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There’s only one way to head off Theresa May’s threat of no-deal chaos | Zoe Willlliams 11 Feb 1:02pm There’s only one way to head off Theresa May’s threat of no-deal chaos | Zoe Willlliams
The prime minister has given Labour an ultimatum. Now Jeremy Corbyn must respond by demanding a people’s voteIn a strange new twist, Theresa May has replied to Labour’s suggestions on Brexit in terms so opaque that this newspaper has interpreted them as a
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The Observer view: Jeremy Corbyn must honour his party’s pledge 10 Feb 1:00am The Observer view: Jeremy Corbyn must honour his party’s pledge
The Labour party has a duty to speak out for all those alarmed by Theresa May’s strong-arm tactics for the sake of the countryIt is hard to see the wood for the trees, so complex and tortuous has the Brexit endgame become. But stand back for a moment, if you can, and a truly astonishing vista opens up. It is of a Conservative prime minister purposefully threatening the people of Britain with all kinds of catastrophic consequences unless they and their elected representatives pipe down and do what she demands. Day after day, as 29 March approaches, dire warnings proliferate about the disruptive, dangerous impact of the no-deal Brexit that Theresa May refuses to rule out. NHS chiefs say that hospitals could run out of life-saving drugs. Top company directors, the CBI and the Bank of England warn of gathering economic storm clouds. A Brexit emergency “
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Labour MPs must not be fooled by Theresa May’s Brexit promises | Faiza Shaheen 7 Feb 12:42pm Labour MPs must not be fooled by Theresa May’s Brexit promises | Faiza Shaheen
Those thinking of helping the prime minister have forgotten a golden rule: never trust the ToriesJust when we think we have reached peak Brexit complexity, we always seem to go one better. As Jeremy Corbyn’s letter to Theresa May laying out Labour’s terms for supporting her deal
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Labour will be punished by voters if it gives any backing at all to Brexit | Polly Toynbee 7 Feb 7:30am Labour will be punished by voters if it gives any backing at all to Brexit | Polly Toynbee
Jeremy Corbyn’s offer to soften his party’s stance is at odds with a new poll showing the depth of opposition to BrexitJeremy Corbyn’s
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Margaret Thatcher deserves further elevation | Brief letters 6 Feb 1:10pm Margaret Thatcher deserves further elevation | Brief letters
Statue in Grantham | Placenames | Tickling | Jeremy Corbyn | WaitroseMight I suggest that instead of a 3.3 metre plinth for Grantham’s new statue (
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Jess Phillips: ‘I thought I was quite posh – I’ve realised I’m basically a scullery maid’ 3 Feb 9:00am Jess Phillips: ‘I thought I was quite posh – I’ve realised I’m basically a scullery maid’
Last week, the Labour MP’s witty speech on immigration made waves around the country. She talks about class, Jeremy Corbyn – and who should be the next Labour leader If you want to make yourself depressed about the state of politics, go on Twitter and search for Jess Phillips. Last Monday, the Labour MP for Birmingham Yardley stood up in the House of Commons during the immigration bill debate. The House was largely empty – “The reason I got to speak for so long is that there weren’t that many people down to speak,” she says several days later –
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The Observer view the pressing need for a second referendum | Observer editorial 3 Feb 1:23am The Observer view the pressing need for a second referendum | Observer editorial
A parliament in paralysis. No leadership. Ask the people In less than eight weeks, Britain will crash out of the EU by default, if nothing changes. Yet the desperate absence of political leadership on the single most important political issue for decades is, if anything, getting worse. The prime minister continues to be held hostage by the rump of hard Eurosceptics in her party, last week voting to trash the exit deal she spent months negotiating for the sake of an inconsequential sliver of Tory unity. Jeremy Corbyn continues to do all he can to avoid taking a Brexit position grounded in reality, while looking the other way as some of his MPs attempt to strike shabby cash-for-support deals with Theresa May. There were some green shoots of leadership in evidence last week, but they came from the backbenches. A cross-party amendment by Yvette Cooper and Nick Boles would have paved the way for MPs to authorise the government to seek an article 50 extension if no exit deal were in place by the end of February. Another, from Dominic Grieve, would have set up a series of indicative votes on the various Brexit options over the next few weeks. Neither amendment asked MPs to commit to a firm Brexit position; they were simply seeking a route out of the stasis that has enveloped the Commons. Yet, despite the fact that they voted for a symbolic amendment against a no deal, MPs voted down both of these amendments. Parliament is apparently against no deal, but unwilling to sanction anything that could prevent it.
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The Guardian view on the May-Corbyn talks: make them matter | Editorial 31 Jan 1:32pm The Guardian view on the May-Corbyn talks: make them matter | Editorial
Too late, too little and too grubby. Yet if we want to bring the nation together on Brexit the political parties must continue to try for principled cooperationThe first thing to say about
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If Corbyn gets his hands dirty he can avert a hard Brexit | Martin Kettle 30 Jan 1:39pm If Corbyn gets his hands dirty he can avert a hard Brexit | Martin Kettle
This moment of Tory unity will not last. Theresa May’s deal and no deal need not be the only options – if Labour takes actionIn spite of the upbeat signals that came from
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Labour’s immigration U-turn is a wake-up call for Corbyn supporters | Rachel Shabi 30 Jan 8:34am Labour’s immigration U-turn is a wake-up call for Corbyn supporters | Rachel Shabi
By criticising the party’s approach to migration, loyalists helped to change it. The leadership must learn to listen to themWe’re here, then. The point at which a Labour leadership that won support for being different ends up being the same. The stage that jaded observers warned was an inevitability of politics, no matter who was in charge. The day that a political project with impeccably pro-migration credentials triangulated into abstention on a miserable, destructive Conservative immigration bill.
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I don’t have a posh accent – am I bothered? | Suzanne Moore 28 Jan 11:56am I don’t have a posh accent – am I bothered? | Suzanne Moore
A new book tells us accents are still important. But while Tony Blair, Jeremy Corbyn and even Prince William “neutralise” their voices, this classlessness doesn’t exist in real life
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To those leaving Labour: if you want to stop Brexit, stay and fight | Michael Chessum 23 Jan 11:20am To those leaving Labour: if you want to stop Brexit, stay and fight | Michael Chessum
The fates of Corbyn and remainers are bound together – because only Labour can deliver a second voteIf
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We’ll never see a cross-party deal on Brexit: tribalism runs too deep | Rafael Behr 22 Jan 2:18pm We’ll never see a cross-party deal on Brexit: tribalism runs too deep | Rafael Behr
Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn are too set in their ways to put country before partyImagination, agility, empathy, diplomacy – all the qualities of an effective negotiator that Theresa May lacks. She was unsuited to the task of getting a good deal in Brussels and now looks incapable of steering a bad deal through parliament. But the prime minister is not without skill. She has an exceptional ability to drain the drama from a crisis, to eke dullness out of an emergency. It is practically a superpower. Only May could make a live broadcast in a drastic breaking-news situation feel as
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Its compass smashed, the ghost ship Brexit sails into ever darker waters | Andrew Rawnsley 20 Jan 3:00am Its compass smashed, the ghost ship Brexit sails into ever darker waters | Andrew Rawnsley
We are weeks from crashing out of the EU, but there’s no sign that anyone is prepared to compromise, least of all Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn The curse on the crew of the Flying Dutchman damned them to sail the seas for eternity with no hope of ever reaching port. It came to mind during the dark tempests in which parliament first dismasted the government by
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Corbyn and May must compromise to see off a no-deal Brexit | Caroline Flint 19 Jan 5:00am Corbyn and May must compromise to see off a no-deal Brexit | Caroline Flint
The destructive brinkmanship from no-dealers and people’s vote supporters must be defeated
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Labour must pursue a new Brexit deal, not a second referendum | Owen Jones 16 Jan 3:33pm Labour must pursue a new Brexit deal, not a second referendum | Owen Jones
In the absence of an election, Norway plus has the potential to unite parliament – and the countryIt is, perversely, a sign of the government’s weakness, not its strength, that it has inevitably seen off a vote of no confidence. All that unites a bitterly fractious Conservative party is panic at the prospect of a Jeremy Corbyn-led Labour government coming to power in a general election, a likelihood many are admirably honest about. If Theresa May was confident about the Tories’ prospects, she would risk throwing the dice. But Labour started the last election campaign 24 percentage points behind the Tories in the polls, and ended two points behind six weeks later. Today, the polling average has Labour
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Corbyn and Labour must now go hell for leather for another referendum | Polly Toynbee 15 Jan 4:05pm Corbyn and Labour must now go hell for leather for another referendum | Polly Toynbee
Until now, the left’s voice has been missing. This is the moment when the Labour leader can change hearts and mindsAt last! Labour’s hour has come. Until now, Labour’s voice has been almost unheard in the greatest debate of our time. Jeremy Corbyn has now been obliged to call a vote of no confidence in a government whose policy has crashed in ignominy. No one predicted the monumental, breathtaking scale of this. Theresa May and her government look set to survive, as Jacob Rees-Mogg dashed out to tell the cameras he would support her against the no-confidence motion. Turkeys – even such a turkey as this Conservative administration – don’t vote for their own demise; they just lead the country to it.
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For the sake of working people, the left must back remain | Aditya Chakrabortty 15 Jan 1:00am For the sake of working people, the left must back remain | Aditya Chakrabortty
It’s riskier than People’s Vote diehards know, but Jeremy Corbyn should seize the chance to alter the course of Britain’s future This week the fantasy island finally gets its comeuppance. For two and a half years the UK has bubbled with delusions and dishonesty. About the country we are and the one we could be, about the glittering prizes our leaders will wrangle from Europe, or about how the entire train ride can be stopped. Since June 2016, we have gone from dreams of exporting “
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The Observer view on Jeremy Corbyn’s need to show some leadership on Europe | Observer editorial 13 Jan 1:02am The Observer view on Jeremy Corbyn’s need to show some leadership on Europe | Observer editorial
The longer the Labour leader puts off backing another vote, the harsher will be the judgment of historyBritain has rarely been in more desperate need of courage and direction from the leader of the opposition. In just under 11 weeks, unless MPs have coalesced around another option, the country will crash out of the European Union, with catastrophic consequences for the union, the economy and its global influence. There is, however, a window of opportunity, created by a cabinet and Tory party more riven than ever by divisions over Europe, for Labour to shape the UK’s future from the opposition benches. Seldom do opposition parties have as much power to prevent damage to the lives of millions of their voters. Even more seldom do they squander it in the way Jeremy Corbyn has so far.
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I salute Jeremy Corbyn, but his time is past | Letters 13 Jan 12:59am I salute Jeremy Corbyn, but his time is past | Letters
The Labour leader has done an important service for the party, but his negative attitude to the EU is too serious to overlookI write as one of the many Labour members identified in Andrew Rawnsley’s article in despair at Jeremy Corbyn’s attitude to the EU (“
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The Guardian view on the Brexit endgame: talking at, not with, each other | Editorial 10 Jan 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Brexit endgame: talking at, not with, each other | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn says he might cooperate on Brexit. Theresa May has belatedly decided to see if they can. But there is little basis of trust between the two leaders and their partiesLast autumn, Jeremy Corbyn
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If Jeremy Corbyn gets his election, it would be a nightmare for Labour | Polly Toynbee 10 Jan 7:39am If Jeremy Corbyn gets his election, it would be a nightmare for Labour | Polly Toynbee
Forget speculation that Labour MPs in leave seats might back May’s Brexit deal: they would never support this government Jeremy Corbyn called for a general election in a speech in
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Awaiting Jeremy Corbyn’s lightbulb moment on Brexit | Brief letters 9 Jan 12:40pm Awaiting Jeremy Corbyn’s lightbulb moment on Brexit | Brief letters
Inspiration from Jane Austen | Labour and the ‘will of the people’ | Irish backstop | Theresa May | BolsoverAs the clamour for a second referendum grows, and hopes of it actually happening rise and fall (
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Brexit, Labour and what Jeremy Corbyn should do next | Letters 6 Jan 12:49pm Brexit, Labour and what Jeremy Corbyn should do next | Letters
Readers respond to various Guardian articles and letters discussing the Labour party’s stance on BrexitJeremy Corbyn performed a vital task in repositioning Labour as a distinctly left-of-centre party. Though a thoroughly decent man, he has always struggled as leader of the opposition, lacking the necessary presence, self-confidence, articulacy and flexibility of mind, and vision. With his latest utterances (
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To stop Brexit, Labour supporters will have to revolt against their leader | Andrew Rawnsley 6 Jan 3:59am To stop Brexit, Labour supporters will have to revolt against their leader | Andrew Rawnsley
Jeremy Corbyn won the leadership with a promise that the will of the members would be paramount Since nearly all of his career has been spent in rebellion against his own party, I guess we should not be too surprised that Jeremy Corbyn seems so determined to defy it over Brexit. Labour members hate Brexit and they want it reversed. With parliament deadlocked and growing public support for taking the question back to the people, a large majority of Labour voters, and an even larger majority of Labour members, wants the party to throw its weight behind another referendum. Compare and contrast with a Labour leader who doesn’t hate Brexit, doesn’t want it to be reversed and will not help facilitate another referendum if he can possibly avoid it. That divide between leader and members has been pretty obvious for a long time to anyone who contemplated Mr Corbyn with clear eyes rather than wearing soft-focus lenses. The split has become more evident as the Labour frontbench has run through various tactical ruses to try to mask the tension between its members and its leader. He is what he is and that is a lifetime opponent of the EU. He has not once expressed a flicker of remorse about the result of the 2016 referendum and treats the momentum behind a second referendum not as an opportunity to be seized, but as a threat to be smothered.
