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Crippled by the state: the impact of austerity on disabled people – podcast 10 Jun 10:00pm Crippled by the state: the impact of austerity on disabled people – podcast
Guardian columnist Frances Ryan, who is disabled, has written about inequality and disability rights for decades. She discusses the impact that austerity has had on those most in need. And: Helen Davidson on the Hong Kong protests In 1995, the Disability Discrimination Act was passed, making it unlawful to discriminate against disabled people in connection with employment. It was a landmark moment for disability rights, says the Guardian’s
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Behold, the Tory leadership candidates: all in denial, all in dreamland | Polly Toynbee 10 Jun 2:14pm Behold, the Tory leadership candidates: all in denial, all in dreamland | Polly Toynbee
The final 10 seem oblivious of the scale of our national catastrophe, from schools to hospitals to homelessness. Wasn’t this once the “competent party”?Imagine some Rip Van Winkle, in a coma since 2010, suddenly wakes to look around and see what’s happening as the Tories choose our next prime minister. He’s an acute social observer, so he starts to check the facts of this decade and is shocked by what he finds.Wherever he looks, whatever he checks, he finds the scars of austerity are all around – and he assumes that’s what the candidates will confront. Talking to staff from his hospital bed he hears of 100,000 unfilled vacancies for over-stressed NHS staff, with 2 million more people on hospital waiting lists. What kind of aftercare will he get, he asks? Not much, they say, with
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The Guardian view on digital injustice: when computers make things worse | Editorial 10 Jun 1:32pm The Guardian view on digital injustice: when computers make things worse | Editorial
Software makes bigger mistakes and faster than humans can. It should not be trusted with vital decisionsThe news that the Home Office is
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The Guardian view on identities in conflict: dealing with differences | Editorial 10 Jun 1:31pm The Guardian view on identities in conflict: dealing with differences | Editorial
Recent attacks on lesbians provide shocking proof of rising intolerance, fuelled by populists and hostile public discourseQuestions of identity and belief go to the heart of who we are. Important to us individually, they also determine the shape of our lives – and confer advantages and disadvantages. Equalities legislation in the UK outlaws discrimination by employers and service providers on grounds of nine protected characteristics. These include sexual orientation, reassigned gender, race, sex and religion. Despite this, prejudice based on these factors has not been eradicated. On the contrary, the evidence is that bigotry’s role in aggravating offence is on the rise. Similar trends are
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Why are male playwrights rushing to write about Harvey Weinstein? | Suzanne Moore 10 Jun 1:30pm Why are male playwrights rushing to write about Harvey Weinstein? | Suzanne Moore
David Mamet has written some great stuff in his time – but rape and harassment are not some kind of interesting philosophical exercise
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Martin Rowson on the Tory leadership race starting – cartoon 10 Jun 1:26pm Martin Rowson on the Tory leadership race starting – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/jun/10/martin-rowson-on-the-tory-leadership-race-starting-cartoon">Continue reading...
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Tackling child deaths and coercive control | Letters 10 Jun 12:47pm Tackling child deaths and coercive control | Letters
Readers respond to reports on the murders of two children in Northamptonshire and to news that Sally Challen, jailed for life for killing her husband after decades of emotional abuse, has walked free from court after a judge announced she would not face a retrialI agree with your
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Standing in support of UCL’s provost Michael Arthur | Letter 10 Jun 12:47pm Standing in support of UCL’s provost Michael Arthur | Letter
Michael Arthur can take much credit for UCL rising to become one of the best universities in the world, say eleven high-ranking UCL academics in a letter to the GuardianWe are writing to express our deep disappointment at the unwarranted smearing of the work and achievements of UCL provost Michael Arthur in Peter Wilby’s recent profile (
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Forget Oxford. Let’s hear it for St Andrews | Brief letters 10 Jun 12:46pm Forget Oxford. Let’s hear it for St Andrews | Brief letters
St Andrews | Melissa Harrison | Peterborough byelection | Mind games | Tory leadership contestThe front-page headline “
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These Tory leadership rivals are delusional – and drugs have nothing to do with it | Suzanne Moore 10 Jun 11:06am These Tory leadership rivals are delusional – and drugs have nothing to do with it | Suzanne Moore
The drugs that the Environment secretary and his colleagues are so terribly apologetic about having taken seem not to have worked at all
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Extinction Rebellion’s tactics are working. It has pierced the bubble of denial | Matthew Todd 10 Jun 9:36am Extinction Rebellion’s tactics are working. It has pierced the bubble of denial | Matthew Todd
By stating the terrible truth about the climate crisis it has created authentic hope for the first timeExtinction Rebellion is working. A
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Do these homophobic attacks mean we’ll again have to hide our same-sex relationships? | Amelia Abraham 10 Jun 8:24am Do these homophobic attacks mean we’ll again have to hide our same-sex relationships? | Amelia Abraham
I like to hold hands with my girlfriend in public. But now we know it’s still not safe to do this“Not a safe space.” This is what my girlfriend half-jokingly whispers at me when I reach for her hand if we’re in a place where she doesn’t feel comfortable with a public display of affection. She says it to lighten the situation, which is in reality a depressing one, but also because the threat of violence doesn’t feel totally real to us. We have never been physically attacked because of our sexuality. Being middle class, white and feminine presenting in London puts us in a relative bubble of safety and privilege. Yet where and when we can hold hands, or whether we should do it at all, is something we constantly have to negotiate. On the one hand I feel a duty to utilise my safety and privilege to be publicly out and proud as a gay woman – to not shy away from public displays of affection. But on the other, I understand the complicated conversations and situations this can lead to. “If we hold hands in public it will normalise it,” I argued to one ex, who hated public displays of affection – mostly, she admitted, because of gay shame. “Why is the onus on us to normalise same-sex displays of affection?” she responded. To which I would wonder: “Well … who else is going to do it?”
