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Slavery still exists in modern Britain. My campaign aims to end that | Hannah Wheatley 30 Jul 7:05am Slavery still exists in modern Britain. My campaign aims to end that | Hannah Wheatley
Human trafficking is hidden in plain sight – often on our high streets. To root out this evil, we must all be vigilant“Lucy” was 12 when she was told she was going on holiday with a family friend. She left her village in west Africa, excited to get on a plane for the first time. All was not as it seemed. She was brought to the UK and left in a house with strangers. She was trapped. Men began to visit the house. Day after day, night after night. For months on end, Lucy endured physical and sexual abuse. Finally, she found the chance to run. But, with nowhere to go, she was forced to live rough on the streets. Tragically, Lucy’s story is far from isolated.
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Life-saving optimism: what the west can learn from Africa | Chigozie Obioma 2 Jul 1:00am Life-saving optimism: what the west can learn from Africa | Chigozie Obioma
In the US, where I teach, mental health problems are rife. In Nigeria, poverty is common but there’s no hopelessness. Why? Nigeria, like most African nations, has been taught and dictated to since its independence, largely seen by the rest of the world as a receptacle for ideas rather than a generator of them. But is there something the world could learn from us? During the past few weeks in Nigeria, I’ve interviewed some 40 strangers whose lives, like those of most people in the country, were mired in want and suffering. Everywhere, people ambled about sweating, their skins wearing gradations of deprivation. Everywhere you turned there was a conspicuous lack of opportunities. Beggars walked about naked or in rags, bearing their ailments as banners to request help. Even those who were fully clothed – many looking flamboyant – seemed to be in urgent need of help, aching to achieve a certain dream. He argued: 'If you lived in a world with no suffering, it will be an abnormality. That would make anyone miserable.'
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The Guardian view on the EU migration deal: fault lines in the fortress | Editorial 29 Jun 12:16pm The Guardian view on the EU migration deal: fault lines in the fortress | Editorial
Europe’s leaders came up with a last-minute deal on migration. But it may not last, it may not work and the political sting has not been drawnCompared with the most recent years, the European Union does not currently face a large external migration problem. What it undoubtedly faces, however, is a large internal political problem about such migration. Monthly “irregular arrivals” into the EU from the Middle East and Africa have actually fallen like a stone since 2015. In May this year
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How climate change is wiping out the baobab, Africa’s ‘tree of life’ | Ameenah Gurib-Fakim 13 Jun 6:23am How climate change is wiping out the baobab, Africa’s ‘tree of life’ | Ameenah Gurib-Fakim
The trees are a scientific wonder, once capable of living for thousands of years, but now becoming endangered species
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Calls for inquiry into Israel’s Gaza killings | Letters 15 May 1:28pm Calls for inquiry into Israel’s Gaza killings | Letters
Nine prominent Israelis compare the shooting of Palestinians to South Africa’s Sharpeville MassacreWe, Israelis who wish our country to be safe and just, are appalled and horrified by the massive killing of unarmed Palestinian demonstrators in Gaza (
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Can you be a socialist and rich? You asked Google – here’s the answer 25 Apr 6:20am Can you be a socialist and rich? You asked Google – here’s the answer
Every day millions of people ask Google life’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesIn the mid-20th century, a socialist movement began to develop in many parts of colonial Africa and the Arab world. In
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Winnie Mandela was loved and loathed, but she earned her place in history | Ralph Mathekga 2 Apr 2:33pm Winnie Mandela was loved and loathed, but she earned her place in history | Ralph Mathekga
Despite her isolation and flaws, her role in the ANC-led liberation struggle was crucial to South Africa
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Winnie Mandela helped Nelson become the radical that he was | Peter Hain 2 Apr 2:17pm Winnie Mandela helped Nelson become the radical that he was | Peter Hain
At a pivotal point in South Africa’s history, Winnie urged Nelson to risk ANC alienation and embrace young activistsDuring Nelson Mandela’s 1962 trial in Pretoria, before he was sent to Robben Island, Winnie turned up each day, often magnificent in traditional chiefdom dress. My anti-apartheid activist mother Adelaine was often alone, showing solidarity, in the whites-only section of the public gallery. Once, when my younger sisters went with her, dressed in their primary school uniforms, Winnie bent down and kissed them, to the very evident horror and disgust of the onlooking white policemen, who spat and cursed. The very notion of a black woman behaving that way towards two blonde girls offended every apartheid instinct. But Winnie didn’t care.
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Trade wars? Africa has been a victim of them for years | Afua Hirsch 7 Mar 2:00am Trade wars? Africa has been a victim of them for years | Afua Hirsch
The continent has borne the brunt of taxes and tariffs from the US and Europe. No wonder some believe Africa needs its own version of Donald Trump What Africa needs, a friend of mine is fond of saying, is an African Trump: an “Africa first” leader who is not afraid of rubbing the rest of the world up the wrong way, someone willing to rip up traditional alliances, forgo historic links, forge a united and common purpose among Africa’s diverse nations, and then make their own needs – unambiguously – the priority. It’s a surprising way to frame things, but these are surprising times, and political ideologies are upside down. Protectionism is having a moment in the sun, in a useful reminder of the degree to which our perception is skewed of which countries practise competitive capitalism and which do not.
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World’s oldest art is in Africa, not Europe | Letters 27 Feb 1:21pm World’s oldest art is in Africa, not Europe | Letters
Didn’t you report 2002 that two tiny pieces of engraved ochre found in Blombos Cave in South Africa were the oldest works of art ever discovered, writes
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Cape Town May Dry Up Because of an Aversion to Israel 21 Feb 6:13pm Cape Town May Dry Up Because of an Aversion to Israel
The Palestinian Authority accepts the Jewish state’s help on water projects. South Africa refuses it.
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After Zuma in South Africa 16 Feb 6:55pm After Zuma in South Africa
The nation’s democracy survived but its economy has gone downhill.
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The Guardian view on South Africa’s new leader: a welcome change, but a long road to travel | Editorial 15 Feb 1:23pm The Guardian view on South Africa’s new leader: a welcome change, but a long road to travel | Editorial
The optimism surrounding Cyril Ramaphosa’s presidency is understandable after Jacob Zuma’s disastrous tenure. But South Africa needs systemic change tooThe goodwill surrounding
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Zuma is not enough. The ANC itself must be cleansed of corruption | Sisonke Msimang 15 Feb 8:21am Zuma is not enough. The ANC itself must be cleansed of corruption | Sisonke Msimang
South Africa’s unpopular leader is gone. But if the once mighty ANC is to have a future, this is what Cyril Ramaphosa must do Jacob Zuma, South Africa’s unpopular president, has
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The ANC risks a split, but Ramaphosa should go for broke and fire Zuma | William Gumede 9 Feb 4:00am The ANC risks a split, but Ramaphosa should go for broke and fire Zuma | William Gumede
The deputy president must use the resolve he was known for in the apartheid era, and show who’s in control in South AfricaSouth Africa and its governing ANC have been plunged into a
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How to combat the populism that gave us Brexit? Active citizenship | Ben Okri 30 Jan 1:35pm How to combat the populism that gave us Brexit? Active citizenship | Ben Okri
There’s no mystery to this. The failure of a nation begins with the abdication of responsibility to political leadersCitizenship is one of the most vexed issues in the human story. From the ancient Egyptians to modern times, who is deemed a citizen of this or that city or state has been at the core of what constitutes a human being with rights in this world. The first thing that is done in any colonial or imperial enterprise is to redefine the idea of the citizen. Usually the colonising power revises downward the citizenship content of the indigenes, and revises upward their own status. During the colonial enterprise, the indigene was no longer quite a citizen as citizenship then was determined from the centre of power, with the queen or king at its head. The indigenes were deemed to be living on the periphery. They were outsiders in their own land. This was true with the Romans in Britain, with the Greeks in Persia, with the Spaniards in Peru, and with the English in India and Africa.
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Trump Finds a Fan in East Africa 30 Jan 1:01pm Updated Trump Finds a Fan in East Africa
‘I love Trump because he tells Africans frankly,’ says Uganda’s president.
