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The Guardian view on a Brexit election: the unicorns are back | Editorial13h The Guardian view on a Brexit election: the unicorns are back | Editorial
The frontrunner in the race to be the next prime minister is trading in Trumpian fantasy and his peers are following his lead. When their words catch up with them, the nation will payThe eccentric and extreme nature of Brexit has led to some bizarre outcomes. Perhaps the strangest is that the departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union has been downgraded from a national emergency to a party one. Instead of discussing ways out of the political,
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s crisis: the people have spoken | Editorial13h The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s crisis: the people have spoken | Editorial
The extradition bill and its mishandling have sparked such outrage that the process has been paused. What now?
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The Guardian view on impoverished schools: charity is not the answer | Editorial 16 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view on impoverished schools: charity is not the answer | Editorial
Headteachers are being forced to beg for donations. It makes a mockery of ministers’ talk of fair fundingThe contraction of school budgets over the past three years is one of many grave errors of judgment by this government, and has compounded the mistakes of the previous one. That departing prime minister Theresa May now appears to recognise this, and is reportedly seeking a three-year,
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The Guardian view on the latest crackdown in Turkey: investigate real violence against women, not fiction | Editorial 16 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on the latest crackdown in Turkey: investigate real violence against women, not fiction | Editorial
The Turkish authorities are investigating Elif Shafak’s novels for ‘crimes of obscenity’. It’s another twist in Turkey’s tale of paranoia and repressionAs she sat on the train to the Hay festival late last month, the London-based Turkish novelist Elif Shafak received a chilling telephone call from her editor in Istanbul. She was told that police officers had entered the publishing house and taken copies of her books to a prosecutor, who planned to scour them for evidence of her having committed a “crime of obscenity” by writing about, for example, sexual harassment or child abuse. At the same time, the writer witnessed an avalanche of abusive and misogynist messages directed at her on social media – digital intimidation to accompany harassment by the authorities. The targeting of novelists in this way marks a new nadir in the Turkish government’s persecution of journalists, intellectuals, writers and academics. As Shafak has pointed out, the supreme irony is that real-life violence against women and girls is a desperately serious problem in Turkey.
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The Observer view on the Conservative leadership campaign | Observer editorial 16 Jun 12:59am The Observer view on the Conservative leadership campaign | Observer editorial
Those hoping to succeed May are offering nothing but foolish promises and even greater inequality For three years now, one imperative above all else has shaped the government’s approach to Brexit. Not the essential task of healing a divided nation, or the critical need to negotiate in the nation’s long-term strategic interest, but Theresa May’s increasingly desperate attempts to keep her party’s hardline Eurosceptics onside. The
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The Observer view on the Tory vendetta against the BBC | Observer editorial 16 Jun 12:59am The Observer view on the Tory vendetta against the BBC | Observer editorial
Rather than attacking the broadcaster, they should take responsibility for pensioners’ licences The Conservative right has become the enemy within, a force bent on destroying not only our relationship with Europe but with much else that this country holds dear. The shredding of collective bargaining and the ambition to excuse our privatised utilities from their public-interest obligations were early objectives. Now there is
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The Guardian view on the BBC: a broadcaster, not a welfare agency | Editorial 14 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view on the BBC: a broadcaster, not a welfare agency | Editorial
If the government wants to give over-75s a free TV licence, then it should be the state’s responsibility to pay for themThis week the BBC
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The Guardian view on loneliness: speak up, reach out | Editorial 14 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on loneliness: speak up, reach out | Editorial
An initiative to get people talking on public transport is aimed at a serious problemFriday was “Chatty Bus day”
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The Guardian view on the US and Iran: on a collision course | Editorial 13 Jun 1:21pm The Guardian view on the US and Iran: on a collision course | Editorial
The attack on oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman is an ominous development. Can the escalation be halted?Before the long plume of black smoke from the
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The Guardian view on Grenfell, two years on: the survivors’ campaign deserves results | Editorial 13 Jun 1:21pm The Guardian view on Grenfell, two years on: the survivors’ campaign deserves results | Editorial
Ministers should take more notice of the disaster’s survivors, who are right to say a new, proactive social housing regulator is requiredThe scars of traumatic bereavement never go away. This is especially the case when people have been killed as a result of negligence or poor decision-making by others. But the wounds of survivors, and other people directly affected by calamities such as the
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The Guardian view on the Tories and no deal: choosing rogue government | Editorial 12 Jun 1:24pm The Guardian view on the Tories and no deal: choosing rogue government | Editorial
With Boris Johnson as the frontrunner, Tory MPs are abandoning seriousness and responsibility as qualifications to be prime ministerAll 10 candidates running in the race to be Conservative leader have sat around the cabinet table. Six are serving ministers. Naturally, none voted in parliament on Wednesday for an
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The Guardian view on net zero emissions: better late than never | Editorial 12 Jun 1:24pm The Guardian view on net zero emissions: better late than never | Editorial
Announcing a target to cut greenhouse gases by at least 100% below 1990 levels in 2050 is a necessary step to tackle the climate emergency. But it won’t be enough on its ownOne of Theresa May’s most consequential
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s extradition protests: an essential stand | Editorial 11 Jun 1:52pm The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s extradition protests: an essential stand | Editorial
Hundreds of thousands have rallied against legal changes that imperil the region’s freedoms. They deserve support, even if China’s leaders are unlikely to shift courseImagine that 5 to 10 million Britons took to the streets to attack new legislation. Imagine that the previously cautious, passive or politically conservative came out, including lawyers and church congregations. Then imagine that – even with further protests pending – the government said they just didn’t understand the issue, and vowed to ram through changes within days. This is what
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The Guardian view on a hard Brexit: blocked by parliament | Editorial 11 Jun 1:51pm The Guardian view on a hard Brexit: blocked by parliament | Editorial
Constitutional crises are resolved in line with a Commons majority – and the next Tory prime minister is likely not to have oneMPs will vote on Wednesday to seize control of Commons business later this month to
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The Guardian view on digital injustice: when computers make things worse | Editorial 10 Jun 1:32pm The Guardian view on digital injustice: when computers make things worse | Editorial
Software makes bigger mistakes and faster than humans can. It should not be trusted with vital decisionsThe news that the Home Office is
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The Guardian view on identities in conflict: dealing with differences | Editorial 10 Jun 1:31pm The Guardian view on identities in conflict: dealing with differences | Editorial
Recent attacks on lesbians provide shocking proof of rising intolerance, fuelled by populists and hostile public discourseQuestions of identity and belief go to the heart of who we are. Important to us individually, they also determine the shape of our lives – and confer advantages and disadvantages. Equalities legislation in the UK outlaws discrimination by employers and service providers on grounds of nine protected characteristics. These include sexual orientation, reassigned gender, race, sex and religion. Despite this, prejudice based on these factors has not been eradicated. On the contrary, the evidence is that bigotry’s role in aggravating offence is on the rise. Similar trends are
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The Guardian view on facial recognition: a danger to democracy | Editorial 9 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view on facial recognition: a danger to democracy | Editorial
We don’t want our faces stored in vast databases, whether these are public or privateThe pressure group Liberty
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The Guardian view on failures to protect children: the buck stops where? | Editorial 9 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on failures to protect children: the buck stops where? | Editorial
Two reports about the circumstances surrounding the murders of two children in Northamptonshire beg as many questions as they answerParents are not the only ones responsible for their children. Our social responsibility is at its greatest when parents are unable to protect their families – or, worse, are the threat. The
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The Observer view on the crisis in Sudan | Observer editorial 9 Jun 2:00am The Observer view on the crisis in Sudan | Observer editorial
The world must not look away after the brutal crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Khartoum In Omdurman, just below the confluence of the Blue Nile and White Nile, stands a large, shack-like structure that serves as a popular restaurant. The building’s dusty car park provides a memorable vantage point from which to gaze down upon Africa’s mightiest river. Yet last week, any casual onlooker might have preferred to look away – for there was blood in the water. Following the security forces’ brutal crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators in Khartoum on Monday, the bodies of dozens of murdered victims – the opposition says
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The Observer view: Ford is a grim portent of the future for our industries | Observer editorial 9 Jun 1:00am The Observer view: Ford is a grim portent of the future for our industries | Observer editorial
Why would anyone invest in the UK when tariffs and border delays could cause chaos?The car industry is in the early stages of a massive shakeout and the evidence is that Britain will be one of the biggest losers. Ford’s
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The Guardian view on Labour’s victory: now for the Tories to decide | Editorial 7 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view on Labour’s victory: now for the Tories to decide | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn’s strategy has been successful. Tory leadership candidates will have to find a Brexit solution that honestly confronts its drawbacksOne can read too much into any single byelection in Britain. Most
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The Guardian view on the limits of economics: people are priceless | Editorial 7 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on the limits of economics: people are priceless | Editorial
Human beings have a value in themselves that can’t be measuredA
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The Guardian view on African swine fever: bad for people as well as pigs | Editorial 6 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view on African swine fever: bad for people as well as pigs | Editorial
The current outbreak, linked to smallholders, is likely to affect prices around the world. But supersized animal farms are not the answerIn the coming weeks, bacon sandwich eaters in Newcastle and dairy farmers in California may find their pockets hit by developments thousands of miles away. The culprit is an outbreak of
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The Guardian view on the Tory leadership race: hard truths urgently needed | Editorial 5 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Tory leadership race: hard truths urgently needed | Editorial
Even the self-styled moderate candidates are flinching from the task of confronting their party with the facts about BrexitThe profusion of candidates running to be Conservative leader is not a healthy symptom for the party. It speaks of panic and incoherence. Eleven MPs are running, more might enter, two have already withdrawn. There is disarray over future policy direction and fear of naming the underlying problem. It is Brexit. Under Theresa May the Tories set themselves an impossible task – exiting the EU without confronting the negative consequences of that decision. Inevitably they failed, but not all of them have grasped the nature of that failure. Many candidates, including the frontrunner, Boris Johnson, believe that Mrs May’s mistake was lack of conviction in threatening to walk away from Brussels with no deal. Andrea Leadsom and Esther McVey are
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The Guardian view on media freedom: democracies must defend it | Editorial 5 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on media freedom: democracies must defend it | Editorial
Police raids in Australia remind us that threats to journalistic independence are not confined to authoritarian statesThis week’s
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The Guardian view on the Peterborough byelection: a populist backlash? | Editorial 4 Jun 1:35pm The Guardian view on the Peterborough byelection: a populist backlash? | Editorial
Mainstream parties need to offer narratives, and policies, that address the underlying economic grievances of votersPeterborough is a smallish city in eastern England with a fast-growing population of European migrants attracted by its factories, warehouses and agricultural work. On the edge of the Fens, it sits on top of two faultlines in British politics: those of culture and class. When the city voted to leave the European Union in 2016, it seemed to be reacting against the ethos of the times – against immigration, against diversity, against pluralism. But less than 12 months later, in the general election, Jeremy Corbyn’s leftwing Labour party won in Peterborough. Despite Ukip pulling out to avoid splitting the rightwing vote in 2017, Stewart Jackson, the pro-Brexit Conservative MP,
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The Guardian view on phasing out packaging: back to the plastic-free future | Editorial 4 Jun 1:35pm The Guardian view on phasing out packaging: back to the plastic-free future | Editorial
An effort by Waitrose to reduce polluting waste is welcome, but kicking our rubbishy habits will require more than a nudgeWhat until recently would have looked like a quaint throwback to an old-fashioned high street is,
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The Guardian view on Sudan’s people power: it needs to triumph | Editorial 3 Jun 1:42pm The Guardian view on Sudan’s people power: it needs to triumph | Editorial
The louder the calls for democracy have become in Sudan, the tighter the junta clings to power. Outside powers need to back a democratic transition and tell autocratic allies to accept non-violent changeThe shooting dead of peaceful demonstrators in the Sudanese capital Khartoum is an
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The Guardian view on cybercrime: the law must be enforced | Editorial 3 Jun 1:42pm The Guardian view on cybercrime: the law must be enforced | Editorial
