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The Guardian view on Donald Trump’s UK visit: a mistake | Editorial6h The Guardian view on Donald Trump’s UK visit: a mistake | Editorial
The US president is no respecter of democracy or Britain. He should be held at a distance, not given dinner with the QueenRolling out the red carpet for a US president ought to be
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The Guardian view on religious freedom: protect believers | Editorial30h The Guardian view on religious freedom: protect believers | Editorial
Across much of the world, millions of people are persecuted for their beliefsThe massacre in churches in Sri Lanka forms part of a global pattern of religious persecution and hostility. To target Christian churches on their holiest day of the year is not only an attempt to kill as many families as possible, but also to maximise the shock and demoralising effect of the attack, a tactic familiar from the sectarian wars in Iraq. If this atrocity was perpetrated by jihadis, as seems likely, it is also an attempt to bring about a clash of civilisations. This is not the pattern of most religiously inspired murder, not least because it is an assault by a minority on a larger population. Usually, persecution is carried out against minorities: Christians are persecuted to a greater or lesser degree across much of the Muslim world, from Sudan to Pakistan,
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The Guardian view on the BBC Proms: give women more space and time | Editorial30h The Guardian view on the BBC Proms: give women more space and time | Editorial
There are more than 30 female composers in the Proms programme this year. But why is so much of their work banished outside the Royal Albert Hall?The Proms began in 1895 as the brainchild of impresario Robert Newman and conductor Henry Wood. “Democratising the message of music” was, in Wood’s words, the aim of this cheap summer season of orchestral concerts. When the festival was threatened by financial catastrophe in 1927, it was one of the great enlightened acts of the young BBC to take it on and subsume it into its own work. The annual arrival of
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The Guardian view on European elections: one continent, one ballot | Editorial 21 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on European elections: one continent, one ballot | Editorial
In the shadow of Brexit, Britain has become one front in a pan-continental battle for the soul of the European projectElections to the European parliament can be awkward for admirers of the EU. A ballot in every member state is the most directly democratic feature of the union’s institutional architecture and such a poll should, in theory, bind millions of people in a sense of collective political enterprise. In practice, it rarely feels that way. Awareness of the parliament’s functions is thin. Turnout is low. Parties tend to reserve their best candidates for domestic races. An election of apparently minor consequence invites protest voting, which yield MEPs who have no interest in doing the job properly.
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The Guardian view on the bombings in Sri Lanka: fear and hope | Editorial 21 Apr 11:20am The Guardian view on the bombings in Sri Lanka: fear and hope | Editorial
The worst violence in a decade has struck the heart of a nationThe message of Easter is a message of hope – that most vital yet fragile of qualities, both an instinct and a choice. The
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The Observer view on climate change protesters: their voice must be heard | Observer editorial 21 Apr 1:00am The Observer view on climate change protesters: their voice must be heard | Observer editorial
The stakes have never been higher – a radical movement such as Extinction Rebellion can act as a catalyst for political debate and changeFor decades, we have faced an incontrovertible truth: that human lifestyles are risking the future habitability of our planet. For decades, political leaders have invoked rousing rhetoric in the face of this challenge while failing to act to avert catastrophe. Climate change is an existential risk to the future and the window available to prevent disastrous overheating is closing rapidly. Only now, almost 30 years after the International Panel on Climate Change published its first report setting out the scientific evidence, is there any sense that something may be shifting in popular and political perceptions. Extinction Rebellion protesters have brought parts of central London
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The Observer view on the Mueller report: Trump is a disgrace and is not welcome in Britain | Observer editorial 21 Apr 1:00am The Observer view on the Mueller report: Trump is a disgrace and is not welcome in Britain | Observer editorial
The president has been shown to be the biggest threat to US governance since Watergate. Britain must not honour this dishonourable man with a state visitThe prospect of Donald Trump making a
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The Guardian view on Lyra McKee’s murder: she should have been the future | Editorial 19 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on Lyra McKee’s murder: she should have been the future | Editorial
The death of a young journalist at the hands of dissident republicans is a tragedy linked to the province’s ongoing political crisisThe murder of the 29-year-old Northern Irish journalist and author
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The Guardian view on switching off: seize the day – your smartphone can wait | Editorial 19 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on switching off: seize the day – your smartphone can wait | Editorial
The long weekend is a rare chance for unmediated contact with the world and with our friends. Don’t miss itSpring has come to the UK. The weather invites us to feel it on the skin and not through a window or a screen. Get out there into it, and go there without a phone – unless you’re walking in the mountains and might need to contact the emergency services. For the rest of us, being without a phone is not in itself an emergency, even though it might feel like one at first. Phones do provide us with helpful information all the time. They keep us oriented in the physical world, and position us in the social world, albeit while sharing all this with advertisers. But life was possible without them even as recently as 10 years ago, and sometimes it is worth a visit to that lost age when maps were made of paper and video was something people watched together. There are two reasons at least for trying to make time away from screens this bank holiday. The first is that it is, and ought to be, a true break from work. Anyone who works in an office knows now that email, messaging and phone calls mean that both the office itself and the people who want to deal with it can follow you anywhere, at any time. There is never a moment when you can feel that you have actually accomplished everything that could reasonably be expected.
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The Guardian view on the Mueller report: now we see it. What next? | Editorial 18 Apr 3:20pm The Guardian view on the Mueller report: now we see it. What next? | Editorial
It is no surprise that the document bears little resemblance to that portrayed by the Trump administration. It must not be allowed to draw a line beneath itFinally we have heard
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TThe Guardian view on Britain and the EU elections: get together to stay together | Editorial 18 Apr 1:25pm TThe Guardian view on Britain and the EU elections: get together to stay together | Editorial
There is a public majority against Brexit. The political parties must cooperate to ensure that its voice is heard in any electionsIf they take place,
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The Guardian view on climate change campaigners: suited or superglued, we need them all | Editorial 17 Apr 1:42pm The Guardian view on climate change campaigners: suited or superglued, we need them all | Editorial
The cause is being taken up in the corridors of power. We still need activists outside on the streetsWhen Mark Carney
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The Guardian view on the Palace of Westminster: renovate it – and our democracy | Editorial 17 Apr 1:41pm The Guardian view on the Palace of Westminster: renovate it – and our democracy | Editorial
The dangerous dilapidation of the Houses of Parliament can no longer be ignored. They must be restored and modernised before catastrophe strikesThe physical state of the Palace of Westminster – its confusing warrens of corridors and staircases, its arcane rituals and atmosphere, its leaking roofs, its dreadful plumbing – has become bound up with a general dissatisfaction with the state of British politics. The metaphors pile up without effort: there is an urge, understandable at times, to write off the building as well as the parliament that sits within it, condemning both as worthless and outmoded. This is unfair, not only to the public-service ethics of the vast majority of parliamentarians, but to the building itself. The palace is a Unesco world heritage site, an architectural masterpiece and a historical locus of almost inestimable value. Though most of the Gothic structure was designed by Charles Barry and Augustus Pugin in the 19th century, the palace also contains the 11th-century Westminster Hall and the 13th-century Saint Stephen’s chapel, sole survivals of a catastrophic fire in 1834 that tore through the rest of the buildings.
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The Guardian view on resurrecting Notre Dame: the struggle for meaning | Editorial 16 Apr 1:41pm The Guardian view on resurrecting Notre Dame: the struggle for meaning | Editorial
Catholic conservatives are trying to recruit the disaster as a symbol of their cause. They will failTo be a Christian is to be attentive to signs of God’s action in the world, and this is especially true in Holy Week and at Easter, when – the faithful believe – Jesus by his death and resurrection revealed the nature of God’s relationship with humanity. For some Christians, the most important part of the lesson is that Jesus accepted death and offered his innocence as a gift; for others, or at other times, the point is that the gift was accepted and he was in the end resurrected. Either way, the symbolism has been unavoidable in reactions to the dreadful blaze in
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The Guardian view on rights for renters: only the start | Editorial 16 Apr 1:40pm The Guardian view on rights for renters: only the start | Editorial
A consultation on scrapping no-fault evictions and introducing new safeguards for tenants is welcome – but not enoughHome is not an address. It is a feeling. Millions of people have the keys to a property, yet enjoy none of the security we associate with the word “home” because their housing is not decent, safe and affordable, or because they have no idea how long they may remain there. Private renters are particularly vulnerable. The proportion of private tenants in England doubled in the first decade or so of this century, to around a fifth of the population. The proportion of their incomes consumed by rent also increased sharply. So did the amount that
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The Guardian view on the Catholic church: trouble ahead | Editorial 15 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Catholic church: trouble ahead | Editorial
The rightwing assault on Pope Francis continues. But his opponents are unlikely to succeedJesus entered Jerusalem a week before his death as if he were the messiah, pushing through adoring crowds who sang and waved palm fronds – at least that’s what the story says. By this criterion at least, Pope Francis is further from Jesus than most popes have been. He entered Holy Week this year battered by assaults from the right wing of the American church, the Italian government, and even his immediate predecessor, the former pope Benedict XVI, who published a
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The Guardian view on Tiger Woods’ return: golf needed some good news | Editorial 15 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Tiger Woods’ return: golf needed some good news | Editorial
A new book shows that the American president cheats and lies on the golf course. On Sunday the game got its honour back It helps to enjoy golf, of course. But, in spite of the sport’s traducers, lots of people of all kinds do just that. Even those who don’t, though, could surely scarce forbear to cheer on Sunday as Tiger Woods
