Back The Guardian Friday, February 14, 2020
Search Sections 14 Feb

The Guardian

Friday, February 14, 2020
Close
Advertisement
The Guardian view on looking for aliens: friends in the sky? | Editorial 14 Feb 7:01pm The Guardian view on looking for aliens: friends in the sky? | Editorial
Recent discoveries in space and Earth sciences have provided encouragement to searchers for distant civilisationsIs there anybody out there? For centuries human beings have wondered, although the ways in which we have gone about this have varied, encompassing spiritual and metaphysical questions as well as scientific ones. As we have gained greater understanding of the universe, however, our searches have taken on more concrete form. Questions about extraterrestrials have become a subject for science rather than science fiction and philosophy. Now a
 Like Reply

Most Popular

Currencies in USD
GBP 1,29 +0,464%
EUR 1,08 +0,093%
CHF 1,02 +0,196%
The Guardian view on Idlib: nowhere left to run | Editorial 14 Feb 1:25pm The Guardian view on Idlib: nowhere left to run | Editorial
Hundreds of thousands of civilians are fleeing a renewed assault by the Syrian regime, in desperate circumstances. Is anyone paying attention?After the torture and massacre of civilians, after the targeted attacks upon rescuers, doctors and schools, after the barrel bombs and chemical weapons, it should be hard to believe that there could be a new wave of misery for Syria unleashed by Bashar al-Assad and his Russian and Iranian backers. Yet here it is. The
 Like Reply
Boris Johnson’s cabinet reshuffle: the power and the vainglory | Letters 14 Feb 12:29pm Boris Johnson’s cabinet reshuffle: the power and the vainglory | Letters
As the dust settles after a dramatic reshuffle, readers express their hopes and fears for the new cabinetAlthough much reshuffle reportage has focused on the chancellor’s resignation and the revenge sackings of a number of ministers, other developments do not augur well given that our prime minister does all he can to avoid scrutiny. There should be widespread alarm that the MP appointed to the most senior legal post within government has expressed a desire to “take back control” from the judiciary, especially so in the light of Boris Johnson’s unlawful prorogation and the subsequent dark mutterings about treachery by judges and their interference in the conduct of government policy (
 Like Reply
Pivot in perception or a load of rowlocks? | Brief letters 14 Feb 12:21pm Pivot in perception or a load of rowlocks? | Brief letters
Boris Johnson | Marmalade years | US publishing industry | Quick crossword | Roysters crispsIt’s all very well Labour demanding an inquiry into who paid for Boris Johnson’s Caribbean holiday (
 Like Reply
Dominic Cummings has started to believe he’s cool. What can you say but, ‘Ooooh’? | Marina Hyde 14 Feb 12:15pm Dominic Cummings has started to believe he’s cool. What can you say but, ‘Ooooh’? | Marina Hyde
He likes to play badass, but if he’s so ruthless why does the cabinet still contain such mediocrities as Gavin Williamson and Liz Truss?With regret, I must begin with an apology. As the Westminster-based events of Thursday unfolded, I recalled with mounting horror that I had at one point during 2018 described a Theresa May cabinet as “a government of all the talentless”. As so often over the past few years, this would turn out to be an absolute failure of the imagination. I now realise I was, back then, living through a halcyon era of political accomplishment. Jeremy Hunt,
 Like Reply
The pope’s liberal supporters feel that he’s let them down | Catherine Pepinster 14 Feb 10:16am The pope’s liberal supporters feel that he’s let them down | Catherine Pepinster
Francis’s refusal to allow the ordination of married men has highlighted divisions in the church When the cardinals of the Roman Catholic church gathered for their conclave in the Sistine Chapel in 2013 and
 Like Reply
Boris Johnson’s reshuffle was all about centralising power | Katy Balls 14 Feb 8:46am Boris Johnson’s reshuffle was all about centralising power | Katy Balls
Thursday’s moves have put No 10 firmly in control. Now Johnson can’t avoid responsibility for his government’s actionsIn the weeks after Boris Johnson’s election victory, a cabinet minister paid a visit to Downing Street to discuss their brief. It wasn’t to pitch a flagship policy or suggest a personal programme of radical reform. Instead, their message to the No 10 operation was simple: what do you want to do? This secretary of state had clocked early on what’s only now dawning on many ministers – and former ministers – in the wake of