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Labour members want another vote. Jeremy Corbyn shouldn’t fear that | Michael Chessum 3 Jan 8:31am Labour members want another vote. Jeremy Corbyn shouldn’t fear that | Michael Chessum
We on the left of the party see that ignoring the will of the grassroots is a route straight back to the political wildernessAt the outset of 2019, the Labour left faces both an unprecedented set of opportunities and, potentially, an unprecedented crisis. As Theresa May hurtles towards what should be certain defeat on her Brexit deal, and the divisions within the Conservative party deepen, the prospects for a transformative leftwing government this year look good. Even under the Fixed‑term Parliaments Act, it is entirely plausible that the Tories will lose control and be unable to prevent an election. The problem that the left has is the gap between the apparent position of Labour’s leadership and that of its rank and file. In the most authoritative poll yet done, research published this week by Queen Mary University shows that a whopping
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There is a path to a second referendum – and only Labour can win it | Tom Kibasi 31 Dec 2018, 10:47am There is a path to a second referendum – and only Labour can win it | Tom Kibasi
As the political class returns to Westminster, this could be the time that, through the Brexit process, Labour finds its path to powerIf it was the season of peace and goodwill towards all, then politics failed to get the memo. Not only did hostilities continue through the Christmas period, some of the main protagonists announced in advance that they were incapable of taking a break. If anything, the holidays provided more opportunities for irate, booze-fuelled Twitter rants. One particular object of ire was Jeremy Corbyn’s
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Four reasons Jeremy Corbyn is dead wrong about EU state aid | George Peretz 27 Dec 2018, 5:30am Four reasons Jeremy Corbyn is dead wrong about EU state aid | George Peretz
The Labour leader claims EU rules would stymie his efforts to regenerate the economy. But his arguments make no sense The most depressing aspect of
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Corbyn has given up on Europe. For the good of Britain, we cannot | David Miliband 24 Dec 2018, 7:38am Corbyn has given up on Europe. For the good of Britain, we cannot | David Miliband
As Labour subscribes to the government’s dangerous Brexit fantasies, a people’s vote is now the only way to ensure stability The debate about Brexit has entered a new and potentially chaotic phase. Britain has already suffered an economic and reputational hit from the Brexit saga. Investments are on hold,
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The Guardian view on Labour’s Brexit: damage limitation not an opportunity | Editorial 23 Dec 2018, 1:23pm The Guardian view on Labour’s Brexit: damage limitation not an opportunity | Editorial
The opposition’s Brexit strategy has been smart politically. But it would not survive an impact with realityFormer Tory chancellor George Osborne and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn agree on few things – but both believe the
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Potential consequences of Corbyn’s Brexit pledge | Letters 23 Dec 2018, 12:17pm Potential consequences of Corbyn’s Brexit pledge | Letters
Jeremy Corbyn’s promise to press ahead with Brexit could boost the Tories’ election prospects, says
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Labour owes it to its supporters to become the party of remain | Zoe Williams 23 Dec 2018, 9:20am Labour owes it to its supporters to become the party of remain | Zoe Williams
Jeremy Corbyn is facing a furious backlash over his latest comments on Brexit. But there is another wayTo come out for remain now would be a natural move for Labour. It is the manifest will of its members; it is the overwhelming preference of young people (
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Pantomime politics and the real world | Letters 20 Dec 2018, 1:28pm Pantomime politics and the real world | Letters
Readers respond to the allegations that Jeremy Corbyn called Theresa May a ‘stupid woman’The “did he or didn’t he” over what Jeremy Corbyn actually mouthed at the PM in PMQs (
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Is this how parliament ends – not with a bang but a row about a whisper? | Jonathan Jones 20 Dec 2018, 10:56am Is this how parliament ends – not with a bang but a row about a whisper? | Jonathan Jones
In this image of MPs with John Bercow, the Commons has retreated from the reality of Brexit into form and ritualIt is a superbly theatrical tableau of passion. As MPs harangue the Speaker during this week’s row in the House of Commons over what Jeremy Corbyn did or didn’t say about Theresa May, their gestures and facial expressions are so eloquent and contrived it is hard to believe the picture wasn’t elaborately staged by some great history painter. That is because everyone in this photograph is fluent in a language of gesture and facial expression that goes back to ancient Roman oratory, and was used by artists including Titian, Caravaggio and David to communicate heightened drama.
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This government really is stupid. Labour must get smart on Brexit | Polly Toynbee 20 Dec 2018, 7:52am This government really is stupid. Labour must get smart on Brexit | Polly Toynbee
‘Respecting’ the referendum result has become a liability for Jeremy Corbyn and co as public opinion swings behind remainThis is Britain’s stupidest hour – the age of crass, world-beating idiocy. History might, rather politely, record it as “the parliament of stupids”. As it departs today, many will think: good riddance to them, and to our stupid, obstinate, pig-headed prime minister. The shock is that Wednesday’s uproar in the Commons was government-initiated pandemonium. The seasoned observer Paul Waugh, of HuffPost, called it, “more anarchy than I’ve ever seen in 20 years of sitting in the press gallery” … in part orchestrated by the Tory whips”. The speaker rapidly lost control – and the attacks from the Tory frontbench turned on John Bercow, the one the Brexiters yearn to chase away. Stupid is the wrong word for deadly-dangerous behaviour from an out-of-control government.
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This was the year of Brexit v Westminster – and there was only one winner | Rafael Behr 18 Dec 2018, 11:24am This was the year of Brexit v Westminster – and there was only one winner | Rafael Behr
Party loyalties were trumped by leave and remain, with whips left clueless. May and Corbyn will struggle to regain controlThe ancient Egyptians mummified their pharaohs and sealed them in pyramids. Russian revolutionaries pickled Lenin and displayed him in a mausoleum on Red Square, where he lies to this day. Now Brexit Britain has taken that macabre tradition to the next level, embalming its leader while she is still alive. A waxen Theresa May is entombed in office, still performing basic functions of a prime minister although the last animating breath of her authority has expired. To survive a confidence vote among Conservative MPs last week, May
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Why are the Tories still seen as strong on the economy? | Nesrine Malik 17 Dec 2018, 12:59am Why are the Tories still seen as strong on the economy? | Nesrine Malik
Despite Brexit chaos and the failures of austerity, Theresa May still says Britain’s greatest threat is a Corbyn government It usually takes time for established preconceptions to catch up with reality. For political parties, conventional wisdom about their characteristic strengths and opponents’ weaknesses is their bread and butter. It underpins David Cameron’s now famously
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In troubling times, it’s best to turn to your inner poet | Ruth Padel 13 Dec 2018, 1:00am In troubling times, it’s best to turn to your inner poet | Ruth Padel
As Jeremy Corbyn found with Shelley’s Masque of Anarchy, a resonant poem can help us make sense of the tumult
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Labour must seize this moment to bring down May’s government | Zoe Williams 12 Dec 2018, 9:21am Labour must seize this moment to bring down May’s government | Zoe Williams
Corbyn can no longer stand back and watch. This is the time to champion a vote of no confidence in the governmentYou know we’re in a crisis because the Today Programme was extended by 15 minutes this morning – it’s not long enough to get any clarity, because there is no clarity to be had. It was merely enough to signal the extremity of the situation by mucking up the schedule. Forty-eight letters have gone in to Graham Brady, which means
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Nicola Sturgeon’s clarity on Brexit reminds us what a leader looks like | Gaby Hinsliff 11 Dec 2018, 7:26am Nicola Sturgeon’s clarity on Brexit reminds us what a leader looks like | Gaby Hinsliff
May’s current disaster should be Corbyn’s chance, but instead it is the SNP leader who is displaying purpose, energy and guts Why can’t there be an English Nicola Sturgeon? That was the cry three years ago, in the wake of her stellar performance during the
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Jeremy Corbyn, your fellow European socialists need you in the EU | George Papandreou and others 10 Dec 2018, 3:00am Jeremy Corbyn, your fellow European socialists need you in the EU | George Papandreou and others
In an open letter, we ask you to do all you can to stop Brexit – and spearhead the movement for progressive change in Europe Dear Jeremy Corbyn, We are writing to you as fellow socialists and progressives to urge you to work with us for the future of our continent.
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It’s crunch time for Labour. Empty posturing on Brexit will no longer do | Jonathan Freedland 7 Dec 2018, 12:20pm It’s crunch time for Labour. Empty posturing on Brexit will no longer do | Jonathan Freedland
Under Jeremy Corbyn, the party has evaded tough choices. Next week will be an ordeal for which it has not preparedNormally, an opposition could enjoy a week like the one that’s coming. It could sit back, relax and break open the popcorn as Theresa May walks into a Commons defeat on the policy that has defined her premiership. It could delight in yet more days of debate in which next to no one on the prime minister’s own benches rises to speak up for her, savouring the sight of a governing party that is devouring itself in full public view. But these are not normal times. For one thing, the stakes are too high. It isn’t just a regular piece of domestic legislation that the government is foundering on, but the most important – and potentially most damaging – move in the country’s postwar history. Labour cannot be passive in this process, giving the government enough rope to hang itself. Because if this goes wrong, it’s not just May’s career or the Tories’ electoral prospects that are wrecked: it’s the country.
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Profound and prosaic uses for the iPhone | Brief letters 7 Dec 2018, 11:29am Profound and prosaic uses for the iPhone | Brief letters
Turner prize | Bad sex | Cornish literature | Housing crisis | Dr Wendy Atkin | Corbyn’s cunning Brexit planI was interested to read that the chair of the Turner prize judges has declared winner Charlotte Prodger’s work the “most profound use of a device as prosaic as the iPhone camera that we’ve seen in art to date” (
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Jeremy Corbyn: Labour could do a better Brexit deal. Give it the chance – or give the people another vote 6 Dec 2018, 1:53pm Jeremy Corbyn: Labour could do a better Brexit deal. Give it the chance – or give the people another vote
All options, including another referendum, will be on the table if Theresa May’s botched Brexit is defeated The botched Brexit deal that Theresa May
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Our politicians once told the truth, now voters are treated as children | Nick Cohen 2 Dec 2018, 4:00am Our politicians once told the truth, now voters are treated as children | Nick Cohen
Theresa May, like Jeremy Corbyn, has utterly failed to be ‘straight with people’Perhaps in your weaker moments you feel for Theresa May. She maintains an admirable composure when assailed by Nigel Farage, Boris Johnson and Arron Banks, privileged louts, who would long ago have been on antisocial behaviour orders if they had been born on council estates. She has a plan for Britain’s future: a
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May v Corbyn – the one Sunday night TV show where you won’t get a vote | Marina Hyde 30 Nov 2018, 12:22pm May v Corbyn – the one Sunday night TV show where you won’t get a vote | Marina Hyde
After years of X Factor and Strictly, viewers of the Brexit debate won’t have a say on the trivial matter of our national destinyHow excited are you about the May versus Corbyn TV debate? Face it, it’s the Argentina-West Germany final you dream of. This ends in some shiny-floor Blunderdome, probably on the BBC, as the prime minister and leader of the opposition fight for positions neither of them remotely believes in.
