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It takes a whole world to create a new virus, not just China | Laura Spinney 25 Mar 11:31am It takes a whole world to create a new virus, not just China | Laura Spinney
Viruses such as Covid-19 wouldn’t emerge in food markets if it wasn’t for factory farming, globalised industry and rapid urbanisation When I get stressed, a patch of annoying red eczema appears on the inside of my upper right arm. The doctor gives me some cream to rub on it, but I also know that to stop it coming back I have to deal with the underlying problem. Too much information, you’re thinking, but let me make the analogy. The reason we shouldn’t call the Sars-CoV-2 virus causing global misery the “
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The Guardian view on China and the US: a stricken world without leaders 24 Mar 3:35pm The Guardian view on China and the US: a stricken world without leaders
This pandemic has highlighted the need for global cooperation, but magnified the failings of the major powers
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South Korea took rapid, intrusive measures against Covid-19 – and they worked | Alexis Dudden and Andrew Marks 20 Mar 4:00am South Korea took rapid, intrusive measures against Covid-19 – and they worked | Alexis Dudden and Andrew Marks
The country acted fast when the virus began to spread. Strict quarantine measures and testing have helped to curb it South Koreans are famously nonchalant about North Korean nuclear weapons. Bewilderingly to the rest of us, they “keep calm and carry on” whenever Pyongyang threatens to turn Seoul into a “sea of fire”. The South Korean approach to Covid-19 could not have been more different. On 16 January, the South Korean biotech executive Chun Jong-yoon grasped the reality unfolding in China and directed his lab to work to stem the virus’s inevitable spread; within days, his team developed detection kits now in high demand around the world.
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The UK’s Covid-19 strategy dangerously leaves too many questions unanswered | Anthony Costello 15 Mar 4:12pm The UK’s Covid-19 strategy dangerously leaves too many questions unanswered | Anthony Costello
The coronavirus outbreak can be suppressed as China and others have done, but we need to act now
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Britain goes it alone over coronavirus. We can only hope the gamble pays off | Devi Sridhar 15 Mar 5:00am Britain goes it alone over coronavirus. We can only hope the gamble pays off | Devi Sridhar
Ignoring advice and lessons from Europe and Asia on mass testing and isolation, health experts insist that our approach is the answerOn 23 January, the central government of China imposed a
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China is ill, but not only because of coronavirus | Ai Weiwei 8 Mar 2:15pm China is ill, but not only because of coronavirus | Ai Weiwei
The regime’s power relies on intimidation and censorship. Right now, mistrust is a contagion it is struggling to controlIn China, people from the city of Wuhan are jokingly referred to as “nine-headed birds” because of their habit of inveterate squabbling. In recent weeks, though, an eerie silence has descended on their world. Empty streets, empty malls. Everyone kept indoors. The government says 80,000 are infected by coronavirus, and more than 3,000 have died in China. This pandemic has now spread to more than 100 countries and territories. Is the city just one big prison-hospital? News and rumour arrive round the clock online, but that dismal barrage in a sense only makes things worse. A few people can’t take the pressure, climb to a top floor and jump into black silence below.
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Why haven’t we got a coronavirus vaccine? Because there wasn’t any profit in it | Stephen Buranyi 4 Mar 7:29am Why haven’t we got a coronavirus vaccine? Because there wasn’t any profit in it | Stephen Buranyi
Previous viral outbreaks have provoked races to find a vaccine, but big pharma halts research after pandemics disappearCoronavirus appears to be with us for the long haul. Despite unprecedented attempts at isolation and containment – with 50 million people locked down and economic activity virtually halted in China – cases have spiked in recent weeks. Sixty-seven countries are now reporting a total of more than 8,000 infections outside China. The World Health Organization has been wary of using the word “pandemic”, but last week they advised countries to
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The Guardian view on the UK’s coronavirus plan: sensible, but belated | Editorial 3 Mar 1:36pm The Guardian view on the UK’s coronavirus plan: sensible, but belated | Editorial
A measured response is appropriate. But important questions remain about our ability to tackle Covid-19As Covid-19 has spread, to more than 70 countries already, people are learning not only about the new coronavirus, but about their governments’ ability to respond to it. In many countries, from China to South Korea and Iran, anger at the shortcomings is widely held and deeply felt. With a low but fast-growing tally of
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Post-crash, there’s not much central banks can do to limit the impact of coronavirus | Tony Yates 2 Mar 9:24am Post-crash, there’s not much central banks can do to limit the impact of coronavirus | Tony Yates
A widespread halt in economic activity could put the viability of banks in question and spread financial disruption furtherThe first cases of coronavirus were recorded in China’s landlocked Hubei province, which has a population of about 59 million. Despite the Covid-19 virus and
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Donald Trump’s war on coronavirus is just his latest war on truth | Jonathan Freedland 28 Feb 1:16pm Donald Trump’s war on coronavirus is just his latest war on truth | Jonathan Freedland
The president is reacting to this disaster the way authoritarians always do – by covering up the facts and dodging the blameThe coronavirus crisis is a war against a disease, but it’s also the most serious battle yet in the war on truth. That much was clear from the start, as China moved to
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Must Britain be more like China to halt Coronavirus outbreak? 27 Feb 1:07pm Must Britain be more like China to halt Coronavirus outbreak?
Readers’ views on Britain’s approach to the spread of coronavirus, and whether the current official advice is practical and proportionate Despite a clearly slow start in reacting to the coronavirus, the dynamic capabilities of the Chinese state have enabled it to seemingly quell its rapid spread within China (
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Amid coronavirus fears, Chinese social media is awash with laughter and anger | Yuan Ren 25 Feb 6:14am Amid coronavirus fears, Chinese social media is awash with laughter and anger | Yuan Ren
With people trapped indoors, online activity of all sorts – funny, inspiring, government sanctioned and not – has bloomedIn many ways, the coronavirus outbreak in China has been one big social experiment, testing the thesis: what happens when an entire country goes into hibernation for weeks? Since the outbreak was officially announced more than a month ago, less than one-third of China’s 300 million migrant workers
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The Guardian view on China’s media controls: the truth doesn’t hurt | Editorial 20 Feb 1:51pm The Guardian view on China’s media controls: the truth doesn’t hurt | Editorial
In the midst of the coronavirus outbreak, Beijing has expelled three journalists. The measure is designed to intimidate – and is bad for Chinese citizens as well as the wider publicWe know too little about China, and will soon know a little less. Beijing is
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The Guardian view on Europe after Brexit: unity is strength | Editorial 18 Feb 1:54pm The Guardian view on Europe after Brexit: unity is strength | Editorial
In challenging times, the world needs the EU to be at the top of its game. This week’s budget negotiations are a first testThese are strange and somewhat disorientating times for the European Union. A multipolar world in which China’s influence grows, and Donald Trump’s United States is at best an erratic ally,
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As Wuhan’s desperate and sick beg for help, China shuts them down | Anonymous 17 Feb 11:02am As Wuhan’s desperate and sick beg for help, China shuts them down | Anonymous
Doctors are told not to cause alarm over coronavirus, social media posts are deleted and vital information is dismissed as rumour
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The Observer view on coronavirus | Observer editorial 16 Feb 2:00am The Observer view on coronavirus | Observer editorial
There are still many unknowns about this outbreak but it must be a warning on how to prepare for future pandemicsThe news that coronavirus Covid-19, which has spread across much of China over the past two months, has now claimed its
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The coronavirus outbreak has only heightened Hong Kong’s hostility towards Beijing | Ilaria Maria Sala 13 Feb 5:51am The coronavirus outbreak has only heightened Hong Kong’s hostility towards Beijing | Ilaria Maria Sala
The street protests might be less well attended now, but resentment against the authorities is still growingThe coronavirus outbreak hit Hong Kong as the territory was still reeling from months of political unrest. Last year, the mass protests that started after the special administrative region’s chief executive, Carrie Lam, attempted to introduce an extradition bill with mainland China evolved into nightly confrontations between police and demonstrators. Protesters were arrested in their thousands.
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We can’t avoid the word empire when it still shapes our world | Afua Hirsch 12 Feb 11:59am We can’t avoid the word empire when it still shapes our world | Afua Hirsch
Lisa Nandy’s pledge to remove the word from the honours system won’t erase the history it stands forIf I had learned about the British empire at school, I would find it easier to follow the news. I would have learned that the political struggle for Hong Kong to retain its separate identity from China has its roots as much in the British habits of opium and tea as it does in the cultural ideas of common law and democracy. I could have better understood events as diverse as Sinn Féin’s
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The coronavirus outbreak has exposed the deep flaws of Xi’s autocracy | Richard McGregor 9 Feb 2:00am The coronavirus outbreak has exposed the deep flaws of Xi’s autocracy | Richard McGregor
China’s political system was meant to be all-powerful, capable of dealing with any crisis. The death of one doctor has shaken that claim Soon after
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The Guardian view on tackling the new coronavirus: handle with care | Editorial 7 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on tackling the new coronavirus: handle with care | Editorial
The human and economic cost of the outbreak which began in China is great, but the most extreme response may not be the bestTo a government which relies upon hammers, everything looks like a nail. But the
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China’s response to coronavirus exposes a dangerous obsession with secrecy | Jeffrey Wasserstrom 5 Feb 6:27am China’s response to coronavirus exposes a dangerous obsession with secrecy | Jeffrey Wasserstrom
The World Health Organization said China’s reaction to the outbreak set a ‘new global standard’. The truth is more complex “What is the news from China?” are the words that open the 1900 book World-Crisis in China, though they could equally apply to coverage of coronavirus. The short account of an anti-Christian uprising towards the end of China’s Qing dynasty, written by the journalist Allen Sinclair Will, documented “a startling succession of events that seem destined to shake the world”. Today, a different crisis is unfolding across the country. An outbreak that began in the city of Wuhan, capital of China’s Hubei province, has infected more than
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Coronavirus is a deadly test: did the world learn the lessons of Sars? | Jennifer Rohn 4 Feb 11:12am Coronavirus is a deadly test: did the world learn the lessons of Sars? | Jennifer Rohn
Preparedness is everything – so it’s chilling to realise that investment in it is actually being cut Merely a month after a mysterious respiratory illness arose in Wuhan, China, the world is already in the grip of a global outbreak.
