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For a clear view of Trumpism, step outside the news cycle | Paul Chadwick 11 Aug 1:59pm For a clear view of Trumpism, step outside the news cycle | Paul Chadwick
Journalism must give voice to deep, expert analysis, particularly at moments of violence and recrimination In journalism, you can sometimes feel trapped in one of the smaller faster-spinning cogs of an information machine that never slows. Readers might experience this phenomenon through its palliatives – as, for example, a book by a leader writer or political editor who steps from frenetic years in the inner wheels on to a larger slower-moving part of the contraption and tries to make sense of its cycles. Or through a foreign correspondent who, after a long posting in which he or she has witnessed intensively the daily life of a country or region, offers a spacious survey of the people and place across time, trying to put recent events into history’s weave. The little agile cogs are necessary to the machine, but unless journalists seek out, and point the rest of us towards, those who labour on the bigger belts with less speed but often richer findings – the academics, the scientists, the public sector planners – we miss much.
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The Guardian view on stop and search: not a solution | Editorial 11 Aug 1:41pm The Guardian view on stop and search: not a solution | Editorial
The prime minister is positioning himself as tough on crime. The government should address the root causes insteadEight years ago this month, when Boris Johnson was mayor of London, the worst rioting Britain had seen in decades broke out in the capital, before spreading across the country. An estimated 20,000 people were drawn in, and 4,000 arrested. A subsequent study by the Guardian and the London School of Economics
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The Guardian view on climate crisis: what can we do? | Editorial 11 Aug 1:41pm The Guardian view on climate crisis: what can we do? | Editorial
Curbing meat and dairy consumption is critical to tackling global heating. But the issue must not be reduced to solely a question of personal choices
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Helter skelter will not make Church of England more inclusive | Letter 11 Aug 1:14pm Helter skelter will not make Church of England more inclusive | Letter
A truly inclusive move would be to allow Christians in long-term same-sex relationships to celebrate their weddings in church, says
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When you know you’re over the hill | Brief letters 11 Aug 1:13pm When you know you’re over the hill | Brief letters
Hatriotism | Brexit rapture | Sainthood for MPs | Ageing | Gender stereotypesThe term “hatriotism” was coined much earlier than the 1940s (
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Letter: Cecil Woolf was generous and sociable 11 Aug 12:09pm Letter: Cecil Woolf was generous and sociable
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/jun/26/cecil-woolf-obituary" title="">Cecil Woolf
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Is the Queen remainers’ secret weapon? Don’t bet on it | Matthew d’Ancona 11 Aug 11:47am Is the Queen remainers’ secret weapon? Don’t bet on it | Matthew d’Ancona
It’s much more likely that the courts will decide whether Boris Johnson can delay an election until after Brexit dayIn the preface to
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It’s not extreme to want to leave the EU on 31 October, come what may | Gisela Stuart 11 Aug 11:15am It’s not extreme to want to leave the EU on 31 October, come what may | Gisela Stuart
Politicians have grossly mishandled the Brexit process. Leaving, without a deal if necessary, is the only way to move forwardThe paths we have chosen in the past three years are ones no one would have anticipated. Neither, quite frankly, are they ones anyone would have wished for. Mistakes were made. But let’s be clear about one thing: the voters’ decision to leave the European Union and how politicians have gone about implementing the result are two distinct issues. Criticising the process of leaving is not the same as questioning the referendum outcome. Leave had a clear majority on a high turnout. Whichever way anyone voted, we can probably agree that the paralysis of indecision of this period has been corrosive and damaging. It has entrenched divisions and undermined confidence.
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I’m calling for a cabinet of women to stop a disastrous no-deal Brexit | Caroline Lucas 11 Aug 11:00am I’m calling for a cabinet of women to stop a disastrous no-deal Brexit | Caroline Lucas
Female cooperation was vital to the Paris climate agreement and bringing peace to Northern Ireland. We can stop no dealIt is hard to remember a moment in my lifetime when Britain faced a greater crisis. A coup led by a small group of rightwing libertarians is all but complete, as the Vote Leave team has been reassembled and
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Sexual misconduct complaints at Cambridge University | Letter 11 Aug 10:00am Sexual misconduct complaints at Cambridge University | Letter
The university has undermined student trust in its commitment to tackling sexual violence and safeguarding survivors, says
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Mr Johnson’s plot to subvert democracy is more dangerous than Brexit itself | Andrew Rawnsley 11 Aug 4:00am Mr Johnson’s plot to subvert democracy is more dangerous than Brexit itself | Andrew Rawnsley
In the absence of a formal constitution, British democracy is heavily reliant on politicians acting with honourOnly once since 1945 has a British prime minister been evicted as a result of a successful no-confidence vote in parliament. That was on
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I’ll crack black jokes about my own ills, but when it comes to my daughter… | Kevin McKenna 11 Aug 3:00am I’ll crack black jokes about my own ills, but when it comes to my daughter… | Kevin McKenna
The famed Glaswegian sense of humour quickly fades when a loved one faces the risk of death so young When faced with tribulation, Glaswegian males often feel compelled to reach for humour. This can seem inappropriate, brutal even, but it’s not intended as such. It’s a psychological reflex and one to which we have become genetically predisposed. I feel that much of this stems from decades of fighting adversity when death and sickness were the most persistent neighbourhood pests. To make light of them was to make a statement to your community that you wouldn’t be defeated by them. Besides, if these twin impostors were intent on becoming a part of the local fabric for a while, then best to apply some emotional cosmetics rather than make everyone else miserable. In time, all of them would be expected to take their turn.
