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Labour members want something new – not a return to 1997 | Owen Jones 8 Jan 2:22pm Labour members want something new – not a return to 1997 | Owen Jones
All the candidates to succeed Jeremy Corbyn have questions to answer, and all must show an inspiring alternative to Tory ruleThe plight of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour opponents can be summed up like this. While they have, understandably, railed against the left’s “no compromise with the electorate” tendency, they’ve failed to acknowledge that they cannot retake the Labour leadership without first winning over the membership. They lacked ideas, unable to realise that Corbynism emerged amid the intellectual exhaustion of all other wings of the Labour party. It triumphed because the old social democrats had abandoned consistent social democracy, and the only faction willing to still champion it was the party’s left flank. No answers have been offered as to why there is an international crisis of European social democracy, of which Britain is just one example. In other words, they became backward looking, defined by what they were against rather than what they were for, and politically incurious: traits they once characterised as defining their leftwing opponents.
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The Guardian view on Labour’s leadership race: a long road back | Editorial 6 Jan 1:36pm The Guardian view on Labour’s leadership race: a long road back | Editorial
After a catastrophic election, the party’s contest to replace Jeremy Corbyn must be conducted in a spirit of honesty and humilityIn the lead-up to Monday’s
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Follow us inside Rebecca Long Bailey and Angela Rayner’s flat share, where something’s certainly brewing | Catherine Bennett 5 Jan 3:15am Follow us inside Rebecca Long Bailey and Angela Rayner’s flat share, where something’s certainly brewing | Catherine Bennett
It’s no ordinary domestic drama as secret tapes reveal all about the race to replace Jeremy Corbyn
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Inspirations for the codpiece comeback | Brief letters 2 Jan 1:04pm Inspirations for the codpiece comeback | Brief letters
Jeremy Corbyn | Officially old | Missing folk music | Antonio Navagero | Th’Lone Groover | Flowering daffodilsRichard Burgon MP says Jeremy Corbyn’s popularity rating was not the major factor in the election defeat (
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These are the questions Labour must answer if it is ever to win again | Martin Kettle 1 Jan 11:26am These are the questions Labour must answer if it is ever to win again | Martin Kettle
There can be no quick fixes. The party needs to take time for judgments to settle about its descent into the electoral abyssNearly a month ago Jeremy Corbyn announced he would step down after a period of reflection. This week he offered the first fruits of that process: 2019,
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The only way Labour can win is by ditching ‘Labourism’ | Jeremy Gilbert 31 Dec 2019, 2:00am The only way Labour can win is by ditching ‘Labourism’ | Jeremy Gilbert
The next leader must take an imaginative leap that Corbyn didn’t – and accept the need for progressive coalitions The general election was not just a crushing defeat for Corbynism. It was a resounding verdict on the entire history of “Labourism”. Labourism is the name of a specific political ideology – a habit of political thought and action – that is almost unique to the British left. According to this belief, there is only one true vehicle for progressive politics, the Labour party. Trade unions have their place – to represent their members at an “industrial” level, in workplaces and on shop floors – but actual political campaigning must be delegated to the party, and the primary focus of the party must be winning elections. No other party can ever represent the working class, and any political movement that is not subservient to either unions or party is to be treated with the greatest suspicion.
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If you must compare Corbyn to a past Labour leader, it isn’t Michael Foot | Owen Hatherley 27 Dec 2019, 5:00am If you must compare Corbyn to a past Labour leader, it isn’t Michael Foot | Owen Hatherley
The party should look at the parallels with Neil Kinnock’s second defeat, and learn from themAfter the disaster of the
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Brian Adcock on Jeremy Corbyn and the future of Labour – cartoon 26 Dec 2019, 2:00pm Brian Adcock on Jeremy Corbyn and the future of Labour – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/dec/26/brian-adcock-on-jeremy-corbyn-and-the-future-of-labour-cartoon">Continue reading...
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Even in Tory heartlands, Boris Johnson was merely the lesser of two evils | Dominic Grieve 23 Dec 2019, 12:39pm Even in Tory heartlands, Boris Johnson was merely the lesser of two evils | Dominic Grieve
Few voters I spoke to saw the prime minister as trustworthy, but I still lost my seat because of claims that a vote for me was a vote for Corbyn
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In a world of online everything, a real #PeriodOfReflection could benefit us all | John Harris 23 Dec 2019, 1:00am In a world of online everything, a real #PeriodOfReflection could benefit us all | John Harris
Our lives are increasingly dictated by the frantic pace of social media; it’s time to reclaim the space to slow down and thinkHe didn’t get to nationalise the railways or dish out free broadband, but right at the year’s end Jeremy Corbyn made one undeniable contribution to politics, culture and human understanding. In the wee hours of 13 December, as the scale of Labour’s drubbing became clear, he said he would be stepping down after the start of a “
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Labour has no hope of rebuilding unless it breaks the cold grip of the hard left | Andrew Rawnsley 22 Dec 2019, 3:30am Labour has no hope of rebuilding unless it breaks the cold grip of the hard left | Andrew Rawnsley
After the crushing election defeat, it is not just Jeremy Corbyn who has to go. It must mean the end of Corbynism For some Labour people, there is one consolation to be found amidst the smoking ruin of the party’s devastating election defeat. Such a cataclysm surely has to mean the termination of the party’s fatal experiment with Corbynism. Or does it? The Corbynites don’t think so. They show scant contrition for what they have inflicted on Labour and the many millions of people who depend on the party to protect and champion them. Nor are they displaying any willingness to relinquish their control. Quite the reverse.
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We fought Militant in the 1980s. The far left’s hold is now much worse | Roy Hattersley 21 Dec 2019, 4:00pm We fought Militant in the 1980s. The far left’s hold is now much worse | Roy Hattersley
If Rebecca Long Bailey is elected party leader, Labour MPs should challenge her authorityFor once, Labour has been quick off the mark. It is only 10 days since the party lost a fourth consecutive general election and it is already preparing for its next defeat. Despite the obvious truth that Jeremy Corbyn must take the blame for the worst result in almost 100 years,
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Labour failed to engage older voters – and after 100 hours doorstepping, I know why | Luke Pagarani 21 Dec 2019, 5:00am Labour failed to engage older voters – and after 100 hours doorstepping, I know why | Luke Pagarani
In a generation used to transactional politics, Corbyn’s values failed. But the party can rebuild trust with local socialismKnocking on doors for Labour for more than 100 hours in London, Bedford and Milton Keynes showed me the stark difference in voters’ attitudes by age. Among a section of older, white voters in both more and less affluent areas, I saw a visceral hatred of Jeremy Corbyn, and sometimes Diane Abbott. How did the demonisation of Corbyn and the Labour party under his leadership – as documented by media analysis conducted at the
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The failure of leadership behind Labour’s general election defeat | Letters 20 Dec 2019, 12:50pm The failure of leadership behind Labour’s general election defeat | Letters
Readers respond to an article by Owen Jones in which he said that Labour faced a remorseless assault but Corbyn and the left must own their mistakesOwen Jones (
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Labour’s long route back to power appears to rely on denouncing coffee | Joel Golby 20 Dec 2019, 7:33am Labour’s long route back to power appears to rely on denouncing coffee | Joel Golby
Turns out that it wasn’t Jeremy Corbyn’s unpopularity that did for the party – it was the elitist fixation with hot drinksA few things happen after an election bruising like the one Labour suffered on Friday: former MPs
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A Labour defeat, yes, but this was not nearly as bad as 1983 | Andy Beckett 19 Dec 2019, 1:28pm A Labour defeat, yes, but this was not nearly as bad as 1983 | Andy Beckett
Last week’s result was not a simple rejection of the left: the party’s policies on the big issues of the day could sow the seeds for future successFor the Labour left’s many enemies, there are few events more useful than a leftwing defeat. Not just for its immediate consequences, which have been graphic over the past week as Jeremy Corbyn’s messy but transformative four-year leadership has been
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Brexit and self-inflicted errors buried Labour this election | Owen Jones 18 Dec 2019, 1:55pm Brexit and self-inflicted errors buried Labour this election | Owen Jones
Yes, Labour faced a remorseless assault, but Corbyn and the left must own their mistakesHonest reflection is rarely born from trauma: but a grief-stricken left must conduct a frank postmortem into the
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There is an antidote to demagoguery – it’s called political rewilding | George Monbiot 18 Dec 2019, 1:00am There is an antidote to demagoguery – it’s called political rewilding | George Monbiot
This form of radical trust devolves power away from top-down government, often with some very unexpected results You can blame Jeremy Corbyn for Boris Johnson, and Hillary Clinton for Donald Trump. You can blame the Indian challengers for Narendra Modi, the Brazilian opposition for Jair Bolsonaro, and left and centre parties in Australia, the Philippines, Hungary, Poland and Turkey for similar electoral disasters. Or you could recognise that what we are witnessing is a global phenomenon. Yes, there were individual failings in all these cases, though the failings were very different: polar opposites in the cases of Corbyn and Clinton. But when the same thing happens in many nations, it’s time to recognise the pattern, and see that heaping blame on particular people and parties fixes nothing.
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There is a lot to criticise. But Corbyn and McDonnell have transformed Labour | Andrew Fisher 17 Dec 2019, 9:57am There is a lot to criticise. But Corbyn and McDonnell have transformed Labour | Andrew Fisher
I saw firsthand how it became a mass membership party – and brought in thousands of bright and talented young people who will shape its future
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Let Labour’s fightback begin with a woman as leader | Suzanne Moore 17 Dec 2019, 2:00am Let Labour’s fightback begin with a woman as leader | Suzanne Moore
With Lisa Nandy, Angela Rayner and Stella Creasy in the fold, we are spoiled for choice. How excitingWell, I am excited, which is probably illegal. Still, I am energised by the idea that, finally, Labour may have a woman leader. I like the names mentioned so far. I can’t wait for there to be an opposition, nor can I believe there is not some sort of ethical vet who could come and sedate the Jeremy Corbyn cadre for their own peace of mind. That’s not very gracious of me, is it? Humility? That is a two-way street, man, and there’s not a jot from some of the cheerleaders I see. They “won” again, just as they did in 2017. And anything that went wrong was down to Brexit, Jews, the BBC and bribed-up unbelievers like me who, from day one, said that Corbyn was unelectable. Also – whisper it quietly – the idiotic working class.
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The Lib Dems helped the Tories to victory again. Now they should disband | Simon Jenkins 16 Dec 2019, 12:16pm The Lib Dems helped the Tories to victory again. Now they should disband | Simon Jenkins
The party’s only achievement was to split the vote. It should now merge with Labour and become a moderate influence No, it was not just Jeremy Corbyn. Last week’s crushing defeat of the left was also caused by the Liberal Democrat party splitting the vote. Yet again, by offering itself as the vote launderer of British liberalism, it has served as merely the fellow traveller of British Conservatism. Boris Johnson owes it a huge debt of gratitude. Misreading election results – largely so as to gloat or spread blame – is the traditional folly of post-election analysts. Boris Johnson won the election with a thumping parliamentary victory, but the operative word is parliamentary. His
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Labour needs to change – but it mustn’t forget what it got right | Miatta Fahnbulleh 16 Dec 2019, 10:32am Labour needs to change – but it mustn’t forget what it got right | Miatta Fahnbulleh
The party correctly grasped the scale of Britain’s poverty and the climate crisis. Those eager to reject Corbyn should not abandon this groundThe Labour party is reeling from a
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How Labour went from near-breakthrough in 2017 to disaster in 2019 | Tom Kibasi 16 Dec 2019, 9:31am How Labour went from near-breakthrough in 2017 to disaster in 2019 | Tom Kibasi
Those who entirely blame Corbyn or Brexit are partly right. Here’s the full picture of how the election collapse came about In the days that have passed since Labour’s historic defeat, the party has descended into bitter recriminations. A battle is now under way to define it along factional lines: to his critics, the defeat was a rejection of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership and his politics; to his cheerleaders it could all be explained away by the party’s support for a second referendum on Brexit. The truth, of course, is far more complicated than either of those explanations, though each play a part in that defeat. The purpose of any analysis must be to understand what went wrong so it can be put right. That’s why it is futile to focus on factors outside the party’s control. Yes, there was a ferocious assault from the press, the Liberal Democrats and the Green party stood in seats that they could not win, and the Tories ran a campaign of dirty tricks. But these are not new phenomena. Labour needs the serenity to accept the things it cannot change, the courage to change the things it can, and the wisdom to know the difference.
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Corbyn’s failed Brexit strategy sealed Labour’s fate | Caroline Flint 15 Dec 2019, 1:55pm Corbyn’s failed Brexit strategy sealed Labour’s fate | Caroline Flint
The Tories can now lay claim to be Britain’s party of the working class. Labour now either faces the hard truths or deludes itselfAfter leave-voting Labour seats
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Unions colluded in the fiction that Corbyn’s plan was going to win power | Will Hutton 15 Dec 2019, 3:00am Unions colluded in the fiction that Corbyn’s plan was going to win power | Will Hutton
If the party is going to survive it must pursue a broad coalition, not a socialist utopiaSo, although more than 17 million people voted for parties that wanted a second referendum compared with fewer than 15 million who did not, on 31 January Britain will leave the EU on Boris Johnson’s terrible deal. What he presents as an
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The Observer view on where Britain goes after the general election result | Observer editorial 15 Dec 2019, 1:30am The Observer view on where Britain goes after the general election result | Observer editorial
Corbyn was not the leader to address Labour’s decline. It can’t make the same mistake againThis is the most decisive election result for over a decade. Boris Johnson asked the country for a mandate to “get Brexit done”, and last Thursday voters delivered him an overwhelming majority. The result settles once and for all the vexed question of when and whether we will leave the European Union: Britain’s formal exit will happen at the end of next month. But the conclusiveness of the result should not obscure the massive uncertainty that hangs over our future: over what type of Brexit we choose once we have left, a decision that will have huge implications for our economic wellbeing and the integrity of the union. This is the largest Conservative majority the country has seen since 1987, delivered on the biggest share of the vote won by any party since Margaret Thatcher’s first victory in 1979. For Labour, this defeat is its fourth in a row, producing the smallest cohort of MPs the party has seen since 1935. Britain’s electoral map has been upended as the Conservatives have swept to victory with a raft of seats in the north and the Midlands that were not so long ago seen as impregnable Labour strongholds.
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How Brexit exposed the frailties in Labour | Chaminda Jayanetti 14 Dec 2019, 4:00am How Brexit exposed the frailties in Labour | Chaminda Jayanetti
Remember ‘tactical ambiguity’? It worked briefly in 2017, but sowed the seeds of a disastrous election campaign in 2019 The greatest failure of Jeremy Corbyn’s career was born in the hubris of its greatest success. In 2017, with a voter base split between leave and remain, Labour was widely expected to struggle to keep its flimsy electoral coalition together. But the party adopted a position of “tactical ambiguity”: it committed to leaving the EU and the single market and ending free movement of people, while adopting such a belligerent tone against a no-deal Brexit that remainers might mistake Labour for being against Brexit itself. Once Britain had voted leave, Labour was always going to be in difficulty. But Corbyn’s position afterwards only made things worse
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This Labour meltdown has been building for decades | Aditya Chakrabortty 14 Dec 2019, 12:59am This Labour meltdown has been building for decades | Aditya Chakrabortty
The party has no God-given right to expect votes, let alone to govern. It needs to renew its contract with its base On the really painful days in politics, most commentary isn’t worth the name. It’s not analysis, it’s score-settling; party political broadcasts for the I-told-you-so brigade, rushed out by people who won’t admit to ever getting a single thing wrong themselves. So it will go this weekend. You’ll read that Labour’s wipeout was only down to Brexit, by those who won’t admit a flaw in Jeremy Corbyn and his
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Is Jeremy Corbyn to blame for Labour’s defeat? | Letters 13 Dec 2019, 12:12pm Is Jeremy Corbyn to blame for Labour’s defeat? | Letters
Readers respond to the Conservative landslide in general election 2019The general election result confirms Jeremy Corbyn as a symptom but not a solution to the crisis of social democracy in the Labour party. This has been apparent since his election as leader when he first turned down the offers of electoral alliance with the Scottish and Welsh nationalists and Greens, leaving Labour a unionist party in Scotland. His subsequent tergiversations over Brexit then sought to “unite the country” with a stance of Wilsonian neutrality only masking his persistent Bennism. And, unlike the Greens and Extinction Rebellions activists, and contrary to the hopes of his enthusiastic supporters, neither Corbyn nor John McDonnell clearly explained why a profit-dedicated system is incompatible with human survival. Instead, they tried to advance a reforming socialism at a time when the class basis for mass action has collapsed with the disintegration of traditional manual working-class culture and organisation. In Scotland a new demographic may have come together in a progressive nationalism, but in England it follows Boris Johnson’s nostalgic escapism.
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Andy Burnham should take the lead | Letters 13 Dec 2019, 12:12pm Andy Burnham should take the lead | Letters
Readers on why the mayor of Greater Manchester is the ideal person to succeed Jeremy CorbynA better successor to Jeremy Corbyn than your front-runners (
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Labour won’t win again until it works out why it lost | Gary Younge 13 Dec 2019, 5:51am Labour won’t win again until it works out why it lost | Gary Younge
It’s not enough to blame Jeremy Corbyn, Brexit or the media. The picture is far more complex than that
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This defeat leaves Labour support unrecognisable from 30 years ago | Lewis Baston 13 Dec 2019, 5:14am This defeat leaves Labour support unrecognisable from 30 years ago | Lewis Baston
The party has lost poor urban areas and gained affluent remainer enclaves since Michael Foot’s historic defeat in 1983 Each election invites us to revisit the lessons of the previous one. Just as the 2017 election showed that while a lot of people had an appetite for change and Labour policies, they had not been willing to embrace Ed Miliband as a leader in 2015, the 2019 election sheds a harsh light on how poor a campaigner Theresa May proved to be in 2017. Boris Johnson, avoiding the media and repeating platitudes as banal as the Maybot, unlocked the mandate that she sought last time around. It was an expertly timed election, thanks as much to the blunders of Swinson and Corbyn as to the Machiavellian planning of Boris Johnson and Dominic Cummings. Running against chaos worked for Cameron in 2015, and even more so for the
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Devoid of agility, charisma and credibility, Corbyn has led Labour into the abyss | Polly Toynbee 13 Dec 2019, 2:51am Devoid of agility, charisma and credibility, Corbyn has led Labour into the abyss | Polly Toynbee
Yes, the manifesto was magnificent. But Corbyn has allowed his party to be riven by sectarianism, antisemitism and BrexitThe
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If the exit poll is right, this election will transform British politics | Martin Kettle 12 Dec 2019, 5:41pm If the exit poll is right, this election will transform British politics | Martin Kettle
It looks like a triumph for Boris Johnson, and an epochal collapse for Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour
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Johnson or Corbyn? Democracy is in trouble when we’re obsessed with leaders | Lea Ypi 12 Dec 2019, 1:02pm Johnson or Corbyn? Democracy is in trouble when we’re obsessed with leaders | Lea Ypi
We should judge politicians by their values – not by their charismaCoverage of elections, including this one, inevitably depicts them as a popularity contest between the party leaders – focused on fluctuations in opinion polls and satisfaction ratings. Even where issues rather than personalities seemed to occupy the agenda – with
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Boris Johnson’s record of bigotry, antisemitism and far-right politics must not be forgotten | Letters 11 Dec 2019, 1:20pm Boris Johnson’s record of bigotry, antisemitism and far-right politics must not be forgotten | Letters
A group of Jewish academics and campaigners voice their concerns about the prejudices of the Conservative leader, while residents of Jeremy Corbyn’s constituency express their full confidence in their representativeBoris Johnson has invoked some of the oldest and most pernicious antisemitic stereotypes in a book he wrote when he was a Conservative shadow minister. He describes “Jewish oligarchs” who run the media, and fiddle the figures to fix elections in their favour. He portrays a Jewish character, Sammy Katz, with a “proud nose and curly hair”, and paints him as a malevolent, stingy, snake-like Jewish businessman who exploits immigrant workers for profit. There is nothing subtle about this. We know what antisemitism looks like.
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If I ticked Blair’s box, you can Corbyn’s | Brief letters 11 Dec 2019, 1:17pm If I ticked Blair’s box, you can Corbyn’s | Brief letters
Little Dorrit | New Labour | The will of the people | Emma Dent Coad | VotingIf the result of Thursday’s ballot goes the way Guardian readers will be fearing, it might be accounted for by this observation, in my grandmother’s copy of Little Dorrit, “He had a certain air of being a handsome man – which he was not; and a certain air of being a well-bred man – which he was not. It was mere swagger and challenge; but in this particular, as in many others, blustering assertion goes for proof, half over the world.”
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Scared of Corbyn? As a black Jewish woman I’m terrified of Johnson | Nadine Batchelor-Hunt 11 Dec 2019, 7:53am Scared of Corbyn? As a black Jewish woman I’m terrified of Johnson | Nadine Batchelor-Hunt
Of course I’m angry about antisemitism. But the Tory party, from Windrush to stop and search, has a hostile agenda towards people of colourLabour has traditionally been my political home, and I have voted Labour in every general election since I turned 18. That was why, back in 2017 when the antisemitism crisis began to escalate in Labour, I felt lost and betrayed – resulting in cancelling my Labour party membership. Matters came to a head after the BBC Panorama Is Labour Anti-Semitic? investigation, which became a
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No Brexit, no Johnson, no Corbyn. Is that too much to ask? | Rafael Behr 11 Dec 2019, 1:00am No Brexit, no Johnson, no Corbyn. Is that too much to ask? | Rafael Behr
My dream election result is still just about possible. But I’m not holding out much hope When Boris Johnson became prime minister, I asked a European diplomat, a veteran of overseas missions, for help putting Britain’s political mess in perspective. Where, I asked, did we sit on the spectrum of international dysfunction? The diagnosis was mostly reassuring: a wobble not a nosedive. But there was one symptom of profound malaise – people contacting the embassy in search of an EU passport. In stable democracies, it is not normal to shop around for alternative citizenship as insurance against your home state turning rogue. I have had those conversations – some half-joking, some deadly serious – with people
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The Guardian view on general election 2019: A fleeting chance to stop Boris Johnson in his tracks | Editorial 10 Dec 2019, 2:13pm The Guardian view on general election 2019: A fleeting chance to stop Boris Johnson in his tracks | Editorial
The mood may be one of despair, but this election is critical to the country’s future. The best hope lies with Labour, despite its flaws Britain has not faced a more critical election in decades than the one it faces on Thursday. The country’s future direction, its place in the world and even its territorial integrity are all at stake, primarily because this is a decisive election for Brexit. The choice is stark. The next prime minister is going to be either Boris Johnson, who is focused on “getting Brexit done” whatever the consequences, or Jeremy Corbyn, who with a Labour-led government will try to
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s NHS plan: trading patient data | Editorial 8 Dec 2019, 1:30pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s NHS plan: trading patient data | Editorial
Donald Trump has made clear he wants a post-Brexit Britain to let US tech companies and big pharma access medical recordsThe NHS is a goldmine of patient data which the United States wants to be quarried by some of its biggest companies. Britain’s health service is home to a unique medical dataset that covers the entire population from birth to death. Jeremy Corbyn’s NHS press conference revealed that the US wanted its companies to get unrestricted access to the UK’s medical records, thought to be
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If Boris Johnson gets back to Number 10 he will have Jeremy Corbyn to thank | Andrew Rawnsley 8 Dec 2019, 4:00am If Boris Johnson gets back to Number 10 he will have Jeremy Corbyn to thank | Andrew Rawnsley
Against a decade-old Tory government led by a charlatan, Labour should be confident of winning, not praying for a last-minute miracle One of my colleagues recently recalled that, in advance of the
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Why we in the Jewish Labour Movement have not campaigned for Jeremy Corbyn | Mike Katz 8 Dec 2019, 3:02am Why we in the Jewish Labour Movement have not campaigned for Jeremy Corbyn | Mike Katz
The Labour party leader is failing Jewish members and tolerating antisemitismWho would have thought that antisemitism – and the way it has infected and toxified the Labour party – would become a dominant theme of an election campaign? The party’s problems over this are wholly self-inflicted. It isn’t just because in one interview Jeremy Corbyn
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The Corbyn and Johnson TV debate: our writers’ verdicts | Martin Kettle, Katy Balls, Owen Jones, Gaby Hinsliff 6 Dec 2019, 5:34pm The Corbyn and Johnson TV debate: our writers’ verdicts | Martin Kettle, Katy Balls, Owen Jones, Gaby Hinsliff
With less than a week until polling day, Jeremy Corbyn and Boris Johnson made a late pitch to voters. What did we learn?
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Of course Labour’s policies can work – they used to be the norm | Letters 6 Dec 2019, 12:52pm Of course Labour’s policies can work – they used to be the norm | Letters
Jeremy Corbyn’s proposals were once widely accepted in pre-Thatcher Britain, says
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Can Labour bring its divided family together? | Jonathan Freedland 6 Dec 2019, 12:45pm Can Labour bring its divided family together? | Jonathan Freedland
It’s not just Brexitland and Remainia Jeremy Corbyn has to unite, but the generations and classes within the partyWhatever happens next Thursday, an act of reconciliation will be necessary. Not between the winning and losing parties, but within one of them – bridging a divide that separates their supporters, both former and current, from each other. This gulf is not so much ideological as it is cultural or even tribal. The divide I have in mind is among the millions of people who either used to, or still do, identify themselves with Labour. It’s been discussed often, but it’s rare to see it in a single room. That’s what I witnessed this week in the marginal seat of Dagenham and Rainham, where east London blurs into Essex. For the second time in a matter of days, I was eavesdropping on a focus group of voters, this time
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Corbyn still plays the crowds – but spirit of 2017 remains elusive 6 Dec 2019, 11:44am Corbyn still plays the crowds – but spirit of 2017 remains elusive
As election day nears, the Labour leader visits West Yorkshire and his base is beginning to worry
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From Johnson’s lies to Corbyn’s promises – this election is about trust | Gary Younge 6 Dec 2019, 1:00am From Johnson’s lies to Corbyn’s promises – this election is about trust | Gary Younge
Labour needs to start tying Johnson’s untrustworthiness to Brexit. And stop promising new thingsThe appeal of any presidential candidate, said Richard Nixon’s speechwriter, Raymond Price, is based on a
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Brussels or Washington? Brexit means we must decide whose side we’re on | Rafael Behr 3 Dec 2019, 1:39pm Brussels or Washington? Brexit means we must decide whose side we’re on | Rafael Behr
The Nato summit has underlined a problem both Johnson and Corbyn deny – the cost in power and influence of leaving the EUIt is a common problem, especially at this time of year. You agree to host a party, but when it comes around the timing feels awkward. Work is hectic, some of the guests are barely on speaking terms, someone might make an unpleasant scene. That someone might be you. A less frivolous politician than Boris Johnson could turn this week’s
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Can Labour reach across bitter regional divisions? | Letters 3 Dec 2019, 1:12pm Can Labour reach across bitter regional divisions? | Letters
Readers look at the problems Jeremy Corbyn needs to overcome for his party to win back voters in post-industrial former heartlandsAs usual John Harris provides thoughtful testimony to Labour’s difficulties in working-class areas of the Midlands and north (
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Vote for hope and a decent future | Letter 3 Dec 2019, 11:55am Vote for hope and a decent future | Letter
Only Jeremy Corbyn and Labour offer a transformative plan that prioritises the needs of people and the planet, say leading cultural figuresWe are alarmed by the global rise of far-right nationalism and the authoritarian turn taken by many governments following the global financial crash of 2008. We are shamed by extreme levels of inequality, neglect and environmental impoverishment resulting from decades of neo-liberalism, in Britain and across the world. We are inspired by growing movements, from Chile to Lebanon and beyond, calling for dignity, accountability and economic justice. People are demanding a future that promises their children decent education, health, jobs and homes, and humane and sustainable solutions to the climate crisis.