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Locked-down Wuhan will be a breeding ground for fear and stigma | Kenan Malik 2 Feb 3:00am Locked-down Wuhan will be a breeding ground for fear and stigma | Kenan Malik
China’s reaction to the coronavirus outbreak may have the opposite effect to what’s needed“A major outbreak of novel, fatal epidemic disease can quickly be followed… by plagues of fear, panic, suspicion and stigma.” So wrote the sociologist
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Banning Huawei’s 5G won’t halt China’s tech revolution | Henry Tugendhat 30 Jan 6:07am Banning Huawei’s 5G won’t halt China’s tech revolution | Henry Tugendhat
China’s hi-tech firms are challenging the west’s belief in the free market’s ability to innovateThe US military is one of the most powerful forces of state-financed technological innovation in the world. It has produced such important innovations as the internet, GPS technologies and LCD screens. But outside the military’s immediate technological needs, the US political economy is largely a “free market” system in which venture capitalists and private banks are often the only source of funding for innovations. We are now seeing the unravelling of this laissez-faire attitude, as China has for the first time outpaced the US with its development of 5G technology. Public funding for private-sector innovations is sometimes forthcoming, but nowhere near the scale China used to develop
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The Guardian view on China and the coronavirus: scrutiny, not stigma | Editorial 29 Jan 2:03pm The Guardian view on China and the coronavirus: scrutiny, not stigma | Editorial
It’s right to scrutinise the official response to the outbreak, but that does not justify spreading wild rumours or discriminating against Chinese peopleThe
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Boris Johnson’s Chinese hospital challenge | Brief letters 29 Jan 1:14pm Boris Johnson’s Chinese hospital challenge | Brief letters
New hospitals | Lifespans | English mistakes | MarmaladeIn response to the country’s coronavirus outbreak China began constructing the new 1,000-bed Wuhan Huoshenshan hospital in late January with the aim of opening by 5 February (
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The Observer view on the coronavirus outbreak | Observer editorial 26 Jan 1:00am The Observer view on the coronavirus outbreak | Observer editorial
Worldwide health challenges serve as a grave warning to those who would bury their heads in isolationismThe world’s most populous country yesterday celebrated the lunar new year, usually a time of family reunion and joyful celebration. For many Chinese people who have moved away from their place of birth, it is the one time of year they get to visit their familiesThis year the coronavirus outbreak has profoundly muted the celebrations in China, with several cities in lockdown, the imposition of quarantine measures
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China’s response to the coronavirus shows what it learned from the Sars cover-up | Thomas Abraham 23 Jan 10:30am China’s response to the coronavirus shows what it learned from the Sars cover-up | Thomas Abraham
Beijing is determined to crush this disease as firmly as it crushes dissent. But there is no guarantee a lockdown will work A new disease arrives in a Chinese winter – is history repeating itself? At the end of 2002,
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The Guardian view on the new coronavirus: be alert, not afraid | Editorial 21 Jan 1:29pm The Guardian view on the new coronavirus: be alert, not afraid | Editorial
An outbreak of a pneumonia-causing virus in China is creating alarm. It is sensible to be concerned, but an overreaction would be a mistakeEvery so often, our vague awareness of our vulnerability as a species crystallises around a specific threat. At first, we note with unconcern a handful of cases of a new illness, somewhere far away. Soon it begins to spread. The deaths mount. We start to wonder whether we are being complacent rather than sensible, and whether we are living through the early montage in a disaster movie, in which families bicker over breakfast as news reports on the killer virus play unnoticed in the background. Could this be a new pandemic which will sweep the globe killing tens of millions, as Spanish flu once did? The story of the
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With Brexit imminent, what are the chances of a UK trade deal with China? | Rana Mitter 19 Jan 9:44am With Brexit imminent, what are the chances of a UK trade deal with China? | Rana Mitter
Trump has shown compromise with Beijing is possible but Britain has to dance between US, EU and Chinese demandsLast week, Donald Trump and Liu He, the Chinese vice-premier,
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The big picture on Bafta nominations and US domination of the UK film industry | Letters 13 Jan 12:42pm The big picture on Bafta nominations and US domination of the UK film industry | Letters
The UK is to Hollywood what China is to Silicon Valley: a beneficial location to outsource production, with the bonus in the UK of substantial tax incentives, says
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This decade belonged to China. So will the next one | Martin Jacques 31 Dec 2019, 11:18am Updated This decade belonged to China. So will the next one | Martin Jacques
The west is still finding it extraordinarily difficult to come to terms with China’s remarkable ascentBy 2010, China was beginning to have an impact on the global consciousness in a new way. Prior to the western financial crisis, it had been seen as the new but very junior kid on the block. The financial crash changed all that. Before 2008 the conventional western wisdom had been that sooner or later China would suffer a big economic meltdown. It never did. Instead, the crisis happened in the west, with huge consequences for the latter’s stability and self-confidence.
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A year of growth, strong markets and trade deals, they claim. And if it all goes wrong? 29 Dec 2019, 2:15am A year of growth, strong markets and trade deals, they claim. And if it all goes wrong?
Brexit is going ahead, the WTO has lost its teeth and the climate crisis is worsening. But some say 2020 will be benignThe year that is just coming to an end was the nearly year. There was nearly a global recession. There was nearly a full-blown trade war between the US and China. And Britain nearly left the European Union. In the event, none of things happened and 2019 will go down in history as one of those that are soon forgotten. Unless, of course, it proves to be like 1913, one of those when – in retrospect, at least – it is possible to see the signs of a perfect storm brewing.
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Why Chinese ‘rescues’ of western factories can turn sour for workers | Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar 24 Dec 2019, 10:49am Why Chinese ‘rescues’ of western factories can turn sour for workers | Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar
Our film American Factory shows the damaging effect of reverse globalisation. British Steel should take heedFor Jill Lamantia, driving a forklift was the easy part of a hard life. Like countless other industrial workers in our hometown of Dayton, Ohio, Lamantia was excited that Fuyao Glass – a major Chinese company – had bought and reopened our abandoned General Motors factory. She had a job again. In her new role, after clocking off at the end of each shift, Lamantia retreated to a small brick house. Clutching spare keys, she would shut the front door and descend the stairs, squeezing past cleaning products on a mop rack. This Midwestern grandmother and former homeowner was living in her sister’s basement. Fuyao is the world’s leading automotive glassmaker. Based in China’s Fujian province, the company surprised many by exporting Chinese jobs to, of all places, America. In 2014 its billionaire founder, chairman and owner, Cao Dewang, saw the symbolic power in buying the gutted GM factory and rehiring scores of former employees such as Lamantia to make glass for the windscreens of motor vehicles manufactured in the US.
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The Guardian view on China, Hong Kong and Xinjiang: will the truth hurt? | Editorial 28 Nov 2019, 1:43pm The Guardian view on China, Hong Kong and Xinjiang: will the truth hurt? | Editorial
It has been a bad week for Beijing, with new support for pro-democracy protesters and detailed evidence of the repression in the north-western regionBeijing was never going to welcome the news that the US had passed a law backing pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong. But its
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Planet Windsor, like Westminster, has a real problem with women | Catherine Mayer 24 Nov 2019, 3:30am Planet Windsor, like Westminster, has a real problem with women | Catherine Mayer
Until his actions put the monarchy at risk, Prince Andrew benefited from a culture of impunity that protects rich and powerful men Prince Andrew once told me that he wished he could be a plumber and fix things. At the time, I felt sorry for him. Since his departure from the navy, he had performed a nebulous role as a “full-time working royal”, a bit of ribbon cutting here, a spot of patronising there and a position created to give him the appearance of utility, as Britain’s special representative for trade and investment. In 2004, I travelled with him to China as he gladhanded and guffawed his way across the country. The Duke of York – or “Duck of York”, as per the welcome banner at our Beijing hotel – pushed all manner of British products, from petrochemicals to pig semen. His royal status opened doors. Yet he was clearly out of his depth, unfiltered, like his father, and perplexed by a world that failed to operate to the same laws as Planet Windsor. “People say to me, ‘Would you like to swap your life with me for 24 hours? Your life must be very strange’,” he said to me two years later. “But of course I have not experienced any other life.”
