and found to be false. Mr Johnson’s alternative Brexit proposals have
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The Guardian view on Poland’s election: church-sanctioned bigotry casts a shadow | Editorial 9 Oct 1:25pm The Guardian view on Poland’s election: church-sanctioned bigotry casts a shadow | Editorial
The country’s Catholic hierarchy has played an ignominious part in boosting the ruling party’s homophobic campaignIn the six years of his papacy, one of Pope Francis’s main goals has been to shift the focus of the Catholic church’s preoccupations
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The Guardian view on faltering Brexit talks: a no-deal election is on the cards | Editorial 8 Oct 2:25pm The Guardian view on faltering Brexit talks: a no-deal election is on the cards | Editorial
The blame game has begun after a No 10 briefing of an Angela Merkel phone call. A public row serves the government’s purposeEuropean governments have been justifiably sceptical about Boris Johnson’s approach to Brexit negotiations. After Tuesday’s extraordinary developments, scepticism may have hardened into the certainty that they are dealing with a government willing to risk a no-deal future in order to win a general election. According to
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The Guardian view on Trump and Syria: damage has been done | Editorial 8 Oct 2:06pm The Guardian view on Trump and Syria: damage has been done | Editorial
The ditching of Kurdish-led forces threatens to destabilise the region further. It is just the latest proof of the dangers of this president’s foreign dealingsWherever US policy on Syria settles in the coming weeks and months, damage has already been done. Two announcements within a few hours encapsulated both the style of Donald Trump’s presidency (personalised, ignorant and erratic) and its perils. The first, a White House statement, followed a phone call with the Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and blindsided everyone, including parts of Mr Trump’s administration. It not only announced the abrupt decision to withdraw troops from the north-eastern area bordering Turkey, abandoning the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces with which the US has partnered, but gave the green light to a Turkish invasion. The second – a tweet, following a furious backlash even from his own party at the prospect of further chaos in a desperately unstable region – announced that should Ankara do anything that “I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits, I will totally destroy and obliterate the Economy of Turkey”. But Ankara sees the SDF as indistinguishable from Kurdish insurgents inside Turkey and has long sought to eradicate them. Now it is
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson: let no such man be trusted | Editorial 7 Oct 1:50pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson: let no such man be trusted | Editorial
The prime minister continues to play fast and loose with parliament, the courts and Britain’s interests. His plans must be blockedVisiting Watford, Boris Johnson made it commendably clear on Monday that he opposes the self-interested abuse of a process laid down by treaty and law. Asked about an American spy’s wife who has claimed
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The Guardian view on the police and Carl Beech: questions remain | Editorial 7 Oct 1:50pm The Guardian view on the police and Carl Beech: questions remain | Editorial
The Metropolitan police must be held to account for their botched investigation of false sex abuse claimsThe
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The Guardian view on women’s pensions: a feminist issue | Editorial 6 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on women’s pensions: a feminist issue | Editorial
A court ruled against the BackTo60 group last week. But the 1950s-born activists’ fight against injustice goes onSome means must be found to ease the hardship faced by the 1950s-born women worst affected by pension age changes. Last week the
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The Guardian view on a changing EU: leaving Britain behind | Editorial 6 Oct 1:25pm The Guardian view on a changing EU: leaving Britain behind | Editorial
Brexiters routinely underestimate the resilience of the European project and overstate their own importance on the continentThere is a common misperception among British Eurosceptics that the EU is as obsessed with obstructing Brexit as they are with completing it. That is untrue in two ways. First, the priority in Brussels is to facilitate the UK’s orderly departure. There was a phase of grief, but that has mostly given way to frustration at British politicians’ collective ineptitude – remainers as well as leavers. Second, EU eyes are mostly elsewhere. Last week saw the beginning of confirmatory hearings for Ursula von der Leyen’s new commission. Corruption allegations led to two nominees – from Hungary and Romania – being rejected as unfit by a European parliamentary vetting committee even before public scrutiny had begun. Since the commission reflects the delicate balance of political forces in the legislature, any striking down of candidates risks provoking retaliation. The requirement to secure MEPs’ consent for Ms von der Leyen’s administration means Brexit is not the only issue coming to a head at the end of October.
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The Observer view on the World Athletics Championships: a sport in crisis | Observer editorial 6 Oct 1:00am The Observer view on the World Athletics Championships: a sport in crisis | Observer editorial
Golden moments on the track can’t disguise a deeply flawed event in DohaMajor sports events tend to follow the same, inviolable narrative. In the build-up, the projections are universally doom-laden. Media reports focus on the dubious circumstances under which the host city was awarded the prize (the process, whichever sport we’re discussing, is always dubious). There are invariably problems with the stadiums, which are either behind schedule and over budget or over budget and completed with a disregard to working conditions and human life. But then the action starts and the mood shifts. We forget many of the pre-tournament snags and are overwhelmed, at last, by the awe-inspiring performances of the competitors. Millions of us come together, reminded of the strange fact that nothing unites our nation quite as sport does.