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The Corbyn I know is a rare thing – warm, decent and interested in justice | Ronan Bennett 1 Dec 2019, 1:00am The Corbyn I know is a rare thing – warm, decent and interested in justice | Ronan Bennett
Throughout his life, the Labour leader has striven to create a better society for everyone in Britain In his speech to launch the Labour
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This election will be all about identity, not money. And the Tories know it | Simon Jenkins 28 Nov 2019, 1:51pm This election will be all about identity, not money. And the Tories know it | Simon Jenkins
Labour’s pledge to boost spending may not win it the votes it wants. In this election, other things are more importantWhy would anyone not vote Labour? If person A knocks on your door and offers you £1,000, no questions asked, and person B offers £100, why refuse A? The question has long puzzled experts. Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn has
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Voters have shifted since 2017. Here’s what I’ve seen | Rafael Behr 27 Nov 2019, 12:59am Voters have shifted since 2017. Here’s what I’ve seen | Rafael Behr
Out on the streets, attitudes to Brexit and Corbyn have hardened. But there’s little trust in Boris Johnson, even among Tory voters has little At school I was told a cautionary tale about an art teacher who had the tips missing from two fingers. One had been lost showing a class how not to use a craft knife. The second was lost demonstrating what had happened the first time. The story may be apocryphal, but the lesson is real enough: there is no mistake so stupid that it can’t be made twice. Boris Johnson still has time to bungle this election. If he fails to win an outright victory, his missing lead will take a special place in Westminster folklore alongside its spectral twin –
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Like an old pro, Corbyn ensures the show goes on | Marina Hyde 26 Nov 2019, 2:41pm Like an old pro, Corbyn ensures the show goes on | Marina Hyde
As firestorm rages over antisemitism, Labour leader gives his race and faith event the big sell Wherever the edifying story of this election goes next, we will always have the sheer WTF-ery of launching your race and faith manifesto on a morning that not only has the chief rabbi describing you as “unfit for high office”, but the
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The Guardian view on antisemitism and Labour: a shadow over the body politic | Editorial 26 Nov 2019, 1:59pm The Guardian view on antisemitism and Labour: a shadow over the body politic | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn must tackle racism to make good on his promise to unify the countryThis is turning out to be an election like no other. There is a mood abroad in the UK in which personal feelings about politicians and perceptions about the state of the country are stretching traditional loyalties to breaking point. No one can miss the raw hostility from those in one party toward those in the others. The perceived stakes appear so high that they justify extreme measures. A decade of austerity opened up a debate about the divisions in British society; since 2016 the emotional pitch of arguments has been raised to an intensity not seen before. Brexit is a case in point. How we depart from the European Union will change this country for ever. Political identities have become shaped by the way people voted in 2016, hardened by a cultural divide. To capitalise on this Boris Johnson peddles a hard Brexit while disgracefully
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Johnson or Corbyn? I’d rather vote Sturgeon 26 Nov 2019, 2:00am Johnson or Corbyn? I’d rather vote Sturgeon
The SNP leader emerged from the leadership debates looking like a grownup. I’m tempted to move to Scotland
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On the doorstep, Labour faces the question: who do you speak for? 26 Nov 2019, 1:00am On the doorstep, Labour faces the question: who do you speak for?
A ‘lads’ army’ is taking the fight to the Tories but are these foot soldiers connecting in the party’s traditional areas? The first Friday night of the election campaign and about 100 Labour people hungriest for the fight are packing out a bar in east London. They are here to sound off, to network, to plot. But since the night is hosted by young activists in Momentum – the cheeky ground troops of Jeremy Corbyn’s grassroots movement – they are also here to have a laugh. The bar is small and rough and ready, with bottles of pale ale sold from a hatch and a fog of condensation settling over the windows and newcomers’ glasses. Mince pies and songbooks are handed out, as the crowd is taught some “incredible socialist bangers” for those long, cold nights out on the doorstep.
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The Lib Dems are still the party of centrist ‘common sense’ – but are there any takers? | Andy Beckett 25 Nov 2019, 8:34am The Lib Dems are still the party of centrist ‘common sense’ – but are there any takers? | Andy Beckett
The party may find its self-consciously moderate worldview has little traction in a polarising electionIf you’re on the left, it’s easy to dislike the Liberal Democrats. Helping David Cameron into Downing Street; supporting most of his austerity policies for five years; splitting the anti-Tory vote; attacking Jeremy Corbyn more than Boris Johnson. Since 2010, the Lib Dems, supposedly a party of the centre, have done much to aid three of Britain’s most rightwing governments ever. As their leader, Jo Swinson,
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There’s no more deceptive slogan of this campaign than ‘get Brexit done’ | Andrew Rawnsley 24 Nov 2019, 4:00am There’s no more deceptive slogan of this campaign than ‘get Brexit done’ | Andrew Rawnsley
Any Britons who believe that after 12 December they will never hear the B-word again are in for a disillusioning experienceIn the dim and distant past of about three weeks ago, this election was supposedly called in order to settle Brexit. Britons have been repeatedly told that they are going to the polls for the third time in less than four years to resolve the great issue once and for all. “Get Brexit done” has been the incessant mantra of Boris Johnson from day one of the campaign. He repeated his already hackneyed catchphrase so often during the first of the TV debates with Jeremy Corbyn that the audience was audibly groaning by the end. “Get Brexit done” will be the thumping beat of the Tory manifesto. Yet there is no more deceptive slogan of this campaign. This “Brexit election” is leaving Britons none the wiser about where their country will eventually land.
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The Observer view on the Labour manifesto: a bold vision, but is it less than the sum of its parts? | Observer editorial 24 Nov 2019, 1:29am The Observer view on the Labour manifesto: a bold vision, but is it less than the sum of its parts? | Observer editorial
Jeremy Corbyn has laid out his plans for a greener, fairer land. But will voters be convinced of his ability to deliver them?Britain goes into this general election a harsher country in which to live than it was 10 years ago. A decade of sweeping public spending cuts has destroyed any notion of a decent welfare safety net; services for the vulnerable have suffered eye-watering reductions in local government grants; schools and hospitals have been stretched beyond capacity. Meanwhile, a government more concerned with signalling its toughness on immigration than upholding basic standards of decency has wrongly deported people who have legally lived and paid taxes in this country for decades and in the name of the hostile environment has introduced policies that have been
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The Question Time leaders’ special: our panel’s verdicts | The panel 22 Nov 2019, 5:33pm The Question Time leaders’ special: our panel’s verdicts | The panel
Boris Johnson, Jeremy Corbyn, Jo Swinson and Nicola Sturgeon faced questions from a live BBC audience in Sheffield
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Zero chance of a Labour majority? Maybe. But Corbyn doesn’t need one | Jonathan Freedland 22 Nov 2019, 12:42pm Zero chance of a Labour majority? Maybe. But Corbyn doesn’t need one | Jonathan Freedland
Labour’s leader can get into Downing Street with as few as 270 MPs. Though it will still be a steep and narrow path to get thereI have never trusted opinion polls less than I do now. Part of that is bitter experience, after polls proved their fallibility in 2015, 2016 and 2017. Part of it is a more specific lesson taught by the US presidential election three years ago, when Hillary Clinton learned to her cost that a hefty
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We’ve already got a climate crisis – let’ not turn it into a culture war | Alice Bell 22 Nov 2019, 5:01am We’ve already got a climate crisis – let’ not turn it into a culture war | Alice Bell
Shouting slogans won’t change anyone’s mind. We activists must engage even with those whose views we find abhorrentJust 2% of the election debate was spent discussing the climate crisis. That includes the second Jeremy Corbyn gave it in his opening statement. When it was finally discussed – for a scant 45 seconds in the last 10 minutes – Corbyn was heckled after highlighting the effects our changing climate would have on the world’s poorest, with a jeer of “Oh, here we go!”. For those of us who work on raising awareness and finding solutions to the climate crisis, it was chilling.
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I’m Jewish and I’m voting Labour in the general election. Here’s why | Jonathan Lis 22 Nov 2019, 4:31am Updated I’m Jewish and I’m voting Labour in the general election. Here’s why | Jonathan Lis
Yes, antisemitism exists in Labour, as in other parties. But we can tackle it and still elect a progressive governmentIn three weeks’ time I will do something that shocks many of my closest friends and relatives. The mere mention of it can provoke amazement or outright hostility. In many cases the unspoken – or spoken – accusation is that I am throwing my community under the bus. Why? I am Jewish, and in the general election I will be voting Labour. In the Jewish community, there is genuine fear about a Jeremy Corbyn-led government and anguish that this fear is not being taken seriously. Earlier this month, the Jewish Chronicle
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A brighter, more equal future is Labour’s greatest manifesto pledge | Gary Younge 22 Nov 2019, 1:00am A brighter, more equal future is Labour’s greatest manifesto pledge | Gary Younge
The party has painted a picture of a greener, fairer society – and reminded us of the values that made Corbyn party leaderIn 2007, the renowned intellectual of the left
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Steve Bell on Jeremy Corbyn launching the Labour manifesto – cartoon 21 Nov 2019, 2:03pm Steve Bell on Jeremy Corbyn launching the Labour manifesto – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/nov/21/steve-bell-on-jeremy-corbyn-launching-the-labour-manifesto-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on the Labour manifesto: bold pledges for anxious times | Editorial 21 Nov 2019, 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Labour manifesto: bold pledges for anxious times | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn has three weeks to win the argument with his strikingly radical tax and spending pledgesLabour’s 2019 general election
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Labour’s electrifying manifesto should jolt this election into life | Polly Toynbee 21 Nov 2019, 9:01am Labour’s electrifying manifesto should jolt this election into life | Polly Toynbee
The ambition is breathtaking. Now Corbyn needs to seize the time he has left to confront the politics of despairHere it is, a great cornucopia to lift this miserable election to a higher plane.
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Labour must turbocharge its offer to young people. The fate of the country depends on it | Owen Jones 20 Nov 2019, 1:55pm Labour must turbocharge its offer to young people. The fate of the country depends on it | Owen Jones
The party’s manifesto has to convince voters under 40 it is worth voting for Corbyn, or Johnson will triumphLabour’s fate – and with it that of the country – now rests with the young: not just the fresh-faced undergraduates of Lancaster and Cardiff but the sleep-deprived 35-year-old mums and dads of Hastings and Pembrokeshire. Just as at this stage in the
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Corbyn needs to rouse his fighting spirit to win this election | Aditya Chakrabortty 20 Nov 2019, 5:37am Corbyn needs to rouse his fighting spirit to win this election | Aditya Chakrabortty
The ITV leaders’ debate had no victor. Johnson was a one-trick Brexit pony but Corbyn failed to land an attackThe secret of winning leaders’ debates was taught to David Cameron before the very first one, in the spring of 2010.
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I’ll take Labour dithering over Conservative cruelty any day | George Monbiot 20 Nov 2019, 1:00am I’ll take Labour dithering over Conservative cruelty any day | George Monbiot
We face a choice between a party in it for themselves and one seeking to solve our massive problems. It’s no contestTry to imagine Jeremy Corbyn in Tony Blair’s post-political role: flying around the world,
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The Guardian view on the TV election debate: political theatre needs a new script | Editorial 19 Nov 2019, 5:06pm The Guardian view on the TV election debate: political theatre needs a new script | Editorial
The UK requires an alternative to the mean-spirited and sterile political conversations that have dominated political life since 2016Jeremy Corbyn rose to power on the back of the incontestable argument that Britain needed a kinder, more decent politics. Boris Johnson promised to be an inclusive “one nation” Conservative. There was little of either sentiment on display in the first televised election
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The election debate: who came out on top? | The panel 19 Nov 2019, 4:58pm The election debate: who came out on top? | The panel
After Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn go head to head, four writers assess who gave the best performance
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Johnson and Corbyn fail to land blows in second-rate light entertainment | John Crace 19 Nov 2019, 4:45pm Johnson and Corbyn fail to land blows in second-rate light entertainment | John Crace
Tory and Labour leaders manage an insincere handshake in an S&M dungeon – but little else Teeth to be pulled. Eyes to be gouged. Throats to be slit. Most people had wisely made alternative arrangements. But there were still at least four million masochists for whom the first leaders’ debate was an essential warm-up to I’m A Celebrity … Get Me Out of Here. Had Boris Johnson been smothered in a cage full of rats or Jeremy Corbyn been force-fed termites, ITV would have had the surefire ratings winner of the year. Maybe next time.