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The Guardian view on MPs and Brexit: this is no time to disengage | Editorial 14 Apr 1:35pm The Guardian view on MPs and Brexit: this is no time to disengage | Editorial
Britain must decide within five weeks whether to hold EU elections. There are big decisions to face before then, even though parliament is in recessIt is a reasonable bet that a fair proportion of readers don’t want to think about Brexit at all right now. It would be very understandable if that’s the case. Brexit politics has meant relentlessly hard pounding ever since the new year. Now there’s a brief hiatus. Parliament is
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The Guardian view on Extinction Rebellion: one small step | Editorial 14 Apr 1:34pm The Guardian view on Extinction Rebellion: one small step | Editorial
Disrupting traffic is not enough – we must disrupt our progress towards climate catastropheThe planned choking of traffic in central London on Monday by climate activists of
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The Observer view on extraditing Julian Assange | Observer editorial 14 Apr 1:20am The Observer view on extraditing Julian Assange | Observer editorial
Sending the WikiLeaks founder to face charges in the US would be a disaster for press freedom It’s not difficult to despise Julian Assange. For seven years, he has attempted to evade rape and sexual assault charges in Sweden by seeking asylum in the Ecuadorian embassy in London. He has dismissed the charges as
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The Observer view on giving voters their say on Brexit | Observer editorial 14 Apr 1:00am The Observer view on giving voters their say on Brexit | Observer editorial
Politicians cannot be trusted to agree on anything within the next six months. They should leave it to the voters‘Please do not waste this time,”
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The Guardian view on the Amritsar massacre centenary: time to see ourselves as others see us | Editorial 12 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Amritsar massacre centenary: time to see ourselves as others see us | Editorial
Britain is too cautious about facing its complex past. The result is that Britain fails to understand its futureTheresa May did two significant things this week. The first, her decision to postpone Brexit, is the dominant story of the times. The second has received less attention. At prime minister’s questions, Mrs May prefaced her answers by talking about the “shameful scar on British Indian history” of the killings at
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The Guardian view on the first picture of a black hole: seeing is believing | Editorial 12 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on the first picture of a black hole: seeing is believing | Editorial
Scientists have shown us one of the mysteries of the universe, and the extraordinary power of human cooperation“If you work on something like theoretical physics, you feel like you’re trapped inside a room, and outside people don’t know,” the physicist Carlo Rovelli said recently. While the stereotype of a space scientist is of a loner out of step with the humdrum of everyday life, Mr Rovelli is not alone in believing that his life’s work is not just to find things out, but to communicate. This week’s
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The Guardian view on the Brexit impasse: trust citizens to judge the evidence | Editorial 11 Apr 1:47pm The Guardian view on the Brexit impasse: trust citizens to judge the evidence | Editorial
The familiar methods of British politics have failed to find a solution. Parliament must have the confidence to innovateExtending the time available to make a decision does not increase the range of Brexit options, but it allows for a more honest account of those choices and perhaps a more deliberative, less aggressively partisan evaluation of their merits. The real opportunity represented by the
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The Guardian view on Assange and extradition: say no to the US | Editorial 11 Apr 1:47pm The Guardian view on Assange and extradition: say no to the US | Editorial
The WikiLeaks founder must be held accountable for skipping bail. But extradition to America over this case would be wrongOn Thursday, British police bundled
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The Guardian view on Britain in Europe: an inevitable partnership | Editorial 10 Apr 1:34pm The Guardian view on Britain in Europe: an inevitable partnership | Editorial
Brexit delay will force the UK to confront the fact that its future is intertwined with the European projectFor three years, Brexit arguments have, naturally enough, focused on the impact that leaving the European Union might have on Britain. Less attention has been paid to the effect of Britain’s departure on the rest of Europe. That is about to change. The response of European neighbours to choices forced on them by the UK is getting harder to ignore. A
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The Guardian view on the Israeli elections: further down the wrong road | Editorial 10 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Israeli elections: further down the wrong road | Editorial
Benjamin Netanyahu is on course to become his country’s longest-serving prime minister, for the worst reasonsIt should be astonishing that a prime minister can
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The Guardian view on crowdfunding schools: lessons in unfairness | Editorial 9 Apr 1:26pm The Guardian view on crowdfunding schools: lessons in unfairness | Editorial
Individual acts of philanthropy, however inspiring, are not the solution to the current crisisFrom sponsored bike rides to tombolas and auctions, fundraising drives are part of the fabric of our lives. They can help to strengthen social ties as well as raising money – as when parents bond with teachers across tables loaded with jumble or cakes. Funds raised in this way have long provided valuable extracurricular extras for schools, helping to pay for trips or special projects such as pantomimes or gardens. And there is no reason why communities should not seek to add to the resources supplied by the state. What they cannot do, and should not be forced to attempt, is compensate for the state’s shortcomings. When schools are forced to fundraise for essentials such as pencils, no amount of the goodwill associated with donations can disguise the underlying problem. Yet an
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The Guardian view on Julian Assange: it would be wrong to extradite him | Editorial 9 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Julian Assange: it would be wrong to extradite him | Editorial
The WikiLeaks founder has been in Ecuador’s embassy in London since 2012. Clear judgment will be required if he now leaves his self-imposed retreatIt is almost seven years since the WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange skipped bail and
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No-deal Brexit fears over medication supplies | Letter 9 Apr 12:50pm No-deal Brexit fears over medication supplies | Letter
Given that we are currently due to exit the European Union this Friday without a deal, the issue of safe access to medication is broader than just epilepsyWe were both interviewed by BBC Newsnight last week for a report on no-deal preparations for pharmaceuticals, and profoundly disagree with the assessment by the Department of Health that it was Brexit scaremongering. Newsnight made the editorial decision not to name the drug or drug company involved. We agree with that decision, as it should be the DH’s responsibility to be open and transparent about where there are delays and the reasons why. For example, on Friday, the department circulated guidance from the Epilepsy Society stating that there was six weeks’ supply stockpiled of my medication, which contradicts the confidential advice from NHS England that was the basis of the Newsnight story. Only one of these statements can be true.
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The Guardian view on online harms: white paper, grey areas | Editorial 8 Apr 1:47pm The Guardian view on online harms: white paper, grey areas | Editorial
The internet needs regulation. People and societies need protection. But this will be harder than the government’s new white paper makes it lookThe internet has added a new dimension to the spaces of imagination in which we all live, and the problems of the offline world have moved there, too. This did not once seem an urgent problem, but in the last five years there has been a revolution of attitude around the world away from the anarchic culture encouraged by US law; at the other extreme is the very tight censorship imposed in China, where one popular startup employs as many people on content moderation as it does selling advertising. The white paper
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The Guardian view on Brexit delay: there is still a way forward | Editorial 8 Apr 1:47pm The Guardian view on Brexit delay: there is still a way forward | Editorial
Britain is days away from crashing out of the EU with no deal. It is vital – and possible – to prevent that from happeningIt has come to this – and it is scary. As things stand, Britain will leave the European Union on Friday without either a withdrawal agreement or any kind of plan for future relations. It is hard to exaggerate the destructive seriousness of that possibility for Britain.
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The Guardian view on no deal: Theresa May must expose it as a fantasy | Editorial 7 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on no deal: Theresa May must expose it as a fantasy | Editorial
The idea of a clean break from Europe is a dangerous dream, but remainers who say as much are not believed. The grownup leavers must now speak outIt is difficult to choose the worst of Theresa May’s decisions on the path that has led to our predicament this week: her government is now suspended like
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The Guardian view on Turkey and Erdoğan: a weakened strongman | Editorial 7 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Turkey and Erdoğan: a weakened strongman | Editorial
The opposition’s dramatic advance in local elections has sent a powerful message to the presidentStrongmen are not invincible. The stunning news that the Turkish opposition had surged to victory in local elections – as startling to the opposition itself as anyone – is on hold following
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The Observer view on Benjamin Netanyahu and Israel’s elections | Observer editorial 7 Apr 1:00am The Observer view on Benjamin Netanyahu and Israel’s elections | Observer editorial
The Israeli leaders confrontational style has cut the country off from its friends and exposed its citizens to harm The likelihood that Benjamin Netanyahu will emerge victorious after Israel’s election on Tuesday is doubtless pleasing for his rightwing supporters and his oleaginous pal in the White House. But it is a worrying prospect for the country and the Middle East as a whole. Mr Netanyahu has dominated domestic politics
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The Observer view on Brexit: it’s our political system, not just MPs, that is failing us | Observer editorial 7 Apr 12:59am The Observer view on Brexit: it’s our political system, not just MPs, that is failing us | Observer editorial
Both Labour and the Tories have put party management before the national interest Brexit has prompted a recurring nightmare among an increasingly incredulous population: our very own Groundhog Day. Two weeks after the EU granted us an 11th-hour extension to prevent us crashing out without a deal, we are back in exactly the same position. The only thing standing between us and next Friday’s cliff edge is the hope the EU gifts us another extension. Meanwhile, the political turmoil engulfing the country worsens, the two main parties increasingly consumed by division and disarray and the political leadership we so desperately need to avert crisis as elusive as ever. It’s hard to believe that the Westminster model of democracy was one prized by constitutional theorists for the stability it purportedly delivers. As the stakes get higher, our political system has proved less and less capable of delivering a resolution to the gridlock that has infected Westminster.