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The Observer view on Boris Johnson and his Irish border tactics | Observer editorial 6 Oct 12:59am The Observer view on Boris Johnson and his Irish border tactics | Observer editorial
In presenting proposals that no one but the DUP will accept he puts the hard-won peace process in real peril It is a sign of the extraordinary times in which we live that a government assurance that it would obey the law was
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The Guardian view on Donald Trump: an abuser of his office | Editorial 4 Oct 1:30pm The Guardian view on Donald Trump: an abuser of his office | Editorial
The US president is trying to normalise his self-serving breaches of his oath of office. America must hold him to account and restore the rule of law and ethicsUntil very recently indeed, the idea that the president of the United States might stand outside the White House and call on Communist China to investigate one of his presidential challengers would not merely have seemed
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The Guardian view on Tate Modern’s new sculpture: a gift and a rebuke | Editorial 4 Oct 1:25pm The Guardian view on Tate Modern’s new sculpture: a gift and a rebuke | Editorial
Kara Walker’s new commission remakes the language of monuments through allusions and references to the slavery ageThe Turbine Hall at London’s Tate Modern is a cavernous maw that swallows and spits out all but the most confident artists.
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The Guardian view on the backstop proposals: Britain’s broken promise | Editorial 3 Oct 1:15pm The Guardian view on the backstop proposals: Britain’s broken promise | Editorial
Boris Johnson calls it a compromise. But, once again, the Conservatives are talking only to themselves, not to Ireland and the EUBoris Johnson has reached for the word compromise many times in the last two days as he has promoted his new Brexit proposals. There were three mentions of compromise in his party conference
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The Guardian view on Scotland’s smacking ban: follow the leader | Editorial 3 Oct 1:14pm The Guardian view on Scotland’s smacking ban: follow the leader | Editorial
By granting children equal protection against assault, Holyrood has set an example for the rest of the UKBy
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s new Brexit plan: dodging the issues | Editorial 2 Oct 1:28pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s new Brexit plan: dodging the issues | Editorial
The prime minister says he wants a deal, but his priority is still whipping up support among hardline EuroscepticsThe convention is that a leader’s speech at a party conference is a serious account of domestic and foreign policy priorities. Boris Johnson characteristically defied that convention in Manchester.
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The Guardian view on homeless people: let’s give them homes and support | Editorial 2 Oct 1:27pm The Guardian view on homeless people: let’s give them homes and support | Editorial
The number of homeless people dying on our streets is soaring. We have the power to stop thisEven the bald numbers are horrifying. This week, the Office for National Statistics recorded that 726 homeless people died in England and Wales in 2018, a rise of 22% on 2017 and the biggest year-on-year rise since it began collecting data. And they died shockingly early. On the streets, a man can expect to die at about 45 years old, even while the average man will live until 76. For a woman sleeping rough, life expectancy is lower still at 43, while her counterpart in the wider population can expect to live until 81. In one of the richest societies in human history, we still allow people to die decades too soon for want of a secure roof over their heads. A statistic, a tent on the street, a man holding up a scrap of cardboard: homeless people often die as they live, in anonymity amid general indifference. Even our data on the number of people living without a secure home are worryingly sketchy. The housing charity Shelter estimates that
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The Guardian view on Conservative criminal justice: back to the 1980s | Editorial 1 Oct 1:40pm The Guardian view on Conservative criminal justice: back to the 1980s | Editorial
The latest announcements from the home and justice secretaries echo an outdated approach to prisons and prisonersThe law and order policies unveiled this week by
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The Guardian view on eurozone populism: fight it with fiscal firepower | Editorial 1 Oct 1:40pm The Guardian view on eurozone populism: fight it with fiscal firepower | Editorial
The nationalism that taps into people’s angst and dislocation can be effectively challenged with a bazooka of a eurozone budgetLast month Germany’s version of the Sun, Der Bild, ran a sensationalist attack on the outgoing president of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi. Depicting the central banker as “Count Draghila”,
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The Guardian view on the People’s Republic of China at 70: whose history? | Editorial 30 Sep 2:23pm The Guardian view on the People’s Republic of China at 70: whose history? | Editorial
Seven decades of Communist rule have seen notable advances but at horrific costThe 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China, which will be marked on Tuesday by a mass military parade in the
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The Guardian view on universal credit: Labour’s plan makes sense | Editorial 30 Sep 2:23pm The Guardian view on universal credit: Labour’s plan makes sense | Editorial
The underlying problem with the flagship Tory policy is the idea that claimants need to change. Could a new government turn this on its head?The shocking failings of universal credit are justly blamed on the government having listened to the wrong people when setting it up. The sensible
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The Guardian view on a public health calamity: science facts need reinforcing | Editorial 29 Sep 1:47pm The Guardian view on a public health calamity: science facts need reinforcing | Editorial
Lives are being put at risk because discredited claims about vaccinations are being circulated without effective challenge. The truth urgently needs support in GP surgeries and onlineFreedom from fear of deadly disease is a luxury by historical standards, enjoyed by most British people. But luxury cultivates complacency. That is one explanation for a decline in the number of children receiving routine vaccinations. NHS data
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s Brexit plans: all humbug | Editorial 29 Sep 1:46pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s Brexit plans: all humbug | Editorial