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Steve Bell on the Boris Johnson v Jeremy Corbyn TV debate – cartoon 19 Nov 2019, 1:19pm Steve Bell on the Boris Johnson v Jeremy Corbyn TV debate – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/nov/19/steve-bell-on-the-boris-johnson-v-jeremy-corbyn-tv-debate-cartoon">Continue reading...
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Why vote? You’re just clinging to a wrecked system 19 Nov 2019, 1:31am Why vote? You’re just clinging to a wrecked system
The looming general election offers fake binary choices – Corbyn or Johnson, leave or remain. Taking part is to bolster brokenness I am sitting, with old friends, around a table. We start talking about the election. No one is enthused. My friends are mostly going to vote Labour. It’s what they do. They are unhappy about it – a couple may go Lib Dem. They are all ardent remainers. I feel as if I should be somewhere else, that somehow, while these are decent people trying to do the right thing, they are no longer my people. They are being forced to vote for politicians they do not trust, and to reduce their complex, well-thought-out beliefs. Well, that’s democracy, you might say. Them’s the breaks. I say, break it more. Break it down.
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Boris Johnson gets down to the business of getting business down 18 Nov 2019, 12:26pm Boris Johnson gets down to the business of getting business down
The CBI greeted Jeremy Corbyn with indifference. He went down a storm compared with the PM
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How could it be that the Tories have turned their back on the best of British industry? | Will Hutton 17 Nov 2019, 3:00am How could it be that the Tories have turned their back on the best of British industry? | Will Hutton
If Jeremy Corbyn’s party were not so averse to capitalism, this would be a great opportunity for Labour For the past 40 years, the Conservative party has always championed an economic theory. Whether 1980s monetarism or 2010s austerity economics, I thought them bunk. But while Nigel Lawson or George Osborne were clearly wrong, at least there was an intellectual underpinning for their actions, an underpinning you could shoot at. You also knew that, one way or another, Tory policy was aiming to serve the mainstream business interest. British business represented by the CBI or the various trade association lobbies, notably the Corporation of the City of London, had privileged access and policy reflected their preoccupations. Business might sometimes complain, but in the round it knew it was heard.
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As Bozzie wades through northerners, Stanley clarifies the finer points of onanism | The Secret Diary of Carrie Symonds 17 Nov 2019, 1:30am As Bozzie wades through northerners, Stanley clarifies the finer points of onanism | The Secret Diary of Carrie Symonds
In which our heroine learns more about the conservation of the genus Johnson Dilyn’s cute new jumpers? Check! My sustainable campaign-wear (three sets)? Check! Cue a super week supporting our incredible women candidates (or “double-breasted Amazons” according to guess who!) to show people that Getting Women Done is absolutely our 17th highest priority for 2023! Bozzie is right, never trust Northerners because my reception on the doorstep has been super, I literally lost count of the people who wanted to hear more about Mr Corbyn’s onanism! Happy to help until someone says it is not the same as communism. Text Bozzie to explain, he says not now, he’s literally up to his neck in stormwater like the drowning Leander. Me: “Right just like last week you foul liar.” Still, Stanley picks up.
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The Guardian view on Labour’s broadband nationalisation: radical and necessary | Editorial 15 Nov 2019, 1:30pm The Guardian view on Labour’s broadband nationalisation: radical and necessary | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn’s plan to offer free high-speed internet across Britain is canny politics and an economic idea whose time has comeBritain is in the slow lane when it comes to the internet. Fewer than one in 12 premises in Britain have access to full-fibre connections capable of delivering speeds greater than 1 gigabit per second. By comparison in Spain more than 70% can connect via such networks. In South Korea the figure is close to 100%. So Jeremy Corbyn’s promise to give every home and business in the UK
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It’s Tory remainers – not Labour leavers – who are the real key to this election | Paula Surridge 15 Nov 2019, 11:03am It’s Tory remainers – not Labour leavers – who are the real key to this election | Paula Surridge
A third of 2017 Conservative voters also voted remain. Will fear of Jeremy Corbyn keep them away from the Lib Dems?The first week of campaigning is behind us and the shape of the election is emerging. The critical questions for the next four weeks and beyond are becoming clearer. Among these is whether this election will accelerate a realignment of British politics based on where voters stand on Brexit. The idea that
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Concerns about antisemitism mean we cannot vote Labour | Letter 14 Nov 2019, 12:41pm Concerns about antisemitism mean we cannot vote Labour | Letter
To endorse Jeremy Corbyn as prime minister would be to surrender in the fight against anti-Jewish prejudice, say 24 signatories including
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Tactical pacts won’t turn this into a Brexit election | Rafael Behr 13 Nov 2019, 1:00am Tactical pacts won’t turn this into a Brexit election | Rafael Behr
Trying to organise people into leave and remain compartments is a non-starter. The voters will decide what this poll is about A message pings on my phone from a swing voter. This person was a remainer who accepted the referendum verdict, backed Theresa May in 2017, loathes Boris Johnson and thinks Jeremy Corbyn would ruin the country. The Liberal Democrats don’t appeal and can’t win locally. What to do? It is a commonplace dilemma, hardly worth sharing, except for the detail that this individual was a Tory cabinet minister not long ago. Something peculiar is going on with political identities when people who have served in government for the two biggest parties are at a loss as to how to vote.
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I’m a Liberal Democrat candidate – here’s why I’m stepping aside for Labour | Tim Walker 12 Nov 2019, 1:59pm I’m a Liberal Democrat candidate – here’s why I’m stepping aside for Labour | Tim Walker
Some things are bigger than party politics. And with the Tories in an unholy alliance with Farage, it’s time to do what’s rightWhenever I see Barry Gardiner or Mark Francois on television, I realise how much Jeremy Corbyn and Boris Johnson have contributed to the zombification of British politics. Reason, logic and the capacity for independent thought are qualities now pretty much irreconcilable with party allegiance. In the Lib Dems there’s still, I hope, a home for an individual with a conscience. What’s more, ours has always been a grassroots organisation, where it’s ultimately the members who call the shots, which keeps us uniquely in touch with the national psyche.
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Boris Johnson finally gets his mop out but only makes things worse 12 Nov 2019, 12:44pm Boris Johnson finally gets his mop out but only makes things worse
Glacial responses to situations requiring leadership such as the UK floods have become the PM’s forte To say access to Boris Johnson is heavily controlled for this election would be to understate it. There are areas beneath the floorboards behind the fridge in Antarctic ice stations that are more accessible than the prime minister, who now makes Theresa May look like someone who couldn’t wait to get out there amongst it all. Even a walk to Whitehall’s Cabinet Office Briefing Room A has appeared a bridge too far for the past few days. With both Lib Dem leader, Jo Swinson, and Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, making visits to the flood-affected Doncaster area on Tuesday, it is a mystery why Johnson left it quite so long to chair a Cobra meeting on the situation. The mystery is not so much the failure to empathise – that might be expected given his crisis formbook, of which more later – but the failure to realise he must LOOK as though he empathises. Without wishing to distract the prime minister from whatever it is he is up to in seclusion, you’d think one or other of his advisers might have noticed that a general election was indeed occurring, and that appearing to give at least a quasi-toss about a section of voters might be a helpful position for him to adopt.
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Putting fear of Corbyn’s Labour in perspective | Letters 11 Nov 2019, 12:24pm Putting fear of Corbyn’s Labour in perspective | Letters
Readers respond to a piece by Jonathan Freedland in which he asked how Jews can vote for the Labour leaderJonathan Freedland is incorrect to depict our parliamentary elections as a presidential contest (
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Ben Jennings on Johnson, Corbyn and election spending promises – cartoon 10 Nov 2019, 2:30pm Ben Jennings on Johnson, Corbyn and election spending promises – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/nov/10/ben-jennings-on-johnson-corbyn-and-election-spending-promises-cartoon">Continue reading...
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Boris Johnson versus Jeremy Corbyn for Number 10: the battle of the unfittest | Andrew Rawnsley 10 Nov 2019, 4:00am Boris Johnson versus Jeremy Corbyn for Number 10: the battle of the unfittest | Andrew Rawnsley
The two largest parties are fielding candidates for the premiership who are deeply alarming not just to many voters, but to many people on their own sides For all the many differences that will be on display in the mouth-to-mouth TV combat and other election events of the next few weeks, Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn have at least one thing in common – a lot of people think each is unfit to be prime minister and many of those believing this belong to their own tribe. This is not usual. It is to be expected that each will accuse the other of not being suitable candidates for the most powerful office in the land. It is natural that Jo Swinson, wishing a plague on both their houses, should say that they are so equally awful that she won’t choose between them and neither should you.
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Many Jews want Boris Johnson out. But how can we vote for Jeremy Corbyn? | Jonathan Freedland 9 Nov 2019, 3:01am Many Jews want Boris Johnson out. But how can we vote for Jeremy Corbyn? | Jonathan Freedland
We’re advised to shelve our angst to stop Brexit. It’s painful to be part of a community that can be so easily cast asideFor most progressive-minded, remain-leaning folk, is it even a dilemma? I’m not sure. To them the logic must seem simple and straightforward: they want to eject a cruel and useless government and stop Brexit, and that means denying Boris Johnson a majority and replacing him with Jeremy Corbyn, who will end austerity and hold a second referendum. Job done. I wish it were as simple as that for me. But it’s not.
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Hidden meaning in Jeremy Corbyn’s horseradish gift to Tom Watson? | Brief letters 8 Nov 2019, 12:51pm Hidden meaning in Jeremy Corbyn’s horseradish gift to Tom Watson? | Brief letters
Brexit poetry | Reporting abuse | Tom Watson’s resignation | Film ratings | GCSE marking | FrackingRhiannon Lucy Cosslett’s description of Brooke’s The Soldier as “snivelling ethnocentricity” (
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Jo Swinson says Labour and the Tories are the same on Brexit. That’s just not true | Chaminda Jayanetti 7 Nov 2019, 12:09pm Jo Swinson says Labour and the Tories are the same on Brexit. That’s just not true | Chaminda Jayanetti
There are plenty of reasons not to vote for Corbyn. But his current Brexit policy is close to what the Lib Dems pledged in 2017 Once upon a time, words had meanings. Take “merge”, for example – to “blend gradually into something else so as to become indistinguishable from it”, according to the Oxford English Dictionary.
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The monstrous ugly tangle of Brexit will be ignored in this ‘Brexit election’ | Rafael Behr 5 Nov 2019, 12:34pm The monstrous ugly tangle of Brexit will be ignored in this ‘Brexit election’ | Rafael Behr
British politics has created a situation so toxic that the public cannot bear to look at itThe Conservatives have been in government for nine years, but Boris Johnson seems not to feel the weight of that incumbency. He is seeking his first national mandate as prime minister, so doesn’t see himself as a shop-soiled candidate. But he is asking voters to return his party to office for a third time, and it wasn’t much loved to begin with. Labour has the opposite problem. There is plenty of hunger for a new direction in government, but the appetite is dulled by the sight of Jeremy Corbyn asking to be prime minister. It is risky to serve a dish that the electorate has sent back to the kitchen once already.
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If Russia meddled in the Brexit vote we need to know – before the election | Gaby Hinsliff 5 Nov 2019, 11:05am If Russia meddled in the Brexit vote we need to know – before the election | Gaby Hinsliff
Boris Johnson should not delay the intelligence committee report. It risks undermining trust in our democracyDid Russia meddle in the outcome of the Brexit referendum, or didn’t it? It’s hard to think of a question more pertinent to this general election, and not just because some fear there may be dirty tricks this time too. Boris Johnson’s entire campaign strategy hinges on arguing that Brexit must be done, because it’s the will of the people. The prime minister cannot admit any whisper of doubt about the legitimacy of the referendum, partly because leave voters would eat him alive for it, and partly because Brexit is his only really big idea. Without it, what is the great Conservative mission to change the country? All that would be left is a row about who should put right the damage his party did over nine years, and a promise not to be Jeremy Corbyn for those who find the idea of a Corbyn government terrifying. Without Brexit, the abyss beckons. And that’s the context in which Downing Street is
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The Guardian view on Labour’s radical plans: fix the economy and democracy | Editorial 4 Nov 2019, 1:55pm The Guardian view on Labour’s radical plans: fix the economy and democracy | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn’s plans are required to repair the damage caused by a system that is being run in favour of privileged individuals whose market and political power allows them to extract cash from everyone elseWhen the Office for Budget Responsibility produces its economic forecasts later this week they will show that Conservative chancellors since 2010 have peddled a mistruth: that government must
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The People’s Vote campaign has run aground – but it has one last chance | James Butler 1 Nov 2019, 12:22pm The People’s Vote campaign has run aground – but it has one last chance | James Butler
Remainiacs have never recognised that Brexit was a symptom of bigger problems. Like it or not, they now depend on Corbyn The polls have barely moved. Not the polls for the general election, but the ones on voting intention in a second referendum. They show a country as sharply divided on the question as last time. Now remain has shaded a few points into the lead – but most polls find “don’t know” stubbornly high. The conventional wisdom in 2016 was that these voters would break for remain in the final days. Conventional wisdom was confounded. Leaks from the People’s Vote campaign as it has
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Johnson, Corbyn and Farage are all for ‘the people’ against ‘the elite’. This could end badly | Marina Hyde 1 Nov 2019, 12:05pm Johnson, Corbyn and Farage are all for ‘the people’ against ‘the elite’. This could end badly | Marina Hyde
It’s election time – and when three party leaders recite the same populist message, alarm bells should be ringingImagine our collective surprise to wake up today and discover that prime minister Boris Johnson wasn’t
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Brexit reduced to a petty squabble. Classic Dom | John Crace 29 Oct 2019, 5:14pm Brexit reduced to a petty squabble. Classic Dom | John Crace
Johnson and Corbyn only cared about election timing – leaving this parliament to expire as it had lived. A laughing stock It came down to a matter of days. Once Lindsay Hoyle, the deputy speaker, a man with both eyes on the top job had – as expected – chosen not to select amendments on EU citizens and votes for 16-year-olds, the only issue was about timing. The Tories wanted 12 December because that was the day they had first thought of and didn’t want to look like they were making any concessions. So tough. So brave. Classic Dom. Not wanting to be looking like the only leader too timid to vote for an election, Jeremy Corbyn muscled in on the Lib Dems and the SNP to insist that it took place on 9 December instead.
