Back Search constitution
Search Sections 21 Oct

constitution

31 Entries were found for “constitution”
Close
Advertisement
The Political Distortion of Language 7 Oct 6:39pm The Political Distortion of Language
The left turns a headline about the Constitution into a ‘rape joke.’
 Like Reply
Happy Constitution Day, if You Can Keep It 16 Sep 4:26pm Happy Constitution Day, if You Can Keep It
The long-term survival of the Founders’ design depends on people, not parchment.
 Like Reply
Trump’s ‘clown fascism’ and the US constitution | Letters 1 Jan 12:28pm Trump’s ‘clown fascism’ and the US constitution | Letters
Readers’ thoughts on the constitutional threats exposed by Donald Trump’s presidencyFor transatlantic admirers of Jonathan Freedland’s
 Like Reply
The year of Trump has laid bare the US constitution’s serious flaws | Jonathan Freedland 30 Dec 2017, 2:30am The year of Trump has laid bare the US constitution’s serious flaws | Jonathan Freedland
I once wrote a hymn of praise to the achievements of the founding fathers. There’s still much to celebrate – but their inspirational vision needs an urgent updateThere’s a million things to love about Hamilton, the musical that has opened in London to
 Like Reply
The Guardian view on Chinese politics: an age of ambition | Editorial 24 Oct 2017, 1:56pm The Guardian view on Chinese politics: an age of ambition | Editorial
The incorporation of Xi Jinping’s thinking into the party constitution indicates his extraordinary power – but also his breadth of visionMoney isn’t everything. That is Xi Jinping’s central message – even if he takes rather longer to say it. When the 2,300 delegates to the Communist Party of China’s congress unanimously
 Like Reply
Yes, the House of Lords needs reform. Why not create vocational peerages? | Maurice Glasman 20 Oct 2017, 12:27pm Yes, the House of Lords needs reform. Why not create vocational peerages? | Maurice Glasman
Forget term limits. The vital role played by the second chamber would be enhanced with peers from every walk of life – including cleaners and nursesAs we crawl towards Brexit, it is inevitable that our attention will turn towards our institutions of national self-government. As parliamentary sovereignty is reasserted, the anomalies of the UK’s ancient constitution will re-emerge. Not the least of these is the House of Lords. There was a suggestion this week that there should be
 Like Reply
The EU has tied its own hands. It cannot intervene in Catalonia | Natalie Nougayrède 3 Oct 2017, 2:53pm The EU has tied its own hands. It cannot intervene in Catalonia | Natalie Nougayrède
Brussels has to adhere to its own rulebook even if it looks feeble. It has no mechanism for succession disputesThe Catalan crisis presents the EU with an unprecedented conundrum. Spain joined the European project in 1986, and its democratic transition has for decades been hailed as a model. Tensions have not run this high in the country since the 1981 failed military coup, when colonel Antonio Tejero seized the parliament in Madrid at gunpoint. The then king, young Juan Carlos, prevented the nation from entering another dark age by delivering a speech on TV uncompromisingly defending the constitution and identifying the monarchy with the country’s emerging democratic majority. As Catalonia’s nationalist leadership hurtles towards what may be, in the coming days, a unilateral declaration of independence, the current king, Felipe, also took to the television screens. Can he rally consensus within Spain to prevent a full-on confrontation?
 Like Reply
Why Donald Trump pardoned the unpardonable Joe Arpaio 26 Aug 2017, 1:05pm Why Donald Trump pardoned the unpardonable Joe Arpaio
In pardoning the former sheriff of Maricopa County, our president sided with a lawless renegade over our federal judiciary and the constitution itself Who will go first, President Trump or our constitutional order? The question presses after the president’s most recent affront to our system of governance, his
 Like Reply
Is the American republic built to withstand a malevolent president? | Michael Goldfarb 29 Jul 2017, 7:05pm Is the American republic built to withstand a malevolent president? | Michael Goldfarb
The principle of common good underpins the constitution. Donald Trump is gleefully shredding that idealThe Trump administration, having passed the six-month milestone in office, kicked off the next phase of his presidency with an explosion of crazy, spread over the past seven days. Like sweeps week on
 Like Reply
8 Jun 2017, 6:51pm Updated Mr. Comey and All the President’s Lies
The former F.B.I. director made plain that unlike Mr. Trump, he values honesty and the Constitution above blind loyalty to a particular leader....