The facts are only pertinent to Mr Johnson’s interest in getting away with what he says. It is a tragedy that he can get away with his fabrications and exaggerations whatever the cost to the countryBefore last Wednesday humbug had fallen out of favour from parliamentary usage. MPs used the
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The Observer view: MPs must move soon to end Johnson’s toxic rule | Observer editorial 28 Sep 3:00pm The Observer view: MPs must move soon to end Johnson’s toxic rule | Observer editorial
The prime minister must not be allowed to attack our democratic institutions any longerA prime minister’s job is to speak for the nation. And in his
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The Guardian view on Brexit divisions: a week that reset the dial | Editorial 27 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on Brexit divisions: a week that reset the dial | Editorial
Boris Johnson’s response to the supreme court’s verdict is designed to polarise British politics even further than beforeThis week British politics has been convulsed in ways for which there are few modern comparisons. So dramatic and polarising have these events been that an effort of will is required even to recall the political assumptions that applied before the supreme court changed everything on Tuesday. That effort is nevertheless necessary, because it helps to clarify what has happened and to understand its significance. Until Lady Hale delivered the supreme court’s
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The Guardian view on the Turner prize: hopes and fears | Editorial 27 Sep 1:25pm The Guardian view on the Turner prize: hopes and fears | Editorial
In its snapshot of art now, the show offers a lens through which to see our troubled world On Saturday the 2019 Turner prize exhibition opens at the appropriately named
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The Guardian view on language in politics: playing with fire | Editorial 26 Sep 1:46pm The Guardian view on language in politics: playing with fire | Editorial
With his contemptuous dismissal of colleagues’ fears of violence, the prime minister has sunk to a new lowThe risk that politicians, other public figures or ordinary people taking part in political activities could be physically attacked is the most urgent but not the only reason to be alarmed by the divisive stance adopted by the prime minister following the supreme court ruling against him. With every
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The Guardian view on Egypt: Sisi isn’t everyone’s favourite dictator | Editorial 26 Sep 1:45pm The Guardian view on Egypt: Sisi isn’t everyone’s favourite dictator | Editorial
While foreign leaders buddy up to Abdel Fatah al-Sisi, his people endure a brutal crackdown on rightsEven before Egyptian authorities warned that they would
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Rising tensions in the Commons cause concern | Letters 26 Sep 1:11pm Rising tensions in the Commons cause concern | Letters
Readers share their views on heated exchanges in parliament as it was reconvened after the supreme court’s historic ruling earlier this weekI could not agree more with the headline of your editorial (
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The Guardian view on Brexit politics: arsenic in the water supply | Editorial 25 Sep 2:02pm The Guardian view on Brexit politics: arsenic in the water supply | Editorial
The Conservative party must end its embrace of radical populism, which is pouring poison into the national debateBritain is five weeks away from the ruinous and dangerous position of leaving the European Union without a deal. There is no sign of the country having made any progress towards getting one. Boris Johnson did not meet the 30-day
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The Guardian view on impeaching Trump: a necessary risk | Editorial 25 Sep 1:53pm The Guardian view on impeaching Trump: a necessary risk | Editorial
There is no doubt that the president’s behaviour merits these proceedings. Democrats are right to hold him accountableThe
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson: guilty but he won’t go | Editorial 24 Sep 3:09pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson: guilty but he won’t go | Editorial
For adherents of a no-deal Brexit the prize of remaking Britain in a reactionary mould was worth dispensing with legislative scrutiny altogether. It took the judges to stop them – for nowThe cabinet manual’s rule that the Queen
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The Guardian view on the climate youth movement: we have been warned | Editorial 24 Sep 2:03pm The Guardian view on the climate youth movement: we have been warned | Editorial
Greta Thunberg’s speech on generational injustice shone a spotlight on an emerging political faultlineIf the scale of the challenge to governments around the world was not clear last Friday, when around 4 million people joined a school strike,
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The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour: time to come together | Editorial 23 Sep 2:50pm The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour: time to come together | Editorial
The Labour leader has won an important victory against many high-profile opponents who wanted Labour to be the party of remain. He must now bring them back into the foldJeremy Corbyn is cherished by many delegates in his party. He is not held in awe by them. The membership has twice backed Mr Corbyn overwhelmingly as leader despite their views being far
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The Guardian view on Thomas Cook: wiped out by debt | Editorial 23 Sep 2:02pm The Guardian view on Thomas Cook: wiped out by debt | Editorial
That the oldest holiday company in the world has gone bust is a cause for anger as well as regret – and a grim portent of what lies aheadThe
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Suffering is not relative | Paul Chadwick 22 Sep 2:13pm Suffering is not relative | Paul Chadwick
Fallout from a woefully misjudged Guardian editorialA Guardian editorial online last Sunday was prompted by the imminent appearance of the memoir of a former UK prime minister, David Cameron. Its overarching assertion was that privileged people do not govern the UK well. Its theme was that because Cameron came from a privileged background, he lacked empathy for the people who suffered as a result of policies he pursued when in office between May 2010 and July 2016. A theme like that could generate strong views pro and con; many editorials do. It could involve a harsh character analysis; public figures must expect that. The way the editorial initially elaborated its theme was woefully misjudged. “I am personally completely devastated that it was ever published in any form in the Guardian, and that we caused distress to so many people,” the editor-in-chief, Katharine Viner, told me in one of our exchanges about what had happened.