Governments and police must take crime on the internet seriously. It is where we all live nowAbout half of all property crime in the developed world
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The Guardian view on Trump’s state visit: the president is not welcome | Editorial 2 Jun 1:50pm The Guardian view on Trump’s state visit: the president is not welcome | Editorial
Hobnobbing with the royals will boost the president’s ego. But this is not the greatest danger of rolling out the red carpet nowTwo and a half years after Theresa May rushed to become the first world leader to meet the newly inaugurated President Trump in Washington, she has chosen to make a state visit that should not be taking place the final act of her premiership. While the prime minister’s poor political judgment and obstinacy have been hallmarks of her three years in office, the spectacle of the next three days will make a particularly awful ending. Mr Trump is only the third US president ever to be honoured with a
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The Guardian view on Artemisia Gentileschi on tour: the people’s painting | Editorial 2 Jun 1:49pm The Guardian view on Artemisia Gentileschi on tour: the people’s painting | Editorial
An innovative scheme by the National Gallery has seen a new and prized possession displayed in public buildings across the countryWhen the National Gallery in London
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The Observer view on Donald Trump’s meddling before his state visit | Observer editorial 2 Jun 1:00am The Observer view on Donald Trump’s meddling before his state visit | Observer editorial
The president has once again interfered in British politics. He should learn to mind his mouthAs Britain sees it, a state visit is an important way of celebrating and strengthening the relationship between two sovereign countries. It is a symbolic occasion intended to formalise and promote a voluntary alliance linking two independent peoples. The principal focus is not on individual politicians, except in so far as such leaders are seen as representing their fellow citizens. State visits are certainly not supposed to be an ego trip. This is something, among many other things, that Donald Trump plainly does not understand. When the Queen hosts a foreign leader, she does so in her capacity as head of state, not as a tour guide or re-election campaign prop. The honour she bestows belongs entirely to the country of which her guest is the current, temporary leader. Whatever he may think, the state visit is emphatically not a
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The BBC’s wish for a finger in every pie | Letters 2 Jun 1:00am The BBC’s wish for a finger in every pie | Letters
Editorial standards have been diluted and there is confusion about the corporation’s role in the national lifeIf the BBC hadn’t fallen victim to hubris many years ago, there would be less talk about its decline (“
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The Observer view on the Liberal Democrats | Observer editorial 2 Jun 12:59am The Observer view on the Liberal Democrats | Observer editorial
The party’s clarity on Brexit is welcome. Their record on much else is poorLabour’s performance in the European elections was even more dismal than many predicted: overtaken by the Liberal Democrats, it achieved third place with just 14% of the vote. One
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The Guardian view on Tiananmen, 30 years on: hope and terror | Editorial 31 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on Tiananmen, 30 years on: hope and terror | Editorial
We should remember 1989’s protest movement, as well as the massacreIt’s inevitable that we view the past through the lens of the present. It’s odder that we tend to regard our current picture as the only possible one, and to believe that we can see the future with equal certainty. Revulsion at the bloody crackdown on pro-reform demonstrations in Beijing, on the night of 3-4 June 1989, has obscured memories of the protests themselves. But in China, some still grieve for lost hopes as well as lost friends and children. The weeks of demonstrations in Beijing and other cities proved the people’s desire for change. Millions – including police, judges and naval officers – were drawn in, prompted by anger at corruption and inflation, but also the hunger for reform and greater liberty. China was negotiating a period of social, political and artistic ferment, deeply questioning itself as it recovered from the traumas of Maoism and
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The Guardian view on cricket: play the game | Editorial 31 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on cricket: play the game | Editorial
The game is shrinking in its homeland, but it still thrills hundreds of thousandsOnce in a while sport throws up some feat of truly astonishing athleticism. Professional sportspeople operate all the time at a level which most of us could never for a moment attain, but much of the time they make it look easy or at least unremarkable to anyone who has never tried to imitate them. And then something happens like the catch Ben Stokes produced in England’s
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The Guardian view on the Augar review: taking further education seriously | Editorial 30 May 1:40pm The Guardian view on the Augar review: taking further education seriously | Editorial
A commission appointed by the PM to look at tuition fees has concluded that colleges, and not universities, require the most urgent attentionCommissioned by Theresa May as a panicky response to Labour’s better-than-expected performance in the 2017 general election,
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The Guardian view on the abuse of learning-disabled people: duties of care | Editorial 30 May 1:39pm The Guardian view on the abuse of learning-disabled people: duties of care | Editorial
Undercover filming and a trio of reports show that the lessons of the Winterbourne View scandal have not yet been learnedThe publication in quick succession of three reports, combined with last week’s
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The Guardian view on defending democracy: honesty over simplicity | Editorial 29 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on defending democracy: honesty over simplicity | Editorial
Beware the MP – and Tory leadership contender – who claims there are easy ways out of Britain’s Brexit crisisIn the aftermath of Sunday’s European election results, and as the ranks of Tory leadership contenders swell, every MP should be in a state of alarm about the condition of British democracy. The problem is not that people are denied a voice – millions of opinions have been freely expressed in polling booths – but that parliament looks incapable of satisfying voters’ conflicting demands. Brexit, as it was sold to the country in 2016, cannot be delivered. The view asserted by Nigel Farage and much of the Conservative party that pro-Europeans are refusing to deliver it is false. It is true that parliament prevented the UK from leaving the EU without a deal, but that outcome would have betrayed promises made by the leave campaign three years ago. The offer of that campaign was an easy glide into a brighter future where Britain would have “taken back control”. But the reality of unilaterally breaking treaty ties with the EU would be a surrender of control. Within weeks, possibly days, the prime minister, whoever that might be, and regardless of their preferred Brexit outcome, would be seeking emergency agreements in Brussels to avert chaos and restore severed links. The balance of power that favoured the EU during article 50 talks would be weighted even more heavily. The UK would be reduced to a supplicant.
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The Guardian view on German responses to antisemitism: frankness and honesty | Editorial 29 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on German responses to antisemitism: frankness and honesty | Editorial
The rise of anti-Jewish actions in Germany is profoundly worrying, but Angela Merkel’s fightback sets an example of moral seriousness and rigourThe German chancellor, Angela Merkel, has
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The Guardian view on Europe: change, not decay | Editorial 28 May 1:57pm The Guardian view on Europe: change, not decay | Editorial
The big parties grew smaller and the small parties bigger. But the voters still believe in the European projectWhen the eurozone was locked in crisis and, later, when a million migrants fled to Europe from the Syrian war and elsewhere, many predicted that the European Union would not be able to stand the strain. When these crises were followed by the Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump, it was common to say – especially in the
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The Guardian view on Alastair Campbell’s expulsion: petty, foolish and counterproductive | Editorial 28 May 1:55pm The Guardian view on Alastair Campbell’s expulsion: petty, foolish and counterproductive | Editorial
Thousands of voters and hundreds of party members abandoned Labour last week. Singling out one person for punishment is the wrong sort of response in every wayMore than two million people who normally vote Labour voted instead for the Liberal Democrats or for the Greens in the European elections last week. It is clear that many thousands of Labour party members did exactly the same thing. Most of them did so, it is fair to say, for much the
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The Guardian view on the EU election results: no mandate for no deal | Editorial 27 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on the EU election results: no mandate for no deal | Editorial
The Tory party now represents fewer than one in 10 voters. These results confirm it has no right to crash Britain out of the European UnionThe most unexpected of elections has produced the most unexpected of consequences. It was an election which most people did not think would happen, which a lot did not want, in which only a minority voted, and in which the winning candidates may never take their seats. Yet for all that, the UK’s
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The Guardian view on Facebook: power without responsibility | Editorial 27 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on Facebook: power without responsibility | Editorial
Social media cannot ensure they only publish truths. But what about deliberate falsehoods designed to damage?Are social media companies responsible for the lies their users tell? Both the obvious answers, “yes” and “no”, are clearly wrong. Complete responsibility is a bad idea, and impossible in practice: even in China, the home of the largest and most sophisticated censorship apparatus on the web, the internet is expected to slow down markedly in the coming weeks under the burden of combing through it to ensure that no references to the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre are published. And, as the Chinese example shows, there are also considerable difficulties that arise when any one organisation can decide what counts as truth or falsehood. Yet it can’t be right, either, to say that social media companies have no responsibility to exercise the powers they have to remove obnoxious material from their servers. Videos of murder, child abuse and other horrors are routinely and rightly removed. It will be objected that these are horrible precisely because they are not lies – they record things that really happened. But that doesn’t stand up. It is no defence, either in British law, or in any moral sense, to say that a video of atrocity is faked. If it works as propaganda for jihadis, or for child abusers, it will be censored and its originators punished if that’s possible. The platforms have been much more reluctant to act against lies which promote causes which are not in themselves criminal, however despicable. Google and Facebook are both advertising businesses, the biggest that the world has ever seen, and they depend on their ability to attract and to retain viewers. So the conspiracy theories of Alex Jones were tolerated for many years. So were the 9/11 truthers, the anti-vaxxers, and, on Twitter,
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The Guardian view on the Conservative leadership: unserious contenders | Editorial 26 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Conservative leadership: unserious contenders | Editorial
Getting rid of Theresa May has only brought the dilemmas that defeated her much closer to her partyIt ought to be astonishing when the chancellor of the exchequer announces that he would consider voting to bring down his own government if it adopts the policy which the party members favour on the most important issue of the day, as Philip Hammond did on Sunday. Nowadays it just seems another reminder of the irrelevance of common sense to parts of the Conservative party and the danger that their fever dream poses to the country as a whole. Throwing off Theresa May has changed nothing significant. But it has made one important thing clearer, which is the fault line along which the party is being broken. The schism in the Tory party lies between those who are prepared to bid “no deal” and those who are not. The latest round of escalation was precipitated by Boris Johnson, a man whose word no one has reason to trust. That aspect of his character turns out not to bother much of his party. Whether he means it or not, what matters is that he said it and others were forced to try to outbid him, or to repudiate him in terms.
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The Guardian view on ‘discovering’ overlooked artists: look to the present, too | Editorial 26 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on ‘discovering’ overlooked artists: look to the present, too | Editorial
It’s wonderful when artists are given the attention they deserve late in life – but there’s little cause for self-congratulationLast week
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The Observer view on a post-May Brexit: Labour must show it can offer an alternative | Observer editorial 26 May 1:00am The Observer view on a post-May Brexit: Labour must show it can offer an alternative | Observer editorial
Theresa May leaves a divided and unequal Britain, but her successor is likely only to make things worse. Jeremy Corbyn must work with Tory rebels to prevent a catastrophic hard Brexit Decent, moderate and patriotic” was how Theresa May chose to describe her premiership in
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The Guardian view on Julian Assange: send him to Sweden | Editorial 24 May 12:50pm The Guardian view on Julian Assange: send him to Sweden | Editorial
The founder of WikiLeaks faces charges of espionage in the US and rape in Sweden. He should stand trial for rapeThe US government has brought
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The Guardian view on Theresa May: a poisonous legacy | Editorial 24 May 10:36am The Guardian view on Theresa May: a poisonous legacy | Editorial
She was doomed by her failure to face honestly the real choices of Brexit, and to make her party face them tooPrime ministers do not get to dictate their legacies from a lectern outside No 10, and there was some pathos in Theresa May’s attempt today to list accomplishments in government to offset her colossal failure to take Britain out of the European Union. That she oversaw a reduction in the use of disposable plastics is laudable, but it is not how history will remember her time in office. But Mrs May never saw Brexit as her sole purpose in Downing Street. Her inability to grasp from the outset how all-consuming and difficult the project would be played a large part in her downfall. She was poorly advised by ideologues who thought a hard Brexit could be achieved at minimal cost, but that is no excuse. She chose to take the bad advice when it chimed with her own prejudices and rejected wiser counsel. She entered negotiations in Brussels ill-prepared and was schooled in brutal realities of economics and diplomacy. That was humiliating enough, but her failure to pass those lessons on to a national audience was unforgivable. If she did understand the cruel calculus of Brexit trade-offs, she did not confront her party with the truth. Nor did she use the amplifying power of her pulpit to shape public understanding of the issues. She preferred vacuity and dishonesty – “Brexit means Brexit”; “No deal is better than a bad deal”. She decommissioned the truth, afraid it might be used as a weapon against her.