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The Guardian view on the ANC’s new leader: a fresh start | Editorial 18 Dec 2017, 2:33pm The Guardian view on the ANC’s new leader: a fresh start | Editorial
With the election of Cyril Ramaphosa South Africa has a chance to recover its moral authority, which the rainbow nation gained in its birth but has been lost in the tawdry dealings of the presentSouth Africa’s African National Congress has done the world a favour in
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If only slavery really had been abolished | Kevin McKenna 25 Nov 2017, 7:04pm If only slavery really had been abolished | Kevin McKenna
Just as we once profited from an abhorrent trade, we now turn a blind eye to modern abuses On Thursday night in Killearn, a perjink little village concealed within the folds of the Campsie Fells, 15 miles north of Glasgow, Professor Tom Devine was telling the locals about Scotland and the slave trade. I’d wondered how this comfortable, middle-class audience would respond to being told that not only was Scotland right up to its oxters in the trafficking of people from West Africa, but this was a key driver of the nation’s economy. Furthermore, we then spent the 200 years after the abolition of slavery covering up our involvement. In the centuries prior to the abolition of the slave trade in 1807,
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Africa has been failed by westernisation. It must cast off its subservience | Chigozie Obioma 12 Nov 2017, 1:50pm Africa has been failed by westernisation. It must cast off its subservience | Chigozie Obioma
The continent’s elites have to reject the notion that being ‘modern’ and ‘civilised’ means aping the westOne of the greatest ironies in the history of the collapse of any civilisation must be the initial interaction between Africans and Europeans. The Igbos in the east of Nigeria, for instance, initially saw the Europeans as madmen of strange appearance and ill-formed ideologies. On banking, the Igbos wondered how an adult in his right mind could hand over his possessions for others to keep for him. By the end of the 19th century, the “madman” had overturned their civilisation, and they had adopted his. The irony is especially relevant in these times when, given the relative failures of most former western colonies, there have been renewed calls for recolonialisation. In September, American professor Bruce Gilley
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The Guardian view on Priti Patel’s sacking: no alternative for Theresa May | Editorial 8 Nov 2017, 2:52pm The Guardian view on Priti Patel’s sacking: no alternative for Theresa May | Editorial
The former international development secretary ran her own foreign policy and defied the prime minister. Downing Street had to show who was boss In the end Theresa May did not force out Priti Patel because she wanted to. She did it because she had to. At the weekend, the prime minister was presented with serious reasons to dismiss the international development secretary. Ms Patel’s freelance but secret Middle East foreign policy – notably the 12 private meetings this summer with senior Israeli politicians and officials without first informing the Foreign Office or No 10 – was institutionalised insubordination. Yet in spite of these major breaches of trust and collective responsibility, Mrs May bent over backwards not to fire Ms Patel. She preferred to have her colleague stay, especially so soon after Michael Fallon’s resignation. Ms Patel was given a ticking-off on Monday but she was cleared to fulfil a pre-arranged visit to Africa at the start of the week. The initial failure to sack Ms Patel reflected the weakness of Mrs May’s premiership, which has deepened since June’s humiliating general election. Paradoxically, the same thing is true of Wednesday’s reverse decision to give Ms Patel the sack. If nothing else, the two contrasting responses illustrate Talleyrand’s cynical dictum that, in politics, treachery is all a matter of dates. In between the decisions not to sack and then to sack, it became clear that Ms Patel had again been economical with the facts when she told Mrs May about her recent meetings with senior Israelis. The decisive revelation concerned a meeting at the House of Commons in September with the Israeli public security minister, which Ms Patel continued to conceal at the weekend. Although some of the facts concerning this meeting, and another in New York with the head of Israel’s foreign service, were in dispute on Wednesday, it added up to a deception too far for No 10.
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From Africa to the US to Haiti, climate change is a Black Lives Matter | Patrisse Cullors and Nyeusi Nguvu 14 Sep 2017, 11:52am From Africa to the US to Haiti, climate change is a Black Lives Matter | Patrisse Cullors and Nyeusi Nguvu
Racism is endemic to global inequality. This means that those most affected – and killed – by climate change are black and poor people
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Why do Sikhs wear turbans? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Vivek Chaudhary 13 Sep 2017, 3:00am Why do Sikhs wear turbans? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Vivek Chaudhary
Every day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesNobody knows the precise origins of the turban, although there are references to it dating back almost 4,000 years from Mesopotamia and ancient India. There is little consensus on what it should look like and how it should be worn. There is no specific colour and it can be wrapped tightly around the head or sit loosely; it can have a peak or a flat top or even be tilted, and when unfurled can measure anything up to 40 metres in length. It is a distinctive form of headdress that can be seen throughout countries in south and central Asia and north and west Africa, each of them having their own specific style and reasons for donning it.