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The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour: it should be a broad church | Editorial 22 Sep 2:00pm The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour: it should be a broad church | Editorial
The Labour leader ought to be true to his ideological roots and must not attempt to force members to back his Brexit policy on the back of trade union votesThe seeds of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership victory of 2015 were sown more than a decade earlier on the floor of a Labour party conference in Brighton. Then the Labour leader was Tony Blair and he had, in 2003, taken Britain into the Iraq war with predictable and disastrous consequences. By 2004, when Iraq was descending into chaos, Labour members were
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The Guardian view on machine learning: a computer cleverer than you? | Editorial 22 Sep 1:56pm The Guardian view on machine learning: a computer cleverer than you? | Editorial
There are dangers of teaching computers to learn the things humans do best – not least because makers of such machines cannot explain the knowledge their creations have acquiredBrad Smith, Microsoft’s president, last week
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The Observer view on the Afghanistan peace process | Observer editorial 22 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on the Afghanistan peace process | Observer editorial
America has a duty to make sure that democracy does not fail When Donald Trump revealed a secret plan for a “peace summit” with Afghan Taliban chiefs at the Camp David presidential retreat in Maryland earlier this month, the news caused a sensation. The idea that a group, officially designated as terrorists by the United States, was to be given the red-carpet treatment reserved for important allies shocked many in Washington. In fact, Trump had
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The Observer view on Labour’s lack of leadership over Brexit | Observer editorial 22 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on Labour’s lack of leadership over Brexit | Observer editorial
Voters will not be fooled by Corbyn’s foolish prevarication Britain is gripped by political crisis. We have a prime minister bent on taking Britain out of the EU in just over a month, even if it means crashing out with no deal, with dreadful consequences for jobs and growth, for regional inequalities and for the union. Lacking any democratic mandate, Boris Johnson has shut down parliament for five weeks in an attempt to stop MPs from blocking him, a move whose legality the supreme court will rule on this week. Yet the Labour party is heading into its conference this weekend riven by splits over Brexit and sectarian attempts by Jeremy Corbyn’s allies to scrap the position of deputy leader. It represents a breathtaking failure of leadership by Corbyn. Never has Britain been in such desperate need of a leader of the opposition who can take on a prime minister who appears prepared to ride roughshod over the rule of law and who has shown such rank disregard for our democratically elected representatives. Yet Labour seems determined to show voters that it, too, is a hopelessly divided party that cannot reach consensus on its internal party structures, let alone a clear position on Brexit or a vision for the country.