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The Guardian view on Britain and the Chagos Islands: a wake-up call from the world | Editorial 23 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on Britain and the Chagos Islands: a wake-up call from the world | Editorial
When Britain finds itself isolated alongside the rule-busters, and against the liberal democracies, it is not a good place to beBritain was presented with a profound and urgent wake-up call this week about its standing in the 21st-century world. But the problem, in a political debate consumed by Brexit and Tory leadership speculation, is whether Britain will take any notice at all. The wake-up call was not the UK’s abject last place in the Eurovision song contest, humbling though that was. The far more serious lesson was the one delivered in the
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The Guardian view on Narendra Modi’s landslide: bad for India’s soul | Editorial 23 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on Narendra Modi’s landslide: bad for India’s soul | Editorial
The world does not need another national populist leader who pursues a pro-business agenda while trading in fake news and treating minorities as second-class citizensThe biggest election in history has just been won by one man:
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s final act: nowhere left to fail | Editorial 22 May 1:56pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s final act: nowhere left to fail | Editorial
The prime minister has lacked the vision and judgment to define Britain’s future relations with Europe, let alone convince MPs and the public to trust herFor months political authority has been
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The Guardian view on British Steel’s collapse: productive v predatory capitalism | Editorial 22 May 1:55pm The Guardian view on British Steel’s collapse: productive v predatory capitalism | Editorial
It’s been more than a decade since MPs looked at the private equity model and asked whether it is good for Britain. A bankruptcy in the steel industry is an opportunity to do so againIt is right for the government to bail out Britain’s steel industry. On Wednesday ministers stepped in and kept British Steel going, not only to safeguard thousands of jobs but keep blast furnaces burning that would otherwise go out for ever. Letting this business disappear would deal a devastating blow to North Lincolnshire. The company’s distress was forged in the fires of Brexit, for which this government ought to take responsibility. Closing the plant could also not easily be squared with ministerial promises made on Monday to
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The Guardian view on Greens in Europe: hopeful signs | Editorial 21 May 2:05pm The Guardian view on Greens in Europe: hopeful signs | Editorial
An enlarged Green group in the European parliament would drive climate policy forward, and prove that the activism of recent months has been effectiveIt is an ill wind that blows no one any good. Even the buffeting by the gale of rightwing nationalist parties in the European elections has a bracing message: that the environment is back on the political agenda. Recent months have seen a dramatic rise in the profile of green issues, following last year’s warning from the UN that the window of opportunity for action on emissions
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The Guardian view on May’s Brexit concessions: too late to save her deal | Editorial 21 May 2:03pm The Guardian view on May’s Brexit concessions: too late to save her deal | Editorial
Mrs May has shifted, but not enough to win over critics who prefer to take their chances on the alternative outcomes of a no deal, no Brexit or no Tory government There was a whiff of desperation about Theresa May’s last ditch
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The Guardian view on campaign funding: follow the money | Editorial 20 May 1:38pm The Guardian view on campaign funding: follow the money | Editorial
The mysterious finances of the Brexit party must be dragged into the lightThe decision by the election commission to
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The Guardian view on Google versus Huawei: no winners | Editorial 20 May 1:35pm The Guardian view on Google versus Huawei: no winners | Editorial
The struggle over Huawei isn’t really about technology. It is about whether China or the US is to be masterTrade wars, like real ones, are very much easier to start than to stop. The decision by Google to
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s Brexit options: stark – and getting starker | Editorial 19 May 1:33pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s Brexit options: stark – and getting starker | Editorial
If there is no majority for the prime minister’s bill next month, the chances of a Brexit outcome in this parliament look remote
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The Guardian view on Minecraft: all human life is here | Editorial 19 May 1:32pm The Guardian view on Minecraft: all human life is here | Editorial
How will games play out when they are superimposed on the real world?Once upon a time, when all the world was analogue, games could only be played together by people in the same place and at the same time. But that was before the internet. One of the most profound and least anticipated ways in which the internet has changed society is that it has allowed more people to play more games together than ever before in history.
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The Observer view on the European elections | Observer editorial 19 May 1:09am The Observer view on the European elections | Observer editorial
Europhiles should ignore Labour and vote for a Remain partyThis Thursday, voters face an important choice. It’s not the choice they deserve: whether to approve or reject the Brexit deal Theresa May has negotiated on their behalf. But it is the most important opportunity yet to send a clear message to our political leaders that the gridlock, the lacklustre leadership and the general sense of malaise that have infected Westminster since 2016 just isn’t good enough. For months, people have been denied their say, despite the prolonged parliamentary stalemate and the knots in which both main parties have tied themselves over Brexit. These European elections should not be treated as a proxy referendum: there is no distinct question being put to the public and turnout will probably be much lower than in a general election or referendum. But they are a precious chance for those who share the
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The Observer view on Britain’s scandalous wealth inequality | Observer editorial 19 May 1:00am The Observer view on Britain’s scandalous wealth inequality | Observer editorial
Official figures mask the growing income disparities dividing Britain Britain needs to wean itself off measures of inequality that disguise more than they reveal about the gap between rich and poor. So says the Institute for Fiscal Studies, which last week used the occasion of its 50th anniversary to launch a five-year quest for
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The Guardian view on the EU elections: a chance to reshape our politics | Editorial 17 May 1:29pm The Guardian view on the EU elections: a chance to reshape our politics | Editorial
Pro-European voters should back candidates who oppose hard Brexit and are in with a chance. Above all, they must make their votes countNext week, voters across Europe face the most highly charged election to the
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The Guardian view on the Venice Biennale’s migrant boat: pushing the limits of art | Editorial 17 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on the Venice Biennale’s migrant boat: pushing the limits of art | Editorial
Displaying a wreck in which hundreds perished is certainly provocative. But does it really have a place in an exhibition?There is no material so dark that art should not be able to confront it. Art can be beautiful, or serene, or ecstatic; but it can also be disturbing, harsh, or horrifying. Art should alchemise poetry from unexpected ingredients. It should shake our view of the world, and of ourselves. Bad art, by contrast, asks nothing of us. This week, visitors to the newly opened Venice Biennale, which continues until 24 November, will have passed the
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The Guardian view on privatising probation: a disaster ignored | Editorial 16 May 1:42pm The Guardian view on privatising probation: a disaster ignored | Editorial
Ministers have not learned the lessons of their ideological obsession with making profits out of offendersProbation services are intended to help those who have fallen foul of the law. They ought to change the lives of some of the most marginalised people in our communities. That the government thought it possible to make a profit for shareholders from this process seems beyond satire. Yet the joke was on the voters. Against repeated warnings from civil servants about the potential risks to public safety, the then justice secretary Chris Grayling rushed through a
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The Guardian view on Richer Sounds: mutual benefits | Editorial 16 May 1:36pm The Guardian view on Richer Sounds: mutual benefits | Editorial
By handing over the retail chain to staff, its founder Julian Richer is showing that there are fairer ways to run a business – and to pass it onSeekers for an alternative and more equitable model of how to do business this week struck gold. Julian Richer, owner of Richer Sounds, has at the age of 60 announced a
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The Guardian view on prosecuting war crimes: no one is above the law | Editorial 15 May 7:01pm The Guardian view on prosecuting war crimes: no one is above the law | Editorial
The new defence secretary ought to understand that the rule of law can only be upheld by observing itThe limelight was always going to be on Penny Mordaunt as defence secretary. A Brexiter accused by the last prime minister of
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The Guardian view on The Jeremy Kyle Show: TV with no moral compass | Editorial 15 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on The Jeremy Kyle Show: TV with no moral compass | Editorial
Boundaries of taste change over time, but that doesn’t excuse broadcasters from a duty of care to people who appear on screenThe availability of an audience is not, in itself, justification for putting on a spectacle. There are things people would be quite prepared to watch that are illegal to display. There are many more things that the law does not prohibit, but that broadcasters choose not to show. The Jeremy Kyle Show has now joined that number,
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The Guardian view on UK inequalities: following the US threatens democracy | Editorial 14 May 1:39pm The Guardian view on UK inequalities: following the US threatens democracy | Editorial
Brexit, like Trump, is not the cause of disenchantment with democracy but rather its symptom – one with roots in the UK’s political and economic disenfranchisementSerious questions need to be asked about why Nigel Farage’s Brexit party is
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The Guardian view on hacking: a dangerous arms trade | Editorial 14 May 1:38pm The Guardian view on hacking: a dangerous arms trade | Editorial
Cyberweapons are dangerous in themselves. Their proliferation makes them much more harmfulNSO Group, an Israeli firm that has risen to a billion-dollar valuation on the strength of the aggressive hacking tools it sells to authoritarian governments across the Arab world, is being sued by lawyers and activists who claim to be victims of its software. One of the lawyers involved in the suit
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The Guardian view on private jails: flaws in the system | Editorial 13 May 1:40pm The Guardian view on private jails: flaws in the system | Editorial
English and Welsh prisons are disastrously overcrowded, and new research suggests privatisation may be making a bad situation worseIt should not be possible to make profits out of prisons. The power to lock people up, depriving them of their liberty and separating them from their families, is a responsibility that should be the preserve of the state. Yet a pro-market ideology has seen private companies
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The Guardian’s view on free speech online: a messy compromise | Editorial 13 May 1:40pm The Guardian’s view on free speech online: a messy compromise | Editorial
Rightwing extremists are now being deprived of their income stream from YouTube advertisements. Not to do so would be worseAlphabet, the company that owns Google and YouTube, has quietly become one of the most powerful gatekeepers of permitted speech on the planet, along with Facebook and – within China – the Chinese government. This isn’t entirely a bad thing. Everyone agrees there are some things that have no place online, although different cultures and different countries have varying and often entirely incompatible rules about permissible speech. But an entirely uncensored internet would be a disaster for society, as everyone now acknowledges. Governments want their rules enforced, and the advertising businesses that have become the giants of social media are the players who can enforce them. If Google, Facebook, and Twitter all
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The Guardian view on abortion: protecting a human right | Editorial 12 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on abortion: protecting a human right | Editorial
Cruel laws risk lives and harm women around the world. Attempts to extend them must be resistedNo law can end abortions, however severe its restrictions and however harsh its penalties. Each day almost 70,000 unsafe abortions are carried out
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The Guardian view on a Green New Deal: we need it now | Editorial 12 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on a Green New Deal: we need it now | Editorial
Policymakers ought not wait for economic theory to catch up with the environmental crisisThe Green New Deal is probably the most fashionable policy in the English-speaking world. In Britain it is advocated by both
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The Observer view on English clubs’ unprecedented success in Europe | Observer editorial 12 May 1:00am The Observer view on English clubs’ unprecedented success in Europe | Observer editorial
A mighty week that celebrated heart, principle and defiance Jürgen Klopp grinning with all those mesmerising teeth. Mauricio Pochettino in bits and tie askew, like the father of the bride waving off his daughter on her wedding night. Glenn Hoddle dancing a jig in the studio while the nation feared for his ticker. Has there ever been a week like this one for England’s football clubs? For people who had paid those very-hard-to-justify subscriptions to Sky and BT, or who found the right excuses for four consecutive nights in the pub, there has been a sustained injection of head-shaking, armchair-roaring miracle. How might you objectively measure such a week against all the weeks that have gone before? Careful linguistic analysis of punditry shows the word “unbelievable” was uttered more frequently, and in a greater variety of accents, than on any previous occasion. (Jordan Henderson, the lion-hearted Liverpool captain, managed a dozen utterances single-handedly to the TV interviewer, while his teammates sang “You’ll Never Walk Alone” back to the Kop.)
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The Observer view on the European elections and Nigel Farage’s malign message | Observer editorial 12 May 1:00am The Observer view on the European elections and Nigel Farage’s malign message | Observer editorial
Neither of the major parties has done enough to challenge the leader of the Brexit party Across Europe, rightwing nationalist populism is on the march. Britain is no exception. Polls are putting Nigel Farage’s Brexit party
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The Guardian view on US-China trade wars: don’t start them | Editorial 10 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on US-China trade wars: don’t start them | Editorial
The time has come to rewrite the rules so that the world’s largest economies are able to trade peacefullyDonald Trump has been an opponent of free trade deals all his public life. A protectionist message was central to his run for the White House. On the campaign trail he promised “
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The Guardian view on shrinking breaks: the right to relax | Editorial 10 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on shrinking breaks: the right to relax | Editorial
Pressure on schools to focus on the three Rs must not be allowed to squeeze out a fourth: rest – and the chance to make friendsFew adults would place
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The Guardian view on GP shortages: a symptom that won’t go away | Editorial 9 May 1:47pm The Guardian view on GP shortages: a symptom that won’t go away | Editorial
The government’s plan to boost family doctor numbers has failed. And no wonder, when the health and care system is under so much strainHospital waiting times and access to specific medicines and treatments tend to make the headlines, but the crisis in general practice is the most serious threat now faced by the NHS. GPs are the main point of contact with the health service by an enormous margin; last year 24 million people attended A&E departments in England, compared with
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The Guardian view on elections: Potemkin polls are not democracy | Editorial 9 May 1:46pm The Guardian view on elections: Potemkin polls are not democracy | Editorial
Strongmen don’t always want to get rid of voting. Some find it useful to legitimise their rule – as long as they know they’ll winVoting is not synonymous with democracy. Take Thailand. In 2014, the military launched the latest of its many coups. But juntas are not a good look for modern economies, so
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The Guardian view on hard Brexit trade: making Britain vulnerable | Editorial 8 May 1:27pm The Guardian view on hard Brexit trade: making Britain vulnerable | Editorial
Tensions between Washington and Beijing show the value for the UK of membership of a continental blocSome leave voters hoped for control over immigration. Others expected a budget dividend for the NHS. But for many Tory MPs, Brexit’s most cherished prize was a rather more obscure benefit: restoration of an independent seat at the World Trade Organization, representing freedom to strike bilateral trade deals. No one is more excited about that prospect than Liam Fox, the international trade secretary. He could hardly conceal his impatience in a
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The Guardian view on the abuse of MPs: a threat to us all | Editorial 8 May 1:27pm The Guardian view on the abuse of MPs: a threat to us all | Editorial
A Ukip candidate’s remarks reflect the broader bullying and vituperation directed towards those in public life, particularly womenThe immediate target of the
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The Guardian view on extinction: time to rebel | Editorial 7 May 1:48pm The Guardian view on extinction: time to rebel | Editorial
A million plant and animal species are under threat. Humans are largely to blame – but we will pay the cost tooWe humans pride ourselves on our ability to look beyond immediate concerns and think on a grander scale. While other creatures preen for mates, hunt prey or build homes, only humans ponder the nature of time, explore our place in the universe or are troubled by the question of what wiped out the dinosaurs. Yet we are often poor at focusing on and understanding the things which really matter. A new mass extinction is under way, and this time we are mostly responsible. The new UN Global Assessment Report warns that
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The Guardian view on fewer people giving to charity: generosity is good | Editorial 7 May 1:47pm The Guardian view on fewer people giving to charity: generosity is good | Editorial
Falling donations are a cause for concern at a time when need is rising. And recent scandals are only part of the storyCharity is often said to be begin at home, but should not end there unless by necessity. So research showing that fewer people in the UK
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The Guardian view on London and England: a deep divide | Editorial 6 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on London and England: a deep divide | Editorial
The faultline between London and the rest of England must be healed. It won’t be easyThe texture of life in any country is made of a pattern of small things endlessly repeated until they become too familiar to be visible at all: what is it like to go to work or to buy a drink or snack, what clothes are in the shops. All these things can appear exotic to foreigners, however little the natives tend to think of them. That is why one symbol of England is – or was – a red postbox, while Holland is remembered for a cheese. These are the sort of things that go unnoticed till they disappear. Judged on these everyday standards, England contains
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The Guardian view on the obesity crisis: ideological posturing will not help | Editorial 6 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on the obesity crisis: ideological posturing will not help | Editorial
A successful intervention in Leeds shows what can be achieved in partnership with familiesIt is not controversial to say that an unhealthy diet causes bad health. Nor are the basic elements of healthy eating disputed. An excess of sugar, salt and fat increases vulnerability to stroke, heart disease and diabetes. Obesity raises susceptibility to cancer, and Britain is the
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The Guardian view on extremism online: who will guard the watchdogs? | Editorial 5 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on extremism online: who will guard the watchdogs? | Editorial
The social media advertising giants of the web have great power. When they admit this, they will come under pressure The decision by Facebook to
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The Guardian view on South Africa’s elections: Ramaphosa needs a mandate | Editorial 5 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on South Africa’s elections: Ramaphosa needs a mandate | Editorial
The president inherited a country on the ropes. The stakes are highIt is 25 years since Nelson Mandela cast his vote for the first time, in the elections crowning
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What the local election results mean for Labour’s approach to Brexit | Letters 5 May 12:33pm What the local election results mean for Labour’s approach to Brexit | Letters
Readers interpret last Thursday’s votes and what they mean for Labour’s stance on leaving the European UnionYour editorial (
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The Observer view on the pressing need to save the Arctic | Observer editorial 5 May 1:00am The Observer view on the pressing need to save the Arctic | Observer editorial
This vital region must be conserved, not least from Trump’s ignorant policies Scientifically, the life-threatening dangers of global warming in the Arctic are increasingly understood. But political understanding – and action – lag far behind. Attempts by Donald Trump to
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The Observer view on the local elections | Observer editorial 5 May 1:00am The Observer view on the local elections | Observer editorial
The stunning gains made by the pro-remain Liberal Democrats and the Greens cannot be dismissed as a mere protest voteSunderland was one of the first constituencies to declare its result on the night of the Brexit referendum and the margin of victory for leave sent shockwaves through the political establishment and the financial markets. Since then, Sunderland has become a symbol of Brexit Britain, stereotyped as a “left behind” former mining community marked by anti-immigration, anti-European sentiment.
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The Guardian view on local elections: national lessons for Brexit | Editorial 3 May 1:30pm The Guardian view on local elections: national lessons for Brexit | Editorial
The failure of Britain’s gridlocked politics has found expression in the rise of smaller parties and large swathes of the country where no one party can run local governments. This will further disrupt our broken politicsFor Britain’s major political parties
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The Guardian view on ice-cream vans: shame about the pollution | Editorial 3 May 1:25pm The Guardian view on ice-cream vans: shame about the pollution | Editorial
Their tinny chimes may be an essential sound of the summer. But are they out of tune with the times?Few things could be quite so evocative as the memory of childhood greed sharpened by the jarring, tinny sound of Waltzing Matilda or Greensleeves heard several streets away. Ice-cream as soft as raw meringue, piped with a flourish into an orange cone the consistency of cardboard. The creamy swirl impaled by a crisp, and friable chocolate flake. Sticky fingers as the sweet vanilla melts over small hands. The ice-cream van is as much a trope of suburban British nostalgia as warm beer, cricket on the green and endless summers – notwithstanding a rather less cheerful association with Glasgow’s notorious ice-cream wars of the early 1980s, in which ice-cream vans were used to “fence” stolen goods and to sell drugs. But the ice-cream van in its traditional form is increasingly out of tune with the times. The vans
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The Guardian view on net-zero carbon emissions: sooner is better | Editorial 2 May 1:29pm The Guardian view on net-zero carbon emissions: sooner is better | Editorial
Government advisers have explained how to erase the nation’s carbon footprint. Science dictates that we do it as fast as we canBy the end of this year we should expect UK law to mandate net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Thursday’s
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The Guardian view on the recall of MPs: a reform worth reviewing | Editorial 2 May 1:28pm The Guardian view on the recall of MPs: a reform worth reviewing | Editorial
Three MPs have now been subject to Britain’s new recall process. It is important to ensure that the system is conducted more fairly
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The Guardian view on the Gavin Williamson sacking: a man who leaked ambition | Editorial 1 May 3:12pm The Guardian view on the Gavin Williamson sacking: a man who leaked ambition | Editorial
There are good reasons for leaking in the public interest. But the desire to be prime minister is not one of themThe chaos of Brexit has provided a number of political shocks which have seen parliamentary institutions lose their credibility with the voters. Yet none have been quite as dramatic as tonight’s
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The Guardian view on Venezuela: the impasse continues; the people pay | Editorial 1 May 1:39pm The Guardian view on Venezuela: the impasse continues; the people pay | Editorial
There is no easy way out of this humanitarian and political crisisIt is almost a week since 21 Venezuelans
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Signals from Spain and elsewhere on the health of leftwing parties | Letters 1 May 1:04pm Signals from Spain and elsewhere on the health of leftwing parties | Letters
Guardian readers respond to a Guardian editorial on the result of the Spanish general electionIn your
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The Guardian view on May’s elections: resolve Brexit, defend democracy | Editorial 30 Apr 2:14pm The Guardian view on May’s elections: resolve Brexit, defend democracy | Editorial
Mainstream politicians will only find a way out of current mess by reconnecting with the public. They are failing to do soThe outcome of the 2016 referendum on the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union remains provisional. Brexit is coming about not because government or MPs want it but because the people chose it and are said still to want it. What they chose and what they are now offered is less clear than ever. May’s local council, mayoral and European elections offer a window for politicians to re-engage the population about Brexit, listening to their concerns and priorities. Depressingly, neither the governing party nor the official opposition has grasped the opportunity. Brexit was supposed to force Westminster to venture out of its bubble and rediscover the rest of the country. Yet the political class is more navel-gazing than ever. This is bad for democracy on many levels. Mainstream politicians have to hear what people are saying; they need to test – and if necessary reshape – their arguments; they must balance the people’s wishes with the security of the nation. Instead, the Labour party is split over Brexit and has its work cut out
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The Guardian view on higher education: humans need the humanities | Editorial 30 Apr 2:14pm The Guardian view on higher education: humans need the humanities | Editorial
The subjects of least obvious use may prove to be of ultimate valueThe authoritarian and populist government of Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil is guilty of many crimes. Some, like the assault on the
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The Guardian view on a new social care plan: too little, too late | Editorial 29 Apr 1:32pm The Guardian view on a new social care plan: too little, too late | Editorial
The former cabinet minister Damian Green thinks pensions provide a model to reform social care – but his colleagues have missed their chanceDamian Green’s proposal that a
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The Guardian view on Spain’s election: a chance to rebalance | Editorial 29 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Spain’s election: a chance to rebalance | Editorial
The third general election in four years has given the socialists a mandate to govern one of Europe’s most fragmented nationsThe most striking and perhaps also the most important thing about the results of this week’s
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The Guardian view on the Democratic race: real debate should be welcomed | Editorial 28 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Democratic race: real debate should be welcomed | Editorial
The contest for the presidential nomination is wide open, and the political differences are starkFor a long time, the prospect of a Trump presidency was unthinkable. For many, even when the votes were counted, it was so appalling and implausible that it took a while to sink in. Now the prospect of a second term is very possible indeed. The stakes in 2020 could not be higher for Americans and the rest of the world: another four years of a man who should never have claimed the Oval Office and has used it to wreak damage at home and abroad – or a second chance. The Democrats are now beginning to determine who might best grab that second chance. The
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The Guardian view on time: a social construction | Editorial 28 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on time: a social construction | Editorial
The Japanese calendar resets with every emperor. This is an awkward but human way of organising historyJapan has paused. In preparation for the
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The Observer view on the Spanish elections | Observer editorial 28 Apr 1:00am The Observer view on the Spanish elections | Observer editorial
In Spain, as in the rest of Europe, voters are focused on social and economic problems, not immigration A settled system of responsive, trustworthy government remains an aspiration, not a reality, for many people in Spain. The country has made enormous strides since the end of Franco’s dictatorship in 1975. Its accession to the EEC in 1986 decisively boosted the forces of modernisation. But its recent politics, mired in division, separatism and corruption, has served as a reminder that democracy is fragile and easily subverted. Unsurprisingly, 67% of Spaniards hold a favourable view of the European Union. Only the Poles are more enthusiastic, according to a recent
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The Observer view on the Labour manifesto: get off the fence, Mr Corbyn | Observer editorial 27 Apr 4:00pm The Observer view on the Labour manifesto: get off the fence, Mr Corbyn | Observer editorial
The democratic case for a people’s vote on any Brexit deal is as strong as everJeremy Corbyn put honesty and integrity – the idea of doing politics in a different way – at the heart of his pitch for the Labour leadership four years ago. That makes Labour’s long-standing failure to clarify whether or not it is decisively in favour of a confirmatory referendum on any Brexit deal all the more depressing. Ambiguity remains the name of the game as we approach the European elections in just a few weeks. A
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The Guardian view of UK’s climate responsibility: zero emission target needed | Editorial 26 Apr 1:29pm The Guardian view of UK’s climate responsibility: zero emission target needed | Editorial
Activists are changing the discourse on climate change. Politicians must respond with policies that meet the Paris agreement’s goal of limiting global warming to 1.5CClimate change is becoming hard to ignore. Extreme weather has grown more frequent. Scientists are loudly and urgently sounding the alarm – and people have noticed. The 10-day Extinction Rebellion protests were the biggest act of mass civil disobedience in the UK for generations. The protests, by people drawn from all sections of society, are sure to have a
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The Guardian view on critics: thin-skinned artists beware | Editorial 26 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on critics: thin-skinned artists beware | Editorial
US rapper Lizzo took to social media when angered by an unflattering review. But the wisdom of crowds hasn’t altered the need for independent, expert adviceCritics who don’t themselves make music “SHOULD BE UNEMPLOYED”, the American rapper
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The Guardian view on the Conservatives: the headless chicken party | Editorial 25 Apr 1:24pm The Guardian view on the Conservatives: the headless chicken party | Editorial
Brexit is destroying the Tory party. But the latest leak reveals a government that has lost its bearings on national security tooIn the
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The Guardian view on Libya: this crisis is international | Editorial 25 Apr 1:24pm The Guardian view on Libya: this crisis is international | Editorial
Khalifa Haftar’s foreign backers have egged him on – and civilians are paying the priceThe warlord Khalifa Haftar, who controls eastern
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The Guardian view on Huawei: if May wants to trust, we must keep verifying | Editorial 24 Apr 1:32pm The Guardian view on Huawei: if May wants to trust, we must keep verifying | Editorial
The Chinese telecoms firm has won favour for cheap and sophisticated gear. But its participation in Britain’s 5G network demands the closest scrutinySweeping narratives can soon take hold, even if critics are already pointing to their holes. In the 1990s, two such theses quickly took root. The first was that liberal democracy had triumphed. The second was that technology would inevitably bring liberation; Bill Clinton quipped, in reference to China, that trying to control the internet would be like nailing jello to the wall. Beijing proved both wrong, helping to spell an end
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The Guardian view on the Home Office: a culture of cruelty | Editorial 24 Apr 1:31pm The Guardian view on the Home Office: a culture of cruelty | Editorial
Sajid Javid must do more to address the legacy of injustice from Theresa May’s ‘hostile environment’ policyWhen government decisions ruin lives it is often a result of incompetence. But when the Home Office is involved it is as likely to be vindictive. That department’s institutional cruelty has once again been exposed by the
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The Guardian view on Greta Thunberg: seizing the future | Editorial 23 Apr 1:43pm The Guardian view on Greta Thunberg: seizing the future | Editorial
The Swedish teenager’s clarity and urgency have cut through layers of obfuscation and helplessness – and forced climate change up the agendaNobody could have predicted that a Swedish teenager would shift the terms of the global climate debate in the way that Greta Thunberg has done. Since she began her school strike in Stockholm last August,
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The Guardian view on Donald Trump’s UK visit: a mistake | Editorial 23 Apr 1:43pm The Guardian view on Donald Trump’s UK visit: a mistake | Editorial
The US president is no respecter of democracy or Britain. He should be held at a distance, not given dinner with the QueenRolling out the red carpet for a US president ought to be
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The Guardian view on religious freedom: protect believers | Editorial 22 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on religious freedom: protect believers | Editorial
Across much of the world, millions of people are persecuted for their beliefsThe massacre in churches in Sri Lanka forms part of a global pattern of religious persecution and hostility. To target Christian churches on their holiest day of the year is not only an attempt to kill as many families as possible, but also to maximise the shock and demoralising effect of the attack, a tactic familiar from the sectarian wars in Iraq. If this atrocity was perpetrated by jihadis, as seems likely, it is also an attempt to bring about a clash of civilisations. This is not the pattern of most religiously inspired murder, not least because it is an assault by a minority on a larger population. Usually, persecution is carried out against minorities: Christians are persecuted to a greater or lesser degree across much of the Muslim world, from Sudan to Pakistan,
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The Guardian view on the BBC Proms: give women more space and time | Editorial 22 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on the BBC Proms: give women more space and time | Editorial
There are more than 30 female composers in the Proms programme this year. But why is so much of their work banished outside the Royal Albert Hall?The Proms began in 1895 as the brainchild of impresario Robert Newman and conductor Henry Wood. “Democratising the message of music” was, in Wood’s words, the aim of this cheap summer season of orchestral concerts. When the festival was threatened by financial catastrophe in 1927, it was one of the great enlightened acts of the young BBC to take it on and subsume it into its own work. The annual arrival of
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The Guardian view on European elections: one continent, one ballot | Editorial 21 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on European elections: one continent, one ballot | Editorial
In the shadow of Brexit, Britain has become one front in a pan-continental battle for the soul of the European projectElections to the European parliament can be awkward for admirers of the EU. A ballot in every member state is the most directly democratic feature of the union’s institutional architecture and such a poll should, in theory, bind millions of people in a sense of collective political enterprise. In practice, it rarely feels that way. Awareness of the parliament’s functions is thin. Turnout is low. Parties tend to reserve their best candidates for domestic races. An election of apparently minor consequence invites protest voting, which yield MEPs who have no interest in doing the job properly.
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The Guardian view on the bombings in Sri Lanka: fear and hope | Editorial 21 Apr 11:20am The Guardian view on the bombings in Sri Lanka: fear and hope | Editorial
The worst violence in a decade has struck the heart of a nationThe message of Easter is a message of hope – that most vital yet fragile of qualities, both an instinct and a choice. The
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The Observer view on climate change protesters: their voice must be heard | Observer editorial 21 Apr 1:00am The Observer view on climate change protesters: their voice must be heard | Observer editorial
The stakes have never been higher – a radical movement such as Extinction Rebellion can act as a catalyst for political debate and changeFor decades, we have faced an incontrovertible truth: that human lifestyles are risking the future habitability of our planet. For decades, political leaders have invoked rousing rhetoric in the face of this challenge while failing to act to avert catastrophe. Climate change is an existential risk to the future and the window available to prevent disastrous overheating is closing rapidly. Only now, almost 30 years after the International Panel on Climate Change published its first report setting out the scientific evidence, is there any sense that something may be shifting in popular and political perceptions. Extinction Rebellion protesters have brought parts of central London
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The Observer view on the Mueller report: Trump is a disgrace and is not welcome in Britain | Observer editorial 21 Apr 1:00am The Observer view on the Mueller report: Trump is a disgrace and is not welcome in Britain | Observer editorial
The president has been shown to be the biggest threat to US governance since Watergate. Britain must not honour this dishonourable man with a state visitThe prospect of Donald Trump making a
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The Guardian view on Lyra McKee’s murder: she should have been the future | Editorial 19 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on Lyra McKee’s murder: she should have been the future | Editorial
The death of a young journalist at the hands of dissident republicans is a tragedy linked to the province’s ongoing political crisisThe murder of the 29-year-old Northern Irish journalist and author
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The Guardian view on switching off: seize the day – your smartphone can wait | Editorial 19 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on switching off: seize the day – your smartphone can wait | Editorial
The long weekend is a rare chance for unmediated contact with the world and with our friends. Don’t miss itSpring has come to the UK. The weather invites us to feel it on the skin and not through a window or a screen. Get out there into it, and go there without a phone – unless you’re walking in the mountains and might need to contact the emergency services. For the rest of us, being without a phone is not in itself an emergency, even though it might feel like one at first. Phones do provide us with helpful information all the time. They keep us oriented in the physical world, and position us in the social world, albeit while sharing all this with advertisers. But life was possible without them even as recently as 10 years ago, and sometimes it is worth a visit to that lost age when maps were made of paper and video was something people watched together. There are two reasons at least for trying to make time away from screens this bank holiday. The first is that it is, and ought to be, a true break from work. Anyone who works in an office knows now that email, messaging and phone calls mean that both the office itself and the people who want to deal with it can follow you anywhere, at any time. There is never a moment when you can feel that you have actually accomplished everything that could reasonably be expected.
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The Guardian view on the Mueller report: now we see it. What next? | Editorial 18 Apr 3:20pm The Guardian view on the Mueller report: now we see it. What next? | Editorial
It is no surprise that the document bears little resemblance to that portrayed by the Trump administration. It must not be allowed to draw a line beneath itFinally we have heard
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TThe Guardian view on Britain and the EU elections: get together to stay together | Editorial 18 Apr 1:25pm TThe Guardian view on Britain and the EU elections: get together to stay together | Editorial
There is a public majority against Brexit. The political parties must cooperate to ensure that its voice is heard in any electionsIf they take place,
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The Guardian view on climate change campaigners: suited or superglued, we need them all | Editorial 17 Apr 1:42pm The Guardian view on climate change campaigners: suited or superglued, we need them all | Editorial
The cause is being taken up in the corridors of power. We still need activists outside on the streetsWhen Mark Carney
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The Guardian view on the Palace of Westminster: renovate it – and our democracy | Editorial 17 Apr 1:41pm The Guardian view on the Palace of Westminster: renovate it – and our democracy | Editorial
The dangerous dilapidation of the Houses of Parliament can no longer be ignored. They must be restored and modernised before catastrophe strikesThe physical state of the Palace of Westminster – its confusing warrens of corridors and staircases, its arcane rituals and atmosphere, its leaking roofs, its dreadful plumbing – has become bound up with a general dissatisfaction with the state of British politics. The metaphors pile up without effort: there is an urge, understandable at times, to write off the building as well as the parliament that sits within it, condemning both as worthless and outmoded. This is unfair, not only to the public-service ethics of the vast majority of parliamentarians, but to the building itself. The palace is a Unesco world heritage site, an architectural masterpiece and a historical locus of almost inestimable value. Though most of the Gothic structure was designed by Charles Barry and Augustus Pugin in the 19th century, the palace also contains the 11th-century Westminster Hall and the 13th-century Saint Stephen’s chapel, sole survivals of a catastrophic fire in 1834 that tore through the rest of the buildings.
