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Monday, August 12, 2019
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s prison policy: a fantasy built on an invention | Editorial 12 Aug 1:30pm The Guardian view on Boris Johnson’s prison policy: a fantasy built on an invention | Editorial
Overcrowded prisons have encouraged the use of alternative penal policies. But building new prisons must not mean longer sentencingWhen politicians make summer law and order announcements involving big round numbers, it is time to count your spoons and prepare for an autumn election. Boris Johnson is a serial offender. In July he announced 20,000 more police. Now he says he will provide
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The Guardian view on AI-enhanced noses: something smells off | Editorial 12 Aug 1:25pm The Guardian view on AI-enhanced noses: something smells off | Editorial
The tyranny of snobbery is bad enough when it comes to taste. Let’s not add the tyranny of computers tooWe have long enhanced our frail senses with prostheses. But while human vision has been improved with lenses, touch with prosthetic limbs, and hearing with microphones, taste and smell have proved trickier to upgrade. But not impossible. News that
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Nigel Farage attacking Prince Harry is like the angry man ranting on a bus | Zoe Williams 12 Aug 1:24pm Nigel Farage attacking Prince Harry is like the angry man ranting on a bus | Zoe Williams
The Brexit party leader seeks attention by spouting ever greater nonsense. We should not be drawn in by his attempt to polariseThe sociologist
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Jeffrey Epstein was enabled – he did not operate in a vacuum | Suzanne Moore 12 Aug 12:56pm Jeffrey Epstein was enabled – he did not operate in a vacuum | Suzanne Moore
Even after going to jail, the millionaire sex offender was rehabilitated by the rich and famous I cannot say
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Boris Johnson talks tough but still hasn’t said what he’s doing to get a Brexit deal | Poppy Trowbridge 12 Aug 12:56pm Boris Johnson talks tough but still hasn’t said what he’s doing to get a Brexit deal | Poppy Trowbridge
Some say aggressive language with the EU shows real leadership. They’re wrong – capitalising on division is reckless
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Caroline Lucas’s female cabinet plan – divisive or visionary? | Editorial 12 Aug 12:26pm Caroline Lucas’s female cabinet plan – divisive or visionary? | Editorial
Readers respond to the Green MP’s proposal to 10 female politicians to form a cabinet of national unity to stop a no-deal BrexitI vote for the Green party, oppose Brexit, teach and research women’s history, and consider myself to be a feminist, but I do not agree with Caroline Lucas that assembling a cabinet of women is the means by which to solve the problems of Brexit (
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Christian Science, medicine and prayer | Letter 12 Aug 12:23pm Christian Science, medicine and prayer | Letter
Robin Harragin Hussey
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Oxbridge summer schools and the benefits of a degree | Letters 12 Aug 12:22pm Oxbridge summer schools and the benefits of a degree | Letters
Cambridge hosts less-advantaged students for free every summer, says
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Pets, like people, are deserving of grief | Brief letters 12 Aug 12:20pm Pets, like people, are deserving of grief | Brief letters
Dominic Cummings | Country diary | Marcel Berlins | Grieving | Climate crisisThe similarity between Dominic Cummings and the Doonesbury character Duke (
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With prospects in the gutter, who can blame millennials for turning to the stars? | Nell Frizzell 12 Aug 10:04am With prospects in the gutter, who can blame millennials for turning to the stars? | Nell Frizzell
When you have little control over your life, astrology – and the idea that our fates lie with the planets – can be deeply soothing
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Labour politicians should know better than to buy into Johnson’s ‘Boris’ shtick | Simon Hattenstone 12 Aug 9:35am Labour politicians should know better than to buy into Johnson’s ‘Boris’ shtick | Simon Hattenstone
Diane Abbott ought to loathe everything the prime minister stands for. Referring to him as ‘Boris’ suggests otherwiseIs Labour really prepared for government? I ask not because the party seems more concerned about grouse hunting and the
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Police in Hong Kong are brutally repressing democracy – and Britain is arming them | Andrew Smith 12 Aug 8:02am Police in Hong Kong are brutally repressing democracy – and Britain is arming them | Andrew Smith