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The Guardian view on transport emissions: the trouble with planes and automobiles | Editorial 20 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on transport emissions: the trouble with planes and automobiles | Editorial
The headline figure of a 44% cut in the UK’s total emissions conceals a multitude of failures, with motor traffic and aviation high on the listIf the success of an event like Friday’s school strike can be measured, it is in the extent to which it changes the climate of opinion. Individuals, unions and other organisations that took part in the strike must play their part in reducing emissions. But when it comes to limiting global heating, governments have far more levers than anyone else. Global cooperation by politicians is essential to tackling the climate emergency. Since states are the world’s most powerful organisations, many of the solutions will inevitably be national. In terms of their current and historic carbon emissions, and efforts to reduce them, there are huge differences between countries. There is no one-size-fits-all model of decarbonisation. In the UK, like everywhere else, progress is nowhere near fast enough. Carbon dioxide emissions have been falling for six years, and are at their
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The Guardian view on Thailand: intimidation can’t solve the problem | Editorial 20 Sep 1:25pm The Guardian view on Thailand: intimidation can’t solve the problem | Editorial
The military promised it would reconcile the country. But after a dubious election, divisions continue to growThe good news is that a coup-prone country is unlikely to experience yet another military takeover in the immediate future. The bad news is that the Thai army should no longer need such tactics. The junta laundered its power into a supposed democratic mandate this spring, through an electoral system rigged to ensure it would prevail, and a new constitution. Prayuth Chan-ocha, the 2014 coup leader, is the elected prime minister. Still, you can never be too careful. Despite all its advantages, the military needed weeks to
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The Guardian view on the school climate strike: protests that matter | Editorial 19 Sep 1:57pm The Guardian view on the school climate strike: protests that matter | Editorial
The youth climate movement has created a new sense of urgency. Adults, including politicians, must now focus on plotting a safer courseThis Friday’s school strike, which
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The Guardian view on Japan and South Korea: neither side will win | Editorial 19 Sep 1:54pm The Guardian view on Japan and South Korea: neither side will win | Editorial
The months-old dispute between the two countries is only growing. They may not be the only ones affectedPerhaps the most striking aspect of the
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The Guardian view on Israel’s elections: it could be worse | Editorial 18 Sep 2:00pm The Guardian view on Israel’s elections: it could be worse | Editorial
Netanyahu is unfit for his office, as some voters are acknowledging, but the problems are bigger than himBenjamin Netanyahu’s political magic has broken,
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The Guardian view on teacher workloads: big lessons to learn | Editorial 18 Sep 1:57pm The Guardian view on teacher workloads: big lessons to learn | Editorial
England’s teachers are now working as long hours as bankers, but without the banker payThe new secretary of state for education, Gavin Williamson, knows a lot about the heavy workloads piled on teachers. His wife used to teach in a primary school. Then she left the profession to become a teaching assistant partly because, he said this month, “there was always a big challenge in terms of workload, and this is one of the things we need to address”. Indeed. More than personal experience, hard figures back up the cabinet minister’s worry. A new report from
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The Guardian view on Iran and Saudi Arabia: maximum pressure, maximum risks | Editorial 17 Sep 1:32pm The Guardian view on Iran and Saudi Arabia: maximum pressure, maximum risks | Editorial
The attack on a key oil facility has increased the dangers – but US actions triggered this crisisDonald Trump’s remarks on foreign policy resemble a dot-to-dot designed by an abstract artist – individual points may stand out, and there are discernible lines between some of them, but to look for a coherent whole is a fool’s errand. His reaction to the
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The Guardian view on worker-ownership plans: firms for the many, not the few | Editorial 17 Sep 1:32pm The Guardian view on worker-ownership plans: firms for the many, not the few | Editorial
The left across the world is embracing the idea that soaring wealth inequality can be tackled by giving employees a stake in their companies – and a say over the profits and decisions of their employersThe rich really are different from you. While the pall of the financial crisis still hangs over the ordinary worker, whose income is
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The Guardian view on a Liberal Democrat revoke: a promise that won’t be redeemed| Editorial 16 Sep 1:53pm The Guardian view on a Liberal Democrat revoke: a promise that won’t be redeemed| Editorial
Jo Swinson’s offer is just to permanently polarise the electorate around Brexit. The Lib Dems still have no distinctive pitch for issues beyond leaving the EUDo gamblers know something that pollsters do not? Ever since the Liberal Democrats’ record European election
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The Guardian view on county lines: victims, villains and everything in between | Editorial 16 Sep 1:52pm The Guardian view on county lines: victims, villains and everything in between | Editorial
The use of modern slavery laws to target traffickers was a breakthrough. But the problems thrown up by modern drug gangs won’t be solved by criminal justice aloneThe once poorly understood phenomenon of county lines drug dealing is taking firmer shape in terms of public policy and also of awareness. The emerging picture is disturbing even to those familar with the most destructive consequences of illegal drugs. What is going on, as
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The Guardian view on the future of work: share out the benefits | Editorial 15 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on the future of work: share out the benefits | Editorial
A Californian court has ruled that gig economy workers should be treated as employeesCalifornia is one of the few economies large enough to set the rules in a globalised world. The state’s initiatives on car safety and emissions have in the past set an example that was followed by car manufacturers everywhere. In a less beneficial way, California was also the birthplace of the gig economy, and the widespread use of webs of casual labour tied together by algorithms to subvert labour laws and other regulations in all sorts of fields, ranging from taxi firms to B&Bs. So it’s an important development that the state’s senate has now turned decisively against the exploitation of casual workers. This week