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The Guardian view on resurrecting Notre Dame: the struggle for meaning | Editorial 16 Apr 1:41pm The Guardian view on resurrecting Notre Dame: the struggle for meaning | Editorial
Catholic conservatives are trying to recruit the disaster as a symbol of their cause. They will failTo be a Christian is to be attentive to signs of God’s action in the world, and this is especially true in Holy Week and at Easter, when – the faithful believe – Jesus by his death and resurrection revealed the nature of God’s relationship with humanity. For some Christians, the most important part of the lesson is that Jesus accepted death and offered his innocence as a gift; for others, or at other times, the point is that the gift was accepted and he was in the end resurrected. Either way, the symbolism has been unavoidable in reactions to the dreadful blaze in
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The Guardian view on rights for renters: only the start | Editorial 16 Apr 1:40pm The Guardian view on rights for renters: only the start | Editorial
A consultation on scrapping no-fault evictions and introducing new safeguards for tenants is welcome – but not enoughHome is not an address. It is a feeling. Millions of people have the keys to a property, yet enjoy none of the security we associate with the word “home” because their housing is not decent, safe and affordable, or because they have no idea how long they may remain there. Private renters are particularly vulnerable. The proportion of private tenants in England doubled in the first decade or so of this century, to around a fifth of the population. The proportion of their incomes consumed by rent also increased sharply. So did the amount that
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The Guardian view on the Catholic church: trouble ahead | Editorial 15 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Catholic church: trouble ahead | Editorial
The rightwing assault on Pope Francis continues. But his opponents are unlikely to succeedJesus entered Jerusalem a week before his death as if he were the messiah, pushing through adoring crowds who sang and waved palm fronds – at least that’s what the story says. By this criterion at least, Pope Francis is further from Jesus than most popes have been. He entered Holy Week this year battered by assaults from the right wing of the American church, the Italian government, and even his immediate predecessor, the former pope Benedict XVI, who published a
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The Guardian view on Tiger Woods’ return: golf needed some good news | Editorial 15 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Tiger Woods’ return: golf needed some good news | Editorial
A new book shows that the American president cheats and lies on the golf course. On Sunday the game got its honour back It helps to enjoy golf, of course. But, in spite of the sport’s traducers, lots of people of all kinds do just that. Even those who don’t, though, could surely scarce forbear to cheer on Sunday as Tiger Woods
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The Guardian view on MPs and Brexit: this is no time to disengage | Editorial 14 Apr 1:35pm The Guardian view on MPs and Brexit: this is no time to disengage | Editorial
Britain must decide within five weeks whether to hold EU elections. There are big decisions to face before then, even though parliament is in recessIt is a reasonable bet that a fair proportion of readers don’t want to think about Brexit at all right now. It would be very understandable if that’s the case. Brexit politics has meant relentlessly hard pounding ever since the new year. Now there’s a brief hiatus. Parliament is
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The Guardian view on Extinction Rebellion: one small step | Editorial 14 Apr 1:34pm The Guardian view on Extinction Rebellion: one small step | Editorial
Disrupting traffic is not enough – we must disrupt our progress towards climate catastropheThe planned choking of traffic in central London on Monday by climate activists of
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The Observer view on extraditing Julian Assange | Observer editorial 14 Apr 1:20am The Observer view on extraditing Julian Assange | Observer editorial
Sending the WikiLeaks founder to face charges in the US would be a disaster for press freedom It’s not difficult to despise Julian Assange. For seven years, he has attempted to evade rape and sexual assault charges in Sweden by seeking asylum in the Ecuadorian embassy in London. He has dismissed the charges as
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The Observer view on giving voters their say on Brexit | Observer editorial 14 Apr 1:00am The Observer view on giving voters their say on Brexit | Observer editorial
Politicians cannot be trusted to agree on anything within the next six months. They should leave it to the voters‘Please do not waste this time,”
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The Guardian view on the Amritsar massacre centenary: time to see ourselves as others see us | Editorial 12 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Amritsar massacre centenary: time to see ourselves as others see us | Editorial
Britain is too cautious about facing its complex past. The result is that Britain fails to understand its futureTheresa May did two significant things this week. The first, her decision to postpone Brexit, is the dominant story of the times. The second has received less attention. At prime minister’s questions, Mrs May prefaced her answers by talking about the “shameful scar on British Indian history” of the killings at
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The Guardian view on the first picture of a black hole: seeing is believing | Editorial 12 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on the first picture of a black hole: seeing is believing | Editorial
Scientists have shown us one of the mysteries of the universe, and the extraordinary power of human cooperation“If you work on something like theoretical physics, you feel like you’re trapped inside a room, and outside people don’t know,” the physicist Carlo Rovelli said recently. While the stereotype of a space scientist is of a loner out of step with the humdrum of everyday life, Mr Rovelli is not alone in believing that his life’s work is not just to find things out, but to communicate. This week’s
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The Guardian view on the Brexit impasse: trust citizens to judge the evidence | Editorial 11 Apr 1:47pm The Guardian view on the Brexit impasse: trust citizens to judge the evidence | Editorial
The familiar methods of British politics have failed to find a solution. Parliament must have the confidence to innovateExtending the time available to make a decision does not increase the range of Brexit options, but it allows for a more honest account of those choices and perhaps a more deliberative, less aggressively partisan evaluation of their merits. The real opportunity represented by the
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The Guardian view on Assange and extradition: say no to the US | Editorial 11 Apr 1:47pm The Guardian view on Assange and extradition: say no to the US | Editorial
The WikiLeaks founder must be held accountable for skipping bail. But extradition to America over this case would be wrongOn Thursday, British police bundled
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The Guardian view on Britain in Europe: an inevitable partnership | Editorial 10 Apr 1:34pm The Guardian view on Britain in Europe: an inevitable partnership | Editorial
Brexit delay will force the UK to confront the fact that its future is intertwined with the European projectFor three years, Brexit arguments have, naturally enough, focused on the impact that leaving the European Union might have on Britain. Less attention has been paid to the effect of Britain’s departure on the rest of Europe. That is about to change. The response of European neighbours to choices forced on them by the UK is getting harder to ignore. A
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The Guardian view on the Israeli elections: further down the wrong road | Editorial 10 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Israeli elections: further down the wrong road | Editorial
Benjamin Netanyahu is on course to become his country’s longest-serving prime minister, for the worst reasonsIt should be astonishing that a prime minister can
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The Guardian view on crowdfunding schools: lessons in unfairness | Editorial 9 Apr 1:26pm The Guardian view on crowdfunding schools: lessons in unfairness | Editorial
Individual acts of philanthropy, however inspiring, are not the solution to the current crisisFrom sponsored bike rides to tombolas and auctions, fundraising drives are part of the fabric of our lives. They can help to strengthen social ties as well as raising money – as when parents bond with teachers across tables loaded with jumble or cakes. Funds raised in this way have long provided valuable extracurricular extras for schools, helping to pay for trips or special projects such as pantomimes or gardens. And there is no reason why communities should not seek to add to the resources supplied by the state. What they cannot do, and should not be forced to attempt, is compensate for the state’s shortcomings. When schools are forced to fundraise for essentials such as pencils, no amount of the goodwill associated with donations can disguise the underlying problem. Yet an
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The Guardian view on Julian Assange: it would be wrong to extradite him | Editorial 9 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Julian Assange: it would be wrong to extradite him | Editorial
The WikiLeaks founder has been in Ecuador’s embassy in London since 2012. Clear judgment will be required if he now leaves his self-imposed retreatIt is almost seven years since the WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange skipped bail and
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No-deal Brexit fears over medication supplies | Letter 9 Apr 12:50pm No-deal Brexit fears over medication supplies | Letter
Given that we are currently due to exit the European Union this Friday without a deal, the issue of safe access to medication is broader than just epilepsyWe were both interviewed by BBC Newsnight last week for a report on no-deal preparations for pharmaceuticals, and profoundly disagree with the assessment by the Department of Health that it was Brexit scaremongering. Newsnight made the editorial decision not to name the drug or drug company involved. We agree with that decision, as it should be the DH’s responsibility to be open and transparent about where there are delays and the reasons why. For example, on Friday, the department circulated guidance from the Epilepsy Society stating that there was six weeks’ supply stockpiled of my medication, which contradicts the confidential advice from NHS England that was the basis of the Newsnight story. Only one of these statements can be true.
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The Guardian view on online harms: white paper, grey areas | Editorial 8 Apr 1:47pm The Guardian view on online harms: white paper, grey areas | Editorial
The internet needs regulation. People and societies need protection. But this will be harder than the government’s new white paper makes it lookThe internet has added a new dimension to the spaces of imagination in which we all live, and the problems of the offline world have moved there, too. This did not once seem an urgent problem, but in the last five years there has been a revolution of attitude around the world away from the anarchic culture encouraged by US law; at the other extreme is the very tight censorship imposed in China, where one popular startup employs as many people on content moderation as it does selling advertising. The white paper
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The Guardian view on Brexit delay: there is still a way forward | Editorial 8 Apr 1:47pm The Guardian view on Brexit delay: there is still a way forward | Editorial
Britain is days away from crashing out of the EU with no deal. It is vital – and possible – to prevent that from happeningIt has come to this – and it is scary. As things stand, Britain will leave the European Union on Friday without either a withdrawal agreement or any kind of plan for future relations. It is hard to exaggerate the destructive seriousness of that possibility for Britain.
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The Guardian view on no deal: Theresa May must expose it as a fantasy | Editorial 7 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on no deal: Theresa May must expose it as a fantasy | Editorial
The idea of a clean break from Europe is a dangerous dream, but remainers who say as much are not believed. The grownup leavers must now speak outIt is difficult to choose the worst of Theresa May’s decisions on the path that has led to our predicament this week: her government is now suspended like
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The Guardian view on Turkey and Erdoğan: a weakened strongman | Editorial 7 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Turkey and Erdoğan: a weakened strongman | Editorial
The opposition’s dramatic advance in local elections has sent a powerful message to the presidentStrongmen are not invincible. The stunning news that the Turkish opposition had surged to victory in local elections – as startling to the opposition itself as anyone – is on hold following
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The Observer view on Benjamin Netanyahu and Israel’s elections | Observer editorial 7 Apr 1:00am The Observer view on Benjamin Netanyahu and Israel’s elections | Observer editorial
The Israeli leaders confrontational style has cut the country off from its friends and exposed its citizens to harm The likelihood that Benjamin Netanyahu will emerge victorious after Israel’s election on Tuesday is doubtless pleasing for his rightwing supporters and his oleaginous pal in the White House. But it is a worrying prospect for the country and the Middle East as a whole. Mr Netanyahu has dominated domestic politics
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The Observer view on Brexit: it’s our political system, not just MPs, that is failing us | Observer editorial 7 Apr 12:59am The Observer view on Brexit: it’s our political system, not just MPs, that is failing us | Observer editorial
Both Labour and the Tories have put party management before the national interest Brexit has prompted a recurring nightmare among an increasingly incredulous population: our very own Groundhog Day. Two weeks after the EU granted us an 11th-hour extension to prevent us crashing out without a deal, we are back in exactly the same position. The only thing standing between us and next Friday’s cliff edge is the hope the EU gifts us another extension. Meanwhile, the political turmoil engulfing the country worsens, the two main parties increasingly consumed by division and disarray and the political leadership we so desperately need to avert crisis as elusive as ever. It’s hard to believe that the Westminster model of democracy was one prized by constitutional theorists for the stability it purportedly delivers. As the stakes get higher, our political system has proved less and less capable of delivering a resolution to the gridlock that has infected Westminster.