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If Beijing does not budge, the struggle for Hong Kong will last decades | Louisa Lim and Ilaria Maria Sala 27 Oct 2019, 2:50pm If Beijing does not budge, the struggle for Hong Kong will last decades | Louisa Lim and Ilaria Maria Sala
Police violence has further radicalised protesters, and China’s ‘one country, two systems’ formula lies in tatters“Is there any way that
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NBA’s travails in China a cautionary tale for the Premier League | Marina Hyde 23 Oct 2019, 8:12am NBA’s travails in China a cautionary tale for the Premier League | Marina Hyde
Sticking to the principle of freedom of speech can be uncomfortable when commercial gain in China is at stake If you have problems with the term “late-stage capitalism”, I hope you can get behind the alternative “ironicidal capitalism”. This is the bit where democracies are so evolved and self-assured they sell their freedom of speech to totalitarian regimes. I know! But kind of logical, when you think about it. There was basically nothing left to flog. For those who’ve missed the saga of the NBA’s travails in China, have no fear. It isn’t going away any time soon, with last weekend’s development being groups of fans wearing masks and “Stand With Hong Kong” T-shirts standing in protest at the Brooklyn Nets pre-season finale at the Barclay Center, in a show of support unlikely to be looked on fondly by the People’s Republic. Tuesday night’s opening
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The Guardian view on Xinjiang, China: forced labour and fashion shows | Editorial 20 Oct 2019, 1:25pm The Guardian view on Xinjiang, China: forced labour and fashion shows | Editorial
Repression in the north-western region takes many forms. They all deserve scrutinyWhen a million Uighurs and other Muslims have been locked up in
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Why China fears sending the tanks into Hong Kong | Howard W French 16 Oct 2019, 1:00am Why China fears sending the tanks into Hong Kong | Howard W French
A crackdown could alienate the mainland’s middle class and damage Xi Jinping’s standing Two decades ago, many scholars began predicting that as China’s creation of wealth continued to speed ahead, the country would cross a threshold. Once a substantial new middle class had been created, they reasoned, politics would tip decisively in a more participatory, possibly even democratic, direction. But while robust economic growth continued, the first decade of this century came and went with no severe challenge to China’s authoritarian model. And under China’s present leader, Xi Jinping, who took office in 2013, it has only become more entrenched: last year he changed the longstanding
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Western tech giants must stop kowtowing to China’s bullying | John Naughton 13 Oct 2019, 4:15am Western tech giants must stop kowtowing to China’s bullying | John Naughton
Market access matters more than Beijing’s abuses as companies outdo each other in their deferenceIt has been a bad few weeks for anyone wanting to express approval for Hong Kong protesters online. A player of the
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The Guardian view on China and basketball: power games | Editorial 10 Oct 2019, 1:25pm The Guardian view on China and basketball: power games | Editorial
A boycott sparked by comments on Hong Kong’s protests has highlighted how China is exporting its controls on speech by economic meansSport is a serious business. Ping-pong diplomacy sped US detente with China; Richard Nixon followed the path of American table tennis players. Now some
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The Guardian view on Donald Trump: an abuser of his office | Editorial 4 Oct 2019, 1:30pm The Guardian view on Donald Trump: an abuser of his office | Editorial
The US president is trying to normalise his self-serving breaches of his oath of office. America must hold him to account and restore the rule of law and ethicsUntil very recently indeed, the idea that the president of the United States might stand outside the White House and call on Communist China to investigate one of his presidential challengers would not merely have seemed
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The Guardian view on the People’s Republic of China at 70: whose history? | Editorial 30 Sep 2019, 2:23pm The Guardian view on the People’s Republic of China at 70: whose history? | Editorial
Seven decades of Communist rule have seen notable advances but at horrific costThe 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China, which will be marked on Tuesday by a mass military parade in the
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Is defeat inevitable for Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement? | Simon Tisdall 30 Sep 2019, 1:27pm Is defeat inevitable for Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement? | Simon Tisdall
Western governments could have joined the battle against China’s repression. Instead they offered spineless servitudeWho lost Hong Kong? It’s a question that should worry – and anger – western politicians and voters as they watch from afar the slow, merciless strangulation of the former British colony’s courageous pro-democracy movement. Once the grand panjandrums of China’s ruling Communist party have completed Tuesdays national day celebrations, additional, potentially fatal twists of their state security garrotte appear inevitable. The malign nature of Beijing’s looming actions may only be intensified by the
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Change will come to China, but not through following western ways | Hans van de Ven 29 Sep 2019, 4:00am Change will come to China, but not through following western ways | Hans van de Ven
As it celebrates its first 70 years, the People’s Republic might benefit from re-examining its pastOn Tuesday, 15,000 perfectly groomed military personnel, each between 5ft 9in and 6ft 1in tall, will march down Chang’an Avenue in Beijing. Some 170 aeroplanes and 580 ballistic missiles, drones, tanks, machine guns and other military kit will showcase the might of the People’s Republic of China. The parade marks the 70th anniversary of the day that Mao Zedong announced the founding of the People’s Republic from atop the Tiananmen Gate. It will inspire a sense of pride among Chinese citizens and worries among their neighbours, especially Taiwan.
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End to Brexit chaos cannot come too soon for factories | Larry Elliott 2 Sep 2019, 10:44am End to Brexit chaos cannot come too soon for factories | Larry Elliott
The US-China trade war is also having an impact on manufacturing worldwide The shockingly bad
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Biarritz was an empty charade. The G7 is a relic of a bygone age | Simon Tisdall 26 Aug 2019, 12:40pm Biarritz was an empty charade. The G7 is a relic of a bygone age | Simon Tisdall
From Syria to the US-China trade war, the list of issues left untackled by the world’s leaders is shamefully longThe G7 summit in Biarritz, now thankfully concluded, told us a lot about the world we live in. Unfortunately, very little of it was useful or vaguely hopeful. As the presidents and premiers of the world’s wealthiest countries posed for back-slapping group photos, and
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The weaponisation of information is mutating at alarming speed | Sophia Ignatidou 19 Aug 2019, 4:00am The weaponisation of information is mutating at alarming speed | Sophia Ignatidou
As countries and companies line up to enter the disinformation business, privacy has to be reclaimedCommunication has been weaponised, used to provoke, mislead and influence the public in numerous insidious ways. Disinformation was just the first stage of an evolving trend of using information to subvert democracy, confuse rival states, define the narrative and control public opinion. Using the large, unregulated, open environments that tech companies once promised would “empower” ordinary people, disinformation has spread rapidly across the globe. The power that tech companies offered us has become a priceless tool in propagandists’ hands, who were right in thinking that a confused, rapidly globalising world is more vulnerable to the malleable beast of disinformation than straightforward propaganda. Whatever we do, however many fact-checking initiatives we undertake, disinformation shows no sign of abating. It just mutates. While initially countries that were seasoned propagandists, such as Russia and North Korea, were identified as the main culprits, the list of states employing disinformation is growing. China is apparently using disinformation to portray Hong Kong protesters as proxies of nefarious western powers and violent rioters, potentially to prepare the ground for more violent intervention to suppress the movement. India has been the host of constant disinformation campaigns,
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The Observer’s view on China’s reaction to pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong | Observer editorial 18 Aug 2019, 1:00am The Observer’s view on China’s reaction to pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong | Observer editorial
The only way forward is to stop posturing and begin a dialogue In Hong Kong, China’s leaders are confronted by an old truth, familiar to more securely established governments, that with power comes responsibility. There is no doubt Beijing has the brute strength to crush pro-democracy protests in Britain’s former colony. Equally, there is no doubt it would be irresponsible and self-defeating to do so. Satellite images of motorised units of
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The Guardian view on the China-US trade wars: the global economy is at risk | Editorial 5 Aug 2019, 1:35pm The Guardian view on the China-US trade wars: the global economy is at risk | Editorial
Xi Jinping’s newfound readiness to let the yuan float sends a worrying message that there will be no deal by the end of August deadlineEvents have moved disturbingly swiftly since Donald Trump surprised everyone last week by announcing plans for a fresh wave of tariffs on Chinese imports. Beijing retaliated by targeting US agricultural products and allowing its currency to depreciate against the US dollar. Mr Trump duly fired off a tweet accusing the Chinese of currency manipulation, a clear sign that he is preparing to ratchet up the tension still further.
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The Hong Kong protests are putting China on a collision course with the west | Simon Tisdall 5 Aug 2019, 11:59am The Hong Kong protests are putting China on a collision course with the west | Simon Tisdall
From Trump’s tariffs to Iranian oil, sources of tension are multiplying. Beijing’s next move could be a tipping pointAs pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong
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The Guardian view on Xinjiang: speak out, or be complicit | Editorial 17 Jul 2019, 1:25pm The Guardian view on Xinjiang: speak out, or be complicit | Editorial
An estimated 1 million Uighurs and other minorities are held in China’s camps. But Beijing’s power has silenced many of those who one might expect to criticise itWhat does it take to make people speak out? A growing number of Uighurs overseas are
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Hong Kong showed China is a threat to democracy. Now Europe must defend Taiwan | Anders Fogh Rasmussen 16 Jul 2019, 10:23am Hong Kong showed China is a threat to democracy. Now Europe must defend Taiwan | Anders Fogh Rasmussen
Beijing is bullying another democratic neighbour. The EU must stop ignoring authoritarianism for the sake of stability and cash
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The extradition bill might be ‘dead’ but in Hong Kong, we cannot afford to back down | Nathan Law 12 Jul 2019, 4:58am The extradition bill might be ‘dead’ but in Hong Kong, we cannot afford to back down | Nathan Law
Anything short of a full withdrawal is not enough. The fight for genuine political reform is far from overOn Tuesday morning, Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s embattled chief executive, finally held a press conference in response to the latest protests in the region. Speaking about the controversial extradition law with China that she had tried to ram through the legislative council,
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The world needs to pressure China over the plight of the Uighurs | Peter Irwin 5 Jul 2019, 6:45am The world needs to pressure China over the plight of the Uighurs | Peter Irwin
A decade on from the start of the violence in Xinjiang, pressure on Beijing could stop the oppression of its Muslim minorityToday, 5 July, marks 10 years since the far western Chinese region of Xinjiang exploded into violence between Uighurs, a majority-Muslim group living there, and Han, China’s dominant ethnic group. The
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The fight for democracy in Hong Kong is the defining struggle of our age | Simon Tisdall 2 Jul 2019, 9:41am The fight for democracy in Hong Kong is the defining struggle of our age | Simon Tisdall
The conflict reflects a broader contest between liberal democracy and populist authoritarianism. China must not be allowed to impose direct ruleBy accident or design, the eruption of political violence in Hong Kong has opened the way for direct rule from Beijing. It is unlikely radical new measures to bring Britain’s former colony to heel will be imposed overnight. But furious
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I felt the fear of abduction by China in Hong Kong. Appeasing Bejing has to stop | Ma Jian 28 Jun 2019, 9:10am I felt the fear of abduction by China in Hong Kong. Appeasing Bejing has to stop | Ma Jian
People in the territory have shown huge courage. G20 leaders must do the sameWhen I moved to Hong Kong in 1987, after my books had been permanently banned by the Chinese government, the territory’s distinctive character was immediately obvious. The pungent, salty air smelt of freedom. In China’s huge city boulevards and vast deserts and mountains, my thoughts always felt imprisoned, but in Hong Kong’s narrow streets and tiny, cramped bookshops they were set free and given infinite space to wander. No printed word was banned, no thought outlawed. For 10 years, Hong Kong became a refuge where I could speak, write and be published in freedom, without fear of arbitrary arrest. These basic civil liberties – security and free expression – are threatened by the passage of the much-reviled
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The Guardian view of the Osaka G20 summit: bad as he is, Trump is not the only problem | Editorial 27 Jun 2019, 1:30pm The Guardian view of the Osaka G20 summit: bad as he is, Trump is not the only problem | Editorial
The climate crisis underlines the need for effective global economic leadership. The US president makes this harder, but so do China and several othersEver since the G20 of leading global economies was founded, its summits have mostly been convergent occasions, marked by attempts to find common ground and remembered for nothing more unseemly than a bit of
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Beijing will not rest until it controls Hong Kong. We must keep fighting | Joshua Wong and Johnson Yeung 27 Jun 2019, 11:43am Beijing will not rest until it controls Hong Kong. We must keep fighting | Joshua Wong and Johnson Yeung
In Hong Kong, we have pushed back against the extradition bill. But China is finding other ways to attack our freedomLet’s put it in plain words: the people of Hong Kong haven’t defeated the
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Hong Kong is not China yet, but that feared day is coming ever nearer | Louisa Lim 16 Jun 2019, 4:00am Hong Kong is not China yet, but that feared day is coming ever nearer | Louisa Lim
The extradition law was delayed after a million people took to the streets, but the fight for the territory’s values is far from overHong Kong has become a place whose present is unresolved and whose future is unimaginable. After the unexpected violence of the last week, no one can predict how the events of this afternoon, tomorrow, this week will play out. The only certainty is that Hong Kong’s way of life is under immediate threat and its
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When will the resistance in Britain to populism properly begin? | Nick Cohen 15 Jun 2019, 1:00pm When will the resistance in Britain to populism properly begin? | Nick Cohen
It’s now getting late, at least in terms of Brexit, for opponents to get their act togetherThe resistance to the Johnson-Farage axis will not come from the parliamentary Conservative party. In private, MPs, who once made sure demagogues did not become prime ministers, admit that Johnson is a phoney, unfit for high office or any office. But the Tory party’s guardians no longer care. The gatekeepers are lifting the lock and urging the bullshitter to charge into the china shop. They calculate that only an alliance between the
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Britain has a duty to help Hong Kong out of this dark moment | Chris Patten 14 Jun 2019, 10:35am Britain has a duty to help Hong Kong out of this dark moment | Chris Patten
China’s power grab via a new extradition bill must be opposed by governments around the world, especially Britain’sIt took something out of the ordinary to provoke a million people in
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As a former lawyer, I’m protesting to save the rule of law in Hong Kong | Anonymous 13 Jun 2019, 8:20am As a former lawyer, I’m protesting to save the rule of law in Hong Kong | Anonymous
The extradition bill would bulldoze our legal system and hurt our economy. I’ve lost faith in China’s promise of democracyThe ninth of June 2019 was a Sunday. Any other Sunday in summer at Causeway Bay, Hong Kong, old men and women would do their usual walkabouts and maids would gather, spread out groundsheets, cover them with spicy delicacies and listen to Filipino pop songs. But it was not like any other Sunday, at least not for me. Filled with anxiety, hope and anger, I joined
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s extradition protests: an essential stand | Editorial 11 Jun 2019, 1:52pm The Guardian view on Hong Kong’s extradition protests: an essential stand | Editorial
Hundreds of thousands have rallied against legal changes that imperil the region’s freedoms. They deserve support, even if China’s leaders are unlikely to shift courseImagine that 5 to 10 million Britons took to the streets to attack new legislation. Imagine that the previously cautious, passive or politically conservative came out, including lawyers and church congregations. Then imagine that – even with further protests pending – the government said they just didn’t understand the issue, and vowed to ram through changes within days. This is what
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The west is complicit in the 30-year cover-up of Tiananmen | Ai Weiwei 4 Jun 2019, 1:00am The west is complicit in the 30-year cover-up of Tiananmen | Ai Weiwei
Beijing’s continued whitewashing cannot expunge our collective memory of the killings of 4 June 1989 The events of 4 June 1989, when the Chinese government deployed the full might of its military to purge Tiananmen Square of students who’d been peacefully protesting there, have become known in China as the “June Fourth Incident”. Thirty years on, it is still thought of as an
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China continues to deny Tiananmen, but we won’t let the world forget | Rowena Xiaoqing He 3 Jun 2019, 2:16pm China continues to deny Tiananmen, but we won’t let the world forget | Rowena Xiaoqing He
On the 30th anniversary of the massacre, commemorations to those who were killed will show the Chinese government we will not be silencedHe was just a kid, but he cried like an old man in despair.” Liane was trying hard to steady her emotions when she described to me how she had attempted to hold back a young boy whose unarmed brother had been shot by soldiers during the
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The Guardian view on Tiananmen, 30 years on: hope and terror | Editorial 31 May 2019, 1:30pm The Guardian view on Tiananmen, 30 years on: hope and terror | Editorial
We should remember 1989’s protest movement, as well as the massacreIt’s inevitable that we view the past through the lens of the present. It’s odder that we tend to regard our current picture as the only possible one, and to believe that we can see the future with equal certainty. Revulsion at the bloody crackdown on pro-reform demonstrations in Beijing, on the night of 3-4 June 1989, has obscured memories of the protests themselves. But in China, some still grieve for lost hopes as well as lost friends and children. The weeks of demonstrations in Beijing and other cities proved the people’s desire for change. Millions – including police, judges and naval officers – were drawn in, prompted by anger at corruption and inflation, but also the hunger for reform and greater liberty. China was negotiating a period of social, political and artistic ferment, deeply questioning itself as it recovered from the traumas of Maoism and
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The Guardian view on Facebook: power without responsibility | Editorial 27 May 2019, 1:25pm The Guardian view on Facebook: power without responsibility | Editorial
Social media cannot ensure they only publish truths. But what about deliberate falsehoods designed to damage?Are social media companies responsible for the lies their users tell? Both the obvious answers, “yes” and “no”, are clearly wrong. Complete responsibility is a bad idea, and impossible in practice: even in China, the home of the largest and most sophisticated censorship apparatus on the web, the internet is expected to slow down markedly in the coming weeks under the burden of combing through it to ensure that no references to the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre are published. And, as the Chinese example shows, there are also considerable difficulties that arise when any one organisation can decide what counts as truth or falsehood. Yet it can’t be right, either, to say that social media companies have no responsibility to exercise the powers they have to remove obnoxious material from their servers. Videos of murder, child abuse and other horrors are routinely and rightly removed. It will be objected that these are horrible precisely because they are not lies – they record things that really happened. But that doesn’t stand up. It is no defence, either in British law, or in any moral sense, to say that a video of atrocity is faked. If it works as propaganda for jihadis, or for child abusers, it will be censored and its originators punished if that’s possible. The platforms have been much more reluctant to act against lies which promote causes which are not in themselves criminal, however despicable. Google and Facebook are both advertising businesses, the biggest that the world has ever seen, and they depend on their ability to attract and to retain viewers. So the conspiracy theories of Alex Jones were tolerated for many years. So were the 9/11 truthers, the anti-vaxxers, and, on Twitter,
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The Guardian view on Google versus Huawei: no winners | Editorial 20 May 2019, 1:35pm The Guardian view on Google versus Huawei: no winners | Editorial
The struggle over Huawei isn’t really about technology. It is about whether China or the US is to be masterTrade wars, like real ones, are very much easier to start than to stop. The decision by Google to
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These elections could define Europe. It must urgently rediscover its founding spirit | Natalie Nougayrède 20 May 2019, 1:00am These elections could define Europe. It must urgently rediscover its founding spirit | Natalie Nougayrède
Facing challenges from Russia, China and the US, the continent can no longer neglect its core values of peace and human rightsSometimes, when it comes to Europe, things are clearer from afar. Take Viktor Orbán’s encounter
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China wants us to forget the horrors of Tiananmen as it rewrites its history | Louisa Lim and Ilaria Maria Sala 19 May 2019, 2:00am China wants us to forget the horrors of Tiananmen as it rewrites its history | Louisa Lim and Ilaria Maria Sala
The state is enforcing a collective amnesia about not only recent political events but those that happened thousands of years agoRemembering the deaths of
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No waste in the East End, me old china | Brief letters 17 May 2019, 12:20pm No waste in the East End, me old china | Brief letters
Plastic waste and the NHS | Food containers | The Voynich manuscript | DH Lawrence | Letters on a single pageDavid Attenborough’s call for urgent action to companies responsible for producing plastic (
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How theatre can help to reawaken our faith in Europe | Katie Ebner-Landy 15 May 2019, 1:00am How theatre can help to reawaken our faith in Europe | Katie Ebner-Landy
We need to recognise the European aesthetic: a way of making art that stretches across nationsSome things appear in waves, others in shocks – lightning rods of clarity. My sense of how theatre might be able to deepen our understanding of what Europe is or could be came from two different shocks: one of which happened while working in China, the other in St Petersburg. While in Beijing to
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The Guardian’s view on free speech online: a messy compromise | Editorial 13 May 2019, 1:40pm The Guardian’s view on free speech online: a messy compromise | Editorial
Rightwing extremists are now being deprived of their income stream from YouTube advertisements. Not to do so would be worseAlphabet, the company that owns Google and YouTube, has quietly become one of the most powerful gatekeepers of permitted speech on the planet, along with Facebook and – within China – the Chinese government. This isn’t entirely a bad thing. Everyone agrees there are some things that have no place online, although different cultures and different countries have varying and often entirely incompatible rules about permissible speech. But an entirely uncensored internet would be a disaster for society, as everyone now acknowledges. Governments want their rules enforced, and the advertising businesses that have become the giants of social media are the players who can enforce them. If Google, Facebook, and Twitter all
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The Iron Lady could keep stumm when it suited her | Brief letters 12 May 2019, 11:46am The Iron Lady could keep stumm when it suited her | Brief letters
Huawei | IAAF ruling | Emma Thompson films | Gender inequality in salons | The royal babyThe US secretary of state says: “Ask yourself: would the Iron Lady be silent when China violates the sovereignty of nations through corruption or coercion?” (
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Martin Rowson on fears of a looming US-China trade war – cartoon 10 May 2019, 3:05pm Martin Rowson on fears of a looming US-China trade war – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/may/10/martin-rowson-on-fears-of-a-looming-us-china-trade-war-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on US-China trade wars: don’t start them | Editorial 10 May 2019, 1:30pm The Guardian view on US-China trade wars: don’t start them | Editorial
The time has come to rewrite the rules so that the world’s largest economies are able to trade peacefullyDonald Trump has been an opponent of free trade deals all his public life. A protectionist message was central to his run for the White House. On the campaign trail he promised “
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Would Margaret Thatcher have taken the US side against Huawei? Not necessarily | Tim Bale 10 May 2019, 7:52am Would Margaret Thatcher have taken the US side against Huawei? Not necessarily | Tim Bale
The US has invoked the Iron Lady in its beef with China, but she was a pragmatist who would ‘outsource’ to win value for moneyLady Thatcher may be an icon to her most devoted fans but, as far as I know, none of them has ever worn a “What would Maggie do?” wristband. That’s not to say that they don’t find themselves asking (or being asked) the question now and then. After all, Thatcher, together with her eponymous
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The Guardian view on Huawei: if May wants to trust, we must keep verifying | Editorial 24 Apr 2019, 1:32pm The Guardian view on Huawei: if May wants to trust, we must keep verifying | Editorial
The Chinese telecoms firm has won favour for cheap and sophisticated gear. But its participation in Britain’s 5G network demands the closest scrutinySweeping narratives can soon take hold, even if critics are already pointing to their holes. In the 1990s, two such theses quickly took root. The first was that liberal democracy had triumphed. The second was that technology would inevitably bring liberation; Bill Clinton quipped, in reference to China, that trying to control the internet would be like nailing jello to the wall. Beijing proved both wrong, helping to spell an end
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Internet regulation proposals could censor the lawful speech of millions | Letters 10 Apr 2019, 1:07pm Internet regulation proposals could censor the lawful speech of millions | Letters
If enacted, the online harms white paper on internet regulation would make China’s state censors proud, say representatives from six civil liberties organisations.