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The UK should stop obsessing over GDP. Wellbeing is more telling | Dan Button 10 Jun 6:33am The UK should stop obsessing over GDP. Wellbeing is more telling | Dan Button
New Zealand has begun measuring national growth in a more nuanced way. Britain should follow its lead This morning, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) released the latest set of
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It’s ridiculous that Michael Gove’s drug use could prevent him becoming Tory leader | Simon Jenkins 10 Jun 5:31am It’s ridiculous that Michael Gove’s drug use could prevent him becoming Tory leader | Simon Jenkins
He is by far the most competent candidate. This hysteria is further proof that UK drug laws are in desperate need of reform Britain’s Conservative party is having a nervous breakdown. It is turning on the most competent candidate for its leadership, Michael Gove,
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Chernobyl is still horrifyingly relevant – the lessons have not been learned | Natalia Antonova 10 Jun 4:30am Chernobyl is still horrifyingly relevant – the lessons have not been learned | Natalia Antonova
Watching the Chernobyl TV drama made me realise that the lies and political expediency that led to the tragedy still occurI was two years old and living in Kyiv when the
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The CPS is failing rape victims. That’s why we’re taking legal action | Rachel Krys 10 Jun 3:00am The CPS is failing rape victims. That’s why we’re taking legal action | Rachel Krys
Reported rapes have soared, but cases reaching court have plummeted. Our coalition of women’s groups won’t stand for it
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Vince Cable: ‘The Tories have made a Horlicks of Brexit’ 10 Jun 1:00am Vince Cable: ‘The Tories have made a Horlicks of Brexit’
As he prepares to stand down as leader of the Lib Dems, the veteran MP talks about past coalitions, possible alliances – and ballroom dancingVince Cable, the other party leader stepping down this summer, looks like a man ready to hand over. In the Twickenham home he has lived in for 45 years, a table is covered with piles of notes and clippings from the Financial Times – “horizontal filing,” he calls it – research for a new book he is working on. It is a study of how major politicians “have changed the way we do economics”, from Alexander Hamilton to Margaret Thatcher and, although he has not made a final decision on this – because who knows how the story will end? – Donald Trump. He will soon have more time for that project. Unlike Theresa May, the 76-year-old leader of the Liberal Democrats did not have to be dragged from politics’ front line. It was his decision. But what a way to go. A few months ago, the Lib Dems were down to just 11 MPs. It seemed that theirs was a permanently ruined brand, rendered toxic by five years in coalition with David Cameron’s Tories. The decline was painfully obvious every Wednesday lunchtime, when Cable would have to wait the best part of 45 minutes to be called at Prime Minister’s Questions, long after the leaders of Labour and the Scottish National Party and a string of backbenchers. He and his party were a political afterthought.Any centrist energy was focused on the Independent Group, the breakaway of Labour and Conservative MPs who looked set to gobble up the Lib Dem vote and perhaps the party itself.
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Notre Dame is becoming a symbol of Macron’s gung-ho presidency | Pauline Bock 10 Jun 1:00am Notre Dame is becoming a symbol of Macron’s gung-ho presidency | Pauline Bock
The innovation-obsessed president is at odds with most French people who would like a faithful restoration of the cathedralTo restore or to innovate? Ever since that terrible blaze
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Gerraway with accentism – I’m proud to speak Yorkshire | Katie Edwards 10 Jun 1:00am Gerraway with accentism – I’m proud to speak Yorkshire | Katie Edwards
Despite attempts to stamp it out at school and in the workplace, my dialect is alive, kicking and bloody gorgeousHopefully you haven’t subjected yourself to Still Open All Hours, the
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