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The Guardian view on David Cameron: the boy in the bubble | Editorial 15 Sep 1:24pm The Guardian view on David Cameron: the boy in the bubble | Editorial
When great power comes with great irresponsibilityThe publication of extracts from David Cameron’s memoirs casts a chill light on the flaws of the British political system. The interest lies not in the detail of who stabbed whose back or which
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The Observer view on the threat posed to Israel by another Benjamin Netanyahu victory | Observer editorial 15 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on the threat posed to Israel by another Benjamin Netanyahu victory | Observer editorial
The prime minister’s pre-election tactics underline why he must be ousted from office Benjamin Netanyahu’s bid to secure another term as Israel’s prime minister has grown more desperate and divisive as Tuesday’s elections approach. Bibi, as he is known, has never been afraid to fight dirty. Now he is at it again as his Likud party and its rightwing allies
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The Observer view: fewer rape claims come to court. That is alarming | Observer editorial 15 Sep 1:00am The Observer view: fewer rape claims come to court. That is alarming | Observer editorial
Sexual assault is being effectively decriminalised by the woefully low rate of prosecutions – and convictions – of attackers She was in the early stages of a relationship with a man who pretended to be a police officer. He was gradually more controlling and, at one point, he became jealous of photos on her phone. “He punched me in the back of the head, then he raped me… The second time he attacked me he had a huge kitchen knife.” Rebecca – not her real name – eventually reported her attacker to the police. It turned out that he was a prisoner released on licence, with a history of violence against women. He was initially charged with three counts of rape, as well as assault by beating and false imprisonment. But Rebecca was later informed that the
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The Guardian view on the rise in domestic killings: figures to shock politicians to act | Editorial 13 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on the rise in domestic killings: figures to shock politicians to act | Editorial
At the end of a week that saw Theresa May trash her reputation for taking domestic abuse seriously, the 32% rise in deaths must be a wake-up callIt has been a terrible week for everyone in the UK who is concerned about shockingly high levels of violence against women. First, the prorogation of parliament meant that a long-awaited domestic abuse bill, placing new statutory duties on councils among other measures, fell. Then Theresa May made the appalling decision to
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The Guardian view on Modi’s 100 days: trashing lives and the constitution | Editorial 13 Sep 1:25pm The Guardian view on Modi’s 100 days: trashing lives and the constitution | Editorial
The Indian prime minister is being feted in the west. But he is arbitrarily curbing the human rights and civil liberties of minorities on a vast scaleThis week India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi,
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The Guardian view on Yellowhammer: the ugly truth about a no-deal Brexit | Editorial 12 Sep 1:31pm The Guardian view on Yellowhammer: the ugly truth about a no-deal Brexit | Editorial
Ministers insist it is a worst-case scenario. But with no new deal in sight, the dangers set out in a document they wanted to hide must be taken seriouslyEven for a government that prides itself on high-handedness,
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The Guardian view on a children’s manifesto: families need more from ministers | Editorial 12 Sep 1:31pm The Guardian view on a children’s manifesto: families need more from ministers | Editorial
Opening schools at weekends for sports activities is one of a list of demands to which politicians should pay attentionChildren, says the government-appointed commissioner charged with representing their interests in England, lack a voice in politics. As a result, their interests are too often “subjugated to the interests of others”, or lost down the cracks between departments. The
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and the crown: a clear abuse of power | Editorial 11 Sep 1:48pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson and the crown: a clear abuse of power | Editorial
A Scottish appeal court ruling exposes quite how little the prime minister can be trusted with the powers of his officeWhen Boris Johnson arrived in Downing Street, he brought with him a reputation for duplicity in matters personal and professional. Only his most credulous cheerleaders expected that to change when he became prime minister. The pessimists did not anticipate how swiftly and egregiously Mr Johnson’s worst attributes would be displayed. Even by his own shabby standards it is an achievement already to have corrupted the relationship between a prime minister and the monarch. A court has judged that parliament was unlawfully prorogued. Scottish appeal judges
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The Guardian view on Netanyahu’s land grab: a prison, not a peace | Editorial 11 Sep 1:47pm The Guardian view on Netanyahu’s land grab: a prison, not a peace | Editorial
The Israeli political leadership, with the help of Donald Trump, is making finding a way out of conflict with the Palestinians impossibleBenjamin Netanyahu’s
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The Guardian view on the Brexit economy: the UK risks recession | Editorial 10 Sep 2:04pm The Guardian view on the Brexit economy: the UK risks recession | Editorial
There is no good time to be leaving the European Union but this might be the worst – as a failure to learn the lessons of the 2008 crash leaves the country exposed to another downturnThere is more than a little truth in the idea that those who do not learn from history are condemned to repeat it. The global financial crisis was meant to lead to economic and political reckoning for neoliberals carried away with their
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The Guardian view on John Bolton: good riddance, but the problem is his boss | Editorial 10 Sep 2:03pm The Guardian view on John Bolton: good riddance, but the problem is his boss | Editorial
Many will rightly celebrate the departure of the US national security adviser. But however welcome the news, it reflects the deeper problems with this administrationNo sensible observer of international affairs could lament Donald Trump’s announcement that he has