 Like Reply
Bees and flowers have had the world’s longest love affair. Now it’s in danger | Alison Benjamin 14 Feb 6:35am Bees and flowers have had the world’s longest love affair. Now it’s in danger | Alison Benjamin
Bees pollinate many human foodstuffs. But intensive farming practices may kill them off if we don’t demand changeThe oldest love affair in history is between the bee and the flower. It began more than 100m years ago, when nature devised a more efficient way than winds for plants to procreate. About 80% of plant species now use animals or insects to carry pollen grains from the male part of the plant to the female part. The plants developed flowers. Their perfumed scent, colourful displays and sweet nectar are all designed to woo pollinators. Over time, 25,000 or so species (we still don’t know exactly how many) of bee have evolved globally to play Cupid to specific flowering plants and trees: their short life cycle perfectly synchronised with the blooming of the flowers. On each visit they refuel with nectar, collect pollen to feed their young and in the process become a messenger of love.
 Like Reply
Beware oil execs in environmentalists’ clothing – BP could derail real change | Alice Bell 14 Feb 5:43am Beware oil execs in environmentalists’ clothing – BP could derail real change | Alice Bell
If a company that made its name in oil wants us to believe it can be part of the climate solution, it needs to stop drillingBP’s got a new boss, Bernard Looney. He doesn’t wear a tie,
 Like Reply
The war between boomers and millennials benefits neither side | Rachel Shabi 14 Feb 4:35am The war between boomers and millennials benefits neither side | Rachel Shabi
Boomers are right to worry that low-paid millennials won’t be able to provide for them in their later yearsSitting in a Wakefield coffee shop, three women in their early 70s, each of whom was raised in a Labour family, discuss the life prospects for today’s younger generation. “It was as hard for us then as it is for young people now,” one says. Harder actually, interjects another woman, listing the home comforts now provided by TVs and washing machines, and the consumer perks accessible by credit card. The women say they’re sympathetic to younger generations, but that the young need to work harder, not rely on handouts. “We are expected to pay for them now,” as one woman puts it. All three women voted Conservative in 2019 – they wanted Brexit done and didn’t want Jeremy Corbyn as prime minister – turning the West Yorkshire seat blue for the
 Like Reply
Market economics has driven universities into crisis – and we’re all paying the price | Owen Jones 14 Feb 2:00am Market economics has driven universities into crisis – and we’re all paying the price | Owen Jones
When staff strike this month, they will be battling not just for the future of higher education but for our economy and cultureThe trebling of tuition fees would unleash a new golden age for English universities, or so we were told. They would become financially sustainable, competitive, liberated from stifling bureaucracy and responsive to the needs of students. And yet, nearly a decade later, higher education is in crisis. Tuition fees have formed part of a full-frontal assault on the living standards of a generation battered by a housing crisis, stagnating wages and slashed services. And with
 Like Reply
There could soon be a test to detect cancer years in advance. Would you take it? | Saskia Sanderson 14 Feb 1:00am There could soon be a test to detect cancer years in advance. Would you take it? | Saskia Sanderson
New research says mutations could be picked up long before symptoms appear. Society must be ready for the ethical problems this poses “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”: a phrase beloved of medical professionals – largely because it’s true . When it comes to cancer, you could readily add “an ounce of early diagnosis”. Cancers that are diagnosed early can often be cured. This knowledge has spurred efforts among my colleagues in the research community to develop new, more sophisticated ways to detect early signs of the disease.
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Monday, February 24, 2020

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept