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The Venezuela uprising: the story so far – podcast 13 May 10:00pm The Venezuela uprising: the story so far – podcast
Nicolás Maduro appeared on the brink of being forced from power in an uprising plotted by the opposition leader, Juan Guaidó. But key figures stayed loyal, allowing the president to begin reprisals. Tom Phillips in Caracas has watched it play out. Plus: Owen Jones on public schools and who gets to go to Britain’s elite universities Juan Guaidó described his
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The Guardian view on private jails: flaws in the system | Editorial 13 May 1:40pm The Guardian view on private jails: flaws in the system | Editorial
English and Welsh prisons are disastrously overcrowded, and new research suggests privatisation may be making a bad situation worseIt should not be possible to make profits out of prisons. The power to lock people up, depriving them of their liberty and separating them from their families, is a responsibility that should be the preserve of the state. Yet a pro-market ideology has seen private companies
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The Guardian’s view on free speech online: a messy compromise | Editorial 13 May 1:40pm The Guardian’s view on free speech online: a messy compromise | Editorial
Rightwing extremists are now being deprived of their income stream from YouTube advertisements. Not to do so would be worseAlphabet, the company that owns Google and YouTube, has quietly become one of the most powerful gatekeepers of permitted speech on the planet, along with Facebook and – within China – the Chinese government. This isn’t entirely a bad thing. Everyone agrees there are some things that have no place online, although different cultures and different countries have varying and often entirely incompatible rules about permissible speech. But an entirely uncensored internet would be a disaster for society, as everyone now acknowledges. Governments want their rules enforced, and the advertising businesses that have become the giants of social media are the players who can enforce them. If Google, Facebook, and Twitter all
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Martin Rowson on Corbyn and a second Brexit referendum – cartoon 13 May 1:00pm Martin Rowson on Corbyn and a second Brexit referendum – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/may/13/martin-rowson-on-corbyn-and-a-second-brexit-referendum-cartoon">Continue reading...
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Jeremy Corbyn has to get off the fence for Labour to see off the Faragists | Polly Toynbee 13 May 1:00pm Jeremy Corbyn has to get off the fence for Labour to see off the Faragists | Polly Toynbee
If the party doesn’t get behind remain, its voters will be counted among the Brexiters. That would be a mortal errorLabour remainers are in a dilemma. Wherever I go I find lifelong Labour voters – indeed (whisper it) even some elected Labour councillors and probably an occasional MP – agonising over their European election vote in 10 days’ time. In the privacy of the polling booth no one will ever know, with both Momentum-leaners and non-Momentumites united in the same quandary. This election is all about Europe and our place in the world, nothing else, not a dry run for a general election. Results will have only one meaning: how many voted remain and how many voted leave? This will tell if all the opinion polls are right. Not one has shown a leave lead for more than two years, with remain
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Why Daisy May Cooper in a bin bag was the best-dressed person at the Baftas | Suzanne Moore 13 May 12:45pm Why Daisy May Cooper in a bin bag was the best-dressed person at the Baftas | Suzanne Moore
The star of This Country wore a genuinely rubbish homemade frock to the TV awards ceremony on Sunday – and stole the show ‘Of course, women are quite fashionable at the moment,” Steve Coogan quipped at the Baftas. It is true:
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A sex strike is not enough: women need to down tools completely | Suzanne Moore 13 May 12:31pm A sex strike is not enough: women need to down tools completely | Suzanne Moore
The idea proposed last week by Alyssa Milano won’t cut it. To assert their worth, women should refuse to fulfil the unpaid labour expected by society Sex is the very least of our concerns, the last thing that has to be crossed off the to-do list. Or so I have heard from harassed women in the school playground. Yet sex is the very meaning of life, the cement that glues together every relationship, half our culture also tells us, while the remainder portrays women as a series of orifices to be penetrated. Perhaps sex is all and none of these things.
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Bring back the joy of learning languages | Letters 13 May 11:58am Bring back the joy of learning languages | Letters
Readers respond after the exams regulator Ofqual is accused of ‘killing off’ modern languages by marking them too harshlyLanguages teachers have known for a long time that GCSE and A-level exams have been subject to harder marking criteria than other subjects. They’ve also known that students find languages more difficult than most other subjects they study. So your report won’t come as a surprise to them (
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When West Indies stars ruled in the Lancashire League | Brief letters 13 May 11:56am When West Indies stars ruled in the Lancashire League | Brief letters
Seymour Nurse | One-way bus fares | Barber’s search fee | Hawthorn blossomReading the
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We’re deluged with images of ‘beauty’. No wonder so many of us feel so bad | Dawn Foster 13 May 11:33am We’re deluged with images of ‘beauty’. No wonder so many of us feel so bad | Dawn Foster
Adverts constantly bombard us on social media, undermining our self-confidence. We know the cost – this can’t continueIn the early 2000s, the internet was a key component of my teenage life: many evenings we annoyed my friends’ parents by hogging the phone line and spending hours talking to schoolmates on MSN Messenger. But during the day, we didn’t use the internet: we had clunky phones that could only call and text. So I wasn’t bombarded 24/7 with images of purportedly perfect-looking women. Few of us bothered with teen magazines bar reading the problem pages. One company has bombarded me with adverts offering interest-fee credit for several procedures
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Why is Nigel Farage all over the airwaves while my party barely gets a look-in? | Catherine Mayer 13 May 8:55am Why is Nigel Farage all over the airwaves while my party barely gets a look-in? | Catherine Mayer
Media codes meant to ensure fair elections leave the Women’s Equality party battling for coverage others get on a plateThis morning I woke up wondering if lightning ever struck twice – and hoping that it did. In April 2016, as my Icelandair flight made its final descent into Heathrow, a fireball engulfed the plane. By the time I reached arrivals, news organisations were on the phone asking for eyewitness testimonies. I had little to say about my split-second inside a giant firework, but the platform gave me an opportunity to speak about something else. “What did you think when the lightning hit?” asked one interviewer after another. My responses were the same: “I thought, ‘I can’t die – I have to vote for the Women’s Equality party (WE) next week.’” The party I had co-founded months earlier was in the closing stages of its first election campaigns. Our biggest task, as a new party, was to let people know we existed. WE went on to pick up more than 350,000 votes. Now I am fighting another campaign, this time as WE’s lead candidate in London for the European elections. If you weren’t aware of my candidacy, or that we’ve just published
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The party leaders have failed on Brexit. The UK’s fate is now in MPs’ hands | Simon Jenkins 13 May 6:52am The party leaders have failed on Brexit. The UK’s fate is now in MPs’ hands | Simon Jenkins
Last time round the Commons funked it. Now it must work across party lines to agree on a deal – and deliver itAn attempt to find a
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Tommy Robinson wants to exploit abuse victims. We won’t let him | Sarah Green 13 May 5:00am Tommy Robinson wants to exploit abuse victims. We won’t let him | Sarah Green
The anti-Islam activist is feigning concern for women to stoke hatred – he can keep his money
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North-east England is not ablaze with Brexit – it’s just a symbol | Phil McDuff 13 May 4:00am North-east England is not ablaze with Brexit – it’s just a symbol | Phil McDuff
Brexit stands in for hopes and fears. European elections bring it down to the level of MEPs and trade policy, and few people careGiven the north-east of England’s reputation as Brexit Central, you’d expect the upcoming EU elections to be particularly fraught round here. Normally EU elections are almost invisible affairs, but this one should be different, right? Brexit has set Westminster ablaze, constitutional crises loom, Nigel Farage has started another party. MEPs clearly matter now, don’t they? That’s what Ukip thought, too. Party leader Gerard Batten rode his purple bus up Middlesbrough’s Linthorpe Road to kick off Ukip’s official EU election campaign. I saw that news and thought: “Wait, what happened? How didn’t I notice that?”
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Is India the frontline in big tech’s assault on democracy? | John Harris 13 May 1:00am Is India the frontline in big tech’s assault on democracy? | John Harris
Social media such as WhatsApp may enable voters, but encrypted messaging polarises them and blocks public scrutinyIn 10 days’ time, two political dramas will reach their denouement, thanks to the votes of a combined total of about 1.3 billion people. At the heart of both will be a mess of questions about democracy in the online age, and how – or even if – we can act to preserve it. Elections to the European parliament will begin on 23 May, and offer an illuminating test of the rightwing populism that has swept across the continent. In the UK, they will mark the decisive arrival of Nigel Farage’s Brexit party, whose
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From Years and Years to Bird Box: why we turn to dystopian dramas in a crisis | Fiona Sturges 13 May 1:00am From Years and Years to Bird Box: why we turn to dystopian dramas in a crisis | Fiona Sturges
The vogue for bleak TV seems to reflect our anxiety over troubled times – yet we keep watchingIn Years and Years, the six-part BBC drama series from the writer Russell T Davies that starts this week, Daniel (Russell Tovey) cradles his newborn nephew and says: “I don’t think I could have a kid in a world like this … Because if it’s this bad now, what’s it going to be like [for him] in 30 years’ time, 10 years, five years?” It would be tempting to write Daniel off as a catastrophist except that, as the series shifts forward in time, he and his family are forced to navigate an increasingly divided country in which technology is wreaking havoc, the economy is collapsing and war in Europe is bringing record numbers of refugees to British shores. If you think we’ve got problems now, Davies seems to warn us, you ain’t seen nothing yet.
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