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s Brexit breach: rift with EU could be here to stay | Editorial 9 Sep 1:45pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s Brexit breach: rift with EU could be here to stay | Editorial
In attempting to turn domestic weakness into a diplomatic asset, the prime minister risks poisoning the well of future EU-UK relations Boris Johnson’s attempt to get a deal with the European Union seems like a speeding car negotiating with a brick wall. The more solid and immovable the wall appears, the harder Mr Johnson charges towards it, claiming he is unable to swerve out of the way. The British prime minister reasons that as both the vehicle and the barrier have a part to play in a car crash, he can blame the collision on the wall because it is made of brick. Hence his
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The Guardian view on Pope Francis: a voice in the wilderness | Editorial 9 Sep 1:44pm The Guardian view on Pope Francis: a voice in the wilderness | Editorial
No other spiritual leader is speaking out so clearly for the poor and for the environment in the developing worldPope Francis has been visiting two of the poorest countries in the world, but on the way he took a moment
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The Guardian view on the world and Brexit: rue Britannia | Editorial 8 Sep 1:31pm The Guardian view on the world and Brexit: rue Britannia | Editorial
A project supposed to enhance Britain’s international stature has only served to diminish itThe case for
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The Guardian view on tourist taxes: travellers should pay their way | Editorial 8 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on tourist taxes: travellers should pay their way | Editorial
Levies won’t suit every destination, but they can help make sure that visitors are good news for all, not just the businesses that serve themNicola Sturgeon’s speech last Tuesday setting out the Scottish government’s
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The Observer view on the best way to defeat Boris Johnson | Observer editorial 8 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on the best way to defeat Boris Johnson | Observer editorial
The stakes have never been higher as Britain heads for an election “A no-deal Brexit could cause far more damage to our future economic success than a Corbyn government, the former chancellor Ken Clarke told the
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The Observer view on Putin’s ongoing corruption of democracy | Observer editorial 8 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on Putin’s ongoing corruption of democracy | Observer editorial
The Kremlin’s underhand scheming in municipal voting is a warning to Britain to protect a forthcoming election Vladimir Putin’s regime has done all in its power to skew and distort the results of Sunday’s nationwide regional elections in Russia. This is no surprise. The Kremlin has become notorious in recent years for its efforts, both brazen and underhand, to subvert democracy at home and abroad. With general elections approaching in Britain and the US, a close eye needs to be kept on Russia’s president. Recent events surrounding
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The Guardian view on demography and politics: nationalist narratives must be challenged | Editorial 6 Sep 1:30pm The Guardian view on demography and politics: nationalist narratives must be challenged | Editorial
Women’s autonomy and reproductive rights must be upheld as far-right ideas gain groundThe
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The Guardian view on Margaret Atwood and the Booker: a testament to fiction | Editorial 6 Sep 1:25pm The Guardian view on Margaret Atwood and the Booker: a testament to fiction | Editorial
The prize has come in for justified criticism, its rules are imperfect. But this year’s authors are an exciting prospectIt is easy to deride awards, especially if you haven’t won one. And good fun too. Edward St Aubyn, snubbed by Booker judges in 2006 for the finale to his Patrick Melrose series, At Last, took revenge with the 2014 satire Lost for Words. That novel depicted clownish judges deciding which book, from a terrible shortlist, should win a thinly veiled
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s cunning plan: winning by resigning | Editorial 5 Sep 2:17pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s cunning plan: winning by resigning | Editorial
The prime minister sees a route to a hard Brexit by resigning and forcing opponents to answer the question they have yet to find an answer for: who leads the rebel alliance?Perhaps the strangest unintended consequence of Boris Johnson’s decision to seek a snap election is that Jeremy Corbyn could be received at this month’s Labour party conference as the country’s prime minister. This would be quite a role reversal for the pair of duelling politicians. Mr Johnson’s misplaced optimism in his powers of persuasion would have meant that he risks being, at some 48 days, the
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The Guardian view on testing four-year-olds: wrong again | Editorial 5 Sep 2:16pm The Guardian view on testing four-year-olds: wrong again | Editorial
Accountability is important, but the new measuring stick being pushed on primary schools is blunt and unimaginativeAccountability in education is important. Politicians, acting on the public’s behalf, are right to seek evidence that schools are delivering a good service. So there is nothing wrong, in principle, with gathering information in order to track progress. The problem with the government’s new baseline assessment of four-year-olds – being trialled over the next six weeks in around half of English primary schools, and intended to replace the tests previously taken by seven-year-olds – is the idea’s execution. Ministers already have
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The Guardian view on Tory purges: a historic betrayal | Editorial 4 Sep 1:42pm The Guardian view on Tory purges: a historic betrayal | Editorial
By forcing sensible, moderate MPs into exile Boris Johnson is extinguishing a valuable Conservative tradition in British politicsThe intensity of the current political crisis can dull the impact of events that would, in quieter times, be explosive. Until recently it was hard to imagine Ken Clarke’s political affiliation as anything other than Conservative. He has served in government under four Tory prime ministers. But Mr Clarke and 20 parliamentary colleagues have been driven into exile from Boris Johnson’s party. Their offence was supporting a cross-party bill to prevent a no-deal Brexit. The bill passed its second Commons reading on Wednesday by a majority of 29. Mr Johnson’s aggressive tactics, withdrawing the whip from dissenters, emboldened their rebellion.