The UK has been flouting its own rules to sell hi-tech weaponry to despotic regimes. It will only escalate under Boris JohnsonThis weekend there was a further intensification of
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Boris Johnson’s ‘crime fighting’ crusade is mere posturing | Simon Jenkins 12 Aug 6:11am Boris Johnson’s ‘crime fighting’ crusade is mere posturing | Simon Jenkins
The prime minister is vowing to tackle crime, even as it falls. It’s just a ruse to distract from the grim realities of BrexitThe most pressing issue facing Britain this month is not its falling crime rate. Yes, that reads falling crime rate – it has, indeed, been falling since 1995. The trouble is that it is not falling faster than Boris Johnson’s electoral prospects. Hence a month-long blitz of
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Do you know which 2020 Democratic forerunners are hawks, and which doves? | Tyler Bellstrom 12 Aug 6:00am Do you know which 2020 Democratic forerunners are hawks, and which doves? | Tyler Bellstrom
It’s time for a real debate on foreign policy among Democratic candidates so we know who stands for what
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Moscow’s peaceful protests enrage the Kremlin because its only tool is violence | Alexey Kovalev 12 Aug 4:11am Moscow’s peaceful protests enrage the Kremlin because its only tool is violence | Alexey Kovalev
Thousands are calling for opposition candidates to be allowed to run for office, without lifting a finger against the authoritiesOn a typical weekday, Moscow is a modern, rapidly developing metropolis, a far cry from its dark, litter-strewn, dilapidated self 20 years ago. Its formerly abandoned industrial parks are hipster havens serving artisanal cocoa milk lattes and avocado bruschetta to crowds that wouldn’t look out of place in east London or Brooklyn, while its public transport system is one of the cheapest and most efficient in the world. But by the weekend, downtown Moscow is a warzone. For several weeks, Muscovites have been peacefully
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Joseph Fiennes: ‘I’ve done my bit for society – I’ve illustrated the patheticness of misogyny’ 12 Aug 1:00am Joseph Fiennes: ‘I’ve done my bit for society – I’ve illustrated the patheticness of misogyny’
The star of The Handmaid’s Tale says he doesn’t like to equate Donald Trump’s politics with the show. But, he adds, sometimes you just have to point out the blazingly obvious …‘It’s alluded to in the novel … someday, something will happen to Fred. Quite soon.” In a neutral-looking cafe in central London, Joseph Fiennes is talking about the future of his role in The Handmaid’s Tale. “Why, though?” I plead with him. “Why does he have to die?” “It’s in the novel,” Fiennes explains very patiently. “He’s got to. Come on, there are some very angry women in red out there.” When The Handmaid’s Tale first appeared on our screens in 2017, it was a bit like having an anxiety dream about the new politics, your subconscious supplying the sharp contrasts and glorious Technicolor, the brutally formal sexual violence and the intricate dystopian detail. There was a watchful intelligence in all the performances – particularly Elisabeth Moss as June/Offred, Fiennes as Fred and Yvonne Strahovski as Serena, his wife – which was arresting, and left you vaguely unsettled for a long time after each episode.
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Putin began by embracing the west. Now, he wants revenge | Angus Roxburgh 12 Aug 1:00am Putin began by embracing the west. Now, he wants revenge | Angus Roxburgh
There’s little hope of an improvement in relations so long as the Russian president’s 20-year reign continues When Boris Yeltsin appointed Vladimir Putin prime minister on
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A rock, the sea and a battle for meaning | Ayelet Gundar-Goshen 12 Aug 1:00am A rock, the sea and a battle for meaning | Ayelet Gundar-Goshen
Near Tel Aviv beach in 1939, an almost mythical struggle took place between a desperate refugee and his saviour, my grandfather The rock rises out of the water about a kilometre from Tel Aviv beach. It is sharp and serrated, and only desperate hands – the hands of a drowning man – would dare to grasp it. From an outsider’s perspective, my perspective, the perspective of a woman standing on dry land, what happened on this rock is simply impossible. How on earth could it have supported not one but two men, for long, endless minutes, in a life or death battle? The year is 1939. The Mediterranean is deep and blue. Tel Aviv’s shores are under the control of the
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