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Friday, November 8, 2019
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The Guardian view on the fall of the Berlin Wall: history’s lessons | Editorial 8 Nov 1:30pm The Guardian view on the fall of the Berlin Wall: history’s lessons | Editorial
It was hailed as the definitive triumph of liberal democracy. Thirty years on, the lessons of 1989 look rather different“The owl of Minerva begins its flight only with the coming of the dusk,” wrote Hegel in the Philosophy of Right. This was a poetic way of saying that wisdom and understanding only come with hindsight, and history never ceases to play itself out in unanticipated ways. As
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The Guardian view on boosting maternity leave: from small beginnings | Editorial 8 Nov 1:25pm The Guardian view on boosting maternity leave: from small beginnings | Editorial
Increasing entitlements for mothers will not reduce gender inequality. What’s needed is a rebalancing between work and homeIt is a mark of how much society has moved on that a woman’s right to paid maternity leave, introduced in the UK in 1975, is now taken for granted. That fathers’ rights to time off lag so far behind, meaning that women continue to do the vast majority of unpaid domestic work and earn less money as a result, is a mark of how far we have still to go.
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Untangling the lies told about universal credit | Letters 8 Nov 1:04pm Untangling the lies told about universal credit | Letters
Guardian readers respond to the Advertising Standards Authority ruling on the government’s advertising campaignAditya Chakrabortty’s article (
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Mayflower 400 is ignoring slavery | Letters 8 Nov 12:59pm Mayflower 400 is ignoring slavery | Letters
Mayflower 400 is commemorating the Mayflower voyage of 1620 without reference to the context and aftermath of that colonising venture, writes
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We need more staff for the NHS, but not from the poorest countries | Letters 8 Nov 12:56pm We need more staff for the NHS, but not from the poorest countries | Letters
Clinicians are putting our faith in the next government to get to grips with the workforce crisis, writes
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Hidden meaning in Jeremy Corbyn’s horseradish gift to Tom Watson? | Brief letters 8 Nov 12:51pm Hidden meaning in Jeremy Corbyn’s horseradish gift to Tom Watson? | Brief letters
Brexit poetry | Reporting abuse | Tom Watson’s resignation | Film ratings | GCSE marking | FrackingRhiannon Lucy Cosslett’s description of Brooke’s The Soldier as “snivelling ethnocentricity” (
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The Essex lorry deaths are not just ‘tragic’. They’re political | Imogen Dobie 8 Nov 12:35pm The Essex lorry deaths are not just ‘tragic’. They’re political | Imogen Dobie
The language of grief and shock always frames such incidents, masking the crucial question of culpabilityThe 39 Vietnamese nationals whose bodies were
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Lurching and rambling, Boris Johnson is in charge. But he’s lost control | Marina Hyde 8 Nov 12:21pm Lurching and rambling, Boris Johnson is in charge. But he’s lost control | Marina Hyde
It’s been a taboo-busting start to the Tories’ election campaign. But the spectacle of their leader is the most grotesque of allThe spectacle of Boris Johnson in a suit is increasingly disconcerting. Everything the prime minister says would make much more sense if he was wearing just his pants and a three-day-old dressing gown, and slurring, “I promise you I’ll CHANGE …” at one of the mothers of his children. It goes without saying that he might win a majority.
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Instagram’s murky ‘shadow bans’ just serve to censor marginalised communities | Chanté Joseph 8 Nov 11:03am Instagram’s murky ‘shadow bans’ just serve to censor marginalised communities | Chanté Joseph
Images of queer and plus-sized bodies are not ‘sexually suggestive’ content. So why is Instagram blocking them?Vulnerable and marginalised communities on Instagram have been calling for a wider conversation to address what they say is the platform’s censoring of queer and plus-sized bodies.
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Farage is the homeopathic politician: he has a memory of an idea but no trace | John Crace 8 Nov 10:50am Farage is the homeopathic politician: he has a memory of an idea but no trace | John Crace
The Brexit party leader only continues because he’s worried he may no longer exist if he stops There were more security guards outside the Little Mill village hall in south Wales than there were people trying to get in. Once inside, it became clear why. They were trying to do everyone a favour by keeping them out. An hour or so that nobody unlucky enough to be there would ever get back. Six months ago, a Brexit party rally could be guaranteed to have a certain energy. The thrill of the new, if nothing else. No more. This one would have died on its feet if it hadn’t already been dead on arrival. Normally it’s shopping channel 3am graveyard slot presenter Richard Tice who gets wheeled out to compere these events. But with Tice otherwise engaged, hastily mugging up where Hartlepool is on the map and taking lessons in how to talk to northern people, before he announces he is
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The trivial tasks that haunt our to-do lists | Emma Brockes 8 Nov 10:47am The trivial tasks that haunt our to-do lists | Emma Brockes
I suspect that thinking about my broken vacuum cleaner functions as a small diversion from other anxieties For a while, it was anything to do with insurance that would break me. I’d file my taxes roughly on time, conscientiously plough through the rest of my to-do list, then let a major piece of insurance lapse because the thought of picking up the phone to talk to an agent was apparently too much to bear. A similar lassitude took hold around the broken booster on my wifi. I thought about the booster and talked about the booster in inverse proportion to my efforts to fix it. We hold our lives together with tape and string until something trivial comes along to undo us.
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Letter: Esther Hindley obituary 8 Nov 10:36am Letter: Esther Hindley obituary
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/oct/14/esther-hindley-obituary" title="">Esther Hindley
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Capitalism is in crisis. And we cannot get out of it by carrying on as before | Michael Jacobs 8 Nov 9:11am Capitalism is in crisis. And we cannot get out of it by carrying on as before | Michael Jacobs
Even capitalists agree our economic model is broken. Fundamental change on the scale of 1945 and 1979 is needed now General elections are rarely epoch-defining events. Though the parties pretend that their political differences are large, in economic terms they rarely are. But this one could be different. Of course, elections lead to change. Labour’s victory in 1997 marked a decisive break with the Thatcher-Major years in terms of public spending and welfare policy. Yet New Labour didn’t fundamentally challenge the dominant model of economic policy that it had inherited from the Tories: a globalised and declining manufacturing sector, and deregulated financial and labour markets. In 2010 the coalition
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Does America need another billionaire in the 2020 race? Bloomberg thinks so | Cas Mudde 8 Nov 7:00am Does America need another billionaire in the 2020 race? Bloomberg thinks so | Cas Mudde
Bloomberg is worried that no one in the current crop of Democratic candidates is ‘well positioned’ to defeat Donald Trump. But is he?
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The continuing gender pay gap is shameful. Labour will use the law to end it | Shami Chakrabarti 8 Nov 5:51am The continuing gender pay gap is shameful. Labour will use the law to end it | Shami Chakrabarti
Women will never be paid equally until government takes enforcement seriously – that’s what we will do
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Delhi’s toxic politicians must be held to account for this deadly pollution | Aruna Chandrasekhar 8 Nov 4:20am Delhi’s toxic politicians must be held to account for this deadly pollution | Aruna Chandrasekhar
India’s climate movements are growing, but a unique political deadlock in the capital is creating a destructive inertiaFly out of Delhi and you can see it: a band of grey smog, so thick it blots out the sun. Tune in carefully and you’ll hear it, too: a subtle symphony of snorts, coughs and wheezing. To the untrained nose, Delhi’s air is a potent bouquet. High notes of charred biomass mingle with sulphurous remnants of Diwali bonfires, with base notes of subsidised diesel, burned plastic and coal.
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Tactical voting could swing this election – but we need to get it right | Zoe Williams 8 Nov 3:00am Tactical voting could swing this election – but we need to get it right | Zoe Williams
For people in marginal seats, there’s more data available than ever. But there’s little consensus on how to interpret it It is rare, in a first-past-the-post electoral system, to live in a constituency where you can vote exactly as you choose and know you’ve made an impact. In a safe seat – which is most of them – you’re either piling up votes needlessly for your candidate or barely making a dent in the majority of your opponent.
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When Jacob Rees-Mogg lets slip what he really believes, the choices become clear | Gary Younge 8 Nov 1:00am When Jacob Rees-Mogg lets slip what he really believes, the choices become clear | Gary Younge
His candour revealed a sense of innate superiority. A Labour MP’s comment about billionaires spoke to very different values In a recent interview, the Indian novelist and campaigner
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