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The Guardian view on online harms: white paper, grey areas | Editorial 8 Apr 2019, 1:47pm The Guardian view on online harms: white paper, grey areas | Editorial
The internet needs regulation. People and societies need protection. But this will be harder than the government’s new white paper makes it lookThe internet has added a new dimension to the spaces of imagination in which we all live, and the problems of the offline world have moved there, too. This did not once seem an urgent problem, but in the last five years there has been a revolution of attitude around the world away from the anarchic culture encouraged by US law; at the other extreme is the very tight censorship imposed in China, where one popular startup employs as many people on content moderation as it does selling advertising. The white paper
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Bulldozing mosques: the latest tactic in China’s war against Uighur culture | Rachel Harris 7 Apr 2019, 11:12am Bulldozing mosques: the latest tactic in China’s war against Uighur culture | Rachel Harris
The levelling of ancient sites in Xinjiang, alongside mass detention, is part of an attempt to destroy an entire societyTen years ago, I started
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The global battle for the internet is just starting | John Harris 25 Mar 2019, 2:00am The global battle for the internet is just starting | John Harris
Two competing visions of our digital future have emerged from China and Silicon Valley. But are they really so different? If only for a moment, set aside the comparatively parochial drama of Brexit, think about the giant swath of humanity that now uses the internet, and consider one of the most basic facets of how 4 billion of us live our lives. This is a 21st-century story, but it will ring bells with people old enough to remember the cold war: how people understand their own experience and events in the wider world is increasingly decided by the version of the internet they use. On one side sits the system used in China, which produces
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Victor Hochhauser obituary 24 Mar 2019, 1:28pm Victor Hochhauser obituary
Impresario and promoter who brought many great Russian artists to Britain, incuding Shostakovich and NureyevThe impresario Victor Hochhauser, who has died aged 95, made possible performances by leading figures of the worlds of classical music and ballet in Britain, sometimes also in Israel and in the former communist bloc countries. Many of them became personal friends. In the decades following the second world war, Victor made it his business, and his pleasure, to bring such great talents to the widest audiences. To that end he ventured behind the iron curtain and to China, opening western doors for performers from the Soviet Union such as
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The Guardian view on Xinjiang’s detention camps: not just China’s shame | Editorial 17 Mar 2019, 2:29pm The Guardian view on Xinjiang’s detention camps: not just China’s shame | Editorial
Vast numbers of Uighurs and other Muslim minorities are being held in detention. The world must speak outAn “A-list” comedian, well-known singers, scholars, pensioners and civil servants – the
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Bohemian Rhapsody’s release in China is a victory, despite the cuts | Le Fil 5 Mar 2019, 10:22am Bohemian Rhapsody’s release in China is a victory, despite the cuts | Le Fil
In a country where gay scenes are banned on TV, the fact that Freddie Mercury’s story is being shown at all is a breakthrough
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The U.S. Is Ceding the Pacific to China 3 Mar 2019, 4:45pm The U.S. Is Ceding the Pacific to China
While Washington’s focus is elsewhere, Beijing plays the long game—that means preparing for war.
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Is the world ready for lab-grown meat? | Jacy Reese 3 Mar 2019, 9:05am Is the world ready for lab-grown meat? | Jacy Reese
The idea of ‘clean meat’ enjoys wide acceptance in Asia, a study finds, and Silicon Valley is well-placed to take advantage Do people want to eat lab-grown meat? A new study, for which I was a peer-reviewer, is the first to rigorously assess consumer interest in plant-based and “clean meat” (also known as lab-grown or cultured meat) in the US, India and China. The study found “high levels of acceptance” in all three countries and “significantly higher acceptance” in India and China, where 86% and 93% respectively reported being at least “somewhat likely” to purchase clean meat. Chris Bryant, the lead author on the study in the
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Japan Grows Nervous About the U.S. 28 Feb 2019, 6:53pm Japan Grows Nervous About the U.S.
It fears China’s advance, America’s retreat and South Korea and Taiwan becoming compromised.
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Gunboat diplomacy can only harm Britain’s relationship with China | Liu Xiaoming 26 Feb 2019, 8:40am Gunboat diplomacy can only harm Britain’s relationship with China | Liu Xiaoming
Our cooperation is like a symphony: it relies on mutual respect and trust to keep out the noises of enmity
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The Lib Dems should act decisively – and join the Independent Group now | David Boyle 26 Feb 2019, 2:00am The Lib Dems should act decisively – and join the Independent Group now | David Boyle
Vince Cable’s party are facing a 1980s merger moment. For the benefit of both groups, they should grab it with both handsI was almost 22 in March 1981 when the SDP gang of four (as we called them in those days – an echo of the post-Mao junta ruling China)
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The Guardian view on Britain and China: it’s complicated | Editorial 21 Feb 2019, 1:32pm The Guardian view on Britain and China: it’s complicated | Editorial
Beijing’s might and ambitions, and the approach of Brexit, make the path ahead more difficult. It’s time for careful thoughtA few years ago, George Osborne announced that Britain’s relations with China were entering a “golden era”. On Thursday, his successor as chancellor gave a more measured assessment: they are “complex”,
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A Taliban Precedent? Mao That You Mention It... 20 Feb 2019, 6:41pm A Taliban Precedent? Mao That You Mention It...
Afghan peace talks look like the 1945 negotiations that led to communist victory in China.
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The Observer view on Gavin Williamson’s Pacific blunder | Observer editorial 16 Feb 2019, 12:40pm The Observer view on Gavin Williamson’s Pacific blunder | Observer editorial
Talking tough to China is typical of Mrs May’s gaffe-prone defence secretaryGavin Williamson is a loose cannon. That would not matter so much if, as was the case until a couple of years ago, he was a government whip whose views were of little account. But Theresa May’s surprise decision to make Williamson defence secretary has given him an international platform, and a degree of responsibility, to which he appears ill-suited. Until now, his most publicised blunder concerned his schoolboy remarks following last year’s chemical weapons attack in Salisbury. Asked how he thought Vladimir Putin might respond to British sanctions, he replied: “Frankly, Russia should go away and it should shut up.” He was widely mocked.
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India Is Falling Behind China in an Asian Arms Race 7 Feb 2019, 7:18pm India Is Falling Behind China in an Asian Arms Race
High defense-spending totals mask the weakness of its weapons systems, and the threat is growing.
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The Nightmare of Human Organ Harvesting in China 5 Feb 2019, 6:57pm The Nightmare of Human Organ Harvesting in China
Transplants far outnumber official donors. Prisoners of conscience evidently account for the difference.
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A Sino-Russian Entente Again Threatens America 29 Jan 2019, 7:50pm A Sino-Russian Entente Again Threatens America
The U.S. must revise its policy toward Moscow if it is to meet the threat from a rising China.
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The Guardian view on the US case against Huawei: the conflict sharpens | Editorial 29 Jan 2019, 2:14pm The Guardian view on the US case against Huawei: the conflict sharpens | Editorial
The Chinese firm is under increasing pressure, and so are countries considering its role in their 5G networksThe struggle between the US and China is coming into sharper relief. In the weeks since the arrest of a top executive from telecoms giant Huawei, Beijing has directed pressure at Toronto – which held her at the behest of Washington, according to their extradition treaty – rather than risk challenging its rival head-on. Now the US has formally confirmed its request and filed
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Hardline Brexiteers are misreading history | Richard Godwin 25 Jan 2019, 3:00am Hardline Brexiteers are misreading history | Richard Godwin
Too many prominent leavers are not in fact patriots, but nurse a hatred of Britain as it really is The decision of his enemy “could not be reconciled with reason,” once mused a great statesman. “I felt sure she would be ruined for a generation by such a plunge, and this proved true. But governments and peoples do not always take rational decisions. Sometimes they take mad decisions. Or one set of people get control, who compel all others to obey and aid them in folly.” Any takers, Balliol College, Oxford? No? It’s Winston Churchill, considering why Japan, already mired in an unwinnable campaign in China, would “court destruction” by going to war with Britain and the US in 1941. “I have not hesitated to record repeatedly my disbelief that Japan would go mad,” Boris Johnson’s idol wrote in his history of the second world war. “However sincerely we try to put ourselves in someone else’s position, we cannot allow for processes of the human mind and imagination to which reason offers no key.”
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China Opens the Door to U.S. GMOs 24 Jan 2019, 7:28pm China Opens the Door to U.S. GMOs
The decision is a boon to farmers and a milestone for agronomic innovation.
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How China Exploits Anti-Soviet Money Policy 21 Jan 2019, 8:47pm How China Exploits Anti-Soviet Money Policy
The dollar’s role as the global reserve currency has let China become the world’s factory floor.
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The Xi Jinping Slowdown 21 Jan 2019, 3:41pm The Xi Jinping Slowdown
China’s weakest growth in 30 years shows the logic of a trade deal.
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Apple and China’s problems show that today’s titans may not rule the world tomorrow | Will Hutton 6 Jan 2019, 1:00am Apple and China’s problems show that today’s titans may not rule the world tomorrow | Will Hutton
Even superpowers and trillion-dollar tech giants are at risk in a fast-changing societyOur mental geography is bounded by what has gone before. What has happened in the recently remembered past is most likely to continue. Inflection points, when trends decisively change, are more infrequent than the many instances when things go on as they have done. Two of today’s trends seem unstoppable. China’s astounding growth will continue, so the story runs, underwriting its arrival as the second economic superpower. To get a share in that China action, underpinning the entire growth of Asia, is one of the prime economic arguments for Brexit. Abandon sclerotic Europe, embrace the prosperity of Asia – even if it is a world of semi-democracy at best, authoritarian government at worst. It can be guaranteed to grow.