 Like Reply
The Guardian view on May and the constitution: what does she mean by that? | Editorial 1 Jun 2017, 3:04pm The Guardian view on May and the constitution: what does she mean by that? | Editorial
The Conservative manifesto proposes abolishing the Fixed-term Parliaments Act. It doesn’t say why, and it doesn’t say what would replace itThe
 Like Reply
Donald Trump is a president gripped by delusions of absolute power | Jill Abramson 17 May 2017, 1:27pm Donald Trump is a president gripped by delusions of absolute power | Jill Abramson
We expect the leader of the United States to uphold the constitution, but this one confronts and threatens it every day ‘I have the
 Like Reply
No one sabotages Donald Trump better than Donald Trump | Joshua Matz 26 Apr 2017, 11:15am No one sabotages Donald Trump better than Donald Trump | Joshua Matz
Yet another executive order by the US president was blocked by the courts, in part because of his own words. His tweets are a political doomsday device Welcome to the age of presidential sabotage. Since assuming office, President Donald J Trump has shown little inclination to “take care that the laws be faithfully executed”, as commanded by the US constitution. Instead, he has openly declared his intention to wreak havoc in key programs. He has appointed officials
 Like Reply
The Guardian view on Labour’s manifesto process: get ready for the blame game | Editorial 24 Apr 2017, 2:57pm The Guardian view on Labour’s manifesto process: get ready for the blame game | Editorial
In the Bennite era, the left wanted the leader to follow conference policy in the election manifesto. Jeremy Corbyn now seems to have adopted the opposite approachThe term “clause IV” – the clause of Labour’s 1918 constitution setting out the party’s aims and values – still resonates, more than 20 years after Tony Blair persuaded Labour to change it. “Clause V” has always been less iconic. So few under the age of 60 are likely to have much clue what the party’s “clause V meeting” once portended. Yet, until the 1980s, clause V was probably a greater concern to Labour leaders than the more celebrated fourth clause. That’s because it is the job of a meeting held under this clause to agree the party’s election manifesto. In recent elections, the clause V meeting has taken place without much excitement. Yet in the 1970s and early 1980s, they were immense internal battles. In the
 Like Reply
This election is a fight for the very core of our democracy | David Blunkett 22 Apr 2017, 7:04pm This election is a fight for the very core of our democracy | David Blunkett
It’s not about Brexit or Corbyn. It’s a fight for the core of our democracyFor the first time in my adult life I will not be voting in this general election. Hell, what a headline. But hold on, this is nothing to do with my well-known views about the Corbyn project. Rather, it is the result of an arcane part of Britain’s historic, political and outdated constitution that bars members of the House of Lords from this vote. For the absence of doubt, I would if I could be voting Labour and I urge every progressive, whatever their doubts, to do the same. In fact I would go further. This election is not about Jeremy Corbyn or those around him, and it is not about Brexit. The truth is that we are fighting to maintain a functioning democracy in which all the levers of power do not rest in the hands of those commanding wealth and privilege.
 Like Reply
21 Apr 2017, 8:37pm Let’s All Learn About Hawaii
Attorney General Jeff Sessions, for one, clearly needs some remedial education on the state — and on the Constitution....
 Like Reply
Why are liberals now cheerleading a warmongering Trump? | Owen Jones 9 Apr 2017, 9:17am Updated Why are liberals now cheerleading a warmongering Trump? | Owen Jones
In just three months, those who vowed to oppose the president are eating out of his hands. Applauding his Syria missile strikes only emboldens him to go further So now we know what it takes for an unhinged, bigoted demagogue to get liberal applause: just bypass the constitution to fire some missiles. It had seemed as though there was consensus among those against Donald Trump. This man was a threat to US democracy and world peace.
 Like Reply
22 Feb 2017, 9:00pm Updated The Reach of the Constitution at the Border
Noncitizens involved in cross-border shootings should be allowed to sue in American courts.
 Like Reply
Could Donald Trump’s ‘junta’ be his salvation? | Mary Dejevsky 21 Feb 2017, 2:46pm Could Donald Trump’s ‘junta’ be his salvation? | Mary Dejevsky
The president’s choice of respected military men such as lieutenant general HR McMaster for key roles may be his best protection from himselfThe guy has been in the White House barely four weeks, and the talk within the global opposition has passed from how he might be prevented from getting there to how he might legitimately be evicted. Article 4 of the 25th Amendment is enjoying a moment in the sun, providing as it does for the replacement of a president who is “unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office”. Enter (briefcase in hand) the sane, sensible, foreigner-friendly President Pence. We are all experts in the US constitution now. Except that there is no sign whatever that Donald Trump is going anywhere – other than to Mar-a-Lago of a weekend. The wishful parallels with opposition to Brexit here in the UK – a second referendum, a Lords rebellion, a popular uprising – betray the same reluctance on the part of the losers to face facts. The new president’s style may be unorthodox, and the substance may as yet be hard to detect, but any evidence of actual incapacity is hard to find – indeed, the frenetic activity suggests the very opposite.
 Like Reply
Taking a stand in the name of democracy | Brief letters 7 Feb 2017, 1:49pm Taking a stand in the name of democracy | Brief letters
John Bercow | LP cartridges | Rugby populations | Problems with a North Channel rail tunnel | Weetabix Congratulations to John Bercow, the Speaker, for his brave and principled refusal to provide the historic platform of Westminster Hall to a man who preaches racism and sexism, and who dismisses a fundamental principle of the US constitution, the rule of law (
 Like Reply
The supreme court Brexit judgment isn’t a victory for me, but for our constitution | Gina Miller 24 Jan 2017, 4:44am The supreme court Brexit judgment isn’t a victory for me, but for our constitution | Gina Miller
An overriding principle of British law is that parliament is sovereign – and we should be grateful to the judges, in the face of huge pressure, for upholding itIn upholding the high court’s
 Like Reply
Alienating Labour’s grassroots will keep Corbyn out of power | Michael Chessum 17 Jan 2017, 3:00am Alienating Labour’s grassroots will keep Corbyn out of power | Michael Chessum
Momentum’s new constitution disempowers the activists it needs for the inspiration, ideas and hard graft that could change the political landscapeI don’t even like cupcakes that much – and I despise the practice, which is sadly becoming more widespread, of playing out the left’s internal squabbles on the pages of newspapers. But the picture painted by leaked emails from Momentum’s steering committee last week, in which I
 Like Reply
The Observer view on president-elect Donald Trump | Observer editorial 14 Jan 2017, 7:04pm The Observer view on president-elect Donald Trump | Observer editorial
America and the world enter the unknownThe inauguration of a US president is normally a moment of great hope. It is a celebration of representative democracy and the peaceful transfer of power. It is an affirmation that the ideals and laws set out in the 1789 US constitution, still a global paradigm for modern-day governance, continue to be honoured and observed. Inauguration confers legitimacy on a head of state in the name of “we, the people”. The incumbent has a duty to respect and uphold the constitution’s central aims, namely “to form a more perfect union, establish justice, ensure domestic tranquillity, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty”. The inauguration this Friday of
 Like Reply
The Constitution Says Nothing About Behavioral Economics 9 Jan 2017, 7:18pm The Constitution Says Nothing About Behavioral Economics
A hair salon tells the Supreme Court that trendy research backs up its right to charge credit-card fees.
 Like Reply
Even when she’s talking to the Queen, Theresa May keeps ma’am on Brexit | d’Ancona 23 Dec 2016, 9:58am Even when she’s talking to the Queen, Theresa May keeps ma’am on Brexit | d’Ancona
The prime minister’s reticence on her plans for Britain leaving the EU is unshakable. Whether the strategy is a good idea remains to be seenIn the introduction to his brilliant play The Audience, Peter Morgan writes that by dramatising the relationship between the Queen and her prime ministers “one was dealing with the British constitution, the bone structure of our establishment in its most elemental form”. This is why it is so intriguing to read in Friday’s Times of Her Majesty’s alleged frustration that Theresa May
 Like Reply
29 Nov 2016, 8:18pm Updated Mr. Trump, Meet the Constitution
Why is the president-elect afraid of free speech?
 Like Reply
18 Oct 2016, 11:11am The battle for Mosul is not just coalition (good) v Isis (bad) | Jonathan Shaw
The reality is more complex than many assume. Without a peace plan and counter-narrative that involves all the peoples of Iraq, victory will be partial and short-livedThe Unesco constitution says: “Since wars begin in the minds of men, it is in the minds of men that the defences of peace must be constructed.” The only thing people seem to agree about the current
 Like Reply
10 Oct 2016, 9:10am My ‘insane’ Uncle Ed tried to kill Queen Victoria – he was treated with kindness | Penny Pepper
It’s a tragedy that Ed probably fared better in Bedlam nearly 200 years ago than he would do in today’s mental healthcare systemA young Queen Victoria rides out of the palace with her dashing husband. It’s June, and she is happy as the open carriage moves down Constitution Hill. Waiting on a grassy verge is a young man. Scarcely that – he’s a boy, just 18, with dark eyes and a baby face, short of stature and wearing a high top hat, as was fashionable in 1840. As the Queen draws closer he raises two pistols, determined to fire on the pregnant Victoria.
 Like Reply
3 Oct 2016, 2:21pm Hungarian voters make a positive abstention | Letters
The point being missed in the reporting of the results of the Hungarian referendum is that the 43.9% turnout, which made the referendum result invalid under the Hungarian constitution’s 50% minimum vote rule, was not a sign of voter apathy, as may have been in the case of the EU membership referendum in Britain. In Hungary, the overwhelming majority of the political parties opposed to the ruling Fidesz and the even more rightwing Jobbik positively campaigned for people to abstain as an act of protest or spoil their ballots (something enough people appear to have done to bring the valid votes actually down below 40% of the country’s total electorate).  So despite the vast government propaganda effort, which besides its vicious overtones is estimated to have cost far more per head than not just its counterpart in Britain’s EU referendum campaign but also the media spending projected in the US presidential election; and contrary to Orban’s claim of victory, the result is quite a triumph for the opposition. No wonder Orban felt desperate enough to pledge altering the validity rule – which he himself had inserted into the constitution to undermine the chances of a successful referendum challenge to government policies – so as to lend legal force, post facto, to the result he got.
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Sunday, October 21, 2018

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept