Back Opinion Sunday, June 9, 2019
Search Sections 9 Jun
Close
Advertisement
The Guardian view on facial recognition: a danger to democracy | Editorial 9 Jun 1:30pm The Guardian view on facial recognition: a danger to democracy | Editorial
We don’t want our faces stored in vast databases, whether these are public or privateThe pressure group Liberty
 Like Reply
Teaching children about LGBT issues is not brainwashing – it equips them for life | Russell Hobby 9 Jun 1:27pm Teaching children about LGBT issues is not brainwashing – it equips them for life | Russell Hobby
Parents’ rights do not trump all. Teachers need the support of the government on this highly charged issueLast week, a high court injunction
 Like Reply
The Guardian view on failures to protect children: the buck stops where? | Editorial 9 Jun 1:25pm The Guardian view on failures to protect children: the buck stops where? | Editorial
Two reports about the circumstances surrounding the murders of two children in Northamptonshire beg as many questions as they answerParents are not the only ones responsible for their children. Our social responsibility is at its greatest when parents are unable to protect their families – or, worse, are the threat. The
 Like Reply
When Tory outsourcing and cuts end in fatal social services errors | Letters 9 Jun 1:01pm When Tory outsourcing and cuts end in fatal social services errors | Letters
Chaotic children’s services are the result of an ideologically driven commitment to outsourcing and austerity, says
 Like Reply
Fighting to protect women at work | Letters 9 Jun 12:58pm Fighting to protect women at work | Letters
Signatories including
 Like Reply
Why is Feast so hot on chilli peppers? 9 Jun 12:57pm Why is Feast so hot on chilli peppers?
Does the Guardian’s Feast section have a chillis-with-everything agenda?
 Like Reply
The Booker prize and the literary league tables | Letters 9 Jun 12:56pm The Booker prize and the literary league tables | Letters
Booker Prize Foundation literary director
 Like Reply
Tempted to pray for a less pitiful pension | Brief letters 9 Jun 12:50pm Tempted to pray for a less pitiful pension | Brief letters
Veterans’ pensions | Lord’s Prayer | Sherry refills | Shared birthdays | Mickey MouseIt is not my wish to denigrate the sacrifices made for the nation in the second world war, but if these brave veterans are so valued by the government, why are they among the recipients of the poorest pensions in Europe? Compared to Germany they are insulting.
 Like Reply
What kind of country have we become? Try asking a disabled person | Frances Ryan 9 Jun 11:55am What kind of country have we become? Try asking a disabled person | Frances Ryan
The progress of the 1990s has been brutally rolled back. For the most vulnerable, there is no meaningful safety net any moreI grew up in a Britain that said life would be full of promise for disabled people like me. We might not have conquered the media and corridors of power, but – unlike generations before me – by the 1990s we were no longer hidden from sight. Grim words such as “crippled” and “retarded” were no longer part of everyday speech. Charity tins that until recently symbolised the scraps handed out to us were now accompanied by concrete rights – from the groundbreaking disability civil rights law of my childhood to the welfare state’s tailor-made benefits and services for disabled people. Progress, though, is rarely as permanent as it appears. Nearly 20 years later, in the spring of 2013, I watched as David Cameron’s coalition government launched what would become an unprecedented assault on disabled people: from the bedroom tax to the rollout of “fit for work tests”, and the
 Like Reply
Hard Brexit is the drug the Tories need to wean themselves off | Matthew d’Ancona 9 Jun 11:28am Hard Brexit is the drug the Tories need to wean themselves off | Matthew d’Ancona
The notion that our 27 EU partners will suddenly yield to a tough new PM is a special example of magical thinkingImagine my surprise to learn in the Daily Mail on Sunday that I had been a pupil at Eton. And not just that: I was among the “contemporaries of David Cameron”. As Dean Martin sang first and best: how lucky can one guy be? Sadly, this is all nonsense. No fancy waistcoats or winged collars for me. I did my A-levels in Catford, not Slough. True, I have been to Eton a few times over the years. But I never inhaled. The context of this journalistic schoolboy error (in every sense) was an article about Michael Gove’s allegedly louche lifestyle in his youth – inspired by his admission on Saturday that he “took drugs on several occasions at social events more than 20 years ago”.
 Like Reply
Letter: Henry Graham obituary 9 Jun 11:20am Letter: Henry Graham obituary
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/mar/20/henry-graham-obituary" title="">Henry Graham
 Like Reply
Pesticide report ‘was misrepresented’ | Letter 9 Jun 10:47am Pesticide report ‘was misrepresented’ | Letter
Three scientific advisers to the European commission take issue with the Guardian’s account of their recommendations concerning pesticidesWe write as chief scientific advisors to the European commission, authors of the
 Like Reply
Arts institutions: cut your ties with BP | Farhana Yamin 9 Jun 10:00am Arts institutions: cut your ties with BP | Farhana Yamin
We at Extinction Rebellion call for the National Portrait Gallery and Royal Opera House to stop enabling this agent of climate breakdownWhen Extinction Rebellion activists
 Like Reply
Why? The most difficult question for journalists to answer 9 Jun 9:38am Why? The most difficult question for journalists to answer
From the serious to the faintly ridiculous, here’s my attempt to explain three puzzling issues Journalists learn from their first day in the trade that their articles should include the five Ws: who, what, where, when and why. The first four are straightforward enough, objective truths if you like. The fifth, however, often travels into subjective territory. It is frustrated by obfuscation and therefore results in speculation. Sometimes, despite our best efforts, it simply goes unanswered. Consider three examples. Why were journalists Trevor Birney and Barry McCaffrey arrested? Why did the BBC’s otherwise excellent documentary on Margaret Thatcher omit one of the defining moments in her reign as prime minister? Why do broadcasters go on using vox pops?
 Like Reply
Tea with the Trumps – a red leicester nightmare | Stewart Lee 9 Jun 5:00am Tea with the Trumps – a red leicester nightmare | Stewart Lee
The royal family has been forced to dine on the wrong side of history’s table Last Monday I attended the worst family dinner I have ever experienced. It honoured a visiting American with whom we were barely acquainted, but were somehow obliged to entertain. A few years previously our guest had suggested on a radio show that, despite thinking she was “crazy”, he could have “nailed” my late mother. She feared he was “stalking” her. Our guest had then clarified that he would only have had sex with my mother if she had an Aids test, perhaps because she had shaken hands with Aids sufferers.
 Like Reply
If the magisterial 63 Up teaches us anything, it’s that we are sustained by love | Tim Adams 9 Jun 4:00am If the magisterial 63 Up teaches us anything, it’s that we are sustained by love | Tim Adams
The latest episodes in Michael Apted’s groundbreaking series revealed the importance of the right relationshipsOn Friday night my wife, Lisa, and I watched the three episodes of
 Like Reply
If we really want change, we have to face reality | Rory Stewart 9 Jun 4:00am If we really want change, we have to face reality | Rory Stewart
Conservatives can’t pretend we can get a different Brexit deal, or slash taxes. We have to do what is practical and possibleMy father, who was wounded on the Normandy beaches, often repeated Aristotle’s line that true courage was the middle point between cowardice and foolhardiness. He insisted that it came from the ability to face reality. I came to the same conclusion in a different way. Having followed in my father’s footsteps as a public servant in Indonesia, the Balkans, Iraq, and Afghanistan, my life was changed not through my work but through the two years I spent walking across Asia, staying in over 500 village houses. It was there that I noticed most starkly the grotesque gap between the rhetoric of governments and the reality on the ground.
 Like Reply
Our archaic first-past-the-post system is alarmingly unfit for a multi-party age | Andrew Rawnsley 9 Jun 3:00am Our archaic first-past-the-post system is alarmingly unfit for a multi-party age | Andrew Rawnsley
Britain ruled by wildly unrepresentative governments is one scary version of our futureLabour’s tight win in
 Like Reply
The Observer view on the crisis in Sudan | Observer editorial 9 Jun 2:00am The Observer view on the crisis in Sudan | Observer editorial
The world must not look away after the brutal crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Khartoum In Omdurman, just below the confluence of the Blue Nile and White Nile, stands a large, shack-like structure that serves as a popular restaurant. The building’s dusty car park provides a memorable vantage point from which to gaze down upon Africa’s mightiest river. Yet last week, any casual onlooker might have preferred to look away – for there was blood in the water. Following the security forces’ brutal crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators in Khartoum on Monday, the bodies of dozens of murdered victims – the opposition says
 Like Reply
These D-day heroes evoked a glorious shared purpose. It’s now under threat | Will Hutton 9 Jun 2:00am These D-day heroes evoked a glorious shared purpose. It’s now under threat | Will Hutton
The anniversary events were in stark contrast to the totalitarian spirit again polluting politics, this time across our own landIt was well done, in the end; in parts, beautifully done. In an era of anniversaries, there was never a chance that the 75th anniversary of the
 Like Reply
Who better than men to rule on the delicate subject of surrogacy? | Catherine Bennett 9 Jun 1:59am Who better than men to rule on the delicate subject of surrogacy? | Catherine Bennett
The rights and welfare of surrogate mothers are being ignored by the Law CommissionLater in her career, Baroness Warnock, architect of the UK’s fertility legislation, apologised for having “got surrogacy wrong all those years ago”. The 1984
 Like Reply
How rationing could save the world | Letters 9 Jun 1:00am How rationing could save the world | Letters
It worked during the war, so why shouldn’t the ‘all in it together’ approach work to combat the climate crisis?It was great to see Sonia Sodha highlighting the potential unfairness of carbon taxes and promoting the possibility of rationing as an alternative policy to combat climate change (“
 Like Reply
Michael Gove got high but his party champions a futile war on drugs | Stephen Bush 9 Jun 1:00am Michael Gove got high but his party champions a futile war on drugs | Stephen Bush
Our would-be prime ministers confess all, but countless lives are ruined by their laws There are two public settings in which you might expect someone to freely admit to taking illegal drugs. The first is an ex-con explaining why they ended up in prison and can now only find employment that is insecure, poorly paid or in the criminal economy. The second, it turns out, is in the Conservative leadership election. Jeremy Hunt, the foreign secretary, has admitted to drinking
 Like Reply
Natalie McGarry deserved to be punished but did we really have to lock her up? | Kevin McKenna 9 Jun 1:00am Natalie McGarry deserved to be punished but did we really have to lock her up? | Kevin McKenna
The imprisonment of the ex-MP was greeted with howls of glee that ignored her plight and that of others like herSocial media is a place to be avoided when it’s time for a public execution. At these times, it becomes something savage, as an assortment of semi-literate grotesques gather to yell insults and throw eggs. On Thursday, it was
 Like Reply
May I have a word about… the brave new world of banking and fintech | Jonathan Bouquet 9 Jun 1:00am May I have a word about… the brave new world of banking and fintech | Jonathan Bouquet
Long gone are the days when bankers’ communiques were short and to the point… In olden days, communication from the bank was often along the lines of: “Dear sir, I’m more than distressed by the state of your current account. Could we please revert to the situation whereby you bank with us, rather than vice versa?” Nothing so simple in the complex world of banking and fintech. Consider
 Like Reply
The Observer view: Ford is a grim portent of the future for our industries | Observer editorial 9 Jun 1:00am The Observer view: Ford is a grim portent of the future for our industries | Observer editorial
Why would anyone invest in the UK when tariffs and border delays could cause chaos?The car industry is in the early stages of a massive shakeout and the evidence is that Britain will be one of the biggest losers. Ford’s
 Like Reply
On the top

Date settings

Today is Friday, July 19, 2019

+ 1 -
+ 1 -
+ 2016 -

Close

By using our website, you agree to the use of cookies as described in our cookie policy.

Accept