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The Labour party and Jeremy Corbyn – stick or twist? | Letters 27 Oct 2019, 1:37pm The Labour party and Jeremy Corbyn – stick or twist? | Letters
Readers discuss who should lead the main opposition party as the country heads for a general electionApart from a few diehard loyalists, I imagine most Labour party members would agree with Jonathan Freedland that Labour is not going to come anywhere close to winning an election as long as Jeremy Corbyn remains leader (
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Turkeys won’t vote for Christmas when the polls are telling them they’ll be stuffed | Andrew Rawnsley 27 Oct 2019, 4:30am Turkeys won’t vote for Christmas when the polls are telling them they’ll be stuffed | Andrew Rawnsley
Neither Boris Johnson nor Jeremy Corbyn is being straight about why they do or don’t want an election When Australia sneezes, the world catches a cold. So be warned that they had an unusually early and quite nasty flu season down under this year. I mention this because fear of the flu is one of the hidden reasons why Boris Johnson craves a pre-Christmas election. Senior NHS officials have warned ministers that the
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The question for Labour: why are you sticking with Jeremy Corbyn? | Jonathan Freedland 25 Oct 2019, 12:30pm The question for Labour: why are you sticking with Jeremy Corbyn? | Jonathan Freedland
The party leader is polling so badly that we risk a hard Brexit and five more years of Boris Johnson. It’s time to change courseIn all this talk of
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Corbyn can win a December poll despite the fears of some in his own party | Owen Jones 25 Oct 2019, 9:48am Corbyn can win a December poll despite the fears of some in his own party | Owen Jones
Labour should tell Boris Johnson he can have an election when his woeful deal is suspendedLabour must agree to a December election – and in exchange it should get the government to abandon its Brexit deal. Anything else will be a huge political error. Boris Johnson’s current offer – more time to debate his woeful deal in an attempt to triumphantly ram it through parliament before an election – is clearly unacceptable. It is, in part, an attempt to deflect from his failed commitment to “
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It’s time for Labour to bite the bullet and embrace an election | Owen Jones 23 Oct 2019, 2:29pm It’s time for Labour to bite the bullet and embrace an election | Owen Jones
If the party picks up Johnson’s gauntlet, it must pitch itself as the antidote to an arrogant Tory establishmentTis the season to be canvassing. The odds on the first December election for nearly a century have dramatically shortened. With Boris Johnson’s commitment to Brexit happening by 31 October now dead in a ditch, the Vote Leave faction of his administration is pushing hard for the “parliament versus the people” contest they have always craved. The political calculations now made by Labour will prove critical to the prospects of the embattled Corbyn project. It was a strategic blunder for Labour and other opposition parties not to accept the election gauntlet when it was first thrown down
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We marched with hope but few expectations. Yet history will side with us | Will Hutton 19 Oct 2019, 12:06pm We marched with hope but few expectations. Yet history will side with us | Will Hutton
For the prime minister’s Europhobe supporters, Brexit has become nothing less than a religion. But it will never be the road to paradiseThis was the third People’s Vote march I have joined – the most sombre, with the blackest humour. We could all read the runes: the best we could hope for was deferring the vote. Instinctive Tory tribalism and Jeremy Corbyn’s endless temporising had delivered insufficient momentum to muster parliamentary support for a second referendum. Still, we cheered
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The panic over Labour’s ‘trigger ballots’ is misguided | Sienna Rodgers 17 Oct 2019, 5:39am The panic over Labour’s ‘trigger ballots’ is misguided | Sienna Rodgers
Most deselection attempts have been caused by local issues, and have nothing to do with any concerted campaignUnless you’re fixated on the intricate details of Labour’s internal processes, you’ll be forgiven for assuming that any MP who is critical of Jeremy Corbyn can expect to be booted out of the parliamentary party. There is currently a drip, drip of stories coming out about Labour MPs being “triggered”. Louise Ellman, who quit the party yesterday citing alleged antisemitism, was one such MP widely expected to meet that fate. But the reality is that, far from facilitating a Corbynite takeover, the trigger-ballot battles taking place across the country have allowed the Labour leader’s critics to come out largely unscathed and better organised than ever. In the summer, ahead of a likely early general election, the party began its
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Does Labour really want to elect a female leader? | Suzanne Moore 14 Oct 2019, 1:40pm Does Labour really want to elect a female leader? | Suzanne Moore
John McDonnell is calling for a woman to succeed Corbyn, but it feels as though the party is being embarrassed into it Not now, darling. There are really more important things than women. And the Labour party. There is Brexit, the Queen’s speech, voter suppression, almost every other issue – and the unfettered egos of Boris Johnson and the posh bouncer Dominic Cummings. And there is the Brexit party on the sidelines, with its Stepford Wives view of femininity. This is not the time to think about that “single issue” of female representation, because everything else is more urgent. Except, actually, there is no policy that doesn’t affect the majority of the population – women. And there is no future for Labour unless it attracts women voters. When John McDonnell spoke of
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There is only one way out of Brexit | Letters 13 Oct 2019, 12:59am There is only one way out of Brexit | Letters
Tony Blair and Will Hutton are right about the need for another referendumAs a political economist, I have been critical of the Tony Blair-led era of neoliberal governance and his support for the Iraq war and I find some of Will Hutton’s criticisms of Jeremy Corbyn unfair. But I appreciate both of them for having argued very cogently in different ways that the only way to avoid the looming tragedy of Brexit is to build a broad political alliance to facilitate a second referendum on Brexit (“
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The shakeup in Corbyn’s team comes at a critical moment for Labour | Owen Jones 11 Oct 2019, 6:25am The shakeup in Corbyn’s team comes at a critical moment for Labour | Owen Jones
Karie Murphy brought discipline to the leader’s office, but her departure lets the McDonnell-Corbyn alliance reassert itselfAs the Jeremy Corbyn project hurtles towards an existential election, an old alliance is reasserting itself. The political partnership between Corbyn and John McDonnell sustained the Labour left at its weakest moments. “Jeremy is my best friend in parliament,” McDonnell used to say, before being swiftly corrected by his wife, Cynthia Pinto: “Your only friend!”
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The Crown: Princess Margaret role should have gone to Kathy Burke | Brief letters 7 Oct 2019, 12:50pm The Crown: Princess Margaret role should have gone to Kathy Burke | Brief letters
Jeremy Corbyn | Offensive language | The Crown | Welsh household meals | Ginger BakerI don’t entirely buy the scepticism of some of your correspondents about Jeremy Corbyn as a leader (
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Can anti-no-dealers unite behind Corbyn? Or should he give way for Britain’s sake? | Letters 6 Oct 2019, 12:34pm Can anti-no-dealers unite behind Corbyn? Or should he give way for Britain’s sake? | Letters
Readers discuss the best way of resolving the Brexit crisis and bringing down Boris Johnson’s governmentGary Younge’s article (
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There is only one route out of the Brexit maze and Jeremy Corbyn must lead the way | Will Hutton 6 Oct 2019, 2:30am There is only one route out of the Brexit maze and Jeremy Corbyn must lead the way | Will Hutton
Labour’s leader is not my natural political bedfellow but I believe that he holds the keyBrexit-weary as we are, we must gird ourselves for the most significant few weeks for Britain since the Second World War. The crises of our economy, our constitution, our political parties, our identity and even public truthfulness are finally coming to a head. We must save our country from the duplicitous clutches of a zealous nationalist right – and for that the array of opposition parties and independent MPs, with Labour necessarily at its heart, must act. There is only one way out of the maze. There must be a second referendum, with the facts laid out in the light of the lessons of the past three years. The seismic act of leaving the European Union, with its disastrous consequences, has to be reality-tested in a single-issue confirmatory vote. A general election, with its shopping list manifestos addressing multiple issues, can never provide either the clarity or legitimacy for addressing such a question, especially as it was a referendum that created the mess in the first place.
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For those who want to stop no deal, Jeremy Corbyn is the only hope | Gary Younge 4 Oct 2019, 1:30am For those who want to stop no deal, Jeremy Corbyn is the only hope | Gary Younge
Many MPs are in denial, refusing to accept the Labour leader’s legitimacy. Yet he is the only one who can prevent Boris Johnson trashing Britain Departing Tory leaders have developed an odd and presumptuous habit of demanding that the leader of the opposition resign too. “As a party leader who has accepted when her time was up,” Theresa May
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Reviving Theresa May’s deal is the only way out of the Brexit nightmare | Simon Jenkins 3 Oct 2019, 12:48pm Reviving Theresa May’s deal is the only way out of the Brexit nightmare | Simon Jenkins
Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn should steer this crisis to resolution and leave decisions about soft or hard Brexit for laterSo what now? Boris Johnson’s tactic of leaving Brexit to the last minute and then serving up a dog’s breakfast seems unlikely to work. Both Dublin and Brussels have effectively rubbished it. The
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Labour’s message of ‘the many not the few’ can beat the Tories | Owen Jones 2 Oct 2019, 2:30pm Labour’s message of ‘the many not the few’ can beat the Tories | Owen Jones
The Tory populists crave an election that is a culture war. But whoever successfully portrays themselves as the anti-elite will win For those bristling under a near-decade of Tory rule, what should disturb most about the Tories’ annual gathering? Priti Patel’s bitter broadside against the “north London, metropolitan, liberal elite” and her look of sadistic delight as she pledged to “end the free movement of people once and for all”? The crowd of Tory members, faces contorted with fury, angrily booing and jeering when a journalist dared to challenge Boris Johnson’s cruel appropriation of Jo Cox’s memory? Or what about when Johnson addressed a party reception and began a sentence about Jeremy Corbyn with
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Labour, Brexit and the task of uniting a deeply divided country | Letters 25 Sep 2019, 1:08pm Labour, Brexit and the task of uniting a deeply divided country | Letters
Readers discuss the stance of neutrality adopted at this week’s party conference and whether Jeremy Corbyn can appeal to both sides of the EU debatePaula Surridge is right up to a point (
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Labour elite wins a battle, but it might have just lost the war 23 Sep 2019, 3:29pm Labour elite wins a battle, but it might have just lost the war
Unconditional adoration for Corbyn overrules Momentum remainers who believed promises their voices would be heard Brexit continues to turn everything it touches to dust. There are no wise people left, so it can only now take pleasure by making fools of fools. Easy pickings but good for the LOLs. It’s come down to this for Labour. On the third day of its conference in Brighton, the best result for the party would have been for all three contradictory Brexit motions to have been passed. That way everyone could have gone home happy in a state of constructive ambiguity. The Momentum remainers who had backed Jeremy Corbyn in 2015 precisely because he had promised party members a say in forming policy would feel their voice had been heard. Those Momentum members for whom Corbyn had only ever been the once and future king would have made their mark. And the old guard of the national executive committee (NEC) who had always traditionally stitched up policy behind the scenes would be free to do so again. Come the Clause V meeting to write the next election manifesto, the NEC would have a free rein. Win-win for everyone.
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The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour: time to come together | Editorial 23 Sep 2019, 2:50pm The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour: time to come together | Editorial
The Labour leader has won an important victory against many high-profile opponents who wanted Labour to be the party of remain. He must now bring them back into the foldJeremy Corbyn is cherished by many delegates in his party. He is not held in awe by them. The membership has twice backed Mr Corbyn overwhelmingly as leader despite their views being far
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Labour is finally reaching out to minority voters to help shape policy | Rachel Shabi 23 Sep 2019, 7:42am Labour is finally reaching out to minority voters to help shape policy | Rachel Shabi
For too long the party has focused on white voters in leave areas, while taking the support of everybody else for grantedThe Jeremy Corbyn project wants to hear from people within minority communities across Britain. At last. Speaking at the Labour party’s annual conference in Brighton, Dawn Butler, the shadow women and equalities secretary, said, “
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Forget Brexit. The new battle is over Jeremy Corbyn’s successor | Zoe Williams 22 Sep 2019, 2:04pm Forget Brexit. The new battle is over Jeremy Corbyn’s successor | Zoe Williams
The bid to remove Tom Watson was about more than the deputy leader’s support for the remain causeLabour is a remain party,” Sadiq Khan, London’s mayor, said on Saturday night to a room in Brighton that exploded. Emily Thornberry arrived at the People’s Vote rally wearing a blue top with a necklace of golden stars, calling for Labour to become the party of remain. Keir Starmer, John McDonnell, Diane Abbott, Clive Lewis, Tom Watson: all of the high-ranking members of the shadow cabinet are openly remain. Some 90% of constituency Labour party motions on Brexit call for the party to campaign unambiguously for remain. It has the features of a showdown not between the leadership and the members but between a very tight inner circle – which no longer even includes McDonnell, the shadow chancellor – and everybody else. But atmospherically, it feels more like an ultimatum delivered in a rocky relationship. “Do this or I’ll leave” is never the starting point of the row, or even its apex. By the time that person says it, and means it, the balance of power has already shifted.