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Smooth passage for swallowed Lego | Brief letters 28 Nov 2018, 12:33pm Smooth passage for swallowed Lego | Brief letters
Brexit TV debate | Licence fee | Teaching children poetry | Swallowing legoSo, Theresa May is to argue with Jeremy Corbyn on TV (
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A TV debate on Brexit would force politicians to answer to the people | Martha Gill 28 Nov 2018, 7:02am A TV debate on Brexit would force politicians to answer to the people | Martha Gill
It is vital this Brexit debate happens. Matters of national importance should be discussed in publicTheresa May has challenged Jeremy Corbyn to debate her Brexit plan on TV, and he wants to do it
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The Guardian view on Labour’s countryside dilemma: to be green or not to be green | Editorial 26 Nov 2018, 12:32pm The Guardian view on Labour’s countryside dilemma: to be green or not to be green | Editorial
The opposition has some noble aims on the environment. It must not abandon them in pursuit of rural votesThe Labour party under Jeremy Corbyn has rightfully much to boast about when it comes to green policies. The party says it will ban fracking, spend £2bn a year to insulate homes and build a net zero-emission economy by 2050. Meeting such targets will need politicians to fend off vested interests and their special pleading. Big reforms are easily scuppered by entrenched industries. So it is strange that when plans to change the face of rural Britain in a positive way come before MPs, Labour’s environment team, headed by Sue Hayman, has been accused of trying to
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May v Corbyn: who would win a TV Brexit battle? And would it change anything? | Zoe Williams 26 Nov 2018, 12:02pm May v Corbyn: who would win a TV Brexit battle? And would it change anything? | Zoe Williams
The prime minister’s idea of a debate may look like an act of self-sabotage, but could be a cunning planThe idea of
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My letter to Jeremy Corbyn: your nation is threatened – back a people’s vote | Gina Miller 26 Nov 2018, 10:37am My letter to Jeremy Corbyn: your nation is threatened – back a people’s vote | Gina Miller
Brexit is too dangerous to be used in a bid for power – Labour must help to prevent the UK becoming a laboratory for this rightwing experimentDear Jeremy Corbyn, The words “j’accuse” have probably been overused since Émile Zola used them in his open letter to the French president, Félix Faure, on the
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For people suffering under austerity Corbyn is the answer, not the EU | Holly Rigby 22 Nov 2018, 10:30am For people suffering under austerity Corbyn is the answer, not the EU | Holly Rigby
Forget a ‘people’s vote’: reversing Brexit would be a terrible betrayal of the people left behind by the EU’s neoliberal agendaWhen I tell people that I voted in favour of leaving the EU in 2016, my statement is often followed by an awkward pause. Sometimes, the reaction is openly hostile; did I not realise that my vote had enabled racists and power-hungry Tories to destroy the country? In an era where to be anti-Brexit has become a symbol of progressive credentials, my leave vote is seen as a transgression against a cosmopolitan, liberal ideal. But the truth is that I am not alone: 35% of Labour voters such as me also voted for Brexit. Not only that, but polls of my fellow Labour party members on their desire for a second referendum are
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Labour talk of forming a minority government is unrealistic – for now | Catherine Haddon 22 Nov 2018, 7:04am Labour talk of forming a minority government is unrealistic – for now | Catherine Haddon
Despite the Brexit crisis, the chances of Jeremy Corbyn becoming prime minister without a general election are slimWith the Conservative party struggling to navigate Brexit, Labour is pressing the point that Jeremy Corbyn is ready to step in as prime minister. But while Labour is quite justified in presenting itself as the
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A Corbyn government, unlike New Labour, would tax the rich properly | Clive Lewis 12 Nov 2018, 4:00am A Corbyn government, unlike New Labour, would tax the rich properly | Clive Lewis
If we want to create a truly fair tax system, we need to target the top 10%. Our forebears didn’t, the Tories won’t – but we will
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Why bookshops are unexpected beneficiaries of Brexit | Natalie Haynes 9 Nov 2018, 8:26am Why bookshops are unexpected beneficiaries of Brexit | Natalie Haynes
In the face of disaster, the public is arming itself with literary analysis to try to make sense of our scary new political worldOver the past two years, the nation has felt deeply divided. May, Corbyn, Brexit: supporters and detractors alike have seemed less capable than ever of seeing things from each other’s perspectives. The only thing on which we all seem to agree is the molten toxicity of
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I wear a white poppy. It deserves as much respect as a red one | Michelle Harris 6 Nov 2018, 7:00am I wear a white poppy. It deserves as much respect as a red one | Michelle Harris
Criticising peace campaigners for wearing this poppy is wrong. It represents a generational shift in attitudes towards warWhy does the anti-war poppy, symbolising peace for all, provoke heated debate in the run-up to Remembrance Day? Among the nationalists and patriotic pin-ups, this upset is most pronounced. Labour MP Simon Danczuk criticised Jeremy Corbyn for
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The Labour stagecoach has hit a bump and got stuck in a rut | Andrew Rawnsley 4 Nov 2018, 3:00am The Labour stagecoach has hit a bump and got stuck in a rut | Andrew Rawnsley
The Corbyn revolution has been self-fuelled by its sense of relentless forward progress. That feeling is dissipatingHarold Wilson is not a Labour prime minister anyone much quotes these days, but he did leave behind
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Three years of Labour under Jeremy Corbyn has changed British politics | Gary Younge 13 Oct 2018, 1:00am Three years of Labour under Jeremy Corbyn has changed British politics | Gary Younge
Those who call his leadership a cult fail to understand Labour’s invigorated base. The Tories could learn from this During May’s local elections, Ilford Conservative party printed and distributed a leaflet
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Corbyn’s right. It’s not as simple as having ‘pride’ or ‘shame’ in our history | David Wearing 12 Oct 2018, 5:24am Corbyn’s right. It’s not as simple as having ‘pride’ or ‘shame’ in our history | David Wearing
From Brexit to military interventions, Britain’s empire casts a long shadow. It’s past time for a grownup conversation about itAt the root of so much that is poisonous in British politics and society lies a simple, common theme. Behind racism and xenophobia, the resurgence of the far right, the
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How would Corbynism work in government? Here’s a clue | Aditya Chakrabortty 10 Oct 2018, 1:00am How would Corbynism work in government? Here’s a clue | Aditya Chakrabortty
The small story of a battle over a market in the borough of Haringey has major lessons for anyone hoping for a radical alternativeWhat will a Corbyn government actually do? Brexit aside, British politics has no bigger known unknown. The prospect fills the rich with fear and the left with hope. Both sides assume that Prime Minister Jeremy Corbyn will be defined by his radicalism, yet in one corner of Britain an arm of the state is already ruling in his name. And the early results are sobering. In the north London borough of Haringey, the Blairite council leadership was
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The rich say they fear Labour. It’s Brexit they should be worried about | Polly Toynbee 9 Oct 2018, 1:00am The rich say they fear Labour. It’s Brexit they should be worried about | Polly Toynbee
We’re told a Corbyn government would cause the wealthy to flee Britain. We’ve heard these threats before: they’re hollow Is this an augury that Labour is on its way to power? The mega-rich are taking fright and threatening flight. They see the red peril rolling towards their mansion doorsteps as Jeremy Corbyn ushers in an era of Venezuela-on-Thames. Get out now, before the reds take everything!
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Labour voters should look again at the Tory party, here for the many | Theresa May 6 Oct 2018, 3:38pm Updated Labour voters should look again at the Tory party, here for the many | Theresa May
We have great plans to build a country with opportunities for allI want the Conservatives to be a party for the whole country. I believe that the principles that guide us – security for families and the country, freedom under the rule of law and opportunity for everyone – can unite our people and help build a better future for our country. That responsibility also rests on our shoulders because of what has happened to Labour over the past few years. Millions of people who have supported Labour all their lives are appalled by what has happened to a once-great party under the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn. Antisemitism has grown, the party’s response to threats to our country’s security has become equivocal, and moderate Labour MPs have become targets for deselection and harassment. These are all alien to Labour’s best traditions.
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I’m an ex-Tory minister: only Labour grasps Britain’s desire for change | Jim O’Neill 5 Oct 2018, 1:00am I’m an ex-Tory minister: only Labour grasps Britain’s desire for change | Jim O’Neill
In addressing the failures of the market, house prices and low wages, Corbyn and McDonnell have caught the public mood Since the EU referendum, much of the focus on improving people’s lives that attracted me to join the Conservatives in government in May 2015 has vanished. The
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Our cult of personality is leaving real life in the shade | George Monbiot 3 Oct 2018, 1:00am Our cult of personality is leaving real life in the shade | George Monbiot
By reducing politics to a celebrity obsession – from Boris to Trump to Corbyn – the media misdirects and confuses us What kind of people would you expect the newspapers to interview most? Those with the most to say, perhaps, or maybe those with the richest and weirdest experiences. Might it be philosophers, or detectives, or doctors working in war zones, refugees, polar scientists, street children, firefighters, base jumpers, activists, writers or free divers? No. It’s actors. I haven’t conducted an empirical study, but I would guess that between a third and a half of the major interviews in the newspapers feature people who make their living by adopting someone else’s persona and speaking someone else’s words. This is such a bizarre phenomenon that, if it hadn’t crept up on us slowly, we would surely find it astounding. But it seems to me symbolic of the way the media works. Its problem runs deeper than fake news. What it offers is news about a fake world.
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Boris Johnson’s dubious effort to rally grifters | Letters 2 Oct 2018, 1:28pm Boris Johnson’s dubious effort to rally grifters | Letters
Readers query the linguistic accuracy of the Conservative MP for Uxbridge and South RuislipBoris Johnson criticises Jeremy Corbyn for not standing up for the “grafters and the grifters” (
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Good work, Labour – now the anti-Brexit movement must change gear | Michael Chessum 28 Sep 2018, 10:11am Good work, Labour – now the anti-Brexit movement must change gear | Michael Chessum
If there is to be another vote, Corbyn must lead the remain campaign with a vow to go into Europe and fight the eliteIn the Labour party, no one ever really gets what they want. Those of us who went to Labour conference campaigning for an outright anti-Brexit position did not win everything, but it is clear which way things have shifted. Labour is now committed to the principle of
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How an Accident Could Happen in Britain 27 Sep 2018, 6:48pm How an Accident Could Happen in Britain
Jeremy Corbyn’s anti-Semitism and ’70s-style socialism mean he can’t be prime minister. Or can he?