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Power politics always drives space conquest. China’s coup is no different | Kenan Malik 6 Jan 2019, 1:00am Power politics always drives space conquest. China’s coup is no different | Kenan Malik
Landing a spacecraft on the far side of the moon is a fine achievement – and propaganda win Nasa rejected it as too difficult and costly an undertaking. Last week, China declared “mission accomplished” after
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The iPhone Canary 3 Jan 2019, 7:03pm The iPhone Canary
Apple’s sales plunge shows the need for a U.S.-China trade deal.
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My Predictions Are 2 for 3---Thanks, Oscar 2 Jan 2019, 6:53pm My Predictions Are 2 for 3---Thanks, Oscar
Plus a look ahead at 2019, from Mueller and impeachment to trade with China.
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The Guardian view on spaceflight: the outward urge 2 Jan 2019, 1:26pm The Guardian view on spaceflight: the outward urge
Missions like Nasa’s flyby of Ultima Thule, and China’s to place a lander on the far side of the moon, are more than a triumph of technologySome things are almost too extraordinary to comprehend. Take what is almost the smallest and simplest measurement from the New Horizons space probe which has
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With China, we don’t need a trade war but a truce on tech | Anne McElvoy 28 Dec 2018, 10:08am With China, we don’t need a trade war but a truce on tech | Anne McElvoy
The west will need to balance security fears with a confidence that global trade is key to our prosperityA visit to Huawei’s HQ in Shenzhen is a glimpse into the way China’s leadership would like to envision its future. About 180,000 workers throng quietly around a pristine campus in the new-build city, which prizes digital expertise so highly that some outstanding engineers are lured with special rent deals to work on a campus that looks more like architect-designed Silicon Valley than the crowded factories that feature in much of urban China. I was whisked around examples of sleek bicycles, remote-controlled fridges telling me when food needed to be consumed and super-fast immersive gaming – all showcasing the speed and flexibility of 5G-honed technology.
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Countering Russia and China in Africa 14 Dec 2018, 12:25am Countering Russia and China in Africa
The U.S. has a new focus, but it can’t neglect the terror front.
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14 Dec 2018, 12:24am Will China Cheat American Investors?
Beijing wants to bring home its big tech firms. U.S. shareholders may face undervalued buyouts.
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The Guardian view on China and the US: unlucky Canada is taking the hit | Editorial 13 Dec 2018, 1:24pm The Guardian view on China and the US: unlucky Canada is taking the hit | Editorial
Playing it straight is not enough to help Ottawa. Beijing has warned it faces ‘grave consequences’ over the Huawei caseOn first sight, Canada is caught in a clash between two rhinos. Unfortunately for Ottawa, the truth is probably worse. If Beijing charged straight at Washington, it would risk being badly gouged. Instead, it seems to be redirecting aggression in a threat display and Ottawa is the unlucky object getting thrashed. Chinese state media report that two Canadians have been separately detained on suspicion of “engaging in activities that harm China’s national security”, days after Beijing
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What to Do About Huawei? 11 Dec 2018, 7:04pm What to Do About Huawei?
China’s turn toward totalitarianism should not shake Western confidence in freedom.
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The dramatic arrest that threatens to ramp up trade tensions between the US and China | Will Hutton 9 Dec 2018, 12:59am The dramatic arrest that threatens to ramp up trade tensions between the US and China | Will Hutton
Trump might have a point in his anxiety about Xi’s ambitions on the technology frontThe arrest and request for extradition of a top executive of one of the world’s biggest tech companies is scarcely business as usual. But that is what happened to Huawei’s chief financial officer,
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The Education of Huawei 6 Dec 2018, 7:21pm The Education of Huawei
The telecom giant pays a price for China’s abuse of global trade norms.
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Reading the Tea Leaves on Trade With China 4 Dec 2018, 6:29pm Reading the Tea Leaves on Trade With China
Talks will take place behind closed doors. Here’s what to watch to gauge their progress.
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Can the Communist party get out of China’s bedrooms now, please? | Audrey Jiajia Li 29 Nov 2018, 3:00am Can the Communist party get out of China’s bedrooms now, please? | Audrey Jiajia Li
I was born in 1983, so have no siblings. Now the government wants bigger families – but young Chinese won’t listen Chinese millennials such as me are collectively known as the “post-1980 generation”. The controversial
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Where Are the Corporate Patriots? 28 Nov 2018, 6:23pm Where Are the Corporate Patriots?
Regarding China, U.S. companies should step up and do their part to protect national security.
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Is the Chinese billionaire Jack Ma using AI to create dystopian cities? | Alfie Bown 28 Nov 2018, 8:42am Is the Chinese billionaire Jack Ma using AI to create dystopian cities? | Alfie Bown
News that tech giant Ma is a member of Communist party of China should set alarm bells ringing – and not just in ChinaOn the outskirts of Hangzhou, eastern China, in
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The Deal America and China Need 26 Nov 2018, 7:03pm The Deal America and China Need
It is in both countries’ interests to back away from the brink. Can Trump offer Xi a way to save face?
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How China Copes With Capital Flight 19 Nov 2018, 7:15pm How China Copes With Capital Flight
As growth slows and tariffs threaten, the central bank now strives to prevent a sharp slide in the yuan.
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China’s mass incarceration of Muslims cannot be left unchallenged | Timothy Grose 13 Nov 2018, 1:00am China’s mass incarceration of Muslims cannot be left unchallenged | Timothy Grose
Despite appalling abuses of the Uighur people, the world remains quiet. We must present a united voice of disapproval More than 12 million Muslims have effectively been taken prisoner in their own homeland, an area of north-west China officially referred to as
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Government Motors Is Back 11 Nov 2018, 6:58pm Government Motors Is Back
GM floats a China-style plan to subsidize and promote electric cars.
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A Better China Trade Strategy 1 Nov 2018, 7:14pm A Better China Trade Strategy
The U.S. hits a Chinese company for allegedly stealing Micron’s secrets.
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Backlash Builds Against Beijing 30 Oct 2018, 6:04pm Backlash Builds Against Beijing
China wants to displace the U.S. as leader of the world, but it faces dissent at home and abroad.
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The Guardian view on China’s detention camps: now we see them | Editorial 26 Oct 2018, 12:40pm The Guardian view on China’s detention camps: now we see them | Editorial
Courageous personal testimony and painstaking research are giving us an increasingly detailed and shocking view of the centres in Xinjiang where hundreds of thousands have been held without arrest, charge or trialThe courage of former inmates and relatives, and the diligence of academics, journalists and other researchers, has brought a terrible secret into plain view. As the evidence piled up of the mass extrajudicial detention of Muslim Uighurs, Kazakhs and others in China’s north-western region of Xinjiang, it was met with silence or denial from Beijing. When experts
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A Naval Message for China 22 Oct 2018, 7:26pm A Naval Message for China
Two U.S. warships sail through the Taiwan Strait.
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China’s new diplomacy in Europe has a name: broken porcelain | David Bandurski 17 Oct 2018, 1:00am China’s new diplomacy in Europe has a name: broken porcelain | David Bandurski
Beijing’s message to Sweden and beyond – criticise us, and we’ll topple your agenda – won’t win it any hearts and minds Two days after
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Relations with Pakistan remain stable, says China | Letters 14 Oct 2018, 1:06pm Relations with Pakistan remain stable, says China | Letters
The Chinese embassy responds to our report on criticism from PakistanThe Chinese ambassador to Pakistan recently met with Pakistan’s minister for religious affairs, Pir Noorul Haq Qadri (
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China Grows More Repressive 9 Oct 2018, 6:52pm China Grows More Repressive
America long hoped trade and engagement would encourage Beijing to open up. It hasn’t happened.
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Mike Pence Announces Cold War II 8 Oct 2018, 6:58pm Mike Pence Announces Cold War II
The administration is orchestrating a far-reaching campaign against China.
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Merging Onto the Belt and Road 2 Oct 2018, 7:17pm Merging Onto the Belt and Road
Congress tries to counter China by aping its bad ideas.
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Trump Is Right About China Trade 2 Oct 2018, 6:47pm Trump Is Right About China Trade
Small manufacturing can thrive on a level playing field.
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The Guardian view on the Vatican and China: an ideological struggle | Editorial 1 Oct 2018, 1:25pm The Guardian view on the Vatican and China: an ideological struggle | Editorial
Since the death of Mao, religion has revived immensely in China. But who is to be the master of the growing churches?Every power in the world must now come to terms with China’s rise to superpower status; last week it was the turn of the Vatican, a global soft superpower.
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More Belt and Road Backlash 24 Sep 2018, 7:45pm More Belt and Road Backlash
The Maldives turns away from China and back toward democracy.
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California Farmers Are Trade-War Casualties 19 Sep 2018, 6:56pm California Farmers Are Trade-War Casualties
China imposes retaliatory tariffs on pistachios, almonds and wine, while Canada is taxing ketchup.
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The Missing China Trade Strategy 18 Sep 2018, 7:27pm The Missing China Trade Strategy
Trump imposes new tariffs but what he wants from Beijing isn’t clear.
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Ben Jennings on the latest round in the US-China trade row – cartoon 18 Sep 2018, 2:51pm Ben Jennings on the latest round in the US-China trade row – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2018/sep/18/ben-jennings-on-the-latest-round-in-the-us-china-trade-row-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on US-China trade wars: careful what you start | Editorial 18 Sep 2018, 1:31pm The Guardian view on US-China trade wars: careful what you start | Editorial
The tit-for-tat between the two countries continues, but macho political posturing will not deal with the real issues“It is easier to start a war than to end it,” Gabriel García Márquez once observed. This is true even when the skirmishes are fought over cotton hammocks, ornamental fish, motorboats and soya bean oil rather than territory. On Monday, Donald Trump ramped up his trade offensive by announcing that the US would
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Imperialism Will Be Dangerous for China 17 Sep 2018, 11:39pm Imperialism Will Be Dangerous for China
Beijing risks blowback as it exports surplus economic capacity to Africa and Asia.
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Why China Is Brutally Suppressing Muslims 16 Sep 2018, 4:28pm Why China Is Brutally Suppressing Muslims
The assault on the Uighurs serves Beijing’s imperial ambitions, which require stable land borders.
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The Guardian view on surveillance in China: Big Brother is watching | Editorial 28 Dec 2017, 9:15am The Guardian view on surveillance in China: Big Brother is watching | Editorial
In Xinjiang, cutting-edge technology is reinforcing tight social controls. These measures are unlikely to stay within the region’s bounds“Orwellian” is a
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China Bullies Mr. Moon 22 Dec 2017, 6:10pm China Bullies Mr. Moon
Beijing wants South Korea to remove its missile defenses.