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The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour: it should be a broad church | Editorial 22 Sep 2019, 2:00pm The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour: it should be a broad church | Editorial
The Labour leader ought to be true to his ideological roots and must not attempt to force members to back his Brexit policy on the back of trade union votesThe seeds of Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership victory of 2015 were sown more than a decade earlier on the floor of a Labour party conference in Brighton. Then the Labour leader was Tony Blair and he had, in 2003, taken Britain into the Iraq war with predictable and disastrous consequences. By 2004, when Iraq was descending into chaos, Labour members were
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Corbyn has committed to a people’s vote, so why do remainers still attack him? | Owen Jones 22 Sep 2019, 9:44am Corbyn has committed to a people’s vote, so why do remainers still attack him? | Owen Jones
A Labour election victory is the only viable route to ending the UK’s polarising culture war over BrexitEssential to the success of any struggle is to recognise when you have won. It is less than a year and a half since the
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The failed Watson plot exposes what really scares Corbyn and his coterie | Andrew Rawnsley 22 Sep 2019, 3:00am The failed Watson plot exposes what really scares Corbyn and his coterie | Andrew Rawnsley
Instead of focusing on winning the election, the Corbynite left are desperate to tighten their grip on the party for fear it will be broken by another defeat On the eve of the Labour conference, a
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Labour has travelled a long way from the first Euro referendum to the third 22 Sep 2019, 2:00am Labour has travelled a long way from the first Euro referendum to the third
Corbyn is claiming to emulate Harold Wilson in staying neutral over Brexit. But the reality of 40 years ago was very different My friend Tom McGuinness, who will be known to many as the lead guitarist in Manfred Mann (now the Manfreds), recently spotted a most moving Churchill quote on a D-Day memorial in Normandy. “Men will be proud to say ‘I am a European’. We hope to see a day when men of every country will think as much of being a European as of being from their native country.” Having at one stage early in the second world war proposed a union between Britain and France, the great man cooled on the idea. Later he called for a United States of Europe, but he was not in favour of our joining. Nor was Clement Attlee, Labour prime minister from 1945 to 1951. As for Attlee’s successor as Labour leader, Hugh Gaitskell, he was passionately against it, arguing that it would be an insult to “a thousand years of history”.
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The Observer view on Labour’s lack of leadership over Brexit | Observer editorial 22 Sep 2019, 1:00am The Observer view on Labour’s lack of leadership over Brexit | Observer editorial
Voters will not be fooled by Corbyn’s foolish prevarication Britain is gripped by political crisis. We have a prime minister bent on taking Britain out of the EU in just over a month, even if it means crashing out with no deal, with dreadful consequences for jobs and growth, for regional inequalities and for the union. Lacking any democratic mandate, Boris Johnson has shut down parliament for five weeks in an attempt to stop MPs from blocking him, a move whose legality the supreme court will rule on this week. Yet the Labour party is heading into its conference this weekend riven by splits over Brexit and sectarian attempts by Jeremy Corbyn’s allies to scrap the position of deputy leader. It represents a breathtaking failure of leadership by Corbyn. Never has Britain been in such desperate need of a leader of the opposition who can take on a prime minister who appears prepared to ride roughshod over the rule of law and who has shown such rank disregard for our democratically elected representatives. Yet Labour seems determined to show voters that it, too, is a hopelessly divided party that cannot reach consensus on its internal party structures, let alone a clear position on Brexit or a vision for the country.
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The language of Brexit ‘betrayal’ is poisoning politics | Jonathan Lis 21 Sep 2019, 3:00am The language of Brexit ‘betrayal’ is poisoning politics | Jonathan Lis
A puritanical culture war has taken hold in which compromise is regarded as treasonFor a few weeks it was all going well for the so-called remain alliance. As Boris Johnson strained every sinew to facilitate the most damaging Brexit possible, bitter opponents Jeremy Corbyn and Jo Swinson teamed up with other party leaders to force,
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Even bankers are starting to think Corbyn might be the safe choice now | Andy Beckett 21 Sep 2019, 1:00am Even bankers are starting to think Corbyn might be the safe choice now | Andy Beckett
Faced with the Tories’ no-deal extremism and a glaring crisis in capitalism, the financial establishment is losing its fear of a radical Labour government Beneath all the noise of Brexit, an unexpected question is being quietly asked in British politics as an election nears. Is a Jeremy Corbyn government actually the safe option? If you’ve been persuaded by the years of warnings from most of the media and countless politicians that such a government would be extreme, chaotic, authoritarian and doomed to failure, you may find this question ridiculous. If you’re still a Corbynista, then the notion of him as a stabilising premier for today’s turbulent Britain may be equally absurd. For many believers, the whole point of Corbynism has been the possibility that it might lead to “the most radical government in British history”, as the leftwing theorist and activist Jeremy Gilbert
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County lines: how drugs gangs are recruiting children - podcast 18 Sep 2019, 10:00pm County lines: how drugs gangs are recruiting children - podcast
Aamna Mohdin tells Anushka Asthana how county lines gangs are stepping up their operations by using short-term holiday flats and recruiting local teens to sell drugs in small towns around Britain. Plus Owen Jones on Jeremy Corbyn’s ‘neutral’ stance on Brexit Drug gangs in major cities such as London and Liverpool have been expanding their operations into small towns in recent years. They use teenagers as runners and have been known to take over the homes of drug addicts as bases to deal from. The Guardian’s
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Will Corbyn’s Brexit referendum strategy work? Our panel responds | Polly Toynbee and others 18 Sep 2019, 8:15am Will Corbyn’s Brexit referendum strategy work? Our panel responds | Polly Toynbee and others
The Labour leader has set out his Brexit stall, vowing to remain neutral and give the people a final say
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Only Labour will give the people a final say on Brexit | Jeremy Corbyn 17 Sep 2019, 2:30pm Only Labour will give the people a final say on Brexit | Jeremy Corbyn
Boris Johnson will crash Britain out of the EU. The Lib Dems will overturn the 2016 referendum. But I’ll deliver a public vote
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Swinson’s remain extremism has given Labour a golden opportunity | Polly Toynbee 16 Sep 2019, 1:44pm Swinson’s remain extremism has given Labour a golden opportunity | Polly Toynbee
Against the Liberal Democrats’ revoke and Boris Johnson’s no deal, Jeremy Corbyn’s referendum plan is the best Brexit policy Brexit is the disrupter that breaks things and shape-shifts as it scythes through the political life of the nation. Look at its unexpected landing zone this week after the Liberal Democrat conference. The Tories and the Lib Dems have adopted two startlingly extreme positions – Boris Johnson heading for no deal, damn the consequences, versus Jo Swinson’s
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Labour cannot out-remain the Lib Dems. Thankfully, it doesn’t need to | Tom Kibasi 16 Sep 2019, 12:57pm Labour cannot out-remain the Lib Dems. Thankfully, it doesn’t need to | Tom Kibasi
It need not be a one-dimensional party defined by Brexit. Here’s how Jeremy Corbyn can resolve the crisisThe Liberal Democrats, at their Bournemouth conference this week, are in triumphant mood. This year has witnessed the strange rebirth of the party as the champions of remain. And its latest commitment, to
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Boris Johnson is damaging Britain, while Corbyn betrays Labour values | Jo Swinson 14 Sep 2019, 5:04pm Boris Johnson is damaging Britain, while Corbyn betrays Labour values | Jo Swinson
The Liberal Democrats are now the only party fighting for the values of diversity and inclusion that Labour and the Tories have abandoned, says its leaderGillian Marshall from Newtown in Wales is an epilepsy patient. She takes three different medications to manage her epilepsy – even changing the brand of one of these medications has seen Gillian admitted to hospital in the past. The
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Jeremy Corbyn is wise to emulate Harold Wilson’s pragmatism on Europe | Steve Howell 11 Sep 2019, 6:11am Jeremy Corbyn is wise to emulate Harold Wilson’s pragmatism on Europe | Steve Howell
Wilson left it late before backing his own deal in the 1975 referendum. Corbyn should keep Labour’s options open tooIt is said of Harold Wilson that he epitomised the quip: “
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Is it the end of the road for the Conservative party? | Poppy Trowbridge 11 Sep 2019, 5:25am Is it the end of the road for the Conservative party? | Poppy Trowbridge
After this week’s chaos, Boris Johnson must look at ways of mending the fractured Tory party to keep Jeremy Corbyn at bayIn his only working week presiding over a full House of Commons, Boris Johnson was defeated in
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Corbyn goes mainstream just as extremism comes back into fashion | John Crace 10 Sep 2019, 12:11pm Corbyn goes mainstream just as extremism comes back into fashion | John Crace
Compared with Boris Johnson, the serial rebel Labour leader almost looks like an establishment figure Boris Johnson has done wonders for Jeremy Corbyn. While Theresa May was prime minister it was possible for the Conservatives to portray the Labour leader as a dangerous radical. A man who couldn’t be trusted to maintain his allotment, let alone run the country. Now, though, Corbyn is increasingly looking like the sensible, safe choice. Against
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If Boris Johnson quits, MPs should back Jeremy Corbyn to avoid no deal | Polly Toynbee 9 Sep 2019, 1:49pm If Boris Johnson quits, MPs should back Jeremy Corbyn to avoid no deal | Polly Toynbee
It’s no use wishing for another leader of the opposition: we need a united alliance, and in this crisis he is stepping upWho’s afraid of Jeremy Corbyn? Unthinking, knee-jerk Corbynphobia is a danger in the precarious weeks ahead, as the country’s fate hangs by that red thread. As parliament is brutishly banished by Boris Johnson after failing to secure an election, both sides retire to plot feverish ploys and counterploys for the Brexit endgame.
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The Observer view on the best way to defeat Boris Johnson | Observer editorial 8 Sep 2019, 1:00am The Observer view on the best way to defeat Boris Johnson | Observer editorial
The stakes have never been higher as Britain heads for an election “A no-deal Brexit could cause far more damage to our future economic success than a Corbyn government, the former chancellor Ken Clarke told the
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s cunning plan: winning by resigning | Editorial 5 Sep 2019, 2:17pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s cunning plan: winning by resigning | Editorial
The prime minister sees a route to a hard Brexit by resigning and forcing opponents to answer the question they have yet to find an answer for: who leads the rebel alliance?Perhaps the strangest unintended consequence of Boris Johnson’s decision to seek a snap election is that Jeremy Corbyn could be received at this month’s Labour party conference as the country’s prime minister. This would be quite a role reversal for the pair of duelling politicians. Mr Johnson’s misplaced optimism in his powers of persuasion would have meant that he risks being, at some 48 days, the
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Boris Johnson is a hostage in No 10. No wonder he fears a long contest 5 Sep 2019, 3:05am Boris Johnson is a hostage in No 10. No wonder he fears a long contest
Now that Labour has refused to rise to the prime minister’s bait, his project lies cruelly exposed in all its absurdity Boris Johnson’s strategy is coming apart. He had no plan for a deal. He promised not to call a general election. He feared the consequences of no deal. So in an ideal world, which is the only one he had planned for, he would have had an election forced upon him by Jeremy Corbyn. Instead, he had to go to the House of Commons and ask for one under the Fixed Term Parliament Act, which requires a two-thirds majority. His request was rejected, leaving him a hostage prime minister, with no meaningful option available that doesn’t lead him into the territory of compromise, which would jeopardise his offer: the man who beats the Brexit party by being even more uncompromising than them.
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Boris Johnson fails to bring Tories sunshine in excruciating PMQs 4 Sep 2019, 3:29pm Boris Johnson fails to bring Tories sunshine in excruciating PMQs
Their clown prince resorts to telling bare-faced lies, making even Corbyn look dignified in the process Practice makes imperfect. There was an air of expectancy on the Tory benches as Boris Johnson prepared to face his
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We know how Johnson wants to play this election. The signs are it’s not working | Owen Jones 4 Sep 2019, 1:53pm We know how Johnson wants to play this election. The signs are it’s not working | Owen Jones
The Tories’ key funders are split, and Johnson’s performances have been dire. Meanwhile, Corbyn has regained his mojoImagine the scene in parliament late last night: a scruffy man with a ruffled open shirt, swinging a plastic carrier bag, staggers up to the escalator near the Palace of Westminster, yelling wildly at the leader of the opposition: “Jeremy, let’s have an election!” Corbyn was on a phone call, but a bewildered phalanx of shadow ministers clocked who it was: “
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PMQs: Boris Johnson faces Jeremy Corbyn after Brexit vote defeat – live news 4 Sep 2019, 7:23am Updated PMQs: Boris Johnson faces Jeremy Corbyn after Brexit vote defeat – live news
Prime minister threatens to seek snap general election after crucial vote passed on Tuesday in Commons
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Should Labour back a general election under any circumstances? | Matt Zarb-Cousin and Peter Kyle 3 Sep 2019, 8:21am Should Labour back a general election under any circumstances? | Matt Zarb-Cousin and Peter Kyle
Matt Zarb-Cousin and Peter Kyle go head to head on whether Labour should back a general electionIf rule number one of opposition is “Never turn down an election” then rule number two ought to be: “Don’t label an opportunity to replace the government as ‘pointless’” – particularly if you’ve spent the past four years railing against Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, arguing that the left enjoys the comfort of opposition, and would rather be a party of protest and rallies than a serious party with aspirations of government.