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I worked at Bell Pottinger. The South Africa scandal reflects its toxic culture | Anonymous 7 Sep 2017, 6:49am Updated I worked at Bell Pottinger. The South Africa scandal reflects its toxic culture | Anonymous
As a minority woman at the PR firm, I found a place where good people struggled to have their voices heard. The current race relations row came as no surpriseIt was lunchtime on 31 July 2013, and I had suddenly realised how toxic the corporate culture at Bell Pottinger – the
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Europe has failed to integrate its refugees – but one tiny Greek island succeeded | David Patrikarakos 7 Sep 2017, 4:17am Europe has failed to integrate its refugees – but one tiny Greek island succeeded | David Patrikarakos
Recent migration waves have left refugees and asylum seekers struggling to survive. On Tilos, 50 refugees have been not only integrated but enabled‘Sorry, please one cigarette, my friend.” The man is young: early 20s at the most, Syrian I think. He and many others from across the Middle East and Africa patrol Exarchia Square in central Athens. Bereft of work, they beg for change. Often they turn to selling pirated DVDs, tissues or, occasionally, drugs. The
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Bell Pottinger has toxified political debate in South Africa | Justice Malala 6 Sep 2017, 1:59pm Bell Pottinger has toxified political debate in South Africa | Justice Malala
The disgraced PR firm did not create our racial problems but it exploited them ruthlessly, giving our struggle for justice a sinister toneYou don’t have to look for racial inequality when you land in South Africa. It is everywhere. It is in the spatial arrangements: the pristine formerly whites-only suburbs (where a few of us black people now live) and their high walls, sitting miles away from the sprawling black squatter camps and townships that provide labour for the still – two decades after democracy – white-dominated economy. The face of unemployment, poverty and poor education is black. The face of prosperity and privilege is white.
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Africa doesn’t need white tech entrepreneurs – it needs a level playing field | Eliza Anyangwe 6 Sep 2017, 5:00am Africa doesn’t need white tech entrepreneurs – it needs a level playing field | Eliza Anyangwe
African entrepreneurs face huge barriers – and our adoration of the intrepid explorer armed with a Harvard degree privileges everything foreign and whiteLast week I attended my first TED conference. Held on an expansive lodge on the foot of Mount Meru, in the Tanzanian town of Arusha, TED Global 2017 promised to “share bold ideas, tough truths and jaw-dropping creative visions”. It delivered. For three full days, 700-plus attendees from around the world were treated to talks from writers and scientists, artists and academics, politicians and activists. But amid the laughter and the occasional tears, for me there were intermittent bouts of anger. Among TED’s “astonishing group of speakers” was a creature anyone who watches the African continent will know well: the tech entrepreneur. From Morocco to Madagascar, Africa has emerged as the last frontier for entrepreneurs, a land overflowing with problems that any intrepid explorer, armed with a Harvard degree and a bright idea can make his name and fortune solving (it’s nearly always “his”).
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Trying to block migrants won’t work. Europe needs a realistic plan | Sophie in ’t Veld 30 Aug 2017, 8:54am Trying to block migrants won’t work. Europe needs a realistic plan | Sophie in ’t Veld
From dubious deals with third countries to processing points in Africa, Europe’s response to migration is failing. But there are better ways to tackle it togetherThe central Mediterranean migratory route has become the
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The Guardian view on migration to Europe: changing routes, unchanged principles | Editorial 28 Aug 2017, 2:36pm The Guardian view on migration to Europe: changing routes, unchanged principles | Editorial
International leaders have been meeting in Paris to craft policies that stop the human traffic. Pushing the border further south is not the answer on its ownMigration remains at the heart of Europe’s political and social crisis. Instability in Africa and elsewhere, wars, persecution, poverty, demographic trends and the ancient human urge to seek a better life in safer, more prosperous regions, all mean that this reality is not about to change. Two years after more than a million people made their way to Europe in the largest arrival of migrants from outside the continent in its history, European institutions and governments still struggle to find solutions. Even when sound policies are crafted, such as relocation sharing, to alleviate the pressure on “frontline” states, implementation lags far behind. On Monday the leaders of several European and African states – the UK not among them – met in Paris to try to forge more unity on how to address both the humanitarian urgency and the root causes of migration. The talks centred on stemming migration flows closer to their source. This makes sense, but only if the rights of migrants who need urgent protection are respected. Europe’s strategies must not amount to pushing the problem further away from its shores, rather than trying to solve it.
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The Guardian view on Confederate statues: they must fall | Editorial 18 Aug 2017, 1:57pm The Guardian view on Confederate statues: they must fall | Editorial
Toppling symbols of hate is not an assault on the past but a defence of the futureOne Friday afternoon in September 1994, a statue was pulled down from in front of provincial government offices in what was then the Orange Free State in South Africa. It depicted Hendrik Verwoerd, the country’s prime minister from 1958 to 1961, administrative architect of “apartheid” and a vicious racist. No one who grasps the barbarism that his doctrines imposed laments the removal of monuments in his honour. Is the morality of statues honouring heroes of the Confederacy in the US civil war any more complicated? The south fought to preserve a social order founded on white racial supremacy, and economically dependent on industrial-scale slavery – a vast crime. Monuments now targeted for removal were erected
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South Africa’s poorest people will be hit by Jacob Zuma’s hollow victory | William Gumede 9 Aug 2017, 9:49am South Africa’s poorest people will be hit by Jacob Zuma’s hollow victory | William Gumede
The ANC leader and president survived a vote of no confidence – but this could stifle further economic returns as well as spur a potential party splitJacob Zuma may have
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The Guardian view on South Africa: Zuma goes on – but at what cost? | Editorial 8 Aug 2017, 2:16pm The Guardian view on South Africa: Zuma goes on – but at what cost? | Editorial
The president has survived yet another vote of no confidence. But he has damaged his party as well as his countryJacob Zuma’s shortcomings cannot shock anyone; nor can his ability
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Silicon Valley Trails in Medical Tech 23 Jul 2017, 5:33pm Silicon Valley Trails in Medical Tech
With smartphones everywhere and little regulation, India and Africa are set to lead.
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Why is Africa so poor? You asked Google – here’s the answer 28 Jun 2017, 3:00am Why is Africa so poor? You asked Google – here’s the answer
Every day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesNow here’s a question that demands an answer. Why is it that arguably the world’s richest continent – in terms of natural resources – has some of the world’s poorest people? To answer it, we’d need to take a trip down memory lane. Already I can sense you rolling your eyes deep into the back of your head. “If I hear one more time about slavery in Africa …” We often seem to be a people with little patience for history or interest in the impact of past events on present realities. But time isn’t linear and we aren’t always moving forward. There is no other way to understand Africa today without considering the history of the continent.
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Oxford’s move to decolonise history degrees is a start. But there’s a long way to go | Kehinde Andrews 30 May 2017, 11:25am Oxford’s move to decolonise history degrees is a start. But there’s a long way to go | Kehinde Andrews
Activists should be proud of campaigns such as Rhodes Must Fall, yet dissatisfied with how little the role of Africa, Asia and the Caribbean in British history is understoodStarting in the new academic year, history students at Oxford University will have to
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Without the common swift, another silent summer beckons | Andrew Mayers 5 May 2017, 6:48am Without the common swift, another silent summer beckons | Andrew Mayers
These thrilling birds used to return from Africa on 5 May every year. But habitat loss, intensive farming and householders’ war on nesting sites have taken a tollOnce it was a day of joy. The fifth of May. A day when even the greyest shades of early summer would be set ablaze by squadrons of yikkering, darting arrows, now screeching recklessly round the rooftops, now twinkling high over the city streets. The day of the sky dolphins. I don’t think you’ll find the description in many ornithology guidebooks or birding websites. But that’s how that first intoxicating contact with the common swift was christened in my household. Though it took a child who had only just started school to make the connection.
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3 May 2017, 8:45pm Updated China Wants Fish, So Africa Goes Hungry
Mechanized fleets scour the oceans clean, destroying fisheries and breaking international law with little chance of repercussions....
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The Guardian view on South Africa: fighting for the ANC’s future | Editorial 13 Apr 2017, 2:04pm The Guardian view on South Africa: fighting for the ANC’s future | Editorial
The condemnation of Jacob Zuma is growing inside and outside his party. But the fate of this powerful personality is not the real issueJacob Zuma
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7 Apr 2017, 8:21pm South Africa’s Protesters Have It Right
The A.N.C. needs to curb the corrupt, scandal-riddled leadership of President Jacob Zuma....
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1 Apr 2017, 7:05pm Jacob Zuma: his exit might be anything but dignified
A veteran of the struggle, South Africa’s president has a knack for survival. But he may have gone too far in sacking half his cabinet last week, and his time as leader is drawing to a closeHis career has been marked by a bullish disregard for convention and a rugged tenacity in the face of adversity A pitted dirt track links the village to the main road. There is intermittent electricity and only haphazard municipal deliveries of water. Children take a bus to school in a township 10km away. The nearest clinic is as far. In the summer, the sun scorches the breeze-block and brick homes. In the winter, a cold wind blasts across the low hills and fields. On a battered fridge in Sibongile Sibeko’s front room is a faded sticker of South Africa’s president, with his trademark wide grin. “Am I a fan? You’re joking. Once, perhaps. Now, no way,” she says.
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29 Mar 2017, 5:32am When Mosul is liberated a new chapter in political policymaking must begin | Ranj Alaaldin
In Iraq and across the Middle East nation-states are collapsing, with the rise of myriad groups. The international community must rethink its strategiesThere is a crisis of authority and security in the Middle East and North Africa that will continue even after the defeat of Islamic State and the military campaigns in Iraq and Syria. Mosul’s liberation and the eventual fall of Raqqa will signal the end of the
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Millions are on the brink of starvation in east Africa. We must act fast | Emma Thompson 28 Mar 2017, 12:11pm Millions are on the brink of starvation in east Africa. We must act fast | Emma Thompson
Families in the region are once more forced into a daily struggle to find food. We can help to avoid a repetition of the famine of 1984When I saw the
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Overseas aid is most effective when local communities can help | Letters 25 Mar 2017, 8:05pm Overseas aid is most effective when local communities can help | Letters
Indigenous knowledge must be harnessed in drought-hit KenyaI am from Marsabit in northern Kenya and have seen how the drought has left pastoralist communities with no other choice but to rely on aid. It was heartening to read that the UK’s development secretary, Priti Patel, has pledged more support to East Africa (
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We need the will for a way out for Africa | Letters 24 Mar 2017, 2:19pm We need the will for a way out for Africa | Letters
Your heartbreaking photograph of children at a camp for families fleeing drought in Somalia (Eyewitness, 21 March) and reports of the
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Africa deserves better from Comic Relief | David Lammy 24 Mar 2017, 2:30am Africa deserves better from Comic Relief | David Lammy
This biannual guilt trip perpetuates Band Aid stereotypes. Can we finally look at the issues behind the problems, and inspire anger as well as donations? Raucous comedy, flamboyant red noses, celebrity endorsement and a plethora of ways to get involved from bake sales to triathlons: the
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Long live the diverse, multicultural NHS | Letters 20 Mar 2017, 2:45pm Long live the diverse, multicultural NHS | Letters
NHS staff | Gendered language | Wasted coffee cups | Article 50 | Oddly named mealsDuring a recent 10-day stay in a London hospital I impertinently asked each of the 49 people who came to my bedside where they were from originally. Ten were British, five Portuguese, four Spanish, three Philippino, two each from India, Ghana, Somalia and Finland, and one each from France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Ireland, Romania, South Africa, Sierra Leone, Nepal, Brazil, Ethiopia, Malawi, Zaire, Malaysia, Mauritius, Eritrea, Sri Lanka, Iran and Nigeria. These figures should mean something to politicians. They certainly meant a great deal to me and to my fellow ward-mates.
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Famine and its causes in the Horn of Africa | Letters 17 Mar 2017, 2:29pm Famine and its causes in the Horn of Africa | Letters
As members of the Eritrean community, we were deeply moved by the appeal for assistance in the Horn of Africa, launched by British aid organisations (
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It’s right for Britain to reach out to Africa – wrong to send Boris Johnson | Afua Hirsch 16 Mar 2017, 2:58pm It’s right for Britain to reach out to Africa – wrong to send Boris Johnson | Afua Hirsch
The foreign secretary carries the baggage of his derogatory comments about black people. The continent deserves better – and so do weBoris Johnson, our foreign secretary, is in Africa. On Wednesday
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India, Brexit and the legacy of empire in Africa | Letters 16 Mar 2017, 2:42pm India, Brexit and the legacy of empire in Africa | Letters
It is disingenuous of Shashi Tharoor to pretend that religious hatred did not exist in India before “the British introduced it” with their policy of “divide and rule” (
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Why is South Africa still so anti-black, so many years after apartheid? | Panashe Chigumadzi 10 Mar 2017, 10:16am Why is South Africa still so anti-black, so many years after apartheid? | Panashe Chigumadzi
Afrophobic violence against black ‘outsiders’ has its roots in the system’s continuing, spectacular failure to deliver economic justiceIn 1994 Shoshozola became the unofficial anthem of South Africa’s
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American Teachers Unions Oppose Innovative Schools---in Africa 9 Mar 2017, 5:42pm American Teachers Unions Oppose Innovative Schools---in Africa
Bridge Academies show promising results in Kenya and Uganda, but unions see them only as a threat.