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Maximum Pressure on North Korea 30 Nov 2017, 11:37am Updated Maximum Pressure on North Korea
China and the U.S. still haven’t imposed the toughest sanctions.
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Fear American Complacency, Not China 20 Nov 2017, 7:10pm Fear American Complacency, Not China
Today just 8% of U.S. businesses are startups, down from about 12.5% in 1980.
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The 2022 Gay Games will be a historic moment for LGBTI rights in Hong Kong | Yiu-tung Suen 12 Nov 2017, 9:04am The 2022 Gay Games will be a historic moment for LGBTI rights in Hong Kong | Yiu-tung Suen
I’m glad that Hong Kong won the bid to host the Games. But governmental attitudes towards LGBTI equality both here and in China remain archaicThis month Hong Kong won the bid to host the
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Nicola Jennings on Donald Trump, Twitter and China – cartoon 9 Nov 2017, 3:50pm Nicola Jennings on Donald Trump, Twitter and China – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/nov/09/nicola-jennings-donald-trump-twitter-china-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on Trump in China: a bromance unlikely to run smooth | Editorial 9 Nov 2017, 2:27pm The Guardian view on Trump in China: a bromance unlikely to run smooth | Editorial
The US president has been gushing about the Beijing stretch of his Asian tour. But strains in the bilateral relationship are growing with China’s ambitionsMao once observed that a revolution is not a dinner party. Neither are great power relations – even if they manifest temporarily as a lavish meal in the Forbidden City. Wednesday’s feast for Donald Trump was the first time the palace in central Beijing had hosted a banquet for a foreign leader since the Communist party took power in 1949. Beijing, adept at ladling on such flattery, pitched this leg of the US president’s Asia tour as
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Steve Bell’s If ... Donald Trump welcomes President Xi to China 8 Nov 2017, 1:10am Steve Bell’s If ... Donald Trump welcomes President Xi to China
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/nov/08/steve-bells-if-donald-trump-welcomes-president-xi-to-china">Continue reading...
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The Observer view on Donald Trump’s tour of Asia | Observer editorial 4 Nov 2017, 8:05pm The Observer view on Donald Trump’s tour of Asia | Observer editorial
The American president’s poor grasp of international relations, his bluster and his ‘America first’ rhetoric are unlikely to reap success in the face of Xi Jinping pragmatism The phrase “bull in a china shop” might have been coined to describe this week’s tour of Asia by Donald Trump. During last year’s presidential election campaign, he
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Trump’s Asia tour will expose his craving for the approval of despots | Simon Tisdall 3 Nov 2017, 6:36am Trump’s Asia tour will expose his craving for the approval of despots | Simon Tisdall
Don’t expect to hear much about human rights abuses in the Philippines, Vietnam or China. This trip will be more chummy than challengingExpect to hear a lot of talk in the coming days about the existential threat posed by
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The Guardian view on Trump in Asia: brace yourselves | Editorial 2 Nov 2017, 3:40pm The Guardian view on Trump in Asia: brace yourselves | Editorial
The US president is about to embark on his first trip to the region. With tensions high over North Korea, and China asserting its ambitions, what will his ignorance and disdain for diplomatic subtlety bring?This weekend Donald Trump embarks on his first trip to Asia as president, and his longest foreign tour since he’s been in office. Over a week and a half he will visit Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines. To say the region’s leaders are bracing themselves for potential displays of freakishness, provocation or incompetence is to put it mildly. If this is indeed the “Asian century”, the US president will nonetheless help determine how it unfolds. That can only be a cause for concern. Mr Trump has cultivated a reputation for unpredictability – or more often sheer inconsistency, as much as he has cultivated his ignorance or disdain for much of what US diplomacy has traditionally been about. Intense China-bashing over trade in his campaign was followed by
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For some men, rape just isn’t a big deal | Emma Brockes 2 Nov 2017, 12:35pm For some men, rape just isn’t a big deal | Emma Brockes
One man I know thought it wasn’t ‘as bad as working in a factory in China’, which shows just how far we’ve got to go One thing I keep hearing, as the
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As Trump turns his back on the world, the stage is set for President Xi | Larry Elliott 27 Oct 2017, 12:59am As Trump turns his back on the world, the stage is set for President Xi | Larry Elliott
The newly emboldened Chinese leader will exploit US isolationism, giving America its first serious challenge since the collapse of the Soviet Union It was a symbolic moment. High in the Swiss Alps, before an audience of the super-rich gathered for their annual shindig in Davos, China’s Xi Jinping
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The Guardian view on Chinese politics: an age of ambition | Editorial 24 Oct 2017, 1:56pm The Guardian view on Chinese politics: an age of ambition | Editorial
The incorporation of Xi Jinping’s thinking into the party constitution indicates his extraordinary power – but also his breadth of visionMoney isn’t everything. That is Xi Jinping’s central message – even if he takes rather longer to say it. When the 2,300 delegates to the Communist Party of China’s congress unanimously
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We are obsessed with Brexit and Trump: we should be thinking about China | Martin Kettle 20 Oct 2017, 1:00am We are obsessed with Brexit and Trump: we should be thinking about China | Martin Kettle
It will no longer do to skip over the detail of the superpower’s beliefs and ambitions. What Xi Jinping says and does will shape our worldThis has not been, it must be admitted, an exactly stellar week for those of us who continue to make the case for the enduring strengths of liberal democracy. On the contrary, it has felt like one humiliation after another. In the House of Commons,
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The Guardian view on Xi Jinping: the life and soul of the party | Editorial 18 Oct 2017, 2:37pm The Guardian view on Xi Jinping: the life and soul of the party | Editorial
The Communist party congress in Beijing is all about one man. How he uses the power he has amassed will have an impact far beyond China’s shores“The capability of any one individual is limited,” Xi Jinping
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Behold the New Emperor of China 16 Oct 2017, 6:55pm Behold the New Emperor of China
Xi Jinping is the most powerful leader since Mao, and he is set to hold power for as long as he wants.
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Beijing struggles to curb poverty and pollution while keeping its markets open to competition | Phillip Inman 14 Oct 2017, 4:00pm Beijing struggles to curb poverty and pollution while keeping its markets open to competition | Phillip Inman
Party leaders have allowed a massive state and private sector borrowing binge that the IMF sees as a threat to China’s stability There is a steel toboggan run offering rides down the side of the Great Wall of China that would fail the UK’s most basic health and safety tests. It could be a metaphor for the Chinese economy if, as many people believe, Communist party leaders allow a credit bubble to run out of control in a desperate attempt to maintain an electrifying 7% growth rate. The Chinese are not alone when they turn a blind eye to excessive borrowing. Most nations depend on large and growing amounts of borrowing to fund everything from investment to the most basic services. In China’s case much of the debt is being used to offset the transition from a state that manufactures iron, steel and cheap electronics, textiles and consumer goods to one that embraces hi-tech industries attuned to environmental concerns. This creates millions of losers in traditional smoke-stack industries, lots of them in the north and west of the country.
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Turning the Screws on North Korea 22 Sep 2017, 6:43pm Turning the Screws on North Korea
New sanctions and a turn by China may finally isolate the Kim regime.
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Ignore Trump’s lies. North Korea is no threat to Britain | Simon Jenkins 20 Sep 2017, 1:22pm Ignore Trump’s lies. North Korea is no threat to Britain | Simon Jenkins
Kim Jong-un does not present an existential threat, and in the end it will be up to China to cut him down to sizeDonald Trump’s United Nations
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China’s mood on North Korea is toughening – despite Trump’s bluster | Tania Branigan 17 Sep 2017, 12:11pm China’s mood on North Korea is toughening – despite Trump’s bluster | Tania Branigan
The US president’s incoherent rhetoric undermines many long-held certainties. Yet calls are growing in Beijing for stronger action against PyongyangEven a man as self-deluding and indifferent to truth as Donald Trump is unable to claim that his threats have cowed North Korea. Five weeks ago, he warned of “fire and fury”. Since then, Pyongyang has launched three missiles – two over Japan – and tested another nuclear bomb. Trump continues to wave his stick, talking on Friday of “effective and overwhelming” options, despite widespread warnings of the immense risk that they would bring catastrophe, not least for US allies and service people. Allies fear he is genuinely willing to take military action. Most probably, he believes he will not need to do so: if only he keeps shouting, the North Koreans will fall into line eventually.
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The Lattice Warning to China 15 Sep 2017, 6:14pm The Lattice Warning to China
The U.S. blocks the purchase of a firm with sensitive technology.
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The pursuit of pleasure is a modern-day addiction 9 Sep 2017, 7:05pm The pursuit of pleasure is a modern-day addiction
The easy availability of temptations, combined with constant stress, is taking its toll on a whole generationHere’s a story that is not about Trump or Brexit. But this could be worse, with even direr consequences. Addiction is up. Depression is up. Death is up. In America, we have seen a decline in our life expectancy for the first time since 1993. But this is not just happening in the US – death rates are up in the UK, Germany and China. At the same time, suicide rates in teenagers have reached an all-time high and continue to climb. After their introduction in 1987, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescriptions in the US quintupled over the ensuing 15 years and doubled over the next 10. Recently, SSRI prescriptions have declined slightly as marijuana use has increased following legalisation in many states – it’s easier to procure an over-the-counter drug than a prescription one.
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Global power is shifting to Asia – and Europe must adapt to that | Natalie Nougayrède 9 Sep 2017, 1:00am Global power is shifting to Asia – and Europe must adapt to that | Natalie Nougayrède
From China to North Korea, this region is on the rise. The European Union can compete, but only by sticking together In 2012, McKinsey analysts, using data from the University of Groningen, released a striking map showing how the
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Why Trump should let China take the lead on North Korea | Isaac Stone Fish 4 Sep 2017, 11:45am Why Trump should let China take the lead on North Korea | Isaac Stone Fish
Beijing could still be a good partner for the United States in countering Pyongyang’s brinkmanship and aggression – if handled correctly
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China’s clout has few limits. Shouldn’t we be worried about its new Silk Road? | Tom Miller 4 Sep 2017, 1:00am China’s clout has few limits. Shouldn’t we be worried about its new Silk Road? | Tom Miller
Xi Jinping’s global infrastructure investment programme threatens the west with more than economic dominance. He’s playing a serious political gameEarlier this year the first direct freight train from China to the UK arrived at a depot in Barking, east London, carrying containers loaded with consumer goods. Named
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Are global ambitions driving Xi’s approach to Korea? No, it’s about keeping the party on top | Steve Tsang 2 Sep 2017, 7:04pm Are global ambitions driving Xi’s approach to Korea? No, it’s about keeping the party on top | Steve Tsang
Beijing is not yet seeking to usurp the US in the area, but is acting to preserve the standing of the ruling elite The North Korean nuclear missile threat has provided China with a golden opportunity to assert a leadership role in a matter of critical global security. What’s more, it comes at a time when the world worries that President Trump cannot be trusted to deal with the matter with wisdom and responsibility. So why does the Chinese government not take advantage and make the most of it? The answer has to be found in the nature of the political system in China, one that places the perpetuation of Communist party power above all else, including foreign policy.