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The Guardian view on the gender pay gap: acts must follow facts | Editorial 5 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on the gender pay gap: acts must follow facts | Editorial
Naming and shaming employers who pay men far more than women is important, but progress requires policy as well as dataKnowing that there is a gender pay gap is one thing. Shrinking it is something else. When the UK government introduced compulsory reporting of the difference between men’s and women’s pay by companies employing more than 250 people, the hope was that publishing the data would lead to action. Announcing what he called a “
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The Guardian view on online politics: transparency is essential | Editorial 5 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on online politics: transparency is essential | Editorial
Democracy needs strengthening when parties are replaced by opaque lobby groups in an age of social mediaThe Guardian’s revelation that Facebook campaigns which appear to be spontaneous outpourings of popular sentiment are
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The Guardian view on the parties’ Brexit talks: to agree is to split | Editorial 4 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on the parties’ Brexit talks: to agree is to split | Editorial
A plumbing failure at Westminster brought a soggy end to proceedings. Everything else is getting harderIt felt like a timely metaphor. Maybe it was even a divine judgment. In fact it was caused by a humble plumbing failure from above, rather than a weightier verdict from the same quarter. Even so, few
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The Guardian view on Brunei and stoning: don’t leave it to celebrities to act | Editorial 4 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Brunei and stoning: don’t leave it to celebrities to act | Editorial
Brunei’s shocking new penal code must be challenged – through deeds as well as words. Britain’s responsibilities are clearBrunei’s introduction of new laws
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The Guardian view on Brexit radicalisation: take time, lower the temperature | Editorial 3 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on Brexit radicalisation: take time, lower the temperature | Editorial
Brexiters may well be frustrated but their rhetoric of betrayal, sabotage and treason is fuelling a dangerously febrile atmosphereIt is a measure of how fevered British politics has become that many MPs speak of holding elections to the European parliament as a calamity to be avoided at all costs. It would certainly be an unusual exercise for a country committed to leaving the EU, but there are worse things that could happen to a democracy than its citizens having an opportunity to vote. The UK could be
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The Guardian view on Algeria’s ousted president: what next? | Editorial 3 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Algeria’s ousted president: what next? | Editorial
Protesters have forced the departure of Abdelaziz Bouteflika. But that may prove to be the easy partThe scenes of jubilation on the streets of Algeria on Tuesday night had vivid, almost uncanny echoes of events in the region eight years ago. A wave of protest in a youthful country has
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The Guardian view on May’s Brexit offer to Corbyn: years too late | Editorial 2 Apr 3:21pm The Guardian view on May’s Brexit offer to Corbyn: years too late | Editorial
The prime minister’s offer to Labour’s leader seems designed to share the blame rather than the gloryTheresa May’s
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The Guardian view on fiction vending machines: attention seekers | Editorial 2 Apr 2:00pm The Guardian view on fiction vending machines: attention seekers | Editorial
If they succeed in distracting commuters from their smartphones, short story dispensers will be a welcome addition to the landscapeCan
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The Guardian view on Brexit votes: put nation before party | Editorial 1 Apr 4:46pm The Guardian view on Brexit votes: put nation before party | Editorial
MPs offer a grown-up response to the chaos while hard Brexiters see the crisis as a way of getting people to vote against their economic interests. Which will sway Mrs May?It is a matter of national shame that the civil war in the Conservative party led to the United Kingdom voting to leave the European Union. That war continues today. The split is now between
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The Guardian view on school exclusions: the wrong answer | Editorial 1 Apr 2:38pm The Guardian view on school exclusions: the wrong answer | Editorial
A steep rise in the number of primary-age children in pupil referral units is proof that inclusion needs a boost – and new resourcesIt has taken a few years, but awareness of the rising number of pupils being excluded from English schools has grown to the point where the problem has become impossible to ignore. In the process, observers have become wiser to the methods used by schools seeking to expel awkward children without resorting to the formal last resort of permanent exclusion. Ofsted chief Amanda Spielman has made
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The Guardian view on Brexit’s imbroglio: MPs offer a way out | Editorial 31 Mar 1:25pm The Guardian view on Brexit’s imbroglio: MPs offer a way out | Editorial
Restoring the sovereignty of parliament was a major aim of Brexit. Mrs May could honour that by accepting what the Commons votes forThis week MPs
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The Guardian view on antidepressant use: no cure-all | Editorial 31 Mar 1:24pm The Guardian view on antidepressant use: no cure-all | Editorial
The record number of pills being handed out for depression is a cause of concern, especially when access to other treatments is restrictedAlmost
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The Observer view: malign ideas driving child poverty haunt Brexit debate | Observer editorial 30 Mar 2:00pm The Observer view: malign ideas driving child poverty haunt Brexit debate | Observer editorial
Theresa May says parliament is preventing her from fixing the country’s social ills, but the mess was caused by Tory austerityBritain is the fifth richest country in the world. Yet figures out last week show that more than 4 million children – almost one in three – are living below the relative poverty line. That’s one in three children growing up in families that face a daily struggle to make ends meet, where parents sometimes have to go without to ensure their children can eat and where the cost of school uniforms can
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s defeat: three strikes and out | Editorial 29 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s defeat: three strikes and out | Editorial
The majority against the prime minister’s Brexit deal was smaller than last time but still decisive. The deal is dead. It’s time for a new approach Theresa May’s third successive
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The Guardian view on killing speed: a sensible restriction | Editorial 29 Mar 2:25pm The Guardian view on killing speed: a sensible restriction | Editorial
Speeding, one of the pleasures of modern life, will soon become technologically impossible. We will be well rid of itDriving fast on a clear road is for many people one of the pleasures of modern life. It seems to express all the feelings of power and autonomy that the daily grind so cruelly denies us. Speed limits then become just another petty restriction to be shoved aside by people glorying in their proper freedom. But now, it seems, all this is to come to an end. A
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The Guardian view on a symbolic Brexit date: May’s last stand | Editorial 28 Mar 2:33pm The Guardian view on a symbolic Brexit date: May’s last stand | Editorial
The prime minister is now going through the motions of executive power as events slip quickly from her graspThe effects of Britain leaving the EU are not determined by the day on which it might happen. It is the terms of a deal that matter. But 29 March has unique symbolism as the date on which Brexit was supposed to happen and the missing of that deadline at 11pm this Friday night carries political and cultural significance. For ardent leavers, it is a betrayal – the refusal of parliament to honour the referendum instruction. For remainers, it is a relief – proof that MPs will not countenance a chaotic no-deal Brexit. No one denies that it is a symptom of failure. The article 50 window was not designed to be spacious. Its constraints presented a reason to begin negotiations only with a destination in mind and to aspire for national consensus on what it should be. Theresa May got that wrong and refused to correct the error for two years. She squandered her time, yet still craves the consolation of a
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The Guardian view on Tory Islamophobia: inaction speaks volumes | Editorial 28 Mar 2:27pm The Guardian view on Tory Islamophobia: inaction speaks volumes | Editorial
The party’s refusal to tackle anti-Muslim prejudice is even more troubling after the Christchurch killingsA fortnight after the
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The Guardian view on May’s resignation offer: a stitch-up for a bad deal | Editorial 27 Mar 5:54pm The Guardian view on May’s resignation offer: a stitch-up for a bad deal | Editorial
Once again, vital questions about the future of the country are being submerged in the murky waters of internal Tory party politicsThere is not much logic in supporting a plan on the condition that the one person who thinks it a good plan resigns – except in the Conservative party. In a bid to win hardline Eurosceptic support for her Brexit deal,
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The Guardian view on kissing the pope’s ring: the power of symbols | Editorial 27 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on kissing the pope’s ring: the power of symbols | Editorial
All government rests on obedience but democracy requires independent thought as well. How to reconcile them?Pope Francis wishes the faithful would
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The revolt at the Vatican shows the church is still failing women | Tina Beattie 27 Mar 2:00am The revolt at the Vatican shows the church is still failing women | Tina Beattie
Pope Francis has not brought about the reforms he once talked of, and now a magazine editor has thrown in the towelThe editor of the Vatican women’s magazine, Lucetta Scaraffia, has announced that she and her all-female editorial team are to
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The Guardian view on Brexit’s revolution: eating its own | Editorial 26 Mar 2:32pm The Guardian view on Brexit’s revolution: eating its own | Editorial
Brexiters will not say leaving the EU is a mistake, but it’s time they admitted there will be a bill to pick up For many Brexiters, the European Union was not an institutional arrangement that eased trade, immigration and political disputes; it was nothing short of a conspiracy to sap money from the United Kingdom to Brussels, construct an
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The Guardian view on segregated playgrounds: sand and fury | Editorial 26 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on segregated playgrounds: sand and fury | Editorial
New flats where the children of social tenants have separate swings is a reminder of everything that is wrong with housing policy Our report about a housing development in south London with
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The Guardian view on parliament and Brexit: take back control | Editorial 25 Mar 2:54pm The Guardian view on parliament and Brexit: take back control | Editorial
By refusing to compromise with MPs over her Brexit plan, Theresa May sinks her premiershipBrexit is a revolution, so expect revolutionary consequences. It
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The Guardian view on the Mueller report: release it in full | Editorial 25 Mar 2:48pm The Guardian view on the Mueller report: release it in full | Editorial
Donald Trump can only be defeated when Democrats understand why he wonOnly Donald Trump could describe as
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Special educational needs require inclusion | Letters 25 Mar 1:54pm Special educational needs require inclusion | Letters
Guardian readers respond to an editorial on how the government is failing pupils with learning disabilitiesThere may well be a “showdown” between parents and the government where special educational needs is concerned, but posing the problem simply as “inclusion” versus “segregation” obscures as much as it illuminates (
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The Guardian view on Conservative crisis: made by Brexit | Editorial 24 Mar 2:49pm The Guardian view on Conservative crisis: made by Brexit | Editorial
The main political parties are split and unable to contain the destructive fallout of the populist politics of leaving the EUTheresa May has not been honest about the withdrawal agreement she negotiated with the European Union. She repeatedly said it was the only one on the table. She now
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The Guardian view on statistics in sciences: gaming the (un)known | Editorial 24 Mar 2:35pm The Guardian view on statistics in sciences: gaming the (un)known | Editorial
Statisticians are calling on their profession to abandon one of its most treasured markers of significance. But what could replace it?Statistical arguments are a crucial part of decision-making in a modern society. The kind of decisions that governments and large companies must make all the time are governed by probabilities. In those circumstances of uncertain knowledge we need to reduce a cloud of unknowing to facts as hard and cold as hailstones that can be acted on, or even just used in arguments. But some of the most popular techniques for doing this are now under attack from within the profession. The p value is supposed to measure whether the conclusions drawn from any given experiment or investigation of data are reliable. It actually measures how unlikely the observed result is compared with what would be expected as a result of random chance. Obviously this requires a sophisticated understanding of the results that chance might be expected to produce. This isn’t always available. To take one popular example, any calculation of how
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The Observer view of Matt Hancock’s cancer gaffe | Observer editorial 24 Mar 2:22am The Observer view of Matt Hancock’s cancer gaffe | Observer editorial
The health secretary’s remarks about prostate cancer are the latest in a long line of ministerial blundersWe are ruled by a government that has, in a very short time, acquired a striking reputation for the crassness of its members’ utterances and actions. Examples include Northern Ireland secretary
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The Observer view: the people have marched; now MPs must take up the challenge | Observer editorial 23 Mar 11:20am The Observer view: the people have marched; now MPs must take up the challenge | Observer editorial
Parliament has to act now to stop Theresa May’s desperate deal ‘You want this Brexit process to be over and done with.” Last Wednesday, Theresa May presumed to
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The Guardian view on the People’s Vote march: a force for good | Editorial 22 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on the People’s Vote march: a force for good | Editorial
The protest on the streets of London will show that the prime minister cannot define the public. They have a will and opinions of their ownSixteen years ago, Tony Blair watched a million people march past Downing Street, imploring him not to join US president George W Bush in invading Iraq. Mr Blair, in the words of one writer this week, “
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The Guardian view on history: don’t take its name in vain | Editorial 22 Mar 2:25pm The Guardian view on history: don’t take its name in vain | Editorial
Politicians claiming to know how the present will be judged should be treated with scepticism. The truth is, nobody doesIt would hardly now be surprising if the ranks of those mustered round the clock at Westminster to air their views about Brexit were to be joined next week by one of those who has the most right to feel aggrieved about these proceedings: History. Throughout the process, poor History has been having words roughly crammed into its mouth by all and sundry. Angela Merkel is said to have done this on Thursday, warning Emmanuel Macron that history would judge the EU harshly if it failed to handle things sympathetically. Yet Mrs Merkel is at least a great world figure. The same can hardly be said for the backbench Conservative member Peter Bone, of whom History’s team of advisers (Herodotus, Jules Michelet and AJP Taylor) have said they have no knowledge. Mr Bone, others may remember, assured the prime minister in the Commons this week that
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s broadcast: a form of national sabotage | Editorial 21 Mar 2:36pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s broadcast: a form of national sabotage | Editorial
The prime minister’s inflexibility and tactical ineptitude have just hit a new low, at the very time that Britain faces a grave national emergencyWhen she put herself forward to lead the Conservative party in 2016,
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The Guardian view on rewilding Scotland: an immodest proposal | Editorial 21 Mar 2:36pm The Guardian view on rewilding Scotland: an immodest proposal | Editorial
If undertaken in the right spirit, the restoration of huge tracts of the Highlands could be a hugely beneficial enterpriseWhat exactly is meant by rewilding depends on who is talking about it. The term was coined by Dave Foreman, a leading figure in the 1980s wave of environmental direct action in the US, to describe the kind of large-scale wilderness restoration he and others advocated. Their idea was that conservationists should move beyond trying to protect particular beauty spots or species, and focus on rebuilding ecosystems that could sustain themselves with minimal human interference. Since then,
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The Guardian view on Theresa May and Brexit: a prime minister gone rogue | Editorial 20 Mar 2:31pm The Guardian view on Theresa May and Brexit: a prime minister gone rogue | Editorial
Theresa May has put no deal firmly back on the table in flagrant defiance of parliament and the dictates of responsible governmentTo achieve anything in EU diplomacy it helps to speak European. That does not require a command of continental languages. What matters, when dealing at the highest level in Brussels, is an ability to acknowledge the common political and economic interests that underpin the whole European project. Theresa May has no fluency in that idiom. She cannot even fake it. Since becoming prime minister, her relations with the EU have been marked by tin-eared diplomacy. She is bad enough at cultivating relationships in Westminster. In Brussels she has none.
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The Guardian view on regulating porn: wrong step, right direction | Editorial 20 Mar 2:31pm The Guardian view on regulating porn: wrong step, right direction | Editorial
Damaging both to the producers and the consumers, online pornography is finally being tackledSuccessive governments have been under pressure to control
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The Guardian view on the Brexit crisis: take back control by giving it up | Editorial 19 Mar 2:37pm The Guardian view on the Brexit crisis: take back control by giving it up | Editorial
The prime minister will only a get a grip on the Brexit crisis by learning to loosening hers on the terms of departure from the EUAlmost two years after Theresa May triggered article 50 it is still
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The Guardian view on weather forecasts: we need the bigger picture | Editorial 19 Mar 2:36pm The Guardian view on weather forecasts: we need the bigger picture | Editorial
Climate must not be confused with local conditions, but remodelled broadcasts could help people understand the dangers we faceStill, and in defiance of decades worth of scientific evidence, vast numbers of people around the world refuse to accept that we are in the process of drastically altering the climate. Vast numbers more lack the information they need to interpret what is going on. This is a global problem whose importance cannot be overstated. It has no single solution. But giving up on trying to halt the damage to life on our planet is not an option. And in this context, this week’s suggestion by the former BBC weather presenter
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The Guardian view on Speaker Bercow: on parliament’s side | Editorial 18 Mar 3:07pm The Guardian view on Speaker Bercow: on parliament’s side | Editorial
The Commons equivalent of the double jeopardy rule is rightly invoked to impose sense on a government elevating a plebiscitary politics over a parliamentary oneThis country has been in a political and constitutional quandary since the results of the Brexit referendum in June 2016. Today the crisis deepened in a dramatic and decisive way. The Commons Speaker John Bercow said he was
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The Guardian view on special educational needs: segregation is not the answer | Editorial 18 Mar 3:05pm The Guardian view on special educational needs: segregation is not the answer | Editorial
As the proportion of SEN children in alternative schools continues to rise, it’s time to stand up for inclusionA showdown between parents of children with special needs and the government is coming. Three families from different parts of England have won the
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s Brexit deal: third time unlucky | Editorial 17 Mar 2:33pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s Brexit deal: third time unlucky | Editorial
The prime minister is poised to try again. But whether she wins or loses the vote on her deal, she has lost the argumentBack in February, ITV’s Angus Walker
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The Guardian view on Xinjiang’s detention camps: not just China’s shame | Editorial 17 Mar 2:29pm The Guardian view on Xinjiang’s detention camps: not just China’s shame | Editorial
Vast numbers of Uighurs and other Muslim minorities are being held in detention. The world must speak outAn “A-list” comedian, well-known singers, scholars, pensioners and civil servants – the
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The Observer view on the school climate strikes: it’s shameful that children need to take the lead | Observer editorial 17 Mar 2:00am The Observer view on the school climate strikes: it’s shameful that children need to take the lead | Observer editorial
Children are right to call politicians to account over a global crisisFor those who care passionately about our planet’s future, these are dispiriting times. Fossil fuel emissions, which are now causing our world to overheat dangerously, continue to rise despite scientists’ clear warnings about the likely consequences: melting ice sheets, rising sea levels, unprecedented storms, acidifying oceans and spreading deserts. Such forecasts should have spurred global action a long time ago. Yet politicians across the world have consistently refused to act and for decades have procrastinated, discounting evidence that clearly shows global warming is already affecting our planet. Many factors account for this inaction. Lobbying by oil and gas companies obsessed with short-term gain has certainly been involved. Others have argued that only God can have a planet-wide influence and that humanity is being presumptuous in believing it could alter a global ecosystem. In addition, there are those who believe bids to introduce limits on coal and oil burning are simply the work of leftwing, anti-capitalist conspirators.
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The Observer view on the Christchurch shootings: we’ve been too slow to see the far right threat| Observer editorial 17 Mar 1:59am The Observer view on the Christchurch shootings: we’ve been too slow to see the far right threat| Observer editorial
We need to reflect on the role that even mainstream parties and the media play in spreading racist attitudesAfter so many attacks over so many years, we have become inured to terrorist atrocities. This in itself is a tragedy. Yet even after so much previous bloodshed in the name of hate-filled ideologies, the murder of 49 men, women and children at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, on Friday has spread shock and disgust around the globe. There is something particularly appalling about targeting people for their faith, as they engage in the act of worship.
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The Guardian view on the Christchurch attacks: extremism’s rising danger | Editorial 15 Mar 2:39pm Updated The Guardian view on the Christchurch attacks: extremism’s rising danger | Editorial
The far right seeks to divide. Responsible politicians ought, especially in times of grief and anger, to bring people together New Zealand is best known for its breathtaking wilderness, found in distant but secure islands at the edge of the world. On Friday that changed. Forty-nine people were
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The Guardian view on language: the flesh made word | Editorial 15 Mar 2:25pm The Guardian view on language: the flesh made word | Editorial
Teeth and tongues make the sounds of our speech, but our humanity makes its meaningsBabies have an astonishing talent that adults entirely lose. By the age of one, they can recognise the significant noises in the babble around them and group them into a language. When we have lost this capacity as adults, it becomes enormously difficult to distinguish between
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The Guardian view on Brexit delay: time to let reality in | Editorial 14 Mar 3:28pm The Guardian view on Brexit delay: time to let reality in | Editorial
Theresa May came to office without answers to European questions and looked for them in the wrong places. Her way of doing Brexit is overFor nearly two years, Britain has known when it is supposed to leave the EU. Its politics have been consumed by the question of how. There has been less exploration of why. The simplest answer is that a majority voted to do so and that their preference should, on democratic principle, be respected. But when the government has failed to find a safe Brexit path, to proceed regardless of the consequences is to risk being wantonly destructive. Just such a point of failure has been reached.
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The Guardian view on the Bloody Sunday prosecution: late but necessary | Editorial 14 Mar 2:28pm The Guardian view on the Bloody Sunday prosecution: late but necessary | Editorial
Northern Ireland’s director of public prosecutions is to charge one soldier with murder and attempted murder over the 1972 killings. But this is not just a question of historyIt is now approaching half a century since Bloody Sunday, when British troops fired on civil rights demonstrators in Derry. The killings not only left families distraught but, as the brother of one victim observed on Thursday, deepened and widened the conflict in Northern Ireland. The Widgery tribunal of the same year compounded anger. It took more than 25 years, and the peace process, for the British government to commission another inquiry. In 2010 Lord Saville finally delivered his devastating report. A lengthy police inquiry followed. Now one former paratrooper is to
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The Guardian view on Tory no-dealers: not serious, still dangerous | Editorial 13 Mar 4:25pm The Guardian view on Tory no-dealers: not serious, still dangerous | Editorial
MPs who embrace impossible, reckless Brexit ideas have forfeited their right to shape the debate about what happens nextRegardless of how many MPs reject the idea of a no-deal Brexit, or how often, the legal fact remains that Britain’s EU membership expires on 29 March. Parliament cannot unilaterally change the date, so the British government is as dependent on a functional dialogue with the EU in the aftermath of Theresa May’s deal having been rejected as it was when the deal was being negotiated. That should be obvious, but a remarkable number of MPs still appear not to understand basic facts about Brexit. Conservatives in particular struggle to process the point that a Brexit plan cooked up in a Westminster corridor is worthless if there is no prospect of it being viable in Brussels.