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Dirty money that funds conflict in Africa flows through the UK. We can stop it | George Clooney and John Prendergast 20 Feb 2017, 9:30am Dirty money that funds conflict in Africa flows through the UK. We can stop it | George Clooney and John Prendergast
High-level corruption and illicit trade in natural resources depend on British and EU banks. Putting financial pressure on them can help save livesAlmost a year ago, the UK government convened a global summit to commit to fighting corruption. The final
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The migrant slave trade is booming in Libya. Why is the world ignoring it? | Ross Kemp 20 Feb 2017, 5:00am The migrant slave trade is booming in Libya. Why is the world ignoring it? | Ross Kemp
I’ve seen the dangerous route to Europe through Libya, with thousands of people at the mercy of cruelty for profit. But our leaders prefer to keep them there It’s a mass grave that we don’t need the United Nations to verify. Every day an average of 14 migrants, the vast majority from countries in sub-Saharan Africa,
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Britain has blood on its hands over Yemen | Owen Jones 8 Feb 2017, 3:05pm Britain has blood on its hands over Yemen | Owen Jones
Bombs made by us and dropped by Saudi Arabia are killing civilians in the civil war. Perhaps a high court ruling will bring our government to accountLittle children should not be drawing missiles and corpses. When I met Yemeni girls and boys in a sandy, sun-scorched refugee camp in the horn of Africa, the pictures they had drawn chilled me. One depicted aeroplanes raining missiles down on houses; there were frowning corpses in crudely drawn puddles of blood, a weeping child beside them. These were horrors they had suffered – and they suffered them, in part, because of the role of Britain’s government. Yemen is in the midst of a civil war that has lasted two years,
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Africa is being choked. But corporations leave their grime on us all | Lola Okolosie 9 Dec 2016, 8:41am Africa is being choked. But corporations leave their grime on us all | Lola Okolosie
The filthy practice of exporting highly polluting fuel to Africa is symbolic of big business the world over: where profit is king, human life becomes trivialDense, dirty air laced with grease best describes the atmosphere of most Lagos streets. Drive from one corner of this great west African city to another and in no time you will find surfaces lightly dusted, like a soft sprinkling of icing on cakes. Under the half moons of fingernails, thick grime settles.
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To so many Africans, Fidel Castro is a hero. Here’s why | Sean Jacobs 30 Nov 2016, 9:08am To so many Africans, Fidel Castro is a hero. Here’s why | Sean Jacobs
‘A source of inspiration to all freedom-loving peoples’: that’s what Nelson Mandela called the Cuban revolutionary leader. And with good reasonIf Africa is a country, then Fidel Castro is one of our national heroes. This may come as a surprise to many oblivious of Africa’s postcolonial history and Castro’s role in it – especially the fate of white regimes and former Portuguese colonies in southern Africa. In the west, Castro’s legacy is usually dismissed as an authoritarian, and Cuba as a one-party state with few freedoms. Despite the many achievements of Cuba under Castro (
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13 Nov 2016, 5:28pm How Dodd-Frank Led to More Mayhem in Africa
A measure to curb violence from conflict minerals has caused militias to simply expand their looting.
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7 Nov 2016, 1:33pm West Africa TB study claims are misleading | Letters
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/nov/03/multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis-rates-soar-west-africa-who-warns" title="">Your article
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2 Nov 2016, 4:11pm The Guardian view on South Africa: a president’s failings and his country’s successes | Editorial
The scandals surrounding Jacob Zuma raise fresh questions about his future, but also highlight the strength of South Africa’s institutionsThe crises keep coming for Jacob Zuma, and if some in South Africa believe he will ride them out, others wonder how many lives he has left. Today it was the call for a full judicial inquiry into allegations of corruption at the top level of government by the recently departed public protector, Thuli Madonsela,
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22 Oct 2016, 8:30pm Opinion: Pardon the American Taliban
John Walker Lindh was motivated by youthful idealism when he aided the Taliban. As a 24-year-old in Africa in the 1960s, I was no different.
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22 Oct 2016, 7:04pm The Observer view on Congo and the failure of democracy in Africa | Observer editorial
The Democratic Republic of Congo is the latest country disintegrating because a leader wants to hang on to powerTwo decades ago, the Democratic Republic of Congo, sub-Saharan Africa’s largest country, was engulfed in what became known as
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22 Oct 2016, 12:00pm Updated Citroën Cactus car review – ‘Its metier is rugged jaunts across tricky terrain’
Bright red seatbelts look like ceremonial sashes: my kid has become an ambassador Having a Citroën Cactus is a bit like painting your house pink; it sounds extraordinary and daring; it looks it for a while, but since you’re mostly inside it rather than outside, it’s your neighbours who have to live with it. I’m talking mainly about the side panels: bubbly sheets whose purpose was never plain to begin with. The Rip Curl keeps the panels and adds a number of driving modes (snow, sand, slipperiness), to ensure you’re ready for more than just bumping into things: you can now bump into things that are also driving on sand. It’s not obvious what the point is, for those of us not planning to reinvade Africa. It does have a mud setting, though, so is not totally inappropriate for the British weather. That is its metier: rugged jaunts across tricky terrain. Round town, it doesn’t get much chance to show off, though it does have a pleasing interior. The driver’s seat is armchair-roomy, like going to a posh cinema. Bright red seatbelts give everyone the look of wearing a ceremonial sash, which can be discombobulating, especially when you catch your kids in the rear-view and try to remember when you made them the Icelandic ambassador. Heavily stylised stitching and natty door pulls make you feel as though you’re sitting inside 1930s luggage. The younger passengers were unimpressed with the pop-out back windows and moaned constantly about not being able to stick their heads out. (It was like being able to hear the internal monologue of a dog.) The satnav was so sluggish that on roundabouts you just had to get used to being told to take the exit you’d just passed.
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20 Oct 2016, 5:30am Mafia III is just a game, but it shines a spotlight on the reality of racism | Tauriq Moosa
As a person of colour, I found it cathartic to play a video game that acknowledges the reality of racism and says: things don’t have to be this wayPeople of colour in South Africa have faced a long history of ostracism on multiple levels. Though I missed the worst of it, apartheid laws mandated racist exclusion: careers, political roles, even door entrances and homes, all were determined by race. These attitudes remain, even without laws to back them up. I was a child, the first time I was subjected to a racial slur. Decades later it continues in South Africa, but also online, particularly in an internet environment dominated by status quo warriors who love Trump, hate women and believe progress is poison.
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13 Oct 2016, 2:38pm Gandhi was an inspiration across Africa | Letters
So some professors at the University of Ghana have succeeded in their campaign to remove the statue of Gandhi from campus (
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8 Oct 2016, 7:02pm Africa must not become one big game park | Patrick Bergin
African wildlife is threatened as never before but the will to enforce conservation must come from within the continentAround the world, people are looking to the recent meeting in Johannesburg of the
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5 Oct 2016, 8:57am Op-Ed Contributor: White Schools vs. Black Hair in Post-Apartheid South Africa
How can Nelson Mandela’s dream of a Rainbow Nation be realized when institutional racism still runs through education?
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4 Oct 2016, 2:00am What will our children say after we let all the lions die? | Patrick Barkham
Manmade policies are wiping out species at an unprecedented rate, yet our politicians allow fat cat hunters to plunder Africa’s dwindling lion populationToughie is a 12-year-old frog with huge black eyes and chestnut-brown skin. Last week, he was
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25 Sep 2016, 2:56pm The Guardian view on an ivory ban: tusk trade rules need teeth | Editorial
No markets in elephant ivory should be legalised. They would sustain demand and provide a cover for illegal trading and poachingThe illegal trade in endangered fauna and flora is the world’s fourth biggest, after the trades in drugs, counterfeit goods and people. The difference is that there is no shortage of the other three. Every 15 minutes, an elephant is killed by poachers. A third of Africa’s savannah elephants were slaughtered between 2007 and 2014. On current trends, by the time that today’s children reach adulthood, the African elephant will be extinct in the wild. This is not inevitable. Governments are about to embark on a three-yearly meeting to discuss the future of international wildlife protection. Cites, the convention on international trade in endangered species of wild flora and fauna, brings together nearly every country on Earth in pledges to protect threatened nature.
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