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The Guardian view on the Brexit talks: clouds of delusion | Editorial 1 Sep 2017, 2:08pm The Guardian view on the Brexit talks: clouds of delusion | Editorial
Richard Nixon had his ‘madman theory’; is Theresa May trying to frighten Europe with the ‘blithering idiot gambit’?What a difference a year makes! Last summer, David Davis bluffly predicted that we would by now be in the middle of trade talks with all our favoured partners. “We can negotiate a free trade area twice the size of the EU. Deals with the US and China alone will give us a trade area almost twice the size of the EU – and of course, we will also be seeking deals with many others,” the Brexit secretary
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Help Afghans Exploit Their Mineral Riches 30 Aug 2017, 6:43pm Help Afghans Exploit Their Mineral Riches
China controls the supply of rare-earth and critical metals.
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The Danger of a Jihadist Pakistan 28 Aug 2017, 6:54pm The Danger of a Jihadist Pakistan
Careless U.S. pressure could push the country’s nukes into the hands of Islamic fundamentalists. China can be helpful.
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Trump’s posturing on Pakistan is a gift to China | Abhishek Parajuli 23 Aug 2017, 11:19am Trump’s posturing on Pakistan is a gift to China | Abhishek Parajuli
Instead of maintaining a policy of careful diplomacy, the US president’s attack on the country has gifted China greater influence in an unstable regionXi Jinping, the Chinese president, is not a man predisposed to smiling. And yet, as I watched Donald Trump
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The Assault on Free Speech 22 Aug 2017, 6:27pm The Assault on Free Speech
China censors an academic publisher, while U.S. academics become censors.
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There is no place in academia for craven submission to Chinese censorship demands 22 Aug 2017, 2:00am There is no place in academia for craven submission to Chinese censorship demands
After an outcry, Cambridge University Press has reinstated deleted articles about China. It’s proof that we must remain wary of creating two academies – one devoted to truth, the other to securing the power of Beijing officials Imagine if the British government could eradicate the
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China’s bid to block my journal’s articles is a new attack on academic freedom | Tim Pringle 21 Aug 2017, 2:57pm China’s bid to block my journal’s articles is a new attack on academic freedom | Tim Pringle
Cambridge University Press was asked to suppress articles in China Quarterly. It has now resisted, but it is a worrying developmentThe international
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Playing Chicken With China 21 Aug 2017, 1:04pm Updated Playing Chicken With China
Trump’s North Korea brinkmanship might seem scary, but it’s not that unusual.
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How to Take On China Without Starting a Trade War 17 Aug 2017, 7:18pm How to Take On China Without Starting a Trade War
On intellectual property, Washington has a strong case against Beijing at the World Trade Organization.
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Soften the Tone and Harden Our Defenses 15 Aug 2017, 8:04pm Soften the Tone and Harden Our Defenses
Trump can solve the North Korea crisis by pressuring China and rebuilding the U.S. military at last.
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How the crash discredited the Anglo-US democratic model | Will Hutton 12 Aug 2017, 7:05pm How the crash discredited the Anglo-US democratic model | Will Hutton
Authoritarian China is now an economic blueprint for Zuma and MaduroTen years ago this week, it became clear that the dread event – a run on one bank that will create a malevolent impact on others – was under way. A US investment bank had a few weeks earlier summarily
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Trumpian Fury on North Korea 9 Aug 2017, 7:12pm Trumpian Fury on North Korea
China needs to know that the threat of military action is real.
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Second Thoughts on Trade With China 8 Aug 2017, 7:17pm Second Thoughts on Trade With China
Inviting Beijing into the WTO seemed like a win-win. It didn’t turn out that way.
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The Latest North Korean Sanctions Show 8 Aug 2017, 1:10pm Updated The Latest North Korean Sanctions Show
Why did China agree to tougher measures against its client state?
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The UN vote against North Korea shows the system working – for once | Mary Dejevsky 6 Aug 2017, 11:55am The UN vote against North Korea shows the system working – for once | Mary Dejevsky
The fact that Russia and China voted with the US to pass security council resolution 2371 offers a rare glimmer of hopeIt is not every day that the UN security council passes a resolution unanimously. But that is what happened on Saturday, when
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The Military Options for North Korea 2 Aug 2017, 7:56pm The Military Options for North Korea
Some sort of strike is likely unavoidable unless China agrees to regime change in Pyongyang.
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Free-Trade is a Two-Way Street 1 Aug 2017, 1:25pm Updated Free-Trade is a Two-Way Street
China, the EU and other trading partners put up formidable barriers to imports from America.
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The Guardian view on Liu Xiaobo’s death: free the Nobel laureate’s wife now | Editorial 13 Jul 2017, 1:55pm The Guardian view on Liu Xiaobo’s death: free the Nobel laureate’s wife now | Editorial
China jailed the author over an appeal for peaceful democratic reform. It is too late to help him – but governments must speak out for his wife, Liu Xia, and other political prisonersNot since Nazi Germany had a country allowed a Nobel peace laureate to die in custody – until today. Liu Xiaobo was still held over his
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Why Xi Jinping Fears Liu Xiaobo 11 Jul 2017, 7:07pm Why Xi Jinping Fears Liu Xiaobo
China bars his treatment overseas for cancer lest we hear his story.
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How to Squeeze China 11 Jul 2017, 3:28pm How to Squeeze China
Force ruling elites to choose between North Korea and American colleges for their kids.
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8 Jul 2017, 7:05pm The Observer view on leadership qualities on the world stage | Observer editorial
Expectations of our political figureheads are unrealistically high. But instead of preening and posing, they should listen, learn and inspire The leaders of the G20 countries gathered for the traditional group photograph in Hamburg on Friday. As is usual on such occasions, the pictures were scrutinised for signs of who’s up and who’s down. Angela Merkel, the summit host, stood out in a red jacket and grey trousers amid the ranks of dark-suited men. France’s newly elected president, Emmanuel Macron, was all smiles. In jolly mood, too, were Canada’s Justin Trudeau and Japan’s Shinzo Abe. In contrast, Vladimir Putin of Russia, Xi Jinping of China and Tayyip Erdoğan of Turkey stood grim faced on the far right of the group. Putin always looks miserable on these occasions, standing straight, his shoulders squared, trying to appear taller than he actually is. Xi looked slightly bemused. Behind them hovered Theresa May, with her usual worried look, possibly wondering whether any of these foreign johnnies want a trade deal.
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China is giving Trump a lesson in how to handle Kim Jong-un | Simon Jenkins 5 Jul 2017, 2:09pm China is giving Trump a lesson in how to handle Kim Jong-un | Simon Jenkins
Rather than getting embroiled in a petty feud over an exaggerated threat from North Korea, Beijing is playing the long gameIs my missile as big as yours? I bet it goes farther and makes a bigger bang. Anything you can do I can do better. Don’t push me too far. I could lose my temper. The fallout over North Korea’s missile test marks a return to the diplomacy of dumb. The news that its infantile leader, Kim Jong-un, had fired a long-range missile “with the possible potential to reach Alaska”, in the words of an unnamed analyst, has apparently “traumatised America”. Has it really? I thought Americans were made of tougher stuff.
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4 Jul 2017, 9:07pm The Way Forward on North Korea
Mr. Trump is learning he can’t rely on China alone. Eventually the United States will have to negotiate directly....
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The Guardian view on North Korea: burgers not bombs | Editorial 4 Jul 2017, 2:59pm The Guardian view on North Korea: burgers not bombs | Editorial
Pyongyang’s latest missile launch is a potent reminder that little time is left to slow the North’s weapons programme. Talks are unpalatable – but necessaryThe prospect of sitting down to hamburgers with Kim Jong-un, as aired by Donald Trump, is not appetising. But North Korea’s latest missile launch should remind the United States that it can’t wait for him to eat humble pie, nor expect China to take his lunch away. Pyongyang’s bold claims of a successful intercontinental ballistic missile test don’t have to be absolutely accurate to be alarming. The US military has suggested it was an intermediate-range missile, though
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Homophobia is back – it’s no accident that nationalism is too | Zoe Williams 2 Jul 2017, 10:41am Homophobia is back – it’s no accident that nationalism is too | Zoe Williams
From China to the US, prejudice is a symptom of a politics that seeks to eliminate all human differenceAs Pride season started to captivate the world’s capitals, the Chinese government was putting the final touches to its new
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If you think the EU should stand up to Trump, it must stand up to China | Natalie Nougayrède 1 Jul 2017, 2:00am If you think the EU should stand up to Trump, it must stand up to China | Natalie Nougayrède
The scandalous treatment of nobel prizewinner Liu Xiaobo means Europe has to challenge President Xi over human rights at next week’s G20 summitNext week Donald Trump and the Chinese president, Xi Jinping, travel to Europe for a
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The Guardian view on Hong Kong: Britain has a duty to defend its freedoms | Editorial 30 Jun 2017, 2:10pm The Guardian view on Hong Kong: Britain has a duty to defend its freedoms | Editorial
As the region marks 20 years since its return to China, there is rightly concern about its futureIt is 20 years since Hong Kong
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The Guardian view on human rights in China: Liu Xiaobo is dying, free him | Editorial 27 Jun 2017, 2:42pm The Guardian view on human rights in China: Liu Xiaobo is dying, free him | Editorial
The country’s Nobel peace prize winner, now facing death, should never have been jailed. Beijing should let Liu Xiaobo and his wife go free – and the rest of the world should say soChina’s Nobel peace laureate is no longer behind bars; but nor is he in any sense free.
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