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The Guardian view on Sajid Javid’s spending review: please sir, can we have some more? | Editorial 4 Sep 1:41pm The Guardian view on Sajid Javid’s spending review: please sir, can we have some more? | Editorial
More money for schools, hospitals and police is welcome – but don’t be fooled by promises of the end of austerityThe roots of Wednesday’s extraordinary performance by the chancellor, Sajid Javid, stretch back at least two and a half years. In the 2017 general election, a nurse on Question Time asked Theresa May why her pay hadn’t gone up once in real terms since 2009. The then prime minister’s response? “
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s strategy: split party, divide country, win election | Editorial 3 Sep 5:36pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s strategy: split party, divide country, win election | Editorial
The prime minister intuitively understands that hard-Brexit chaos will sustain his premiership. He must be stopped
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The Guardian view on the decline of Marks & Spencer: trouble at tills | Editorial 3 Sep 1:59pm The Guardian view on the decline of Marks & Spencer: trouble at tills | Editorial
Public feeling towards M&S is stronger than for other retailers, but its current plight proves that it cannot trade on goodwill for everShops need shoppers, and if people want them to survive as bricks-and-mortar entities in the face of ferocious online competition, they will have to shop in them. So far so obvious, you might think. But the
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The Guardian view on Johnson’s campaign pitch: save my job | Editorial 2 Sep 2:36pm The Guardian view on Johnson’s campaign pitch: save my job | Editorial
The prime minister wants an election because he wants to stay in post. He is not doing it to deliver what’s best for the UKEvery government since 2016 has been driven mad by Brexit’s central contradiction – that there is an economic price to pay for the UK to take back control of its borders. Boris Johnson leads the most demented to date. He uses “the will of the people” to justify the replacement of parliamentary scrutiny with coercion and deceit. Mr Johnson won power because two-thirds of the Tory members preferred the
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The Guardian view on good business: profit is not enough | Editorial 2 Sep 2:33pm The Guardian view on good business: profit is not enough | Editorial
Companies have responsibilities that go beyond profit for their shareholders. These must be enforcedThe Oklahoma court that last week made
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The Guardian view on Johnson’s troll tactics: outrage critics, energise supporters | Editorial 1 Sep 1:28pm The Guardian view on Johnson’s troll tactics: outrage critics, energise supporters | Editorial
This government is bathing in negative publicity, using the storm of indignant fury to whip up the Tory grassroots and stoke the belief that a ‘remainer elite’ is against themWhen anti no-deal Conservative MPs
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The Guardian view on meat substitutes: guts without the gore | Editorial 1 Sep 1:23pm The Guardian view on meat substitutes: guts without the gore | Editorial
In the developed world we should take heart from people’s willingness to try new, vegan foodstuffs – and from the success of the companies that make themThe Seventh-day Adventist church in the US adheres historically to vegetarianism, in large part to the teachings of a co-founder of the church – Ellen G White – who
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The Observer view on the need for courage and unity to halt a no-deal Brexit | Observer editorial 1 Sep 1:00am The Observer view on the need for courage and unity to halt a no-deal Brexit | Observer editorial
MPs of all parties must unite and back an interim governmentParliamentary sovereignty is the fundamental tenet of Britain’s uncodified constitution. Parliament makes the laws of the land; it cannot be overruled by the prime minister or the courts. Yet Boris Johnson, a prime minister selected by the unrepresentative membership of the Conservative party, which does not even have a majority in the Commons, is seeking to stop parliament from doing its job by any means at his disposal. Johnson’s authority to govern is derived from parliament and parliament alone. The more a man who has faced no more than a day of parliamentary scrutiny, let alone a general election, acts as though he has some kind of extra-parliamentary mandate, the more British democracy dangles on a precipice. Johnson’s decision to prorogue parliament for five weeks at the moment of the most dangerous political crisis this country has witnessed in decades is outrageous. He claims he is doing it in order to set out his domestic agenda in a Queen’s speech, but this could have been achieved through a shorter shutdown. By preventing them from scrapping the three-week party conference recess, and taking up four days of Commons sittings with Queen’s speech debates, he has drastically reduced the time MPs have to block a no-deal Brexit. Johnson is trying to stop parliament expressing its will on the most important question postwar Britain has faced.
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