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The Guardian view on ending austerity: in rhetoric alone | Editorial 13 Mar 2:52pm The Guardian view on ending austerity: in rhetoric alone | Editorial
If the Tories want to end austerity, they will have to focus on ending the lived experience of it
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s Brexit: pause it and rethink | Editorial 12 Mar 4:42pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s Brexit: pause it and rethink | Editorial
The UK ought not be precipitously hassled out of the EU by a Conservative party on the verge of a nervous breakdownNo prime minister likes to
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The Guardian view on humanities degrees: art for society’s sake | Editorial 12 Mar 2:54pm The Guardian view on humanities degrees: art for society’s sake | Editorial
To reduce tuition fees while providing top-up grants only for sciences would distort higher education. We need history, poetry and French as well as Stem subjectsThe
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The Guardian view on the world wide web: we wove a tangle | Editorial 11 Mar 5:01pm The Guardian view on the world wide web: we wove a tangle | Editorial
Thirty years ago, a physicist dreamed up a way to organise information from multiple computers all on one screen. The world will never be the sameFor once, the hype was justified. The world wide web really did transform the world in a way that can be compared to the impact of the printing press, or the mass media of the 20th century. The internet existed before the web, of course, but it was hardly used. The genius of Tim Berners-Lee was to glimpse, 30 years ago this week, how it might
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The Guardian view on the Israeli elections: Netanyahu debases his office – again | Editorial 11 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on the Israeli elections: Netanyahu debases his office – again | Editorial
Next month’s poll is a referendum on a prime minister who has triumphed by fuelling divisionsIsrael is not a state of all its citizens, Benjamin “Bibi” Netanyahu
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The Guardian view on MPs and Brexit: time to set a new course | Editorial 10 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on MPs and Brexit: time to set a new course | Editorial
Theresa May’s attempt to trim Brexit policy to suit the Tory right and the DUP is at odds with both the national interest and what people actually wantIt is just possible that there are still a few undecided MPs who need persuading why
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The Guardian view on Pius XII: a pope not a saint | Editorial 10 Mar 2:25pm The Guardian view on Pius XII: a pope not a saint | Editorial
Some have accused him of being Hitler’s pope. The decision to open the archives will show if he was guilty of something more than indifferenceCompared with
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The Observer view on the case for a second Brexit vote remaining as strong as ever | Observer editorial 10 Mar 1:00am The Observer view on the case for a second Brexit vote remaining as strong as ever | Observer editorial
Theresa May must extend article 50 immediately to end the continued lack of certaintyIt seems barely credible but, terrifyingly, it is true. Almost two years since the
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The Observer view on the callous cuts to school funding | Observer editorial 10 Mar 12:59am The Observer view on the callous cuts to school funding | Observer editorial
The cruel economics of austerity is taking its toll on those pupils most in need and most at riskThree months ago, the education minister
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The Guardian view on ending austerity: it needs to happen | Editorial 8 Mar 1:30pm The Guardian view on ending austerity: it needs to happen | Editorial
Whatever the form Brexit eventually takes, there will need to be more public spending to repair the fraying fabric of the British stateWhen a headteacher
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The Guardian view on literature: we need the Nobel prize | Editorial 8 Mar 1:25pm The Guardian view on literature: we need the Nobel prize | Editorial
The Swedish Academy, with its credibility shattered by a scandal, could not award a prize last year. This year, it will award two. It would have been better to let the gap in the record standAfter
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The Guardian view on Karen Bradley and Northern Ireland: out of her depth | Editorial 7 Mar 1:42pm The Guardian view on Karen Bradley and Northern Ireland: out of her depth | Editorial
The Northern Ireland secretary’s remarks make Chris Grayling look like a safe pair of hands
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The Guardian view on violence against women: deeds not words are required | Editorial 7 Mar 1:41pm The Guardian view on violence against women: deeds not words are required | Editorial
International Women’s Day allows us to applaud progress, and demand more of it. But the news about domestic abuse in the UK is mainly badThe creation of the new offence of
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The Guardian view on workers’ rights: endangered by Brexit | Editorial 6 Mar 1:37pm The Guardian view on workers’ rights: endangered by Brexit | Editorial
The government’s offer to give MPs more scrutiny of changes to employment regulation is both flimsy and cynicalThe government’s offer to include new commitments on
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The Guardian view on Sudan’s protests: demanding and deserving better | Editorial 6 Mar 1:37pm The Guardian view on Sudan’s protests: demanding and deserving better | Editorial
Months of protests have demonstrated the scale and scope of anger with Omar al-Bashir’s regime. But the risks are growingMany of the Sudanese protesters demanding an end to
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The Guardian view on teenage stab victims: rising youth violence shames May’s government | Editorial 5 Mar 1:48pm The Guardian view on teenage stab victims: rising youth violence shames May’s government | Editorial
The prime minister has promised to act following two more chilling murders. But what frontline services need are resources, not meetingsThe murders of two 17-year-olds last weekend have catapulted knife crime back into news headlines. Jodie Chesney’s death stands out because she is the first girl out of
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The Guardian view on the biggest privatisation: the land beneath our feet | Editorial 5 Mar 1:47pm The Guardian view on the biggest privatisation: the land beneath our feet | Editorial
A new book helps us understand what is happening in Britain today by exposing the scale of the sell-off of the state’s estateIn her memoirs the late Margaret Thatcher
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The Guardian view on Britain’s finance curse: we must break it | Editorial 4 Mar 1:42pm The Guardian view on Britain’s finance curse: we must break it | Editorial
The government’s actions reveal a weakened Tory party more than ever in hock to a powerful City disconnected from the people it ought to serveThe government’s decision to
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The Guardian view on academic publishing: disastrous capitalism | Editorial 4 Mar 1:41pm The Guardian view on academic publishing: disastrous capitalism | Editorial
The giants of the scientific publishing industry have made huge profits for decades. Now they are under threatScientific publishing has long been a licence to print money. Scientists need journals in which to publish their research, so they will supply the articles without monetary reward. Other scientists perform the skilled and specialised work of peer review
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The Guardian view on Chris Grayling: the joke is on the voters | Editorial 3 Mar 1:30pm The Guardian view on Chris Grayling: the joke is on the voters | Editorial
Ministers must be held accountable when policies go wrong – particularly when public faith in politics is at a low ebb Fierce criticism of ministers is a normal feature of democratic politics. Such attacks can have a theatrical aspect. But it is important that substantive attacks are not dismissed as point scoring, because it matters that powerful individuals are held to account for mistakes. The
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The Guardian view on the hostile environment: the ‘right to rent’ and other wrongs | Editorial 3 Mar 1:25pm The Guardian view on the hostile environment: the ‘right to rent’ and other wrongs | Editorial
Turning landlords into border guards has been ruled illegal. But the fight against cruel anti-immigration politics goes onHalf a century ago, the British government made it illegal to refuse housing on the grounds of race. On Friday, the high court
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The Observer view on the UK’s right to rent shame | Editorial 3 Mar 1:00am The Observer view on the UK’s right to rent shame | Editorial
A scheme forcing landlords in England to act as border agents actively creates race discrimination, the high court has ruled ‘Our policy is not to sell to coloured people.” That’s what a stunned
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The Observer view: even Donald Trump’s base must doubt him now | Observer editorial 3 Mar 1:00am The Observer view: even Donald Trump’s base must doubt him now | Observer editorial
Michael Cohen’s damning testimony means that unless Trump wins the next election, he could find himself in court Donald Trump must be re-elected in 2020. Not because he is the best person to be America’s president – he manifestly is not. Not because his record qualifies him for a second term. The man responsible for the longest government shutdown in history and a reckless and dangerous approach to international affairs has already conclusively proved his unfitness to lead. Trump’s personal conduct shames the country whose people and interests he professes to serve. All this holds true. Yet it does not alter Trump’s most pressing, selfishly subjective 2020 calculation: that he must win again to be sure of staying out of jail. By convention, sitting presidents are not subject to criminal prosecution, although, legally speaking, it is possible. What is certain, however, is that if Trump loses or does not run next time, he will forfeit all actual or notional immunity from criminal proceedings on 20 January 2021. If and when that point is reached,
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The Guardian view on delaying Brexit: time to take part in the EU elections | Editorial 1 Mar 1:30pm The Guardian view on delaying Brexit: time to take part in the EU elections | Editorial
Theresa May envisages only a short delay. But any extension of article 50 raises big issues that would take months to sort outFor two long years, Theresa May always insisted that Britain will leave the European Union on 29 March. So determined has she been to deliver Brexit by this self-imposed deadline that she has even had the date
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The Guardian view on improvisation: in praise of imperfection | Editorial 1 Mar 1:25pm The Guardian view on improvisation: in praise of imperfection | Editorial
From the Grateful Dead to André Previn, collective spontaneity makes music dangerous – and aliveThe death this week of
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The Guardian view on the US and North Korea: Trump’s vanity diplomacy falls flat | Editorial 28 Feb 1:34pm The Guardian view on the US and North Korea: Trump’s vanity diplomacy falls flat | Editorial
The US president boasts of being a deal maker. But his summit with Kim Jong-un in Hanoi has ended in failure and recriminationOnly a year ago, many feared that Donald Trump’s dealings with Kim Jong-un might end with a bang. Then came the Singapore summit. Mr Trump boasted that they “fell in love” and that North Korea was no longer a nuclear threat. The bromance did not look sustainable. Now a follow-up in Hanoi has
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The Guardian view on opioids in the the UK: poverty and pain | Editorial 28 Feb 1:33pm The Guardian view on opioids in the the UK: poverty and pain | Editorial
These painkillers don’t work against chronic pain. The UK must find alternatives to help sufferers in deprived areasPeople in Blackpool are twice as likely as the inhabitants of Wokingham to die before they are 70. A
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The Guardian view on EU citizens: May’s moral blindspot | Editorial 27 Feb 2:38pm The Guardian view on EU citizens: May’s moral blindspot | Editorial
The prime minister has missed countless opportunities to show compassion for people whose lives have been turned upside-down by BrexitMany people were shocked by the result of the 2016 Brexit referendum, but few felt stronger emotions than the three million citizens of other EU countries living in the UK, whose futures
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The Guardian view on Trump in Asia: the crisis is in Kashmir | Editorial 27 Feb 1:35pm The Guardian view on Trump in Asia: the crisis is in Kashmir | Editorial
While the US president preens himself in Hanoi, the pressing issue is the escalating tension between India and PakistanAs the crisis between two nuclear-armed states
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Child abuse scandal and next steps for Catholic church | Letters 27 Feb 1:03pm Child abuse scandal and next steps for Catholic church | Letters
Readers respond to a Joanna Moorhead article in which she claimed lay Catholics who stayed silent were complicit in the church’s failure on abuse, and to a letter and editorial on the scandal engulfing the churchI agree with Joanna Moorhead (
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The Guardian view on May’s Brexit: coming not together but apart | Editorial 26 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on May’s Brexit: coming not together but apart | Editorial
The prime minister’s manoeuvring is about stifling – rather than giving voice to – antagonisms in her party. The same can be said of LabourThe government of Theresa May has
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The Guardian view on the hottest winter day: sunny side down | Editorial 26 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on the hottest winter day: sunny side down | Editorial
Unseasonably balmy February days can be pleasant, but scientists are increasingly linking extremes of heat, storms and other meteorological events to global warmingOver thousands of years, like humans everywhere, we became used to thinking of the sun, rain and wind as the backdrop to our lives – external entities over which we had no dominion. In the 21st century, this has become a delusion. The unpredictability of weather in the UK, particularly during summers that many wish were drier and sunnier, is associated by many people with what it means to be British. It has big variations – temperatures in the north of Scotland can be up to 20C lower than in southern England – and is characteristically unsettled due to the jet stream. Its unreliability may have aided those wishing to avoid the truth about global warming. But the evidence of our senses, as well as what meteorologists and other scientists tell us, is becoming overwhelming. While many people are enjoying
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The Guardian view on Kashmir: the world’s most dangerous place | Editorial 25 Feb 1:37pm The Guardian view on Kashmir: the world’s most dangerous place | Editorial
India and Pakistan need to stop beating the drums of war and seek a way out of confrontationThe war of words between nuclear-armed India and Pakistan is a reminder that the ceasefire line dividing the Himalayan state of Kashmir remains, in the words of former US president Bill Clinton, “
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The Guardian view on sex education: the facts of life are just the start | Editorial 25 Feb 1:37pm The Guardian view on sex education: the facts of life are just the start | Editorial
Compulsory lessons about relationships and health are long overdue. But £6m is not enough to train teachers to teach them properlyThe introduction of compulsory
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The Guardian view on Mrs May’s deal: delay Brexit, not just the MPs’ vote | Editorial 24 Feb 1:38pm The Guardian view on Mrs May’s deal: delay Brexit, not just the MPs’ vote | Editorial
The prime minister’s desperate attempts to build a coalition for her deal has failed. It’s time for her to admit thatTheresa May’s decision to delay the meaningful vote on the terms of her Brexit deal to
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The Guardian view on Egypt and Europe: embracing authoritarianism | Editorial 24 Feb 1:37pm The Guardian view on Egypt and Europe: embracing authoritarianism | Editorial
The summit of the EU and the Arab League in Sharm el-Sheikh highlights the ongoing and ill-advised support for President SisiDays after Egypt executed men who said they were
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The Observer view on the future of the Independent Group | Observer editorial 24 Feb 1:00am The Observer view on the future of the Independent Group | Observer editorial
Let’s hope this upheaval will refresh our tired politicsMore than half of the UK electorate think the political system is broken. That’s according to a poll published by the charity Hope not Hate last week. Just under seven in 10 of
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The Guardian view on Britain’s political parties: Brexit is breaking the mould | Editorial 22 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on Britain’s political parties: Brexit is breaking the mould | Editorial
It would be ironic if, as Britain prepares to leave the EU, the country’s fragmentary politics became more characteristically EuropeanAcross Europe, old two-party political systems have been fragmenting for a generation and more. In most western European countries, the left-right split has long been overlaid by others, notably on social values and identity. Germany now has seven significant parties in the Bundestag. France has at least nine in a national assembly dominated by a party that did not even exist in 2016. Ireland’s Dáil has 10 and more. Spain’s outgoing congress of deputies some 13. Part of this fragmentation can be explained by differences in electoral systems and in national histories that make multiparty outcomes more likely. But not all of it. The fragmentation also reflects the fact that all societies have evolved in the post-industrial era, and that politics has had to adjust. Is the same thing happening here? It already has done in Scotland. The abandonment of the
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The Guardian view on the Catholic church: must do better | Editorial 22 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on the Catholic church: must do better | Editorial
The Vatican conference on sexual abuse needs to be much more than a talking shop. Can that happen?On Wednesday night another statue of a former hero was
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The Guardian view on Britain and China: it’s complicated | Editorial 21 Feb 1:32pm The Guardian view on Britain and China: it’s complicated | Editorial
Beijing’s might and ambitions, and the approach of Brexit, make the path ahead more difficult. It’s time for careful thoughtA few years ago, George Osborne announced that Britain’s relations with China were entering a “golden era”. On Thursday, his successor as chancellor gave a more measured assessment: they are “complex”,
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The Guardian view on MPs and Brexit: they need the Wright stuff | Editorial 21 Feb 1:32pm The Guardian view on MPs and Brexit: they need the Wright stuff | Editorial
Defections from the big parties reinforce the case for parliament to become a legislature that can legislateAs a result of the political dramas of this week, Britain’s hung parliament just got a bit more hung than before. Theresa May now has
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The Guardian view on Tory defections: hard truths for May | Editorial 20 Feb 1:31pm The Guardian view on Tory defections: hard truths for May | Editorial
The prime minister has been complicit in her party’s capture by a narrow, hardline factionThe pro-European wing of the Conservative party has traditionally been more loyal to its leaders and more inclined towards compromise than the Eurosceptic faction. That is one reason why Wednesday’s decision by three remain-supporting Tory MPs to
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The Guardian view on Shamima Begum’s citizenship: removing it is not in Britain’s interest | Editorial 20 Feb 1:31pm The Guardian view on Shamima Begum’s citizenship: removing it is not in Britain’s interest | Editorial
The hasty decision to take away the rights of a high-profile Isis recruit is likely to face a legal challenge. Whether or not it was lawful, it was wrongThe shocking and shameful decision to strip
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The Guardian view on Honda’s closure: of course it’s partly about Brexit | Editorial 19 Feb 1:27pm The Guardian view on Honda’s closure: of course it’s partly about Brexit | Editorial
The Japanese carmaker’s decision to shut its Swindon factory is part of a pattern in which Brexit uncertainties play a significant roleFirst, the uncontroversial bit.