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Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour party isn’t so radical | Letters 27 Sep 2018, 1:54pm Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour party isn’t so radical | Letters
Readers reflect on policies laid out by the leader of the opposition and the shadow chancellor John McDonnell at the party’s conference in LiverpoolI am no fan of Jeremy Corbyn. He has been an ineffective leader of the opposition in parliament, failing to take advantage of a hopelessly inept PM and many political open goals. However, I am fed up with the grudging critique of many of your commentators. Martin Kettle asserts that “Labour has now been radically transformed into a party in the leader’s own far-left political image” (
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Even the rightwing press agree: Corbyn is winning the battle of ideas | Polly Toynbee 27 Sep 2018, 7:25am Even the rightwing press agree: Corbyn is winning the battle of ideas | Polly Toynbee
After his conference speech, the Mail is among those warning that Corbyn is crushing a stale, fatigued Tory partyIf Jeremy Corbyn ever allows himself a glance at the detested MSM, the mainstream media, then he should be pleased today. Of course the overwhelmingly Tory press, owned by a handful of zillionaires, hates everything he stands for. Of course they slam him all over the place – especially for promising to implement
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Could Corbyn solve Brexit and save Britain? I can almost imagine it now | Martin Kettle 27 Sep 2018, 1:00am Could Corbyn solve Brexit and save Britain? I can almost imagine it now | Martin Kettle
The Labour leader knows he must keep the party together – and that allows space for the European cause to advance As Jeremy Corbyn gazed out over the 2018 Labour conference on Wednesday, after the
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The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn’s speech: catching the zeitgeist | Editorial 26 Sep 2018, 1:14pm The Guardian view on Jeremy Corbyn’s speech: catching the zeitgeist | Editorial
After fighting last year’s election on policies from its past, the party’s agenda is future-facing and concerned with dispersing the rights, wealth and power currently concentrated in a few handsUntil today the Labour party’s annual conference had been
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Jeremy Corbyn’s conference speech – what’s the verdict? | Gaby Hinsliff and others 26 Sep 2018, 10:06am Jeremy Corbyn’s conference speech – what’s the verdict? | Gaby Hinsliff and others
Our writers react to the Labour leader taking the stage at Liverpool
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The Guardian view on Labour education policy: a sure start | Editorial 25 Sep 2018, 1:44pm The Guardian view on Labour education policy: a sure start | Editorial
Free state nurseries and increased funding are the right ways to patch up a fragmented systemTony Blair was elected prime minister in 1997 on the back of a promise to prioritise “education, education, education”. Transformation of the economy, not schools, is the heart of the Corbyn/McDonnell programme. But the Labour leader knows that the latter depends on the former. When he announced plans for a National Education Service during his leadership campaign in 2015,
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Go to a party conference? I’d rather stay on the sofa | Suzanne Moore 25 Sep 2018, 2:00am Go to a party conference? I’d rather stay on the sofa | Suzanne Moore
The TV gives a much better view of Theresa May’s hands shaking, Jeremy Corbyn’s unease with an autocue and Vince Cable brilliantly ‘spresming’
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I’m now backing a second referendum – Jeremy Corbyn should too | Paul Mason 24 Sep 2018, 10:20am I’m now backing a second referendum – Jeremy Corbyn should too | Paul Mason
The offer of another Brexit vote and support for a Norway-style deal could be a game-changer in the next election
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Ben Jennings on Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour party and Brexit – cartoon 23 Sep 2018, 4:39pm Ben Jennings on Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour party and Brexit – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2018/sep/23/ben-jennings-on-jeremy-corbyn-the-labour-party-and-brexit-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on Labour: Brexit and the economy are the key tests | Editorial 23 Sep 2018, 1:35pm The Guardian view on Labour: Brexit and the economy are the key tests | Editorial
Labour is emphatically Jeremy Corbyn’s party, but shadow chancellor John McDonnell may make the most important speech of the weekAs the old political adage puts it: “Oppositions don’t win elections; governments lose them.” Many of the dynamics of British politics in 2018 would seem to bear this out. The Conservatives are bungling Brexit big time. The prime minister’s authority is shot. And the Tory conference next week could be a bloodbath. If the adage is right, therefore, then the Labour party may be tempted to spend the next three days in Liverpool avoiding needless mistakes and basking in the advent of a Jeremy Corbyn government. That would be a complacent mistake. For one thing, Commons arithmetic and the Fixed-Term Parliaments Act make an early election
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The Salzburg debacle makes the choices starker for Mrs May – and for Mr Corbyn | Andrew Rawnsley 23 Sep 2018, 2:59am The Salzburg debacle makes the choices starker for Mrs May – and for Mr Corbyn | Andrew Rawnsley
Hopes of a compromise have become bleaker. The chances of a no-deal Brexit or no Brexit have both gone upWhen Theresa May woke up on Friday morning to
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After May’s humiliation, Labour must seize the initiative on Brexit | Michael Chessum 21 Sep 2018, 10:26am After May’s humiliation, Labour must seize the initiative on Brexit | Michael Chessum
By backing a referendum on the deal, Corbyn can prevent a split in his party and lay the foundations for electoral successSometimes the most devastating revelations are those which are already obvious. Theresa May’s Chequers proposals were dead before
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Liberalism needs to be rebuilt – just not by the Lib Dems | Rafael Behr 18 Sep 2018, 1:00am Liberalism needs to be rebuilt – just not by the Lib Dems | Rafael Behr
Insurgent forces of the far left and right have resulted in a hollowing-out of centre politics. But Vince Cable’s tribe is not up to filling the voidIf it is true that failure makes a great teacher, the Liberal Democrats must know a lot about British politics. Currently they are learning about Brexit by failing to capitalise on the votes of millions of remainers, despite being England’s most pro-European mainstream party. In 2016 support for EU membership was 48%, yet the Lib Dems struggle to reach double digits in opinion polls. That reflects another failure: at a time when Jeremy Corbyn has taken Labour radically to the left, and Theresa May’s agenda is dictated by the fanatical right, there must be room for a party of mainstream moderation. But
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Corbyn and Salmond’s deep-state fears are a very British fantasy | Martin Kettle 30 Aug 2018, 1:00am Corbyn and Salmond’s deep-state fears are a very British fantasy | Martin Kettle
Blaming failures on Zinoviev-letter-style conspiracies is understandable. But radical movements should look to their own failings Alex Salmond and Jeremy Corbyn may seem strange political bedfellows. But the movements with which each is associated have something in common. Each is sustained in part by powerful myths, turbo-charged by social media, of
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Latte result is an early win in cup campaign | Brief letters 4 Jan 2018, 2:23pm Latte result is an early win in cup campaign | Brief letters
Corbyn v Clem | Paper coffee cups | BP share tip | Tabloid Guardian | Football scores | Betty Mundy’s BottomRafael Behr (
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I knew that many people don’t vote. I should have asked why | Rafael Behr 3 Jan 2018, 2:00am I knew that many people don’t vote. I should have asked why | Rafael Behr
Like politicians and pollsters, I wasn’t curious about the alienated and the apathetic – until Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn brought them back to the ballot boxThe clue was in the question. “What about the nonvoters?” Since elections are settled by the people who show up, the impact of those who don’t is likely to be small. There’s a reason they’re called nonvoters. It isn’t easy to disentangle the motives of people whose only known common trait is reluctance to express a preference. Pollsters find them as hard to fathom as politicians do – and politicians have vested interests in interpreting silence as consent.
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I backed Owen Smith against Jeremy Corbyn. But I regret it now | Zoe Williams 2 Jan 2018, 2:00am I backed Owen Smith against Jeremy Corbyn. But I regret it now | Zoe Williams
Eighteen months ago I wrote a column backing Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour leadership challenger. But there was dishonesty to itIt was July 2016, and
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2017 killed off an old political lie – that the young don’t care | Zoe Williams 31 Dec 2017, 1:29pm 2017 killed off an old political lie – that the young don’t care | Zoe Williams
The vote for Jeremy Corbyn proved a new generation wants change. If it doesn’t come, 2018 could look a lot like 1968Periodically policy wonks will explain to young people why they’re wrong to feel aggrieved, because they’ve never had it so good. Most recently, the
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What do an Etonian, a Trumpite and a Corbyn fan have in common? My church | Giles Fraser 28 Dec 2017, 10:04am What do an Etonian, a Trumpite and a Corbyn fan have in common? My church | Giles Fraser
It’s hard to think of a more varied group of people than the one that gathers at my local church. Surely a truly healthy society is built on this sort of diversityReviewing the Christmas services it strikes me once again how diverse a group us churchgoers are. In terms of class, race, nationality, gender and sexuality, it’s hard to imagine any other regular collective gathering that pulls in such a varied collection of people. My church is a black majority church in a gentrifying area. University professors sit next to the people who clean their offices. The Ethiopian, Trump-supporting evangelical sings the same hymns as the chap with his fine collection of Jeremy Corbyn badges. The Romanian homeless guy prays alongside the person who is transitioning and next to the old Etonian ex-army officer. Many of these people have very little in common except their faith. But this is enough for them to treat each other as extended family. And I am proud to serve as their priest. This will be the last of the
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My advice to Jeremy Corbyn: create a Labour of all the talents | Martin Kettle 28 Dec 2017, 10:00am My advice to Jeremy Corbyn: create a Labour of all the talents | Martin Kettle
The Tory party’s travails represent a great opportunity, but only if the opposition presents itself as strong and unitedIn a distinctively Conservative context, Michael Heseltine has posed an important question for all those who reject the doctrinaire extremes. The most important liberal Tory of the Thatcher era asked this week whether the national interest of preventing or softening Brexit
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Jeremy Corbyn drove me to despair. How wrong I was | Abi Wilkinson 23 Dec 2017, 4:00am Jeremy Corbyn drove me to despair. How wrong I was | Abi Wilkinson
While I was pleased that Corbyn was taking Labour back to the left, his first year as leader had me fearing the worst I didn’t start out as a proper Jeremy Corbyn supporter. During the
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It’s my mind – I’ll change it if I want to | Mark Rice-Oxley 20 Dec 2017, 2:30am It’s my mind – I’ll change it if I want to | Mark Rice-Oxley
I’ve reversed my opinion on most of the big issues of our time, from social media to Corbyn to porridge. And I reserve the right to change it back againWas there ever a time of greater certitude, when so many were so utterly convinced of so much? Brexiteers, vegans, doomsayers, Putinistas, people of faith, people of no faith, terrorists, trolls, football pundits ... From the occasional below-the-line firestarter right up to the leader of the free world himself, minds are made up, closed for new business. No one, it seems, is open to the subtle arts of persuasion, discussion, debate, exchange.
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Anti-empire, pro-activist … The Last Jedi is as left wing as Jeremy Corbyn | Toby Moses 19 Dec 2017, 4:00am Anti-empire, pro-activist … The Last Jedi is as left wing as Jeremy Corbyn | Toby Moses
The latest Star Wars film is an unlikely champion of the grassroots – and it’s not even subtle about it
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The British elite is at war with itself – on a scale we’ve never seen before | Paul Mason 18 Dec 2017, 11:41am The British elite is at war with itself – on a scale we’ve never seen before | Paul Mason
Our elites used to keep calm in a crisis. But now – with the Tories fighting to the death over Brexit and the tabloids terrified by Corbyn – they’ve lost their heads When I first started working at the BBC, in 2001, what struck me was not how most of the people in charge were from the same universities, or that it was assumed you were a ski enthusiast, or how casually people dropped the names of powerful people they knew. It was the uniformity of thinking. There were progressive people and conservative people, but they mostly subscribed to the groupthink of the elite. Surveying the levels of anger, abuse and fractiousness in the upper levels of British society today, it feels like a very different country. The
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Letters: Corbyn’s liking for Cuba has no relevance to Britain’s problems 16 Dec 2017, 7:05pm Letters: Corbyn’s liking for Cuba has no relevance to Britain’s problems
If Labour’s moderates want to regain control they should engage on issues such as the NHSNick Cohen’s excoriation of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour (
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Why business could prosper under a Corbyn government 16 Dec 2017, 7:02pm Why business could prosper under a Corbyn government
Labour’s economic plans will alleviate the long-term damage being inflicted by austerity policiesWhile the
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Why can’t we get our kicks on the M66? | Brief letters 13 Dec 2017, 2:08pm Why can’t we get our kicks on the M66? | Brief letters
Jeremy Corbyn | Chaplin museum | The M66 | Moon boots | Struggling temperatures | Sexual abuse of girlsBarbara Harriss-White (
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The unions are sounding the alarm over Brexit. Why isn’t Jeremy Corbyn? | Hugo Dixon 13 Dec 2017, 7:02am The unions are sounding the alarm over Brexit. Why isn’t Jeremy Corbyn? | Hugo Dixon
Leadership is about shaping opinion, not sitting on the fence. The Labour leader has a duty to start fighting for the jobs, rights and prosperity of working peopleThere’s a
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The Brexit mist is clearing. Corbyn will have to show his hand and soon/Rafael Behr 13 Dec 2017, 1:00am The Brexit mist is clearing. Corbyn will have to show his hand and soon/Rafael Behr
The party’s fuzzy position works while Tories avoid tough decisions. But it can’t hold for much longerWhen
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Why no Beano about Corbyn’s peace award? | Lettets 12 Dec 2017, 2:40pm Why no Beano about Corbyn’s peace award? | Lettets
Jeremy Corbyn’s peace award | Corybn misprint | May on climate change | Whittle’s memorial jet | Pocket money | Coping with snow and iceLast Friday, 8 December, Jeremy Corbyn was awarded the prestigious MacBride International Peace Prize in Geneva. Sean MacBride was the co-founder of Amnesty International. Not a single mainstream newspaper in the UK, including the Guardian, or the BBC or ITN, seems to have reported this. Is it imaginable that if the prize had been awarded to David Cameron as leader of the opposition when Blair was in office, it would not have been mentioned? Is the Guardian’s commitment to peace less strong than its fear that the leader of the opposition may become the next prime minister?
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Labour isn’t flip-flopping on Brexit – this is practical politics | Maya Goodfellow 12 Dec 2017, 7:58am Labour isn’t flip-flopping on Brexit – this is practical politics | Maya Goodfellow
While the prime minister has been muddying the EU waters, Jeremy Corbyn has been busy forming relationships in BrusselsFor some, Labour can do no right on Brexit. The party has a clear, adaptable position – but in recent days it has, somewhat predictably, been accused of being ambiguous. The party wants “
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The Tories’ rebranding won’t wash: being green is about more than fluffy bunnies | Molly Scott Cato 12 Dec 2017, 7:28am The Tories’ rebranding won’t wash: being green is about more than fluffy bunnies | Molly Scott Cato
It’s all very well for Michael Gove to act as if the Tories love animals but they need to see the bigger picture on fracking, renewables and ecologyUp to their necks in Brexit chaos and with Corbyn’s Labour snapping at their heels, the Tories are trying again with a somewhat tired strategy to escape the label of the “nasty party”. They are having another go at acting like environmentalists, this time combining it with being nice to animals. At the helm of this
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What do British politicians want for Christmas – and what do they deserve? | Jack Bernhardt 11 Dec 2017, 9:08am What do British politicians want for Christmas – and what do they deserve? | Jack Bernhardt
After the year they’ve given us it’s only right that we should give May, Corbyn, Davis, Foster Cable and Farage a little something. So I’ve compiled a listChristmas is a hard time for politicians. They have to interact with children – tiny idiots who can’t even vote. They have to pretend to have wholesome Christmas traditions, such as going to a village fete in their constituency and sampling the local honey, when really they just want the Christmas we all have: getting drunk from 9am, shouting rude words at the Queen and crying solidly through Toy Story 3. And, worst of all, they’re impossible to buy gifts for.
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What would it it take for Labour’s moderates to revolt? | Nick Cohen 9 Dec 2017, 1:40pm What would it it take for Labour’s moderates to revolt? | Nick Cohen
It is not too late to prevent Jeremy Corbyn and his team coming to powerLabour’s new leaders and Labour’s new members appear utterly incompatible. On the one hand, we have stone-hearted Leninists, who proved they were no better than establishment apologists for Saudi Arabia when they
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Jeremy Corbyn should have given GQ the full Mariah Carey | Marina Hyde 1 Dec 2017, 1:39pm Jeremy Corbyn should have given GQ the full Mariah Carey | Marina Hyde
The magazine’s editor seems upset at how the Labour leader treated a fashion shoot. How does he cope with real divas?I am very surprised to find that the GQ editor, Dylan Jones, has become a committed recruiting sergeant for Jeremy Corbyn: after all, Jones did once
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The Guardian view on Labour and Brexit: fight for workers’ rights | Editorial 26 Nov 2017, 2:56pm The Guardian view on Labour and Brexit: fight for workers’ rights | Editorial
Social protections can best be upheld through international cooperation. Labour should clearly back the single market and the customs unionBritish politics is polarised on nearly every axis, so it is strange how little conflict there is between Labour and the Conservatives on the biggest issue: the terms of departure from the EU. Jeremy Corbyn’s challenges to Theresa May over Brexit negotiations
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Corbyn has seen the light on Brexit. Now he’s taking the fight to the Tories | Polly Toynbee 23 Nov 2017, 6:52am Corbyn has seen the light on Brexit. Now he’s taking the fight to the Tories | Polly Toynbee
The Labour leader finally grasps what leaving the EU really means: the greatest harm inflicted on the very people his party cares about the mostAt last, Labour steps up. Brexit is the great national crisis of our times and yet the leaders of the opposition have sometimes seemed so muted it has driven remainers to tear their hair out in frustration. That changed yesterday. Jeremy Corbyn for the first time turned all guns on the prime minister over her incoherent, incomprehensible and impossible Brexit stance. He used all his prime minister’s questions, every one, to wallop her exactly where she and her party are most vulnerable – and not before time.
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This government is falling apart, so Labour’s tribes must come together | Zoe Williams 19 Nov 2017, 1:52pm This government is falling apart, so Labour’s tribes must come together | Zoe Williams
With the great prize in sight, it’s time for Corbynites and their doubters to recognise common groundThe Tories’ main problem with Jeremy Corbyn and the shadow chancellor, John McDonnell, is that they speak human. Critics rush at the opposition like Wile E Coyote, carrying boulders and anvils marked
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Theresa May’s position is unsustainable, yet she still can’t see it | Matthew d’Ancona 12 Nov 2017, 1:20pm Theresa May’s position is unsustainable, yet she still can’t see it | Matthew d’Ancona
Her government is in paralysis, held together by a fear of Jeremy Corbyn. But the Tories have far more to worry aboutThe National Theatre’s new production of
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What can we learn about politics from Gordon Brown’s memoir? 7 Nov 2017, 10:20am What can we learn about politics from Gordon Brown’s memoir?
He doesn’t rate Corbyn, didn’t like ‘touchy-feely’ politics, and still hates Tony Blair – a roundup of all the hot revelations from the former prime minister’s new bookFor reasons now lost to me, I read Gordon Brown’s previous book, Beyond the Crash, in which he revealed precisely nothing about himself, except for that fascinating quirk of the unusual mind. He’d say a big thing with no explanation at all (“that’s what an economy is for, to create jobs”), then explain a small, obvious thing at the most tremendous length. Imagine the surprise, therefore, to find his latest work,
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A Labour council attacking its own people? This is regeneration gone bad | Aditya Chakrabortty 25 Oct 2017, 1:00am A Labour council attacking its own people? This is regeneration gone bad | Aditya Chakrabortty
There are many ways to remedy the housing crisis in London – now it’s up to a high court judge to halt one of the worst that’s been embarked uponNothing about Gordon Peters sings of being a fighter. He is shy and sweetly reticent, keener to wish me a happy Diwali than to hurl abuse at his opponents. Yet on Wednesday morning at the high court, the 73-year-old kicks off one of the most unequal and important battles I’ve seen. Funded largely by donations from neighbours, the pensioner will take on one of the world’s largest property developers and a London borough. Aspects of his claim for a judicial review sound local and technical – but the fight itself is national and totemic. His case is being watched by the construction industry, by councils across the country and by Jeremy Corbyn’s team. Anyone who cares about the future of social housing, or what happens to London, or to local democracy, should root for Peters – not least for his bravery in placing himself squarely before a juggernaut.
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Only a Labour no-confidence motion in the Tories can avert a Brexit disaster | Stephen Kinnock 24 Oct 2017, 2:00am Only a Labour no-confidence motion in the Tories can avert a Brexit disaster | Stephen Kinnock
The government is making an utter shambles of negotiations. My party, united under Jeremy Corbyn and with no Europhobic baggage, is Britain’s only hopeBrexit is often portrayed as just another episode in the long-running and seemingly endless
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Labour could do more to stop the Tories rigging our democracy | Owen Jones 17 Oct 2017, 6:35am Labour could do more to stop the Tories rigging our democracy | Owen Jones
Of course boundary changes that will favour the Tories should be opposed. But Labour needs an alternative plan to expand the electorate and make voting easierThe Tories are determined to rig our democracy in their favour. Having lost their majority – and panicking at the prospect of a Corbyn-led government – they are even more desperate to embed an inherent advantage for their flailing party.
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Stella Rimington should stop fuelling paranoid fantasies about Jeremy Corbyn 16 Oct 2017, 7:39am Stella Rimington should stop fuelling paranoid fantasies about Jeremy Corbyn
The former MI5 chief says some of the Labour leader’s advisers were once under surveillance because they sought to ‘destroy’ democracy. No, they didn’t The former MI5 boss Stella Rimington claimed at a literary festival last week that some of the people advising Jeremy Corbyn were
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Labour has a once-in-a-generation opportunity, and the Tories know it | Larry Elliott 5 Oct 2017, 12:00am Labour has a once-in-a-generation opportunity, and the Tories know it | Larry Elliott
People are ready for a radical change. Trying to brand Corbyn a Marxist throwback who wants to turn Britain into Venezuela won’t workJim Callaghan would have had some sympathy for Theresa May as she
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What is a centrist dad? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett 4 Oct 2017, 3:00am What is a centrist dad? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
Every day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesYou may have heard the term “centrist dad” somewhere over the past couple of weeks as it crests on the wave of mainstream exposure. Who knows, perhaps you – slightly slow on the uptake, for we are already approaching the tailend of the centrist dad craze – have taken to Google to find out and you are concerned that you yourself might have contracted centrist daddishness, and are in urgent need of a symptom checker. Look no further. The first thing I’ll tell you is that the centrist dad meme originated on Twitter. Feeding, as mainstream media does, off Twitter (as well as vice versa – think of it as an ouroboros-esque human centipede, doomed to subsist on its own detritus), centrist dad is now everywhere. He was helped to prominence by leftwing tweeters, most notably Jeremy Corbyn’s former spokesperson Matt Zarb-Cousin, who
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The problem is not capitalism. It’s that the Tories aren’t much cop at it | Aditya Chakrabortty 3 Oct 2017, 1:00am The problem is not capitalism. It’s that the Tories aren’t much cop at it | Aditya Chakrabortty
Four decades on, the party is still in Thatcher’s shadow in terms of economic policy. But now the Treasury’s cupboard is bare – and voters know itDamn the British people, for they have let down Theresa May again. The prime minister could once count on voters to back free markets. But, she sniffs to supporters in Manchester, “Jeremy Corbyn has changed that.” So goes the refrain of this
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In a Tory party torn apart by Brexit, the fever of schism burns | Polly Toynbee 2 Oct 2017, 2:50pm In a Tory party torn apart by Brexit, the fever of schism burns | Polly Toynbee
The cabinet is at loggerheads, the membership spooked by Corbyn. At this Conservative conference the ‘natural party of government’ is an utter shamblesThe civil war in the Tory party rages, yet these are still only opening skirmishes. Far worse is to come.
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Mel Brooks is right, The One Show is crazy – thrilling, isn’t it? | Jack Bernhardt 2 Oct 2017, 9:20am Mel Brooks is right, The One Show is crazy – thrilling, isn’t it? | Jack Bernhardt
From Debbie Harry’s love of chickens to Corbyn’s love of manhole covers, this blend of surreal banality and political subversion is much more than a talk showAh, The One Show. Hosted by Matt Baker – so excitable I’m positive he’s actually just a labrador in human costume – and Alex Jones – contractually obliged since 2010 to smile at all times – it has a reputation of being bland, inoffensive and charmingly incompetent, the
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The Observer view on the future of work | Observer editorial 30 Sep 2017, 7:05pm The Observer view on the future of work | Observer editorial
We must focus our energies on helping those whose jobs will be removed by automationIn his speech at Labour’s conference in Brighton last week, Jeremy Corbyn made an astute observation: “2017 may be the year when politics finally caught up with the crash of 2008.” The financial crisis not only sent shockwaves rippling through the global economy: it sounded a warning bell that all was not well with a weakly regulated economic model powered by consumer debt bubbles and rapid house price growth. Yet the political response has been utterly inadequate. Despite promises to the contrary, we have returned to the same old growth model of debt-fuelled spending and the stark intergenerational divide has got worse, not better. Almost a decade on, there are signs of a growing public appetite for change, from the rejection of the status quo in the Brexit referendum to the surge in support for Labour that denied Theresa May a majority in June’s general election. Both parties have acknowledged there are fundamental problems in Britain’s economic model and have committed to reform it. But Britain now stands on the cusp of an ideological choice: compare and contrast Corbyn’s challenge with May’s robust defence of free markets last week.
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Jeremy Corbyn is right: we need rent controls, and we need them now | Penny Anderson 29 Sep 2017, 4:30am Jeremy Corbyn is right: we need rent controls, and we need them now | Penny Anderson
It was great to hear the Labour leader rally to the cause of tenants. For too long we have been at the mercy of greedy landlords and the agents who facilitate themFor tenants,
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A new shock doctrine: in a world of crisis, morality can still win | Naomi Klein 28 Sep 2017, 2:39pm A new shock doctrine: in a world of crisis, morality can still win | Naomi Klein
Jeremy Corbyn, Bernie Sanders and Podemos in Spain have shown that a bold and decent strategy can be a successful one. That truth should embolden the leftWe live in frightening times. From heads of state tweeting
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Now Theresa May is defending capitalism. That shows just how rattled she is | Polly Toynbee 28 Sep 2017, 8:29am Now Theresa May is defending capitalism. That shows just how rattled she is | Polly Toynbee
She said she needed to be ‘honest’ about failures of the free market. But truths were thin on the ground in her response to Jeremy Corbyn’s conference addressTheresa May’s haste to refute
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Corbyn’s man of the future act is hooked on dogmas of the past | Simon Jenkins 28 Sep 2017, 1:00am Corbyn’s man of the future act is hooked on dogmas of the past | Simon Jenkins
Look behind the slogans and Labour’s new project reeks of pre-Blair revivalism, not the radicalism of the left Jeremy Corbyn’s passage from antihero to premier-in-waiting is the phenomenon of modern politics. Three months ago the idea was absurd that a gauche, accident-prone backbench grump might plausibly stand before cheering supporters and declare himself “
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Jeremy Corbyn on the March 27 Sep 2017, 6:49pm Jeremy Corbyn on the March
He thinks he’s Britain’s next leader, and his opponents are helping.