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Final sovereignty on Brexit must rest with the people | Jeremy Corbyn 31 Aug 2019, 4:00pm Final sovereignty on Brexit must rest with the people | Jeremy Corbyn
In these critical weeks for democracy, we must resist the actions of a phoney populist cabal in Downing StreetWe will do everything possible to stop a disastrous no deal for which this Conservative government has no mandate. This is a smash-and-grab raid on our democracy, to force through no deal, which is opposed by a majority of the public. Most people in Britain reject a Tory no-deal Brexit. Boris Johnson’s government wants to use no deal to create an offshore tax haven for the super-rich and sign a sweetheart deal with Donald Trump.
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Boris Johnson goes prorogue 29 Aug 2019, 1:01pm Boris Johnson goes prorogue
Jessica Elgot and her guests react to the prime minister’s suspension of parliament for five weeks from mid-September, an act the Commons Speaker, John Bercow, called a ‘constitutional outrage’ by , and Jeremy Corbyn said was a ‘threat to our democracy’. Jessica is joined by the Guardian journalists Rafael Behr, Owen Jones and Sonia Sodha to analyse Johnson’s motives and the next steps for MPs returning to the Commons next week.
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Labour desperately needs a pro-EU vision – not just a plan to block no deal | Rafael Behr 28 Aug 2019, 1:00am Labour desperately needs a pro-EU vision – not just a plan to block no deal | Rafael Behr
By merely making hostile noises in the direction of hard Brexit, Corbyn is failing to make a strong case for staying in the EUBoris Johnson is not a skilful manager, except of expectations. He impressed dignitaries at the
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Corbyn’s summit shows a no-deal Brexit is avoidable if MPs put tribalism aside | Jonathan Lis 27 Aug 2019, 12:16pm Corbyn’s summit shows a no-deal Brexit is avoidable if MPs put tribalism aside | Jonathan Lis
Today’s cross-party statement could be a watershed if our political parties can work togetherGood news from the bubble of party politics: Britain’s opposition leaders have today decided to
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Is Jeremy Corbyn the hero or zero of national unity? | Letters 21 Aug 2019, 12:07pm Is Jeremy Corbyn the hero or zero of national unity? | Letters
Views on the Labour leader’s role in any national unity government from
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If you can’t abide Jeremy Corbyn, learn from the moral of Ed Miliband | Aditya Chakrabortty 20 Aug 2019, 1:29pm If you can’t abide Jeremy Corbyn, learn from the moral of Ed Miliband | Aditya Chakrabortty
A coalition making cuts, a Labour leader jeered as a zealot, a rabid rightwing press. But this time, the stakes are even higherIn that moment you could feel British politics lurching out of its rut. Labour was about to pick its next leader – and instead of choosing the favourite, the old Tony Blair tribute act, voters were throwing a giant spanner in the works. They wanted the slightly gawky leftwing underdog. They wanted a transformed party, a bigger politics.
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A no-deal Brexit is disastrous. But are MPs brave enough to stop it? | Polly Toynbee 19 Aug 2019, 1:52pm A no-deal Brexit is disastrous. But are MPs brave enough to stop it? | Polly Toynbee
We now know the costs of crashing out of the EU. All factions must compromise – whether that sees Corbyn in No 10 or notIn the cloudy realms of unreality befogging this cabinet of fanatics, the approaching Brexit cataclysm is only “some bumps in the road”. So says Michael Gove, the minister in charge of national preparedness. True, austerity has inured the country to bumps: there are officially 7.8 million unfilled potholes, a £10bn backlog of repairs. But the
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Corbyn could have been the nation’s saviour. But he’s just too tribal | Simon Jenkins 19 Aug 2019, 7:00am Corbyn could have been the nation’s saviour. But he’s just too tribal | Simon Jenkins
Today’s speech was the Labour leader’s chance to muster a coalition against no deal. But all he wants is a general electionHistory is offering Jeremy Corbyn the gift of his dreams, and he is rejecting it. He has said he will do everything necessary to save Britain from the bizarre self-harm of
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Mr Corbyn wants a general election, but is his party ready to fight one? | Andrew Rawnsley 18 Aug 2019, 4:00am Mr Corbyn wants a general election, but is his party ready to fight one? | Andrew Rawnsley
Labour is short of money, undecided about its key messages and about to unleash deselection mayhem on its own MPs Be careful what you ask for. Labour relentlessly
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The Observer view on Jeremy Corbyn and stopping a no-deal Brexit | Observer editorial 18 Aug 2019, 1:00am The Observer view on Jeremy Corbyn and stopping a no-deal Brexit | Observer editorial
Dislike of the Labour leader should not be allowed to get in the way of Britain’s need for a national governmentNobody in life gets everything they want all of the time. We have to live with the cards we have been dealt and the decisions we have made, good or bad. So it is in politics. The majority of MPs who have expressed their opposition to a no-deal Brexit have to live with two realities they may find unacceptable. Jeremy Corbyn is a committed socialist, careless of division and widely distrusted. Boris Johnson is a prime minister steering Britain full tilt towards a moment of national peril propelled solely by the exigencies of extreme rightwing politics. Yet it is Corbyn who has tried to break the deadlock. It is against this background that MPs beyond the rightwing English nationalist laager into which Johnson has locked his party must assess Corbyn’s offer to create a
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Brexit: can opposition parties get their act together to stop no deal? | Letters 16 Aug 2019, 11:27am Brexit: can opposition parties get their act together to stop no deal? | Letters
Readers respond to the latest manoeuvres by Labour, the Liberal Democrats and others to stop the UK leaving the EU on 31 October without a dealWe read about the Lib Dems being under pressure to back Jeremy Corbyn’s effort to stop a no-deal Brexit (
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By dismissing Corbyn’s overtures, the Lib Dems are showing their true colours | Owen Jones 16 Aug 2019, 8:43am By dismissing Corbyn’s overtures, the Lib Dems are showing their true colours | Owen Jones
It’s telling that Jo Swinson was happier propping up David Cameron for five years than the Labour leader for five weeksIf your signature policy – indeed, only visible political position – is to
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If Jo Swinson is serious about stopping a no-deal Brexit, she must support Corbyn | Jonathan Lis 15 Aug 2019, 12:25pm If Jo Swinson is serious about stopping a no-deal Brexit, she must support Corbyn | Jonathan Lis
The Labour leader’s solution may not be perfect, but for the Lib Dems it could be the most viableJeremy Corbyn has always been more of a politician than either his most fervent supporters or detractors have wanted to admit. Last night he again demonstrated why. In a move unprecedented in modern times, the leader of the opposition has
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Corbyn has taken a brave step. Now he must rule out any ‘Labour Brexit’ | Paul Mason 15 Aug 2019, 10:06am Corbyn has taken a brave step. Now he must rule out any ‘Labour Brexit’ | Paul Mason
The Labour leader’s bold gambit has crossed numerous political and psychological lines – but it is only the first move
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Remainers will do anything to stop Brexit, except install Corbyn as PM. Why? | Rafael Behr 15 Aug 2019, 7:29am Remainers will do anything to stop Brexit, except install Corbyn as PM. Why? | Rafael Behr
Many believe a Corbyn-led government of national unity is as toxic as Brexit itself. But MPs’ options are running outBrexiters stop at nothing to get what they want and remainers stop at everything. The laws of political motion then dictate which direction things move. Jeremy Corbyn has
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After the Brexit storm, a new political alliance could emerge | Rafael Behr 13 Aug 2019, 1:31pm After the Brexit storm, a new political alliance could emerge | Rafael Behr
For those remainers repulsed by both Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn, there is at last real hopeWhen boxers go into a clinch it looks more like a tender embrace than a fight. The same is true of the clash between Labour and the Tories. There is no affection between England’s heavyweight parties, but there is a kind of intimacy about the way they lean into their antagonism for tactical comfort. Boris Johnson is glad to have Jeremy Corbyn to campaign against, and the feeling is mutual. Fear of installing a radical socialist in Downing Street imposes discipline on Tory ranks, while the Conservative leader presents Labour with a caricature of its arch enemy – careless, heartless and posh.
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If Caroline Lucas truly wants to stop a no-deal Brexit, she must work with Corbyn | Phil McDuff 13 Aug 2019, 6:25am Updated If Caroline Lucas truly wants to stop a no-deal Brexit, she must work with Corbyn | Phil McDuff
As a Green party member I find this intransigence embarrassing. Remainers need Labour’s helpI’m old enough to remember when “Caroline Lucas should lead a national unity government” was just another fringe idea found in the hinterlands of Twitter. Alas, a week is such a long time in politics that Caroline Lucas has managed to
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Jeremy Corbyn should press for a referendum, not an election | Hugo Dixon 10 Aug 2019, 4:00pm Jeremy Corbyn should press for a referendum, not an election | Hugo Dixon
If Labour can win enough support to change the law, Boris Johnson would be forced to ask the EU for more time Jeremy Corbyn shouldn’t fall into the trap of giving Boris Johnson an election. Unless, that is, he is pretty confident of winning it and, on the basis of the latest
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If trigger ballots are to work British democracy needs fundamental reform | Michael Segalov 6 Aug 2019, 4:00am If trigger ballots are to work British democracy needs fundamental reform | Michael Segalov
US style primaries for prospective MPs would improve our political system, but only if done right It doesn’t take a seasoned political pundit to understand why MPs might be hostile to any change to our democratic process that puts their job security at risk. That’s not because taking a seat in parliament is an easy option: there’s the online abuse and late-night sessions, the regular cross-country travel and the responsibility inherent to the position. And, apart from the very safest of seats, you could be out of a job whenever the next election may come. Nonetheless, serving your country while attempting to put your beliefs into practice is a privilege. The pay, the perks and future job prospects are not to be sniffed at either. Since Jeremy Corbyn became Labour leader back in 2015, few issues have caused as much division within the parliamentary party as the question of trigger ballots. Or is it deselections? Mandatory reselection? It’s impossible to keep up with the terminology. Whatever it’s called, the fundamental question remains the same: should local Labour party members be able to replace their current representative ahead of an election, if they believe there’s someone better for the job?
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Jeremy Corbyn’s stance on Brexit could yet pay off, even for remainers. Here’s why | Joseph Harker 3 Aug 2019, 1:00am Jeremy Corbyn’s stance on Brexit could yet pay off, even for remainers. Here’s why | Joseph Harker
Like Boris Johnson, I’m an optimist. In fact, the more I see of him, the more optimistic I get for a Labour election victory I’ve always hated “Irish jokes”. Having an Irish mother, I’ve always been aware how they were used to denigrate Irish people and undermine the cause of Irish nationalism. There’s one joke, though, I’ve always enjoyed. It’s the one where the guy asks the Irishman for directions, to which he replies: “Well, if I were you I wouldn’t be starting from here.” It’s stuck with me because it offers a real life lesson that I find myself regularly referring to. Back in the 1980s and 90s, it’s a lesson I should have heeded, as I argued and canvassed for a socialist Labour government when, in hindsight, it was clear that British voters had been wowed by Margaret Thatcher’s strong leadership and populist policies. For my arguments to get through, I shouldn’t have been starting from there. People such as Tony Blair and Alastair Campbell recognised this and modified Labour’s message to resonate with these same voters to spectacular effect.
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Labour’s best tactic to beat Boris Johnson? A popular front | Paul Mason 2 Aug 2019, 1:17pm Labour’s best tactic to beat Boris Johnson? A popular front | Paul Mason
Corbyn’s uncertainty over Brexit is costing the party dear – a progressive pact with the Greens and Lib Dems is its only optionBritain’s current political dynamics have been made crystal clear by the Brecon and Radnorshire byelection result. The Liberal Democrats
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Campbell, Corbyn and Labour’s hopes of winning the next election 31 Jul 2019, 12:16pm Campbell, Corbyn and Labour’s hopes of winning the next election
The party’s former spin doctor is both undermining the leader and speaking eloquently for thousands of members, say readersWell said, Aditya Chakrabortty (
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Blaming Leo Varadkar for no deal is bizarre – even for Britain’s media | Roy Greenslade 31 Jul 2019, 10:04am Blaming Leo Varadkar for no deal is bizarre – even for Britain’s media | Roy Greenslade
The Telegraph and Sun are making ludicrous claims to make the Irish taoiseach the Brexit bogeymanLeo Varadkar, Ireland’s prime minister, is being demonised by the Brexit-supporting section of the British press. His determination to stick by the backstop provision in the EU withdrawal agreement has particularly outraged the Daily Telegraph and the Sun. Both papers, with tacit support from the Daily Express, are engaged in a tactic familiar to those who, down the years, witnessed the treatment that has been handed out to homegrown politicians such as Tony Benn, Michael Foot, Neil Kinnock and, of course, Jeremy Corbyn.
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Jeremy Corbyn, I no longer want to be a member of your Labour party | Alastair Campbell 29 Jul 2019, 5:30pm Jeremy Corbyn, I no longer want to be a member of your Labour party | Alastair Campbell
Though I would win my appeal against expulsion, your losing mentality and lack of Brexit leadership mean I won’t return
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Corbyn must choose: lead the alliance against the Brexit right. Or step aside | Will Hutton 28 Jul 2019, 4:00am Corbyn must choose: lead the alliance against the Brexit right. Or step aside | Will Hutton
We need a common cause to save the country from a calamitous future. The opposition parties must come together to achieve itBritain is not a rightwing country. There is no appetite to go on a national war footing with an accompanying recession in order to leave the EU without a deal. No appetite, either, for relishing the resulting decades of distrust and animosity with the rest of the continent. There remains overwhelming attachment to the idea of the United Kingdom, still substantial attachment to the idea of the European Union and wide distrust of Donald Trump’s US. The great majority do not believe our major institutions – the civil service, the Bank of England, the judicial system – are broken because they will not blindly sign up to a no-deal Brexit.
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An election looms – and Labour must act now to puncture Johnson’s hubris | Owen Jones 26 Jul 2019, 8:20am An election looms – and Labour must act now to puncture Johnson’s hubris | Owen Jones
Tory preparations for the vote have been ruthless. Jeremy Corbyn must keep pace – by backing referendum-with-remainA general election is coming, and Boris Johnson’s ruthlessness in preparing for it has provoked private pangs of jealous admiration among prominent leftwingers. There’s no messing around here:
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What to make of the Lib Dems’ record? | Letters 25 Jul 2019, 12:55pm What to make of the Lib Dems’ record? | Letters
Readers share their views on the Liberal Democrats in the week that Jo Swinson was elected as their new leaderJo Swinson asserts that Jeremy Corbyn can’t be trusted on Brexit (
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Jeremy Corbyn must quit to give Labour a hope | Letters 25 Jul 2019, 12:54pm Jeremy Corbyn must quit to give Labour a hope | Letters
The only answer to a Boris Johnson premiership is a progressive alliance of liberal parties says
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Steve Bell on Jeremy Corbyn seeing off another PM – cartoon 24 Jul 2019, 2:08pm Steve Bell on Jeremy Corbyn seeing off another PM – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/jul/24/steve-bell-on-jeremy-corbyn-seeing-off-another-pm-cartoon">Continue reading...
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I’m a Jewish woman. And, finally, I feel hopeful about Labour | Nadine Batchelor-Hunt 22 Jul 2019, 2:48pm I’m a Jewish woman. And, finally, I feel hopeful about Labour | Nadine Batchelor-Hunt
Despite my initial cynicism, now I’ve studied Jeremy Corbyn’s No Place for Antisemitism campaign I believe he’s sincereAs someone who is both black and Jewish,
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Labour still doesn’t take the threat of Boris Johnson seriously | Zoe Williams 22 Jul 2019, 1:16pm Labour still doesn’t take the threat of Boris Johnson seriously | Zoe Williams
Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership is more defined by its opposition to New Labour than to the ConservativesJeremy Corbyn’s support among Labour members has collapsed,
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Boris Johnson’s braggadocio will soon come back to haunt him at Number 10 | Andrew Rawnsley 21 Jul 2019, 4:00am Boris Johnson’s braggadocio will soon come back to haunt him at Number 10 | Andrew Rawnsley
Lusting after the job is entirely different to doing it, and Britain’s next prime minister has made promises he cannot hope to keep For Theresa May, the worst has been saved for last. After taking her final prime minister’s questions, she will be driven to Buckingham Palace on Wednesday afternoon to perform the most personally disagreeable task of her time at the top. After tendering her resignation, which will be painful enough, she will have the even more hateful duty of recommending that the Queen invites Boris Johnson to become the new prime minister. Her failings have been a major contributory factor to his ascent. Tory activists think he will deliver them the Brexit that she couldn’t and cheer them up after the torture of the May years. Tory MPs believe that he has the campaign skills to scupper Nigel Farage and squash Jeremy Corbyn. None of which is going to be much use to him in the critical opening weeks of a premiership that will inherit all the problems that defeated Mrs May and with some extra challenges of his own.
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Why are some on left and right still seduced by the ‘noble savage’ myth? | Nick Cohen 21 Jul 2019, 12:58am Why are some on left and right still seduced by the ‘noble savage’ myth? | Nick Cohen
Talking to fringe figures, as Jeremy Corbyn seemed to do last week, is easier than engaging with the mainstreamYou learn much about people by the company they keep. The regressive left justified its name last week when Jeremy Corbyn sat down with one
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Antisemitism, Labour and Jeremy Corbyn | Letters 18 Jul 2019, 1:00pm Antisemitism, Labour and Jeremy Corbyn | Letters
Readers respond to an advertisement from 67 Labour peers claiming that the party’s leader had ‘failed the test of leadership’ over his handling of antisemitism complaintsThe advertisement from Labour peers (
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Jeremy Corbyn’s weak leadership betrays those Labour would lift from poverty | Polly Toynbee 18 Jul 2019, 8:08am Jeremy Corbyn’s weak leadership betrays those Labour would lift from poverty | Polly Toynbee
John McDonnell’s bold policies will genuinely improve people’s lives. But they’re of little use if Labour cannot win an electionWith dexterity, decisiveness and a thwack of firm leadership, Jeremy Corbyn
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The government is rubbish at social media. And no, a new PM won’t change that | Jack Bernhardt 18 Jul 2019, 4:00am The government is rubbish at social media. And no, a new PM won’t change that | Jack Bernhardt
Even if @10Downing Street did get a personality, the needs of the state and the messy habits of the internet just don’t matchIn unsure political times, one has to cling to particular certainties. Mark Francois’s face will grow redder and angrier the longer we delay Brexit. By January 2020, he should be visible from space. Chuka Umunna will, at some point, leave the Lib Dems to create a party called Alternative Change Politics, which he will leave within 45 minutes of registering it. Jeremy Corbyn will keep finding new and exciting ways to disappoint you. And regardless of who the new prime minister is, the government will continue to be absolutely rubbish at social media. Last week the government announced it was setting up the adorably pathetic
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I challenged Corbyn on antisemitism a year ago. Things have only got worse | Margaret Hodge 17 Jul 2019, 4:00am I challenged Corbyn on antisemitism a year ago. Things have only got worse | Margaret Hodge
I won’t walk away from the fight to root out antisemitism in the party. But the leadership remains in denial Today marks one year since my
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Nothing sinister in being for the many, not the few | Letters 15 Jul 2019, 1:26pm Nothing sinister in being for the many, not the few | Letters
Readers respond to an article by Jonathan Freedland about the Labour party and antisemitism’s deep rootsJonathan Freedland implies quite wrongly that Jeremy Corbyn and his Labour supporters take a “malign individual” view of history that feeds a conspiratorial paranoia, rather than seeing history as a stream of mutating, socioeconomic structures (
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Labour MPs, remove Corbyn now. Change UK failed to transform politics – it’s your turn | Gavin Shuker 15 Jul 2019, 7:38am Labour MPs, remove Corbyn now. Change UK failed to transform politics – it’s your turn | Gavin Shuker
My former colleagues should not fear challenging their unrepentant leader. There are just 10 days of parliament leftLook, I get it. The headlines wrote themselves last week as more Change UK debris
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The Conservatives look like the party of privilege. We must invest in social mobility | Justine Greening 15 Jul 2019, 3:00am The Conservatives look like the party of privilege. We must invest in social mobility | Justine Greening
Emergency funding could tackle unequal access to education and opportunity, ending the bias against poorer young peopleThe Conservative party can only succeed if it’s in the centre ground of British politics and offers an antidote to Jeremy Corbyn’s hard-left Labour party. We must be seen as the party of opportunity, as we were when I was a working-class teenager growing up in Rotherham. Yet the current Conservative party leadership battle – a candidate from Eton pitting himself against one from Charterhouse – makes us look like the party of privilege. When I was education secretary, I saw first-hand how privilege bias is hardwired into our education system and then beyond into business and careers. Any party committed to equality of opportunity should be determined to change this.
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Labour can effect positive change despite its faction-fighting over antisemitism | John Harris 14 Jul 2019, 2:04pm Labour can effect positive change despite its faction-fighting over antisemitism | John Harris
The party urgently needs to dispense with toxic fringe views and face a post-Brexit reality dominated by the right After a long tumble into disgrace and confusion that dates back well over a year, the story playing out at the top of the Labour party increasingly seems to be so dreadful that it defies belief. Jeremy Corbyn is doing a very good impression of someone who would rather be anywhere else. The party’s
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Where are the politicians with principles they would stand down for? | Andrew Rawnsley 14 Jul 2019, 3:00am Where are the politicians with principles they would stand down for? | Andrew Rawnsley
Over Brexit and antisemitism, Labour and Tory MPs are confronted with character-defining moral questionsIn her swansong appearances at the dispatch box, Theresa May is endeavouring to get in touch with her funny side. She recently tried mocking Jeremy Corbyn by
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Syriza’s defeat shows the left needs a plan to hold on to power, not just win it | Gary Younge 12 Jul 2019, 1:00am Syriza’s defeat shows the left needs a plan to hold on to power, not just win it | Gary Younge
An election victory is one thing, but to sustain social and political advances requires a movementThe day after Jeremy Corbyn scraped together the parliamentarians’ names he needed to get on the
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The BBC’s Panorama set out claims of antisemitism in the Labour party. Our panel responds | The panel 11 Jul 2019, 4:25am The BBC’s Panorama set out claims of antisemitism in the Labour party. Our panel responds | The panel
Former officials made allegations over racism complaints and the party’s handling of them under Jeremy Corbyn
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Labour is finally backing a second referendum. Is it too little, too late? | Gaby Hinsliff 9 Jul 2019, 7:03am Labour is finally backing a second referendum. Is it too little, too late? | Gaby Hinsliff
The unions have cornered Jeremy Corbyn into agreeing to a second Brexit vote. But, as ever, it’s not that simpleIs Labour really the party of remain, or leave? The official answer for a good three years has been both, which increasingly means in the eyes of many voters it is neither convincingly. The paradox of this week’s
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If Tom Watson had guts, he would quit Labour. Instead he is weakening the party | Dawn Foster 9 Jul 2019, 1:00am If Tom Watson had guts, he would quit Labour. Instead he is weakening the party | Dawn Foster
Labour’s centrists seem to think attacking Jeremy Corbyn, rather than attacking austerity, is the key to electoral success Each Sunday, without fail, I attend mass then catch up on the tedious handwringing of Tom Watson, the deputy leader of the Labour party and a lifelong professional wrecker, who has made it his official duty to complain weekly to the Sunday papers, without suggesting any concrete proposals for how to bring the party forward. Last weekend, he was rending his garments at the fact that former Labour members have
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Labour could dominate the centre ground and win. But it doesn’t seem to want to | Matthew d’Ancona 8 Jul 2019, 1:00am Labour could dominate the centre ground and win. But it doesn’t seem to want to | Matthew d’Ancona
The country is crying out for an effective opposition, and yet Jeremy Corbyn cannot grasp the opportunity In the atrium of Portcullis House last week, I saw Yvette Cooper and Stella Creasy chatting over a cup of tea. Which got me thinking: it was no stretch at all to imagine these two talented politicians as prime minister and chancellor, discussing the forthcoming comprehensive spending review. This prompted a further thought: how easy it would be to construct a pretty decent cabinet from Labour’s backbenches: Jess Phillips, Seema Malhotra, Owen Smith, Stephen Kinnock, Gloria De Piero, Angela Eagle and David Lammy for a start. Then add in a handful of existing frontbenchers – Tom Watson, Keir Starmer – and, before you knew it, you’d have the basis of an electable Labour government with a fighting chance of uniting the country and governing it competently.
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The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn: new deeds and words needed | Editorial 7 Jul 2019, 1:30pm The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn: new deeds and words needed | Editorial
Given the politics of today the Labour leader cannot tackle the issues of antisemitism and Europe with yesterday’s argumentsA general who fights the previous war usually loses. When French commanders built the Maginot Line in the 1930s it was with the first world war in their minds. They proved that leaders who think they can win by imagining today’s battles can be fought on yesterday’s terrain will find themselves outflanked. But what can one say of a leader who thinks that victory can be secured by repeating a strategy from the last war that brought defeat? That is what Jeremy Corbyn is in danger of doing. Labour’s leader is coming under fire for sticking to his guns on antisemitism and
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Labour Remainers must try to seize control before the party becomes a historical footnote | Will Hutton 7 Jul 2019, 2:00am Labour Remainers must try to seize control before the party becomes a historical footnote | Will Hutton
Jeremy Corbyn’s wait-and-see approach no longer cuts it as a general election loomsThe Labour party is in peril. The flailing political right, intellectually bankrupt but keenly culturally aware, has unleashed a social and political civil war to save itself. Brexit marks not the end but the beginning of a new politics in which the right is transmuting into the party of English nationalists – the Brexit party engulfing mainstream Toryism. The ugly forces have to be confronted, argued against and beaten. No quarter is possible. By refusing to take up arms, the Labour party has colluded with the Brexit right, created the opening for the Lib Dems and Greens and thus permitted the emergence of a new multi-party system. If Labour continues to temporise, the first past the post electoral system will fell it. The Lib Dems, unapologetic Remainers who are beginning to recognise that their Keynesian tradition offers better policies for the times than soft Thatcherism, have the opportunity to become the new anchor of British progressive politics – strengthened, if they are sufficiently strategic, by working closely with the Greens.
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Jeremy Corbyn and the real civil service | Letter 5 Jul 2019, 12:14pm Jeremy Corbyn and the real civil service | Letter
Civil servants are neither a privileged elite nor the new enemy within, says
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