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The Observer view on Britain’s blackout | Observer editorial 11 Aug 2:00am The Observer view on Britain’s blackout | Observer editorial
Last week’s widespread disruption illuminated the brittle nature of our infrastructureNearly a million people without power; parts of the rail network crippled; Newcastle airport plunged into darkness; a
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Brexit, Boeing and blistering weather put Tui on the road to trouble 11 Aug 2:00am Brexit, Boeing and blistering weather put Tui on the road to trouble
Beset by unfortunate events, the once‑serene travel operator is likely to reveal bad quarterly results this weekIn what feels like an increasingly volatile world, it wasn’t long ago that Tui was steering a smooth course through the ups and downs of the tourist trade. While its rival Thomas Cook
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Industrial exports are the engine of developed economies. Ours has stalled 11 Aug 2:00am Industrial exports are the engine of developed economies. Ours has stalled
Brexit-related recession looks ever more likely, and with their poor investment levels, UK firms are worse-placed than many to withstand the shockDowning Street must add the likelihood of a UK recession to its list of possible scenarios after official figures showed that
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Brexit was becoming a farce. Now it is turning into a coup | William Keegan 11 Aug 2:00am Brexit was becoming a farce. Now it is turning into a coup | William Keegan
Johnson may have come to power by legitimate means, but his language and actions in No 10 have been disturbing indeedI continue to recommend re-reading Joseph Heller’s great novel
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The Observer view on India’s aggression over Kashmir | Observer editorial 11 Aug 1:04am The Observer view on India’s aggression over Kashmir | Observer editorial
Narendra Modi’s high-handed action over the disputed territory is likely to revive conflict with PakistanThe crisis over Kashmir, triggered by the Indian government’s decision to impose direct rule from Delhi, has universal relevance. It says much about the times we live in and how we are ruled. Here is a semi-autonomous state, part of a federal union protected by a constitution, which has seen its
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For women like me, postponing the menopause would be a blessing | Sonia Sodha 11 Aug 1:02am For women like me, postponing the menopause would be a blessing | Sonia Sodha
Scientific advances that prolong fertility can only be a benefit to many would-be mothers Let us imagine for a moment that we lived in a world where male fertility dropped off a cliff by the time men hit their mid 40s, leaving a group of men who wanted to have children but couldn’t. When would science have produced a fix? I am going to hazard a guess that it would have been quite some time ago. But it has taken until 2019 for a fledgling treatment to delay the menopause by up to 20 years to be offered to women, even though the idea has been around for
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Boris Johnson has a problem with women… and it’s not the one you think | Barbara Ellen 11 Aug 1:00am Boris Johnson has a problem with women… and it’s not the one you think | Barbara Ellen
Unfortunately for him they can see through the bluster to the fragile ego of a toddlerBoris Johnson has a woman problem. No, not the rascally lady-killer stuff he probably loves people talking about. This problem is that female voters don’t like him. A
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The good old days? Look deeper and the myth of ideal communities fades | Jon Lawrence 11 Aug 1:00am The good old days? Look deeper and the myth of ideal communities fades | Jon Lawrence
As studies of kinship show, many people were glad to escape the strains of close-knit living In the countdown to a possible no-deal exit from the EU, there are some who cling to an optimistic narrative that our community spirit will get us through. Indeed, recent experiences in
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May I have a word about… our love affair with the French language | Jonathan Bouquet 11 Aug 1:00am May I have a word about… our love affair with the French language | Jonathan Bouquet
We Brits are happy to assimilate French words, so why do they find it so hard to reciprocate? There’s nothing quite so guffaw-making to an Anglo-Saxon sensibility in need of its funny bone being tickled than a French worthy having a fit of the vapours. Last week didn’t disappoint. And all over the delightful word “love”. Apparently, French online advertisers prefer it to “
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There are reasons to be cheerful. These are the dying days of a rancid old order | Will Hutton 11 Aug 12:59am There are reasons to be cheerful. These are the dying days of a rancid old order | Will Hutton
In the UK and the US, the political wind will soon change in favour of those demanding good governmentDon’t despair. We may be living through an attempted rightwing revolution, but its foundations are rotten. There may be a counter-revolution, as there is after every revolution, and it will be built on much firmer ground. The charlatans may be in control in both Britain and the US, but their time is limited. Their programmes are self-defeating and destructive and they do not speak to the dynamic and increasingly ascendant forces in both our societies. What has happened in the US after the atrocities in
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No 10 should not seek to divide ‘the people’ and their politicians 11 Aug 12:59am No 10 should not seek to divide ‘the people’ and their politicians
Manipulative and divisive language may succeed in the short term but poses a threat to democracyI was glad to see the new leader of the Commons, Jacob Rees-Mogg,
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Beleaguered? Not English National Opera | Letters 11 Aug 12:59am Beleaguered? Not English National Opera | Letters
ENO has just made a substantial profit, the biggest in almost a decade, which we have reinvested in more opera and more outreachDalya Alberge described English National Opera as “beleaguered” (“
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