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The Guardian view on criminal justice: when prison doesn’t work | Editorial 19 Feb 1:27pm The Guardian view on criminal justice: when prison doesn’t work | Editorial
Short sentences in dreadful jails do more harm than good. The justice secretary is right to want replace themThe overcrowded prisons of England and Wales are in an awful state after eight years of austerity. In this time, five justice secretaries have failed to come to grips with the problem and moved on. Ian Acheson, a former prison governor,
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The Guardian view on Facebook: the arrogance of power | Editorial 18 Feb 1:32pm The Guardian view on Facebook: the arrogance of power | Editorial
A few giant companies now control most of the internet. This gives democratic governments a paradoxical opportunityPoliticians across the spectrum are now agreed that the powers of the big tech companies must be curbed. The surveillance economy appears as an existential threat to democracy. Self-regulation is no longer enough. But it is a long way from sentiment to policy. Monday’s
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The Guardian view on the Labour split: a mistake but also a warning | Editorial 18 Feb 10:14am The Guardian view on the Labour split: a mistake but also a warning | Editorial
The party has always been a broad church, and it must remain one if it is to form an effective opposition and governmentMonday morning’s
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The Guardian view on vaccination: a duty of public health | Editorial 17 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on vaccination: a duty of public health | Editorial
The anti-vaxx movement arises from mistrust but threatens the physical health of societyThe latest
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The Guardian view on Thailand’s election: staving off the real reckoning | Editorial 17 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on Thailand’s election: staving off the real reckoning | Editorial
The political soap opera around a princess’s brief candidacy has further exposed the dangerous rifts within the country. Until they are addressed, the cycle of elections, unrest and coups is likely to continueThailand is due to go to the polls next month, but after a
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The Observer view on Shamima Begum | Observer editorial 17 Feb 1:02am The Observer view on Shamima Begum | Observer editorial
Whatever the risk this young Isis supporter may pose, she is Britain’s responsibility and we cannot afford to shirk it Exploited victim or unrepentant villain? It’s impossible to determine the truth about Shamima Begum, the 19-year-old who left Bethnal Green in London when she was 15 to join Islamic State, from a single newspaper interview. And it shouldn’t be hard to acknowledge that more than one interpretation of her story might contain a ring of accuracy. Begum is undoubtedly vulnerable. She was groomed online at the age of 15; married off, albeit willingly, to a jihadist fighter while still a child just 10 days after arriving in Raqqa, Syria; in recent months, she has lost two infants to malnutrition and inadequate healthcare. Heavily pregnant with her third child,
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The Observer view on Gavin Williamson’s Pacific blunder | Observer editorial 16 Feb 12:40pm The Observer view on Gavin Williamson’s Pacific blunder | Observer editorial
Talking tough to China is typical of Mrs May’s gaffe-prone defence secretaryGavin Williamson is a loose cannon. That would not matter so much if, as was the case until a couple of years ago, he was a government whip whose views were of little account. But Theresa May’s surprise decision to make Williamson defence secretary has given him an international platform, and a degree of responsibility, to which he appears ill-suited. Until now, his most publicised blunder concerned his schoolboy remarks following last year’s chemical weapons attack in Salisbury. Asked how he thought Vladimir Putin might respond to British sanctions, he replied: “Frankly, Russia should go away and it should shut up.” He was widely mocked.
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The Guardian view on family law: transparency is in the public interest | Editorial 15 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on family law: transparency is in the public interest | Editorial
Children’s privacy must be protected, but the impact of legal aid cuts strengthens the case for openness in courtCuts to the legal aid budget since 2010, coupled with the impact of other spending cuts on low-income and vulnerable people, mean that increasing numbers of people are arriving in court in difficult personal circumstances, having received no legal advice and with no lawyer to represent them. The number of people accessing legal aid fell by 82% between 2010 and 2018. While lawyers, charities and others have repeatedly complained about the impact of legal aid cuts in both civil and criminal courts, and criminal barristers last year threatened to strike, the government has so far declined to reverse the funding decisions taken in the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis. Last week ministers completed a long-awaited review of the Legal aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (Laspo), and announced it will spend an additional £6.5m on restoring help in a few areas from where it was removed. Given the extent of the cuts – £950m has been sliced from the
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The Guardian view on Disney’s Frozen sequel: winter is coming – again | Editorial 15 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on Disney’s Frozen sequel: winter is coming – again | Editorial
The 2013 movie broke box office records and won the hearts of young viewers around the world. But it did so by challenging Hollywood expectationsThis week,
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The Guardian view on parliament and Brexit: Theresa May’s approach has failed | Editorial 14 Feb 1:38pm The Guardian view on parliament and Brexit: Theresa May’s approach has failed | Editorial
The prime minister has tried to ignore parliament and pretend there is backing for her attempt to carry Brexit based on Tory votes. Time for a new strategyThe latest government
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The Guardian view on Shamima Begum: return and face the consequences | Editorial 14 Feb 1:37pm The Guardian view on Shamima Begum: return and face the consequences | Editorial
The pregnant 19-year-old left the UK voluntarily, but is also a victim who should be helped to come backThe remarks made by the 19-year-old British Islamic State recruit
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The Guardian view on drug wars: protect the innocent | Editorial 13 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on drug wars: protect the innocent | Editorial
The jailing of a notorious cocaine smuggler will not end the drug wars. We must fight them with more regard for the victims There’s not much justice in the world. The Mexican drug lord Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán will probably die in an unpleasant American prison after
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The Guardian view on media freedom: it must be defended | Editorial 13 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on media freedom: it must be defended | Editorial
Killed, jailed and bullied, journalists are under growing pressure worldwide. Brave individuals such as Maria Ressa in the Philippines need our supportThe arrest in the Philippines of the courageous journalist
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To avoid environmental catastrophe, everything must change | Letters 13 Feb 12:41pm To avoid environmental catastrophe, everything must change | Letters
Readers respond to an article and editorial on the use of agricultural pesticides and the alarming decline in insect numbersIt is not just the insects that are in serious decline, but also the entomologists who study them (
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The Guardian view on private schools: motors of unfairness | Editorial 12 Feb 1:33pm The Guardian view on private schools: motors of unfairness | Editorial
Social mobility has stalled and inequalities between schools play an important part. It’s time to even things upPrivate schools educate around 6% of the UK’s school population, or around 625,000 children in 2,600 schools. Since they have their own inspectors and select their own intakes, comparisons with state schools are not straightforward. But in outcomes such as exam results, prowess in arts and sport, and rates of admission to universities and the professions, the success of fee-paying schools is unquestionable:
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The Guardian view on Brexit rebels: helpful dissent | Editorial 12 Feb 1:29pm The Guardian view on Brexit rebels: helpful dissent | Editorial
Westminster needs mavericks in public life, even if they are wrong, because a clearer perception of the truth is produced by its collision with errorThe moves not to “
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The Guardian view on the UK economy: before Brexit, rescue it from austerity | Editorial 11 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on the UK economy: before Brexit, rescue it from austerity | Editorial
The public want the government to spend more, yet the Tories cannot grasp how this makes economic and political senseLast week it was
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The Guardian view on the mass death of insects: this threatens us all | Editorial 11 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on the mass death of insects: this threatens us all | Editorial
Global warming and industrialised farming are damaging vital ecosystemsOne of the classic science-fiction treatments of the end of civilisation was
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Google and Facebook Worsen Media Bias 10 Feb 3:04pm Google and Facebook Worsen Media Bias
Silicon Valley’s advertising monopoly translates into editorial influence.