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The Guardian view on the gender pay gap: acts must follow facts | Editorial 5 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on the gender pay gap: acts must follow facts | Editorial
Naming and shaming employers who pay men far more than women is important, but progress requires policy as well as dataKnowing that there is a gender pay gap is one thing. Shrinking it is something else. When the UK government introduced compulsory reporting of the difference between men’s and women’s pay by companies employing more than 250 people, the hope was that publishing the data would lead to action. Announcing what he called a “
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The Guardian view on online politics: transparency is essential | Editorial 5 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on online politics: transparency is essential | Editorial
Democracy needs strengthening when parties are replaced by opaque lobby groups in an age of social mediaThe Guardian’s revelation that Facebook campaigns which appear to be spontaneous outpourings of popular sentiment are
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The Guardian view on the parties’ Brexit talks: to agree is to split | Editorial 4 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on the parties’ Brexit talks: to agree is to split | Editorial
A plumbing failure at Westminster brought a soggy end to proceedings. Everything else is getting harderIt felt like a timely metaphor. Maybe it was even a divine judgment. In fact it was caused by a humble plumbing failure from above, rather than a weightier verdict from the same quarter. Even so, few
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The Guardian view on Brunei and stoning: don’t leave it to celebrities to act | Editorial 4 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Brunei and stoning: don’t leave it to celebrities to act | Editorial
Brunei’s shocking new penal code must be challenged – through deeds as well as words. Britain’s responsibilities are clearBrunei’s introduction of new laws
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The Guardian view on Brexit radicalisation: take time, lower the temperature | Editorial 3 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on Brexit radicalisation: take time, lower the temperature | Editorial
Brexiters may well be frustrated but their rhetoric of betrayal, sabotage and treason is fuelling a dangerously febrile atmosphereIt is a measure of how fevered British politics has become that many MPs speak of holding elections to the European parliament as a calamity to be avoided at all costs. It would certainly be an unusual exercise for a country committed to leaving the EU, but there are worse things that could happen to a democracy than its citizens having an opportunity to vote. The UK could be
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The Guardian view on Algeria’s ousted president: what next? | Editorial 3 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Algeria’s ousted president: what next? | Editorial
Protesters have forced the departure of Abdelaziz Bouteflika. But that may prove to be the easy partThe scenes of jubilation on the streets of Algeria on Tuesday night had vivid, almost uncanny echoes of events in the region eight years ago. A wave of protest in a youthful country has
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The Guardian view on May’s Brexit offer to Corbyn: years too late | Editorial 2 Apr 3:21pm The Guardian view on May’s Brexit offer to Corbyn: years too late | Editorial
The prime minister’s offer to Labour’s leader seems designed to share the blame rather than the gloryTheresa May’s
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The Guardian view on fiction vending machines: attention seekers | Editorial 2 Apr 2:00pm The Guardian view on fiction vending machines: attention seekers | Editorial
If they succeed in distracting commuters from their smartphones, short story dispensers will be a welcome addition to the landscapeCan
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The Guardian view on Brexit votes: put nation before party | Editorial 1 Apr 4:46pm The Guardian view on Brexit votes: put nation before party | Editorial
MPs offer a grown-up response to the chaos while hard Brexiters see the crisis as a way of getting people to vote against their economic interests. Which will sway Mrs May?It is a matter of national shame that the civil war in the Conservative party led to the United Kingdom voting to leave the European Union. That war continues today. The split is now between
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The Guardian view on school exclusions: the wrong answer | Editorial 1 Apr 2:38pm The Guardian view on school exclusions: the wrong answer | Editorial
A steep rise in the number of primary-age children in pupil referral units is proof that inclusion needs a boost – and new resourcesIt has taken a few years, but awareness of the rising number of pupils being excluded from English schools has grown to the point where the problem has become impossible to ignore. In the process, observers have become wiser to the methods used by schools seeking to expel awkward children without resorting to the formal last resort of permanent exclusion. Ofsted chief Amanda Spielman has made
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The Guardian view on Brexit’s imbroglio: MPs offer a way out | Editorial 31 Mar 1:25pm The Guardian view on Brexit’s imbroglio: MPs offer a way out | Editorial
Restoring the sovereignty of parliament was a major aim of Brexit. Mrs May could honour that by accepting what the Commons votes forThis week MPs
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The Guardian view on antidepressant use: no cure-all | Editorial 31 Mar 1:24pm The Guardian view on antidepressant use: no cure-all | Editorial
The record number of pills being handed out for depression is a cause of concern, especially when access to other treatments is restrictedAlmost
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The Observer view: malign ideas driving child poverty haunt Brexit debate | Observer editorial 30 Mar 2:00pm The Observer view: malign ideas driving child poverty haunt Brexit debate | Observer editorial
Theresa May says parliament is preventing her from fixing the country’s social ills, but the mess was caused by Tory austerityBritain is the fifth richest country in the world. Yet figures out last week show that more than 4 million children – almost one in three – are living below the relative poverty line. That’s one in three children growing up in families that face a daily struggle to make ends meet, where parents sometimes have to go without to ensure their children can eat and where the cost of school uniforms can
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s defeat: three strikes and out | Editorial 29 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s defeat: three strikes and out | Editorial
The majority against the prime minister’s Brexit deal was smaller than last time but still decisive. The deal is dead. It’s time for a new approach Theresa May’s third successive
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The Guardian view on killing speed: a sensible restriction | Editorial 29 Mar 2:25pm The Guardian view on killing speed: a sensible restriction | Editorial
Speeding, one of the pleasures of modern life, will soon become technologically impossible. We will be well rid of itDriving fast on a clear road is for many people one of the pleasures of modern life. It seems to express all the feelings of power and autonomy that the daily grind so cruelly denies us. Speed limits then become just another petty restriction to be shoved aside by people glorying in their proper freedom. But now, it seems, all this is to come to an end. A
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The Guardian view on a symbolic Brexit date: May’s last stand | Editorial 28 Mar 2:33pm The Guardian view on a symbolic Brexit date: May’s last stand | Editorial
The prime minister is now going through the motions of executive power as events slip quickly from her graspThe effects of Britain leaving the EU are not determined by the day on which it might happen. It is the terms of a deal that matter. But 29 March has unique symbolism as the date on which Brexit was supposed to happen and the missing of that deadline at 11pm this Friday night carries political and cultural significance. For ardent leavers, it is a betrayal – the refusal of parliament to honour the referendum instruction. For remainers, it is a relief – proof that MPs will not countenance a chaotic no-deal Brexit. No one denies that it is a symptom of failure. The article 50 window was not designed to be spacious. Its constraints presented a reason to begin negotiations only with a destination in mind and to aspire for national consensus on what it should be. Theresa May got that wrong and refused to correct the error for two years. She squandered her time, yet still craves the consolation of a
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The Guardian view on Tory Islamophobia: inaction speaks volumes | Editorial 28 Mar 2:27pm The Guardian view on Tory Islamophobia: inaction speaks volumes | Editorial
The party’s refusal to tackle anti-Muslim prejudice is even more troubling after the Christchurch killingsA fortnight after the
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The Guardian view on May’s resignation offer: a stitch-up for a bad deal | Editorial 27 Mar 5:54pm The Guardian view on May’s resignation offer: a stitch-up for a bad deal | Editorial
Once again, vital questions about the future of the country are being submerged in the murky waters of internal Tory party politicsThere is not much logic in supporting a plan on the condition that the one person who thinks it a good plan resigns – except in the Conservative party. In a bid to win hardline Eurosceptic support for her Brexit deal,
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The Guardian view on kissing the pope’s ring: the power of symbols | Editorial 27 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on kissing the pope’s ring: the power of symbols | Editorial
All government rests on obedience but democracy requires independent thought as well. How to reconcile them?Pope Francis wishes the faithful would
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The revolt at the Vatican shows the church is still failing women | Tina Beattie 27 Mar 2:00am The revolt at the Vatican shows the church is still failing women | Tina Beattie
Pope Francis has not brought about the reforms he once talked of, and now a magazine editor has thrown in the towelThe editor of the Vatican women’s magazine, Lucetta Scaraffia, has announced that she and her all-female editorial team are to
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The Guardian view on Brexit’s revolution: eating its own | Editorial 26 Mar 2:32pm The Guardian view on Brexit’s revolution: eating its own | Editorial
Brexiters will not say leaving the EU is a mistake, but it’s time they admitted there will be a bill to pick up For many Brexiters, the European Union was not an institutional arrangement that eased trade, immigration and political disputes; it was nothing short of a conspiracy to sap money from the United Kingdom to Brussels, construct an
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The Guardian view on segregated playgrounds: sand and fury | Editorial 26 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on segregated playgrounds: sand and fury | Editorial
New flats where the children of social tenants have separate swings is a reminder of everything that is wrong with housing policy Our report about a housing development in south London with
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The Guardian view on parliament and Brexit: take back control | Editorial 25 Mar 2:54pm The Guardian view on parliament and Brexit: take back control | Editorial
By refusing to compromise with MPs over her Brexit plan, Theresa May sinks her premiershipBrexit is a revolution, so expect revolutionary consequences. It
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The Guardian view on the Mueller report: release it in full | Editorial 25 Mar 2:48pm The Guardian view on the Mueller report: release it in full | Editorial
Donald Trump can only be defeated when Democrats understand why he wonOnly Donald Trump could describe as
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Special educational needs require inclusion | Letters 25 Mar 1:54pm Special educational needs require inclusion | Letters
Guardian readers respond to an editorial on how the government is failing pupils with learning disabilitiesThere may well be a “showdown” between parents and the government where special educational needs is concerned, but posing the problem simply as “inclusion” versus “segregation” obscures as much as it illuminates (
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The Guardian view on Conservative crisis: made by Brexit | Editorial 24 Mar 2:49pm The Guardian view on Conservative crisis: made by Brexit | Editorial
The main political parties are split and unable to contain the destructive fallout of the populist politics of leaving the EUTheresa May has not been honest about the withdrawal agreement she negotiated with the European Union. She repeatedly said it was the only one on the table. She now
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The Guardian view on statistics in sciences: gaming the (un)known | Editorial 24 Mar 2:35pm The Guardian view on statistics in sciences: gaming the (un)known | Editorial
Statisticians are calling on their profession to abandon one of its most treasured markers of significance. But what could replace it?Statistical arguments are a crucial part of decision-making in a modern society. The kind of decisions that governments and large companies must make all the time are governed by probabilities. In those circumstances of uncertain knowledge we need to reduce a cloud of unknowing to facts as hard and cold as hailstones that can be acted on, or even just used in arguments. But some of the most popular techniques for doing this are now under attack from within the profession. The p value is supposed to measure whether the conclusions drawn from any given experiment or investigation of data are reliable. It actually measures how unlikely the observed result is compared with what would be expected as a result of random chance. Obviously this requires a sophisticated understanding of the results that chance might be expected to produce. This isn’t always available. To take one popular example, any calculation of how
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The Observer view of Matt Hancock’s cancer gaffe | Observer editorial 24 Mar 2:22am The Observer view of Matt Hancock’s cancer gaffe | Observer editorial
The health secretary’s remarks about prostate cancer are the latest in a long line of ministerial blundersWe are ruled by a government that has, in a very short time, acquired a striking reputation for the crassness of its members’ utterances and actions. Examples include Northern Ireland secretary
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The Observer view: the people have marched; now MPs must take up the challenge | Observer editorial 23 Mar 11:20am The Observer view: the people have marched; now MPs must take up the challenge | Observer editorial
Parliament has to act now to stop Theresa May’s desperate deal ‘You want this Brexit process to be over and done with.” Last Wednesday, Theresa May presumed to
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The Guardian view on the People’s Vote march: a force for good | Editorial 22 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on the People’s Vote march: a force for good | Editorial
The protest on the streets of London will show that the prime minister cannot define the public. They have a will and opinions of their ownSixteen years ago, Tony Blair watched a million people march past Downing Street, imploring him not to join US president George W Bush in invading Iraq. Mr Blair, in the words of one writer this week, “
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The Guardian view on history: don’t take its name in vain | Editorial 22 Mar 2:25pm The Guardian view on history: don’t take its name in vain | Editorial
Politicians claiming to know how the present will be judged should be treated with scepticism. The truth is, nobody doesIt would hardly now be surprising if the ranks of those mustered round the clock at Westminster to air their views about Brexit were to be joined next week by one of those who has the most right to feel aggrieved about these proceedings: History. Throughout the process, poor History has been having words roughly crammed into its mouth by all and sundry. Angela Merkel is said to have done this on Thursday, warning Emmanuel Macron that history would judge the EU harshly if it failed to handle things sympathetically. Yet Mrs Merkel is at least a great world figure. The same can hardly be said for the backbench Conservative member Peter Bone, of whom History’s team of advisers (Herodotus, Jules Michelet and AJP Taylor) have said they have no knowledge. Mr Bone, others may remember, assured the prime minister in the Commons this week that
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s broadcast: a form of national sabotage | Editorial 21 Mar 2:36pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s broadcast: a form of national sabotage | Editorial
The prime minister’s inflexibility and tactical ineptitude have just hit a new low, at the very time that Britain faces a grave national emergencyWhen she put herself forward to lead the Conservative party in 2016,
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The Guardian view on rewilding Scotland: an immodest proposal | Editorial 21 Mar 2:36pm The Guardian view on rewilding Scotland: an immodest proposal | Editorial
If undertaken in the right spirit, the restoration of huge tracts of the Highlands could be a hugely beneficial enterpriseWhat exactly is meant by rewilding depends on who is talking about it. The term was coined by Dave Foreman, a leading figure in the 1980s wave of environmental direct action in the US, to describe the kind of large-scale wilderness restoration he and others advocated. Their idea was that conservationists should move beyond trying to protect particular beauty spots or species, and focus on rebuilding ecosystems that could sustain themselves with minimal human interference. Since then,
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The Guardian view on Theresa May and Brexit: a prime minister gone rogue | Editorial 20 Mar 2:31pm The Guardian view on Theresa May and Brexit: a prime minister gone rogue | Editorial
Theresa May has put no deal firmly back on the table in flagrant defiance of parliament and the dictates of responsible governmentTo achieve anything in EU diplomacy it helps to speak European. That does not require a command of continental languages. What matters, when dealing at the highest level in Brussels, is an ability to acknowledge the common political and economic interests that underpin the whole European project. Theresa May has no fluency in that idiom. She cannot even fake it. Since becoming prime minister, her relations with the EU have been marked by tin-eared diplomacy. She is bad enough at cultivating relationships in Westminster. In Brussels she has none.