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Steve Bell on Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour conference – cartoon 27 Sep 2017, 2:50pm Steve Bell on Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour conference – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/sep/27/steve-bell-on-jeremy-corbyn-and-the-labour-conference-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on Corbyn’s speech: his best yet | Editorial 27 Sep 2017, 2:48pm The Guardian view on Corbyn’s speech: his best yet | Editorial
The Labour leader thinks the election this summer is proof that his party is now electable because of socialism not despite it. It’s too early to bet against himIt is remarkable what a difference a single election can make. Even if you lose. Jeremy Corbyn delivered his third – and best –
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Jeremy Corbyn has declared war on Labour councils over housing | Aditya Chakrabortty 27 Sep 2017, 12:28pm Jeremy Corbyn has declared war on Labour councils over housing | Aditya Chakrabortty
It’s a big, bold move. With his pledges to social tenants, the Labour leader is taking sides against his own municipal leaders and their ‘regeneration’ schemesAt the final day of their party conference, we heard a Labour leader making the
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Like Attlee and Thatcher before him, Corbyn is completely transforming Britain | Owen Jones 27 Sep 2017, 12:18pm Like Attlee and Thatcher before him, Corbyn is completely transforming Britain | Owen Jones
The vision set out by a combative Labour leader will be cheered far beyond the applauding activists in BrightonClement Attlee, Margaret Thatcher, Jeremy Corbyn. The first two led transformative governments that established a new political settlement in Britain: and make no mistake, the Corbyn project’s aspirations are
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Going mainstream: Labour party conference – Politics Weekly podcast 27 Sep 2017, 11:40am Going mainstream: Labour party conference – Politics Weekly podcast
Rowena Mason at the Labour party conference in Brighton is joined by Anushka Asthana, Rafael Behr, Beth Foster-Ogg and John Crace. Plus we hear from Emily Thornberry, the shadow foreign secretary, on how this year’s conference shows Labour is ready for power Jeremy Corbyn rounded off the Labour party’s annual conference in Brighton with a keynote speech in which he claimed Labour was now the party of the mainstream opinion in British politics. Joining Rowena Mason at the conference centre are political editor Anushka Asthana, political sketchwriter John Crace, Momentum’s Beth Foster-Ogg and columnist Rafael Behr.
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Oh, Jeremy Corbyn! I bet you think this song is about you: my week at Labour’s love-in 27 Sep 2017, 10:50am Oh, Jeremy Corbyn! I bet you think this song is about you: my week at Labour’s love-in
The party’s conference was big on euphemisms for not winning the election and low on dissent, with everything unfortunate regarded as a conspiracy against Jeremy. What a difference a year makes! If you are a political archivist, there are two seriously covetable gigs in the world right now. The first is conceptualising the unprecedented annals facility that will one day be the Donald Trump Presidential Library. The second is collating the many different euphemisms for the Labour party having not won the recent general election. At party conference in Brighton, you gotta catch ’em all. “We didn’t lose,”
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Corbyn’s conference speech: the verdict | the panel 27 Sep 2017, 10:01am Corbyn’s conference speech: the verdict | the panel
Was this the address of a prime minister-in-waiting? Guardian writers respond to the most eagerly anticipated leader’s speech in years
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Jeremy Corbyn’s conference speech: the verdict | the panel 27 Sep 2017, 9:40am Jeremy Corbyn’s conference speech: the verdict | the panel
Was this the address of a prime minister-in-waiting? Guardian writers respond to the most eagerly anticipated Labour leader’s speech in years
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What makes a great Labour leader? | Rachel Holmes 27 Sep 2017, 1:00am What makes a great Labour leader? | Rachel Holmes
Attlee, Wilson, Blair: these are the figures Corbyn will be judged against. And he has urgent lessons to learn from each of themThe 11-year-old daughter of a friend of mine recently asked who was the best ever prime minister. Her Labour-supporting mother suggested Attlee, but her grandfather said: “It has to be Wilson, because Attlee went along with the cold war.” In contrast with the Conservatives and Whigs/Liberals, who have represented privilege for centuries, Labour is just getting started. There have been only six Labour prime ministers and the party has had just 19 leaders. This excludes the two women – Margaret Beckett and Harriet Harman – and George Brown, who have “acted up”, and the multiple occupancies of Arthur Henderson, who led the party three times, and
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Steve Bell’s If ... Watson expands on his bean theory for Corbyn 27 Sep 2017, 1:00am Steve Bell’s If ... Watson expands on his bean theory for Corbyn
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/sep/27/steve-bells-if-watson-expands-on-his-bean-theory-for-corbyn">Continue reading...
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Labour’s amendment on antisemitism should reassure Jewish supporters | Keith Kahn-Harris 26 Sep 2017, 10:28am Labour’s amendment on antisemitism should reassure Jewish supporters | Keith Kahn-Harris
That the Jewish Labour Movement, the NEC, Corbyn and Momentum have cooperated on a rule change suggests a desire to unite for the good of the party
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What is Labour’s position on Brexit? It’s time Corbyn told us | Richard Angell 26 Sep 2017, 4:48am What is Labour’s position on Brexit? It’s time Corbyn told us | Richard Angell
On this vital issue, the leader must decide whether to stand with his old Bennite, Eurosceptic colleagues, or his younger, pro-EU supportersThere is a truism in politics that “when you decide, you divide”. The row about
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Corbyn is a changed man – and he’s forging a path to power | Polly Toynbee 25 Sep 2017, 3:30pm Corbyn is a changed man – and he’s forging a path to power | Polly Toynbee
This year’s conference shows Labour has been transformed by electoral success and Tory disarray over Brexit. Its leaders look more credible by the day“We are the grown-ups now.” So said several speakers. In the grotesque political playground of Brexit Britain, Labour has indeed become the nation’s adults, the sensibles, the party least likely to wreck the country’s future. How short a time ago Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell were regarded as delinquent adolescents who had never grown out of the 1970s. They may be the masters soon. What a transformation. Remember how early in the general election campaign they fell 11 points behind in dismal local council results? Whatever Labour leaders say sourly now to those of us who feared the worst, waiting for that exit poll in June they too were braced for heavy losses, never expecting a crushing humiliation for Theresa May.
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The Guardian view of the Labour conference: Corbyn’s party | Editorial 24 Sep 2017, 3:00pm The Guardian view of the Labour conference: Corbyn’s party | Editorial
The Labour leader needs an idea at least as attractive as the vision his detractors have been asked to rejectIt is not an understatement to say that Jeremy Corbyn has revolutionised the politics of the British left. Rather than triangulating around the centre, Mr Corbyn demonstrated that the Labour party can succeed by standing for what it says it believes in. Mr Corbyn argued the country was sick of austerity and inequality and prescribed the sugary medicine of “tax and spend” policies to heal it. His unexpectedly good showing at the June election, when he was written off by the pollsters and dismissed by his opponents, has ensured the Labour party now belongs to Mr Corbyn. The 68-year-old has proved an unlikely political entrepreneur. His policies spotted a gap in the market – young voters who had been electorally orphaned by mainstream policies – and he produced ideas designed to appeal to them, such as scrapping university tuition fees, wrapped up in a message of hope: that of a new kind of politics. Mr Corbyn advanced a participatory model of politics, which argued that party members in groups such as Momentum should be on equal footing with Labour MPs.
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Ben Jennings on Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour conference – cartoon 24 Sep 2017, 2:35pm Ben Jennings on Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour conference – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/sep/24/ben-jennings-jeremy-corbyn-labour-conference-cartoon">Continue reading...
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Labour can’t afford to get emotional over Brexit | Zoe Williams 24 Sep 2017, 11:30am Labour can’t afford to get emotional over Brexit | Zoe Williams
An open letter asking Corbyn to cleave to the single market lends a with-us-or-against-us emotional charge to what should be a purely practical issueThirty Labour MPs, together with trades unionists, MEPs and mayors, signed
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The Tories are in chaos, so Labour must stand ready | Polly Toynbee 19 Sep 2017, 1:00am The Tories are in chaos, so Labour must stand ready | Polly Toynbee
Jeremy Corbyn’s party has the chance to lighten the Brexit darkness with a New Deal. He must seize itTen years ago
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Jeremy Corbyn is being driven by the ‘left-behind’ middle class | Nick Cohen 16 Sep 2017, 1:15pm Jeremy Corbyn is being driven by the ‘left-behind’ middle class | Nick Cohen
The Labour leader has been clever in exploiting a disaffected element of the electorateAnyone who knows the far left will have snorted when they heard that it was banning the most successful Labour politicians in England from addressing the Labour party conference. Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London, and Andy Burnham, his counterpart in Manchester, may have won actual elections on moderate platforms. No matter.
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Tory Brexit is doomed. Corbyn has a chance to build the Europe he wants | John Palmer 13 Sep 2017, 1:31pm Tory Brexit is doomed. Corbyn has a chance to build the Europe he wants | John Palmer
Austerity is being rejected across Europe. Labour could recommit Britain to a Europe based on jobs and growth“This year? Next year? Sometime? Never?” These lines from the old children’s rhyme When Will I Marry? could well be applied to the prospects for Britain’s exit from the European Union. Political realities are becoming ever more complex and the final outcome is still uncertain. The most immediate battle facing Theresa May’s government is securing comprehensive parliamentary approval for its “great repeal bill”, which transfers all EU laws and regulations into UK law. Although the House of Commons this week gave assent to the first stage of this unprecedentedly complex and detailed legislation it still faces serious challenges in the final stages of the bill’s approval.
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The Guardian view on veganism: high in moral fibre | Editorial 5 Sep 2017, 2:31pm The Guardian view on veganism: high in moral fibre | Editorial
Vegans are often unfairly mocked. They should instead be praisedJeremy Corbyn is “going through the process” of eating more vegan food, he has said – he just has to bring himself to give up the brie, verboten under vegan rules, along with eggs, milk and everything animals produce. Later, as if fearful of a backlash, his spokesperson issued a statement denying he was vegan. But the Labour leader was right to be proud of his efforts. Vegans are often unreasonably mocked as do-gooders and sniped at for making dinner parties awkward for those who don’t like lentils quite so much. This is unfair: the diet does do the world good and if vegans provoke their friends into going vegan too, so much the better. There is now a great deal of convincing data that breeding animals for food dirties the air and chews up the earth. One recent peer-reviewed study from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine calculates that should the world go vegan,
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Sturgeon sets out a bold agenda for the UK that’s more radical than Corbyn’s | Robert Somynne 5 Sep 2017, 11:46am Sturgeon sets out a bold agenda for the UK that’s more radical than Corbyn’s | Robert Somynne
The first minister is getting on with the day job and laying the groundwork to make an irrefutable case for Scotland’s independenceNicola Sturgeon’s “
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On Planet Tory, the radio signal from Earth is growing weaker by the day | Matthew d’Ancona 3 Sep 2017, 11:06am On Planet Tory, the radio signal from Earth is growing weaker by the day | Matthew d’Ancona
The government confuses office with power, and may yet pay a terrible price for blindly believing the Brexit talks will prove the need for Tories at the controlsThe Conservative party is in the most desperate position that I can recall. It confuses office with power. It mistakes the EU referendum result for a party-political mandate. It assumes that the voters will sooner or later turn on Jeremy Corbyn as a dangerous socialist imposter. Its smile is really the rictus of internal paralysis.
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Labour has to be bolder on Brexit: our economy depends on it | Seb Dance 29 Aug 2017, 6:02am Updated Labour has to be bolder on Brexit: our economy depends on it | Seb Dance
Any desire for a clean break with the EU is pure Tory fantasy. Jeremy Corbyn must defend access to the single market and customs union permanently
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For Labour to win over Scotland, Jeremy Corbyn needs to sing a different tune | Gerry Hassan 28 Aug 2017, 9:29am For Labour to win over Scotland, Jeremy Corbyn needs to sing a different tune | Gerry Hassan
Instead of taking the lead on Brexit and Scottish independence, Corbyn is gave the same old socialist lines. He needs to take advantage of a stalling SNP Jeremy Corbyn has been
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Now Jeremy Corbyn must say no to Brexit: the time for evasions is over | Steve Richards 21 Aug 2017, 9:16am Now Jeremy Corbyn must say no to Brexit: the time for evasions is over | Steve Richards
There is no option of a ‘soft’ Brexit, and Labour’s mockery of the Conservative government’s position rings hollow when its own position is a mess
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Rightwing Tories would never let May adopt Labour policies | The big issue 12 Aug 2017, 7:04pm Rightwing Tories would never let May adopt Labour policies | The big issue
Vested interests will always prevent the party championing fairnessI enjoyed Will Tanner’s recommendations for the Tory party to avoid “Jeremy Corbyn’s back to the future socialism [which] would be ruinous for Britain” (
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I voted for Corbyn. And I still want Scottish independence | Cat Boyd 11 Aug 2017, 6:30am I voted for Corbyn. And I still want Scottish independence | Cat Boyd
My decision to back Labour in the general election caused outrage. But I’m a socialist, not a nationalist – like thousands of others in ScotlandRoughly five years ago I co-founded the
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The west is gripped by Venezuela’s problems. Why does it ignore Brazil’s? | Julia Blunck 10 Aug 2017, 8:58am The west is gripped by Venezuela’s problems. Why does it ignore Brazil’s? | Julia Blunck
Reporters ask Jeremy Corbyn if he will condemn Nicolás Maduro. But the undemocratic abuses of Michel Temer aren’t flashy enough for the news cycleVenezuela is the question on everyone’s lips. Rather, Venezuela is the question on reporters’ lips
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Martin Rowson on Jeremy Corbyn and violence in Venezuela – cartoon 7 Aug 2017, 3:20pm Martin Rowson on Jeremy Corbyn and violence in Venezuela – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/aug/07/martin-rowson-on-jeremy-corbyn-and-violence-in-venezuela-cartoon">Continue reading...
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Brexit will be catastrophic. Yet I still support Jeremy Corbyn | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett 7 Aug 2017, 5:00am Brexit will be catastrophic. Yet I still support Jeremy Corbyn | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
As a conflicted remainer, it might be difficult to square my reasons for backing Corbyn. But it’s the Tory car crash that’s behind this mess, not himSince his
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Yes, Labour had a great election. But they got a leg-up from the Tories | Deborah Mattinson 3 Aug 2017, 10:54am Yes, Labour had a great election. But they got a leg-up from the Tories | Deborah Mattinson
A new study confirms that a shoddy Conservative campaign gifted votes to Jeremy Corbyn. Labour won’t always be able to rely on such charityThe
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Corbyn betraying young people on Brexit? What colossal nonsense | Matt Zarb-Cousin 1 Aug 2017, 9:33am Corbyn betraying young people on Brexit? What colossal nonsense | Matt Zarb-Cousin
Middle-class, middle-aged remainers will have to try harder to drive a wedge between young Labour voters and the only politician acting in our interests
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Labour used to be the party that saw the folly of leaving the EU 29 Jul 2017, 7:05pm Labour used to be the party that saw the folly of leaving the EU
Harold Wilson was not a Europhile, but a clear-eyed realist. Jeremy Corbyn could learn much from the story of the 1975 referendumWhat have David Cameron (Tory prime minister, 2010-16), and Harold Wilson (Labour prime minister, 1964-70 and 1974-76) got in common? Answer: in order to keep their respective parties together, because they were split over “Europe”, each of them called a referendum. Wilson triumphed, and went down in history as a consummate politician, indeed statesman. Cameron failed lamentably, and his mishandling of this vital issue is sometimes described as the biggest prime ministerial disaster brought upon the nation since Lord North lost the American colonies.
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This Momentum video has really upset the Corbyn deniers. They just don’t get it | Maya Goodfellow 28 Jul 2017, 9:59am This Momentum video has really upset the Corbyn deniers. They just don’t get it | Maya Goodfellow
The anger provoked by Momentum’s social media outing shows rightwing political analysis hasn’t moved on since Labour was 20 points behind in the pollsMomentum’s latest video has caused quite a stir. Described at “hateful” by
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Brexit has already split the UK. Now it risks tearing Labour apart | John Harris 28 Jul 2017, 8:58am Brexit has already split the UK. Now it risks tearing Labour apart | John Harris
In ignoring the party’s remainers and embracing hard Brexit, Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell risk inviting economic doom for the sake of ideology
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Corbyn is a hard-right Brexiter. Progressives must fight back, not follow | Vince Cable 27 Jul 2017, 11:25am Corbyn is a hard-right Brexiter. Progressives must fight back, not follow | Vince Cable
The Labour leader’s 1970s-style thinking on Europe has no place in today’s politics. Brexit is too important to be dictated by tribalism
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Labour has slipped rightwards on immigration. That needs to change | David Wearing 25 Jul 2017, 10:01am Labour has slipped rightwards on immigration. That needs to change | David Wearing
From the newly formed English Labour Network to Jeremy Corbyn’s appearance on Andrew Marr, jingoistic attitudes are being validated, not challenged
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Tony Blair should accept his era is over. Jeremy Corbyn is right for today | Owen Jones 20 Jul 2017, 2:00am Tony Blair should accept his era is over. Jeremy Corbyn is right for today | Owen Jones
In the light of Labour’s surge, it is now clear the party came undone when it conceded too much to the right
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Dear Jeremy Corbyn. Your meeting in Brussels is a chance to recast Brexit | John Palmer 13 Jul 2017, 3:39am Updated Dear Jeremy Corbyn. Your meeting in Brussels is a chance to recast Brexit | John Palmer
At your talks today with the chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, you must show yourself willing to reject Brexit and embrace radical EU reform
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The Guardian view on select committees: chairs of power | Editorial 12 Jul 2017, 3:00pm The Guardian view on select committees: chairs of power | Editorial
Parliament’s system of electing select committee chairs has been a great success. The new incumbents have something to live up toTheresa May and Jeremy Corbyn invariably make the big political headlines, even when they skip prime minister’s questions, as they did on Wednesday in order to be with the Spanish royal visitors, leaving
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Theresa May’s first year was awful. Her next promises far worse | Polly Toynbee 11 Jul 2017, 2:00am Theresa May’s first year was awful. Her next promises far worse | Polly Toynbee
The boulder of Brexit blocks her path, she can feel the Europhobes’ knives at her back, and Corbyn is waiting. The great unravelling is beginning
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The next election isn’t won, whatever Labour and Corbyn think | Matthew d’Ancona 10 Jul 2017, 2:00am The next election isn’t won, whatever Labour and Corbyn think | Matthew d’Ancona
The party leader’s name reverberates, but the old leftwing assumption of inevitable victory is his Achilles heel
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The Guardian view on Labour unity: tolerance wins loyalty | Editorial 6 Jul 2017, 2:59pm The Guardian view on Labour unity: tolerance wins loyalty | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn’s successes have won round sceptical Labour MPs. Internal debate should be used to help broaden the party’s outlook and echo the open-hearted spirit of his campaignIt is rare for a leader to substantially strengthen his authority over a party in the immediate aftermath of general election defeat. Jeremy Corbyn has managed it because his performance last month did not feel like defeat to his supporters, nor indeed to his opponents, not least because it
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Armageddon hasn’t happened – so the Labour right needs a rethink | Owen Jones 6 Jul 2017, 1:00am Armageddon hasn’t happened – so the Labour right needs a rethink | Owen Jones
The doomsayers were wrong about voters’ appetite for Jeremy Corbyn’s kind of politics – and going back to the compromise of 2015 would be a fatal mistakeThose who believed that a leftwing prospectus would inevitably condemn Labour to electoral oblivion now have a choice. In last month’s election, it gained seats for the
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Corbyn has a savvy game plan: wait for the Tories to implode over Brexit | Tae Hoon Kim 5 Jul 2017, 5:52am Corbyn has a savvy game plan: wait for the Tories to implode over Brexit | Tae Hoon Kim
The Labour leader’s Brexit manoeuvring is not based on ideological preferences, but on exacerbating Conservative divisions – and provoking another election
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Will one more heave be enough to get Jeremy Corbyn to Number 10? 1 Jul 2017, 7:05pm Will one more heave be enough to get Jeremy Corbyn to Number 10?
An argument begins within Labour’s ranks about what the party needs to do to win the next electionAfter the thrill of hearing his name turned into an anthem at Glastonbury – “Oh, Jer-e-my Cor-byn” the crowd serenaded his
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Have Katie Hopkins and Farage joined Corbyn on the right side of history? | Marina Hyde 30 Jun 2017, 11:28am Have Katie Hopkins and Farage joined Corbyn on the right side of history? | Marina Hyde
These are weird times in Westminster, so double down on the popcorn and wait for the next bout: Andrea Leadsom v Jacob Rees-MoggThere’s never been a better time to stop trying to understand British politics, and simply decide to experience it as a moodboard. Albeit the sort of moodboard with which crazed killers wallpaper their homes. I see
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Rejoice! Centrism in British politics is dead and big ideas are back | Giles Fraser: Loose canon 29 Jun 2017, 12:02pm Rejoice! Centrism in British politics is dead and big ideas are back | Giles Fraser: Loose canon
Centrists claim that the middle ground is where grown-ups do politics. It isn’t. It’s where the elite try to manage things into staying the sameThe centre ground in British politics is dead. Or, at the very least, extremely poorly. A year after plotters tried to oust Jeremy Corbyn for being unelectably leftwing, those on the right of Labour have finally fallen silent. The Liberal Democrats made no electoral breakthrough, despite being the only go-to party for Brexit dissenters. And the left of the Tory party looks embittered and lost. So much for the oft-repeated mantra that elections are won from the centre ground. I, for one, am delighted that centrism is ailing, because there has long been a fantasy at the heart of it that rots our brains and makes us servile – a very British kind of fantasy that there exists such a thing as non-ideological politics, some calm and sensible mid-point set between the howling gales of ideological extremes. Centrists think this is where the grown-ups do their politics. Indeed, the very metaphor of the “centre” uses language to position others out on to the suspicious “extremes”. From this sensible centre, those on the “edges” of political life are readily patronised as the idealistic young, waving flags at Glastonbury, or the dangerously partisan plotting to overthrow the status quo.
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This clapped-out Tory machine won’t be fixed by kicking out Theresa May | Ian Birrell 29 Jun 2017, 3:29am This clapped-out Tory machine won’t be fixed by kicking out Theresa May | Ian Birrell
A bungled ballot, a cabinet in open revolt against a hapless leader – and beset by fears of a Labour coup. Why not just hand Jeremy Corbyn the keys of No 10 now?The Conservative party has often been seen as a well-oiled fighting machine, feared by foes for its ruthless focus on winning and retaining power. During its long history as the country’s most successful political force it has displayed skill at ditching deadweight leaders and for drastic reinvention to reflect changing times. Yet suddenly it appears like a
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Labour’s shift has been vindicated. The public is tired of austerity | Owen Jones 28 Jun 2017, 10:46am Labour’s shift has been vindicated. The public is tired of austerity | Owen Jones
Two years ago, Jeremy Corbyn challenged political orthodoxy by not attacking benefits claimants. Now public opinion has aligned with his stanceDo you resign yourself to public opinion as it is now, or do you attempt to change it? That is a question that has long divided Britain’s left and produced two competing strategies. The “centrist” approach is one that amounts to resignation. Voters are where they are, and it is largely futile to campaign to change minds when Labour is in opposition. It will simply render the party out of touch. A longstanding centrist argument was that the public believes
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Labour should lead the drive to stay in the single market. Here’s why | Peter Hain 26 Jun 2017, 8:59am Labour should lead the drive to stay in the single market. Here’s why | Peter Hain
Putting jobs and the economy at the top of the Brexit agenda means staying in the single market. Such a move would now attract cross-party supportAs Jeremy Corbyn has argued over Brexit, Labour must prioritise jobs and the economy, and that, for
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Glastonbury is more evidence: Corbyn’s appeal crosses classes | Owen Jones 26 Jun 2017, 5:46am Glastonbury is more evidence: Corbyn’s appeal crosses classes | Owen Jones
The Labour leader has proved his critics wrong. Far from having a narrow support base, both working-class and middle-class voters back himThe left will never win over the middle class, or so the argument used to go: now the left is accused of winning over too many middle-class voters.
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Corbyn’s Labour has done well. To win power it needs to do far better | Martin Kettle 23 Jun 2017, 2:00am Corbyn’s Labour has done well. To win power it needs to do far better | Martin Kettle
June’s election didn’t prove that voters long for a leftwing programme. The truth is far more complexAt a memorial event yesterday for the political scientist
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If the Labour party wants to keep my generation, it will have to listen to us | Marienna Pope-Weidemann 21 Jun 2017, 8:02am If the Labour party wants to keep my generation, it will have to listen to us | Marienna Pope-Weidemann
Remembering my grandmother, I know Corbyn’s ‘new kind of politics’ isn’t so new – and growing it means creating a party culture that values more than votesMy earliest political memory was watching my grandmother with narrow eyes and a heavy sigh tear Tony Blair’s first Labour manifesto into pieces while on the phone to party head office to cancel her membership, breaking generations of family tradition. I sensed her grief but was too young to understand. I asked why she was leaving Labour and she said it was because they were
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As Labour politicians, we reject a hard-right Brexit, and defend the single market | Stephen Doughty, Chuka Umunna and others 20 Jun 2017, 12:30pm As Labour politicians, we reject a hard-right Brexit, and defend the single market | Stephen Doughty, Chuka Umunna and others
We oppose the Brexit policy being dictated by the Tory right. Leaving the single market would cost public services £31bn. Our party should fight thatJeremy Corbyn has rightly said that Labour’s position on Brexit is to focus on a deal that
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Why not put music at the heart of education? | Stephen Moss 19 Jun 2017, 3:39am Why not put music at the heart of education? | Stephen Moss
Every child should have the opportunity to learn to read music and play an instrument, not just the kids of thrusting middle-class parentsOne of the most exciting commitments of the general election campaign was made in Jeremy Corbyn’s wonderful
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Why not put music at the heart of education | Stephen Moss 19 Jun 2017, 3:00am Why not put music at the heart of education | Stephen Moss
Every child should have the opportunity to learn to read music and play an instrument, not just the kids of thrusting middle-class parentsOne of the most exciting commitments of the general election campaign was made in Jeremy Corbyn’s wonderful
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Labour members built networks. Now Corbyn must too | Zoe Williams 19 Jun 2017, 1:30am Labour members built networks. Now Corbyn must too | Zoe Williams
The Labour leader needs to reimagine his party and embrace the different strands that support himJeremy Corbyn may be as popular, but will never be more popular than he is at this moment. I say that with such certainty not because I can see into the future, but because it’s not functionally possible. Anyone
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Corbyn is chiming with the times. But no one can predict anything any more | John Harris 17 Jun 2017, 1:00am Corbyn is chiming with the times. But no one can predict anything any more | John Harris
The mood is rightly jubilant for Labour, but the insurgent party can’t forget the complexity of its positionWe will remember this summer for the rest of our lives. It is starting to feel like a whole decade compacted into mere weeks: despair followed by joy followed by yet more despair, while political certainties that recently seemed rock solid suddenly fall away. After 10 years of pain, austerity might just be in retreat. The idea of England and Wales as some monochrome expanse, full of nostalgia and nastiness and people content to watch as their social fabric is serially wrecked, has been drastically weakened. The horrors at
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Theresa May called a snap election, but we at Labour had Snapchat. No contest | Andrew Gwynne 15 Jun 2017, 5:20am Theresa May called a snap election, but we at Labour had Snapchat. No contest | Andrew Gwynne
The prime minister tried to crush us. But we were ready to hit the ground running, and we knew how to use the brilliant new tools of campaigningWhen Theresa May shocked Westminster on the 18 April by calling a general election she did so with the aim of winning a landslide Tory majority. She wasn’t alone in thinking that would be the outcome. With polling leads of up to 25% in the early stages of the campaign, the story of how Labour turned this election around is one of the most remarkable political fightbacks in modern campaigning history. Jeremy Corbyn, his leader’s office team, the Labour party staff at HQ and in the regions, and the
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My plea to Labour: stop pitying young people, start representing us | Poppy Noor 14 Jun 2017, 11:23am My plea to Labour: stop pitying young people, start representing us | Poppy Noor
Supporting the working class and marginalised groups is what the Labour party is designed for. This is common sense, not revolutionAmid the euphoria of Labour’s extraordinary election campaign, there is continuing confusion. Many MPs who had campaigned against Jeremy Corbyn, in genuine fear of losing their seats, are sitting on hugely
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Momentum’s grassroots democracy can make Labour an unstoppable force | Rachel Shabi 14 Jun 2017, 8:49am Momentum’s grassroots democracy can make Labour an unstoppable force | Rachel Shabi
The campaign group has already been broadening its activities beyond the traditional political realm to social issues such as food banksNot so long ago, in the slur-filled era before this year’s election, Momentum, the grassroots group of supporters for Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, were routinely dismissed as armchair activists, cultish Trots, delusional young naïfs, or some combination of the three. Now, media coverage of the group carries headlines such as
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Corbyn and Labour need to rethink their strategy to win next time | Stephen Moss 14 Jun 2017, 6:05am Corbyn and Labour need to rethink their strategy to win next time | Stephen Moss
To gain the extra seats needed for an outright Commons majority, Jeremy Corbyn will have to bring back the likes of Chuka Umunna and Yvette CooperThroughout the Corbyn leadership I am happy to admit I was a sceptic. At the
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A true progressive alliance would have made Jeremy Corbyn prime minister | Clive Lewis and Caroline Lucas 13 Jun 2017, 11:59am A true progressive alliance would have made Jeremy Corbyn prime minister | Clive Lewis and Caroline Lucas
We felt a profound sense of dismay when Tories won by narrow margins. In seat after seat, progressive votes were wasted, because of our broken electoral systemThis was a bittersweet election. We rejoice at the fact the Conservatives have been pegged back and the landslide they presumed was theirs by right has been
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New Labour is dead. Jeremy Corbyn’s shadow cabinet must stay as it is | Owen Jones 13 Jun 2017, 6:59am New Labour is dead. Jeremy Corbyn’s shadow cabinet must stay as it is | Owen Jones
The idea that people won’t vote for socialist policies has been comprehensively debunked. Why change tack when Labour is in the ascendancy?The Tories’ self-immolation is quite the spectacle. Weeks ago, they genuinely believed they were on the brink of extinguishing Labour as an effective electoral force. They now have
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‘Corbyn won’t renege on promises’: grime artists explain why they backed Labour | Awate, Maxsta, Krucial and Slix 13 Jun 2017, 6:31am ‘Corbyn won’t renege on promises’: grime artists explain why they backed Labour | Awate, Maxsta, Krucial and Slix
The #Grime4Corbyn movement has been credited with increasing young people’s turnout. Four grime stars and rappers explain why they got involved
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How Jeremy Corbyn managed to bring Ukip voters back to Labour | Matt Zarb-Cousin 13 Jun 2017, 5:00am How Jeremy Corbyn managed to bring Ukip voters back to Labour | Matt Zarb-Cousin
Labour’s policy platform buried the lazy caricature of Ukip supporters caring only about immigration – and offered a plan to relieve economic insecurity
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This is Corbyn’s moment: he’s rescued Britain from the chains of austerity | Polly Toynbee 12 Jun 2017, 3:10pm This is Corbyn’s moment: he’s rescued Britain from the chains of austerity | Polly Toynbee
The Labour leader is a man remade. To a remarkable degree, his respectability and plausibility as prime minster is established Nothing succeeds like success.
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What made the difference for Labour? Ordinary people knocking on doors | Emma Rees 12 Jun 2017, 9:21am What made the difference for Labour? Ordinary people knocking on doors | Emma Rees
Jeremy Corbyn’s campaign was buoyed by supporters flooding into marginals to have millions of conversations with voters. At Momentum, this was our focusLabour has staged one of the most spectacular comebacks in British political history. 
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Jeremy Corbyn threw young people a lifeline – and we took it | Ellie Mae O’Hagan 11 Jun 2017, 12:38pm Jeremy Corbyn threw young people a lifeline – and we took it | Ellie Mae O’Hagan
For the first time in years, the gloom I felt about the future has lifted. We don’t have power yet, but we do have hopeIn the early hours after the election results, the week-long rain clouds over London were dissolved by morning light, and it’s been sunny ever since. I hadn’t expected this result, so I didn’t anticipate how I would feel afterwards. I didn’t expect everything to suddenly appear in Technicolor and alive with possibilities. I’m slowly getting used to having hope and a sense of belonging. These feelings have been so absent over the past couple of years that it almost feels uncomfortable to have them.
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Can Jeremy Corbyn reunite his party? | Helen Lewis 11 Jun 2017, 10:02am Updated Can Jeremy Corbyn reunite his party? | Helen Lewis
He has proved he is a great campaigner, but can he bring unity to Labour and win over dissenters? Two Ks tell the story of Labour’s success in the general election – Kensington and Kirkcaldy. Two years ago, the party lost so badly that many wondered if there was any route back to power for it at all. Its support had retreated to English cities and Wales; it held only a single seat in Scotland and in the south-west of England. To form a government, Labour either needed to overturn the granite majorities of the SNP or to make gains in English seats it had rarely, if ever, held before. On Thursday night, it did both. In Gordon Brown’s old seat of Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath, an SNP majority of 9,974 became a Labour lead of 259. In
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I was wrong about Corbyn’s chances, but I still doubt him | Nick Cohen 10 Jun 2017, 7:07pm I was wrong about Corbyn’s chances, but I still doubt him | Nick Cohen
No one can deny that the Labour leader ran a fluent campaign, but can he capitalise on it?In March,
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What Nicola Sturgeon can learn from Jeremy Corbyn | Kevin McKenna 10 Jun 2017, 7:05pm What Nicola Sturgeon can learn from Jeremy Corbyn | Kevin McKenna
After 10 ineffective years in power, the first minister should heed the success of the Labour party leaderOn the eve of an election when you had dared to hope that compassion might prevail over greed, a reality check was provided by the BBC. Jeremy Corbyn had just finished addressing his 90th rally in a seven-week campaign and, for a few hours, we even began to wonder how Britain might be under a Labour government led by him. Imagining the howls of anguish from those who stood to lose most under a Corbyn government was the best bit. They had lately begun to cast Corbyn as a Robespierre figure, gleefully imposing a reign of Marxist terror on mild Albion, roaming the country seeking out the necks of capitalists. It took just one word from the BBC to snap us out of the fantasy.
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Electoral reform is still needed to control the money and lies of online world | Carole Cadwalladr 10 Jun 2017, 7:05pm Electoral reform is still needed to control the money and lies of online world | Carole Cadwalladr
Despite the election’s energy and enthusiasm, democracy is threatened if we don’t regulate the dark arts of the webDid you see Jeremy Corbyn enrapturing a packed rally with Shelley, with lines about lions rising after slumber? Or did you see Corbyn whining on to creepy music about the IRA? If you spent any time online in the last month, you will have seen some form of propaganda, but which? Which lies do you get? Who targeted you? With what? And why? You probably won’t know, won’t ever know. Because that’s how we now do politics in Britain: in darkness, inside closed, proprietary systems that belong to multinational companies owned by billionaires. In 2017, our electoral laws, largely based on the campaigning landscape of the 1880s, simply don’t work any more. This isn’t the opinion of some leftie moaning on but the considered opinion of Britain’s leading experts in the field. It’s the findings of a working group set up by the LSE to investigate how digital campaigning has changed politics.
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Labour’s politics of hope have overcome the politics of fear | John McDonnell 10 Jun 2017, 7:05pm Labour’s politics of hope have overcome the politics of fear | John McDonnell
The leaked manifesto was the making of our campaignSix weeks ago, when Labour was more than 20 points behind the Conservatives in the opinion polls, I said that the gap would narrow and, with hope in my heart, that I believed we could win the election. I argued that when the broadcast media rules kicked in during the election period, we would have a better chance to get our policies across. The more balanced the broadcast coverage of Jeremy Corbyn, the more people would see him for the honest, decent, principled and indeed strong leader he was.
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The Observer view on the general election | Observer editorial 10 Jun 2017, 5:00pm Updated The Observer view on the general election | Observer editorial
Theresa May fought a deplorable election campaign which has left her without authority or credibility How did it come to this? How could a politician hailed for her courage and tactical acumen a year ago be spending this weekend holed up in Downing Street, friendless and widely ridiculed, a prisoner of her furious party and of events that have spun out of her control? How could someone who just days ago was confidently preparing to fulfil her ambition to guide Britain into its new role abroad and refashion its institutions at home be now preparing for the humiliation of resignation from her post that must surely happen soon? How could a prime minister who seemed imperious just weeks ago when she set out to destroy Corbyn’s Labour be laid so low, the power draining from her as her backbenchers and senior cabinet ministers make demands she is too weak to resist? Whatever happened to “strong and stable”, parroted to the point of banality by May and her senior colleagues throughout the campaign. Whatever the position of Theresa May three days after the election, it is not strong and it is not stable. The prime minister presided over one of the worst election campaigns in history. She squandered a 20-point poll lead and her parliamentary majority. The contrast between the
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Britain is more divided than ever. Now Labour has a chance to unify it | John Harris 10 Jun 2017, 4:58am Updated Britain is more divided than ever. Now Labour has a chance to unify it | John Harris
Theresa May is still in No 10 – and the wounds of Brexit are still raw. But Corbyn can build on his party’s amazing breakthrough
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