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The Guardian view on Nigeria’s elections: 84m voters deserve better | Editorial 10 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on Nigeria’s elections: 84m voters deserve better | Editorial
The presidential election has seen more mudslinging than serious debate. But vote-rigging and violence are the immediate concernsNigeria’s 84 million voters will go to the polls next weekend to give their verdict on Muhammadu Buhari. The country is Africa’s most populous, and by some measures has the
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The Guardian view on the science of hangovers: no more research needed | Editorial 10 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on the science of hangovers: no more research needed | Editorial
Raise a glass, though only one, to the selfless German students and Swedish sailors who have offered up their livers to scienceAs
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The Observer view on the premature celebrations on the defeat of Isis | Observer editorial 10 Feb 12:59am The Observer view on the premature celebrations on the defeat of Isis | Observer editorial
Islamic State has lost its Syrian base, but its threat remainsIf he gets his way, Donald Trump will announce at some point in the coming week that the Islamic State terrorist group has been defeated and its hate-filled caliphate in Syria and Iraq destroyed. This will be the second time the US president has declared victory over the jihadists. When Trump first made the claim, in December, he was sharply contradicted by his own intelligence chiefs and by British ministers. Now he is being more cautious. But his eagerness to
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The Guardian view on the rift between Paris and Rome: a new age of schism? | Editorial 8 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on the rift between Paris and Rome: a new age of schism? | Editorial
France’s decision to withdraw its ambassador from Italy points to the deeper divisions that threaten a troubled continentBefore this week, the last time that France recalled its ambassador from Italy was in June 1940, when Benito Mussolini’s fascist government
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The Guardian view on: a twisted tale of publishing | Editorial 8 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on: a twisted tale of publishing | Editorial
The story of Dan Mallory, aka the bestselling author AJ Finn, reads like a thriller. But it asks uncomfortable questions of the literary worldA true story worthy of a Patricia Highsmith thriller was
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The Guardian view on the Brexit talks: tied to a mean-minded fantasy | Editorial 7 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Brexit talks: tied to a mean-minded fantasy | Editorial
The prime minister persists in trying to cobble together a Commons majority behind a form of Brexit that offers no guarantees about the futureDoggedness has sometimes served Theresa May well in the past two years. Yet, as this phase of the Brexit process reaches
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The Guardian view on teenage activists: protesters not puppets | Editorial 7 Feb 1:27pm The Guardian view on teenage activists: protesters not puppets | Editorial
A Belgian minister has resigned after falsely claiming that demonstrators were directed by hidden forces. She should have focused on their messageWhen confronted by child protesters, politicians and other adults often reach for the age-based putdown, rather than engage with the substance of whatever it is they are protesting about. Often, the suggestion is that someone older has put them up to it. Flemish environment minister Joke Schauvliege took the patronising tactic much too far when she said that recent school strikes across Belgium were a “set-up”, and that security services knew who was really “behind this movement”. On Tuesday, after Belgian security services issued a rare denial,
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The Guardian view on Afghanistan talks: hopes for peace, but at what cost? | Editorial 6 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on Afghanistan talks: hopes for peace, but at what cost? | Editorial
Taliban meetings with Afghan powerbrokers, following negotiations with the US, hold out the prospect of an end to this long conflict. But women are especially and rightly concerned about the possible priceAmerica’s longest-running war is edging closer toward a conceivable end. In his State of the Union
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The Guardian view on funding social care: break the tax taboo | Editorial 6 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on funding social care: break the tax taboo | Editorial
Fear of levelling with the public about the real choices leads to political inaction and costs lives When parliament does one day agree on reforms to the system of adult social care in England, there should be a moment of mourning for those who did not live to see the day. For decades this subject has been a focus of independent commissions, parliamentary inquiries, thinktank pamphlets and, last year, a
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The Guardian view on Brexit and Ireland: the forging of folly | Editorial 5 Feb 1:54pm The Guardian view on Brexit and Ireland: the forging of folly | Editorial
Hard Brexiters view the Irish backstop not as a way of keeping the peace but as a devious mechanism to force Britain to march in lockstep with EU regulations they are desperate to get out ofBrexit is about drawing lines on maps and hearts. In that respect it is at odds with the 1998 Good Friday agreement which sought to erase them. Key to ending the Troubles was the removal of the hard border between the north and south of Ireland. Theresa May’s problem is that she has committed to leaving the European Union while respecting the peace deal that depended on both London and Dublin being part of it. The agreement made less salient the
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The Guardian view on deportation flights: the return of the hostile environment | Editorial 5 Feb 1:53pm The Guardian view on deportation flights: the return of the hostile environment | Editorial
The upcoming removal of 50 people to Jamaica reveals the government’s unwillingness to learn from the Windrush scandalIt is the grimmest of ironies that the secret, forced
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My daughter’s life is priceless, but the NHS must not overpay for drugs | Letters 5 Feb 1:32pm My daughter’s life is priceless, but the NHS must not overpay for drugs | Letters
The mother of a young woman with cystic fibrosis and other readers respond to a report and editorial about the prohibitively high cost of life-saving drugsMy 22-year-old daughter has cystic fibrosis (
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The Guardian view on crime and algorithms: big data makes bigger problems | Editorial 4 Feb 1:23pm The Guardian view on crime and algorithms: big data makes bigger problems | Editorial
Machines can make human misjudgments very much worse. And should never be trusted with criminal justiceSome of the best, or at least sharpest, minds on the planet are devoted to guessing what we might buy next, and showing us advertisements for it. Often the results are ludicrously inaccurate; sometimes they are creepily precise. Would we trust the same kind of technology to predict what crimes we might next commit? That is the question raised by the
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The Guardian view on fracking: the end can’t come soon enough | Editorial 4 Feb 1:23pm The Guardian view on fracking: the end can’t come soon enough | Editorial
Launching a new fossil fuel industry was a bad idea, and a coalition of localists and environmentalists appears close to defeating itLess than four months after what was supposed to be a new beginning for fracking in England, when Cuadrilla resumed operations at its Preston New Road site in Lancashire, it appears increasingly unlikely that there is a future for this industry in the UK at all. Minor
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The Guardian view on new drugs: high hopes, higher prices | Editorial 3 Feb 1:45pm The Guardian view on new drugs: high hopes, higher prices | Editorial
The row over the cost of a cystic fibrosis treatment has prevented its use in the UK. These patients, many of them children, deserve betterMedical advances come at a cost, and that cost is increasingly steep. We rely on pharmaceutical companies, as well as public and philanthropic investment, to develop the medicines that can transform and even save lives. New drugs emerge not according to need, but when companies know they can make sizable profits from them. The problem with this, beyond our intuitive sense of wrongness when people reap lavish rewards thanks to products others cannot live without, is twofold. Some diseases or conditions – particularly those prevalent in poorer countries – are
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The Guardian view on the pope in the Gulf: an important signal | Editorial 3 Feb 1:43pm The Guardian view on the pope in the Gulf: an important signal | Editorial
As the first leader of the Catholic church to visit the Arabian peninsula, Francis knows his contact with Muslims will be as important as the mass he hosts for the Christian minorityPope Francis’s visit to
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The Observer view the pressing need for a second referendum | Observer editorial 3 Feb 1:23am The Observer view the pressing need for a second referendum | Observer editorial
A parliament in paralysis. No leadership. Ask the people In less than eight weeks, Britain will crash out of the EU by default, if nothing changes. Yet the desperate absence of political leadership on the single most important political issue for decades is, if anything, getting worse. The prime minister continues to be held hostage by the rump of hard Eurosceptics in her party, last week voting to trash the exit deal she spent months negotiating for the sake of an inconsequential sliver of Tory unity. Jeremy Corbyn continues to do all he can to avoid taking a Brexit position grounded in reality, while looking the other way as some of his MPs attempt to strike shabby cash-for-support deals with Theresa May. There were some green shoots of leadership in evidence last week, but they came from the backbenches. A cross-party amendment by Yvette Cooper and Nick Boles would have paved the way for MPs to authorise the government to seek an article 50 extension if no exit deal were in place by the end of February. Another, from Dominic Grieve, would have set up a series of indicative votes on the various Brexit options over the next few weeks. Neither amendment asked MPs to commit to a firm Brexit position; they were simply seeking a route out of the stasis that has enveloped the Commons. Yet, despite the fact that they voted for a symbolic amendment against a no deal, MPs voted down both of these amendments. Parliament is apparently against no deal, but unwilling to sanction anything that could prevent it.
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The Observer view on the Assad regime’s murder of Marie Colvin | Observer editorial 3 Feb 1:00am The Observer view on the Assad regime’s murder of Marie Colvin | Observer editorial
Journalists must report the truth, not be the targets of autocrats Marie Colvin walked towards the sound of gunfire. Throughout her career as a war correspondent reporting from the killing zones of Iraq, Chechnya, Sierra Leone and Sri Lanka, where she lost an eye when fired upon by government forces, Colvin exhibited exceptional professional ability, coupled with awesome personal bravery. When she died in an artillery attack in Homs, Syria, in 2012, the world of free, independent reporting lost one of its foremost practitioners. It is now certain Colvin’s death was no accident. The
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The Guardian view on India’s Mr Modi: suppressing inconvenient facts | Editorial 1 Feb 1:30pm The Guardian view on India’s Mr Modi: suppressing inconvenient facts | Editorial
Unlike his predecessors, the Indian prime minister has in five years never held a traditional press conference. What has he got to hide?Narendra Modi’s 2014 election victory in India, the most resounding for 25 years, was built on two weaknesses: the shattered credibility of his opponents in the Congress party and the economic downturn the country was experiencing. One of Mr Modi’s most memorable campaign pledges was to
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The Guardian view on business and arts: cash without a voice | Editorial 1 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on business and arts: cash without a voice | Editorial
Corporate sponsorship needs to steer clear of impinging on artistic freedomsNews that investment managers the Man Group is
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The Guardian view on the May-Corbyn talks: make them matter | Editorial 31 Jan 1:32pm The Guardian view on the May-Corbyn talks: make them matter | Editorial
Too late, too little and too grubby. Yet if we want to bring the nation together on Brexit the political parties must continue to try for principled cooperationThe first thing to say about
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The Guardian view on rough sleeping: more than a winter crisis | Editorial 31 Jan 1:32pm The Guardian view on rough sleeping: more than a winter crisis | Editorial
The number of homeless people on the streets stands at 4,677. Finding them somewhere to live is just the startWintry weather sharpens inequality, like any other circumstance that places greater than usual demands on people and their resources. As well as being picturesque, extremely cold temperatures such as the
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The Guardian view on May and the Tories: choosing unity over reality | Editorial 30 Jan 1:30pm The Guardian view on May and the Tories: choosing unity over reality | Editorial
Theresa May’s continued indulgence of Tory Brexit hardliners proves her inability to serve country ahead of partyBrexit has tested many loyalties in parliament but broken few. The line that divides pro-Europeans and Brexiters cannot be neatly drawn between opposition and governing benches. MPs on both sides have been frustrated by their leaders and defied their whips. But, overall, party bonds have proved remarkably resilient. The slender majority that Theresa May won on Tuesday night,
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The Guardian view on colour-conscious casting: mixing it up can be a good thing | Editorial 30 Jan 1:25pm The Guardian view on colour-conscious casting: mixing it up can be a good thing | Editorial
It is welcome that television and film are catching up with theatre by taking a less literal approach to drama
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s victory: a pyrrhic success built on fantasy | Editorial 29 Jan 4:43pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s victory: a pyrrhic success built on fantasy | Editorial
Mrs May will have her work cut out to wrangle a new Brexit deal in Brussels, especially as her plans to reopen it have been rejectedTheresa May won a rare triumph on Tuesday night in the Commons. She came back from the greatest parliamentary loss by a government to secure, miraculously, a
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The Guardian view on the US case against Huawei: the conflict sharpens | Editorial 29 Jan 2:14pm The Guardian view on the US case against Huawei: the conflict sharpens | Editorial
The Chinese firm is under increasing pressure, and so are countries considering its role in their 5G networksThe struggle between the US and China is coming into sharper relief. In the weeks since the arrest of a top executive from telecoms giant Huawei, Beijing has directed pressure at Toronto – which held her at the behest of Washington, according to their extradition treaty – rather than risk challenging its rival head-on. Now the US has formally confirmed its request and filed
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The Guardian view on teacher shortages: the trouble with data | Editorial 28 Jan 1:29pm The Guardian view on teacher shortages: the trouble with data | Editorial
Damian Hinds’ plan to reduce workload is sensible – but schools need more money tooThe government’s
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The Guardian view on the rise in homicides: policing is a partial solution | Editorial 27 Jan 1:43pm The Guardian view on the rise in homicides: policing is a partial solution | Editorial
Poverty and desperation among young people, as well as cuts to police numbers, lie behind a 14% increase in the homicide rateViolent crime brings misery. To its victims and their families; to perpetrators and their families, too. This is not to say that people who have harmed others are entitled to the same consideration as those who have been harmed. They are not. But it is important to realise that when we discuss violent crime statistics, what we are talking about is multiple lives wasted and ruined. That is why the
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The Observer view on why Venezuela needs consensus, not conflict | Observer editorial 27 Jan 1:00am The Observer view on why Venezuela needs consensus, not conflict | Observer editorial
The implicit threat of military intervention on behalf of Juan Guaidó’s opposition raises fears of a cold war proxy conflict Nicolás Maduro was re-elected Venezuela’s president last May by fraudulent means, as regional governments and independent observers noted at the time, and his leadership
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The Observer view on Hugh McIlvanney, a poet in print who brought sport alive | Observer editorial 26 Jan 11:59am The Observer view on Hugh McIlvanney, a poet in print who brought sport alive | Observer editorial
The late Observer journalist elevated sports reporting into an art formThe many tributes to
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The Guardian view on the Queen and Brexit: a crisis in the making | Editorial 25 Jan 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Queen and Brexit: a crisis in the making | Editorial
The palace does not intervene lightly, so even a coded speech alluding to fears for the state of public discourse is revealing A sure sign that political turmoil has tipped into constitutional crisis is a hint that the Queen might get involved. Monarchy can only work in the 21st century if the person occupying the throne upholds a rigorous vow of neutrality. All of the historical, legal precedents behind the weird principle of sovereignty belonging to “the crown-in-parliament” amount to one rule: the crown is for ceremony; MPs do the rest. Elizabeth II is diligent in upholding her side of that bargain, so it must have taken some provocation for the palace to make an
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The Guardian view on Venezuela: its people deserve better | Editorial 24 Jan 1:44pm The Guardian view on Venezuela: its people deserve better | Editorial
Nicolás Maduro has failed his country. Now the US response has raised the stakesVenezuela’s people deserve better than president Nicolás Maduro or reckless US-led intervention. The country is in the grip of a spiralling
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The Guardian view on Davos: elites without answers | Editorial 23 Jan 1:30pm The Guardian view on Davos: elites without answers | Editorial
Delegates at the World Economic Forum fear a growing public backlash against global capitalism but are not equipped to offer solutionsAny advantage that politicians see in attending the World Economic Forum are these days weighed against the disadvantage of being seen to attend. Brexit has kept Theresa May away from Davos this year.
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The Guardian view on Zimbabwe’s crackdown: Mugabe went, but the regime lives on | Editorial 23 Jan 1:30pm The Guardian view on Zimbabwe’s crackdown: Mugabe went, but the regime lives on | Editorial
The ruthless crushing of protests shows how little has changed since Emmerson Mnangagwa took overPeople do not always want to be proved right. Many Zimbabweans watching the
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The Guardian view on Israel’s democracy: killing with impunity, lying without consequence? | Editorial 22 Jan 1:55pm The Guardian view on Israel’s democracy: killing with impunity, lying without consequence? | Editorial
The late Amos Oz was right to say ‘even unavoidable occupation is a corrupting occupation’. Israeli voters should heed his wordsIn the last nine months of 2018,
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The Guardian view on Brexit and Ireland: a danger to peace | Editorial 21 Jan 1:57pm The Guardian view on Brexit and Ireland: a danger to peace | Editorial
Electoral contingency and political expediency cannot be allowed to break up BritainThe
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The Guardian view on Bangladesh: when charity goes wrong | Editorial 21 Jan 1:46pm The Guardian view on Bangladesh: when charity goes wrong | Editorial
Globalised business networks make well-meaning shoppers complicit in the exploitation of workers they are trying to helpWho carries the weight of a global supply chain? Whose lives are bound in its fetters? There is a grotesque quality to
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The Guardian view on Trump and arms: can the doomsday clock be stopped? | Editorial 20 Jan 1:30pm The Guardian view on Trump and arms: can the doomsday clock be stopped? | Editorial
The threat of an arms race is real and growing. The news of recent days has highlighted the dangersHow late is it now? On Thursday, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists will announce the time on its
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s challenge: no change, no Brexit | Editorial 20 Jan 1:25pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s challenge: no change, no Brexit | Editorial
At the weekend, two former prime ministers showed they understand the need for new Brexit approaches. Theresa May needs to learn the same lessonOn Monday afternoon in the Commons, Theresa May will update MPs about any progress she may have made on Brexit options following her conclusive parliamentary defeat last week. It is expected to be a holding statement, to enable her to carry on consulting as she hunts for the elusive formula that can win a Commons majority, retain EU agreement and keep her government alive. Given Mrs May’s approach and personality, this could be a long search. Don’t hold your breath for the outcome. One of Mrs May’s most disabling qualities in this situation is her political rigidity. In spite of last week’s defeat, she struggles to see that everything about her premiership has changed. She remains formally in charge of the government. But, on the issue that defines British politics, she is no longer in charge at all. She merely leads one of the many groups with no majority that make up the
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The Observer view: the Hitachi fiasco confirms that our energy policy is in ruins | Observer editorial 20 Jan 1:00am The Observer view: the Hitachi fiasco confirms that our energy policy is in ruins | Observer editorial
Ministers must act quickly to make up for the firm’s decision to axe its Wylfa nuclear power plantBy any standards,
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The Observer view on why our leaders are neither bold nor flexible | Observer editorial 20 Jan 1:00am The Observer view on why our leaders are neither bold nor flexible | Observer editorial
As Theresa May flounders, the Labour leader should rise to the occasionIn one respect at least, Brexit Britain has already adopted the Norway model. Last week’s drama in parliament most closely resembled the maelstrom (
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The Guardian view on Prince Philip’s crash: road safety matters to all ages | Editorial 18 Jan 1:30pm The Guardian view on Prince Philip’s crash: road safety matters to all ages | Editorial
The Duke of Edinburgh’s crash in Norfolk can teach us all a lesson. Action is required to reduce the harm caused by collisionsIt is natural that the Duke of Edinburgh’s age – 97 – has been the focus of attention alongside other details of
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The Guardian view of crank arguments: such talk costs lives | Editorial 18 Jan 1:25pm The Guardian view of crank arguments: such talk costs lives | Editorial
The way we live our lives is often the result of decisions reached irrationally – and they are killing people. Time to make different choicesIn this year’s gallery of human pestilence, the
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The Guardian view on Lego: price is not value | Editorial 18 Jan 1:20pm The Guardian view on Lego: price is not value | Editorial
A Russian professor has found that collecting Lego makes financial sense. This tells us more about money than about toysDid you tread on a fortune this morning? Are you still limping as a result? The parents of most children will know the sudden pain of a plastic brick sinking its little fangs into bare, vulnerable feet. But instead of just screaming or throwing the thing away, perhaps they should confine it to a box and sell it later. There is a thriving secondhand market in Lego and
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The Guardian view on the Brexit impasse: extend article 50 now | Editorial 17 Jan 1:33pm The Guardian view on the Brexit impasse: extend article 50 now | Editorial
Parliament needs more time to craft a new approach and avoid no-deal after Theresa May’s policy was swept asideFirst, some good news. Theresa May is consulting party leaders and talking to MPs about the next steps on Brexit. About time too, though it is all frighteningly late. Now, the bad news. She isn’t doing the consulting properly. She is using the process to trade
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The Guardian view on nuclear power: expensive mistakes | Editorial 17 Jan 1:33pm The Guardian view on nuclear power: expensive mistakes | Editorial
Hitachi’s decision to walk away from two projects, despite hefty subsidies, indicates strongly that the UK’s current policies don’t add upThe scrapping of
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The Guardian view on Brexit and parliament: now dissolve the red lines | Editorial 16 Jan 3:04pm The Guardian view on Brexit and parliament: now dissolve the red lines | Editorial
The prime minister’s offer of cross-party talks rings hollow without evidence of her readiness to compromise on the substance of BrexitA Commons vote affirming confidence in Her Majesty’s government does not indicate that parliament trusts Theresa May. Her reprieve on Wednesday night, by a margin of 19, largely expresses Tory and DUP reluctance to risk a general election. Power is still flowing away from the prime minister. In 2017
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The Guardian view on warming oceans: a rising toll | Editorial 16 Jan 1:59pm The Guardian view on warming oceans: a rising toll | Editorial
We have barely begun to explore our seas, but our impact is felt on both humans and marine lifeWe know remarkably little about the oceans that cover most of the Earth, provide half of our oxygen and help to regulate the climate. Maps of the ocean floor are
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The Guardian view on May’s Brexit deal: it’s over, but what’s next? | Editorial 15 Jan 4:01pm The Guardian view on May’s Brexit deal: it’s over, but what’s next? | Editorial
The PM leads a party that is divided and a country stockpiling food and medicines as if preparing for war. She needs to humbly reach out to her opponents and find a way to prevent Britain crashing out of the EU in weeks The
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The Guardian view on Jaden Moodie’s murder: criminals targeting children | Editorial 15 Jan 1:30pm The Guardian view on Jaden Moodie’s murder: criminals targeting children | Editorial
Awareness of the exploitation of teenagers has grown – but much more must be done to protect themOne week after the horrifying murder of Jaden Moodie in east London, and with the
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The Guardian view on Mrs May’s deal: dead before the vote | Editorial 14 Jan 1:37pm The Guardian view on Mrs May’s deal: dead before the vote | Editorial
The PM has wasted a month. Her deal cannot command a majority in the Tory party, let alone a majority in the CommonsLast month Theresa May decided to defer the vote on her deal to leave the European Union because, she said, it would be “
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The Guardian view on academic freedom: the right to be very wrong | Editorial 14 Jan 1:37pm The Guardian view on academic freedom: the right to be very wrong | Editorial
Sometimes it takes a true believer to make clear the absurdities of a faith. An Oxford professor’s view on sexuality discredit his church’s doctrineProfessor John Finnis is a devout and learned Catholic legal scholar, who is currently being attacked at Oxford University for his views on sexuality as expressed in
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