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The Guardian view on regulating porn: wrong step, right direction | Editorial 20 Mar 2:31pm The Guardian view on regulating porn: wrong step, right direction | Editorial
Damaging both to the producers and the consumers, online pornography is finally being tackledSuccessive governments have been under pressure to control
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The Guardian view on the Brexit crisis: take back control by giving it up | Editorial 19 Mar 2:37pm The Guardian view on the Brexit crisis: take back control by giving it up | Editorial
The prime minister will only a get a grip on the Brexit crisis by learning to loosening hers on the terms of departure from the EUAlmost two years after Theresa May triggered article 50 it is still
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The Guardian view on weather forecasts: we need the bigger picture | Editorial 19 Mar 2:36pm The Guardian view on weather forecasts: we need the bigger picture | Editorial
Climate must not be confused with local conditions, but remodelled broadcasts could help people understand the dangers we faceStill, and in defiance of decades worth of scientific evidence, vast numbers of people around the world refuse to accept that we are in the process of drastically altering the climate. Vast numbers more lack the information they need to interpret what is going on. This is a global problem whose importance cannot be overstated. It has no single solution. But giving up on trying to halt the damage to life on our planet is not an option. And in this context, this week’s suggestion by the former BBC weather presenter
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The Guardian view on Speaker Bercow: on parliament’s side | Editorial 18 Mar 3:07pm The Guardian view on Speaker Bercow: on parliament’s side | Editorial
The Commons equivalent of the double jeopardy rule is rightly invoked to impose sense on a government elevating a plebiscitary politics over a parliamentary oneThis country has been in a political and constitutional quandary since the results of the Brexit referendum in June 2016. Today the crisis deepened in a dramatic and decisive way. The Commons Speaker John Bercow said he was
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The Guardian view on special educational needs: segregation is not the answer | Editorial 18 Mar 3:05pm The Guardian view on special educational needs: segregation is not the answer | Editorial
As the proportion of SEN children in alternative schools continues to rise, it’s time to stand up for inclusionA showdown between parents of children with special needs and the government is coming. Three families from different parts of England have won the
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s Brexit deal: third time unlucky | Editorial 17 Mar 2:33pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s Brexit deal: third time unlucky | Editorial
The prime minister is poised to try again. But whether she wins or loses the vote on her deal, she has lost the argumentBack in February, ITV’s Angus Walker
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The Guardian view on Xinjiang’s detention camps: not just China’s shame | Editorial 17 Mar 2:29pm The Guardian view on Xinjiang’s detention camps: not just China’s shame | Editorial
Vast numbers of Uighurs and other Muslim minorities are being held in detention. The world must speak outAn “A-list” comedian, well-known singers, scholars, pensioners and civil servants – the
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The Observer view on the school climate strikes: it’s shameful that children need to take the lead | Observer editorial 17 Mar 2:00am The Observer view on the school climate strikes: it’s shameful that children need to take the lead | Observer editorial
Children are right to call politicians to account over a global crisisFor those who care passionately about our planet’s future, these are dispiriting times. Fossil fuel emissions, which are now causing our world to overheat dangerously, continue to rise despite scientists’ clear warnings about the likely consequences: melting ice sheets, rising sea levels, unprecedented storms, acidifying oceans and spreading deserts. Such forecasts should have spurred global action a long time ago. Yet politicians across the world have consistently refused to act and for decades have procrastinated, discounting evidence that clearly shows global warming is already affecting our planet. Many factors account for this inaction. Lobbying by oil and gas companies obsessed with short-term gain has certainly been involved. Others have argued that only God can have a planet-wide influence and that humanity is being presumptuous in believing it could alter a global ecosystem. In addition, there are those who believe bids to introduce limits on coal and oil burning are simply the work of leftwing, anti-capitalist conspirators.
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The Observer view on the Christchurch shootings: we’ve been too slow to see the far right threat| Observer editorial 17 Mar 1:59am The Observer view on the Christchurch shootings: we’ve been too slow to see the far right threat| Observer editorial
We need to reflect on the role that even mainstream parties and the media play in spreading racist attitudesAfter so many attacks over so many years, we have become inured to terrorist atrocities. This in itself is a tragedy. Yet even after so much previous bloodshed in the name of hate-filled ideologies, the murder of 49 men, women and children at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, on Friday has spread shock and disgust around the globe. There is something particularly appalling about targeting people for their faith, as they engage in the act of worship.
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The Guardian view on the Christchurch attacks: extremism’s rising danger | Editorial 15 Mar 2:39pm Updated The Guardian view on the Christchurch attacks: extremism’s rising danger | Editorial
The far right seeks to divide. Responsible politicians ought, especially in times of grief and anger, to bring people together New Zealand is best known for its breathtaking wilderness, found in distant but secure islands at the edge of the world. On Friday that changed. Forty-nine people were
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The Guardian view on language: the flesh made word | Editorial 15 Mar 2:25pm The Guardian view on language: the flesh made word | Editorial
Teeth and tongues make the sounds of our speech, but our humanity makes its meaningsBabies have an astonishing talent that adults entirely lose. By the age of one, they can recognise the significant noises in the babble around them and group them into a language. When we have lost this capacity as adults, it becomes enormously difficult to distinguish between
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The Guardian view on Brexit delay: time to let reality in | Editorial 14 Mar 3:28pm The Guardian view on Brexit delay: time to let reality in | Editorial
Theresa May came to office without answers to European questions and looked for them in the wrong places. Her way of doing Brexit is overFor nearly two years, Britain has known when it is supposed to leave the EU. Its politics have been consumed by the question of how. There has been less exploration of why. The simplest answer is that a majority voted to do so and that their preference should, on democratic principle, be respected. But when the government has failed to find a safe Brexit path, to proceed regardless of the consequences is to risk being wantonly destructive. Just such a point of failure has been reached.
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The Guardian view on the Bloody Sunday prosecution: late but necessary | Editorial 14 Mar 2:28pm The Guardian view on the Bloody Sunday prosecution: late but necessary | Editorial
Northern Ireland’s director of public prosecutions is to charge one soldier with murder and attempted murder over the 1972 killings. But this is not just a question of historyIt is now approaching half a century since Bloody Sunday, when British troops fired on civil rights demonstrators in Derry. The killings not only left families distraught but, as the brother of one victim observed on Thursday, deepened and widened the conflict in Northern Ireland. The Widgery tribunal of the same year compounded anger. It took more than 25 years, and the peace process, for the British government to commission another inquiry. In 2010 Lord Saville finally delivered his devastating report. A lengthy police inquiry followed. Now one former paratrooper is to
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The Guardian view on Tory no-dealers: not serious, still dangerous | Editorial 13 Mar 4:25pm The Guardian view on Tory no-dealers: not serious, still dangerous | Editorial
MPs who embrace impossible, reckless Brexit ideas have forfeited their right to shape the debate about what happens nextRegardless of how many MPs reject the idea of a no-deal Brexit, or how often, the legal fact remains that Britain’s EU membership expires on 29 March. Parliament cannot unilaterally change the date, so the British government is as dependent on a functional dialogue with the EU in the aftermath of Theresa May’s deal having been rejected as it was when the deal was being negotiated. That should be obvious, but a remarkable number of MPs still appear not to understand basic facts about Brexit. Conservatives in particular struggle to process the point that a Brexit plan cooked up in a Westminster corridor is worthless if there is no prospect of it being viable in Brussels.
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The Guardian view on ending austerity: in rhetoric alone | Editorial 13 Mar 2:52pm The Guardian view on ending austerity: in rhetoric alone | Editorial
If the Tories want to end austerity, they will have to focus on ending the lived experience of it
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s Brexit: pause it and rethink | Editorial 12 Mar 4:42pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s Brexit: pause it and rethink | Editorial
The UK ought not be precipitously hassled out of the EU by a Conservative party on the verge of a nervous breakdownNo prime minister likes to
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The Guardian view on humanities degrees: art for society’s sake | Editorial 12 Mar 2:54pm The Guardian view on humanities degrees: art for society’s sake | Editorial
To reduce tuition fees while providing top-up grants only for sciences would distort higher education. We need history, poetry and French as well as Stem subjectsThe
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The Guardian view on the world wide web: we wove a tangle | Editorial 11 Mar 5:01pm The Guardian view on the world wide web: we wove a tangle | Editorial
Thirty years ago, a physicist dreamed up a way to organise information from multiple computers all on one screen. The world will never be the sameFor once, the hype was justified. The world wide web really did transform the world in a way that can be compared to the impact of the printing press, or the mass media of the 20th century. The internet existed before the web, of course, but it was hardly used. The genius of Tim Berners-Lee was to glimpse, 30 years ago this week, how it might
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