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Monday, April 15, 2019
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The Guardian view on the Notre Dame fire: we share France’s terrible loss 15 Apr 3:40pm The Guardian view on the Notre Dame fire: we share France’s terrible loss
One of the great symbols of France has suffered terrible fire damage. The whole of Europe is scarred too
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Why won’t the remain parties work together for the EU elections? | Polly Toynbee 15 Apr 2:41pm Why won’t the remain parties work together for the EU elections? | Polly Toynbee
If the Lib Dems, Greens and Change UK formed a single pro-Europe grouping they’d do far betterEuropean elections take place on 23 May, almost certainly. For this great chance to summon the pro-EU, pro-referendum vote, give thanks from the bottom of our hearts to the unbelievably useful idiots of the European Research Group hard core. Special thanks to Mark Francois, idiot-in-chief, to Peter Bone, Steve Baker and all the other refuseniks, including our friends the doughty DUP.
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The Guardian view on the Catholic church: trouble ahead | Editorial 15 Apr 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Catholic church: trouble ahead | Editorial
The rightwing assault on Pope Francis continues. But his opponents are unlikely to succeedJesus entered Jerusalem a week before his death as if he were the messiah, pushing through adoring crowds who sang and waved palm fronds – at least that’s what the story says. By this criterion at least, Pope Francis is further from Jesus than most popes have been. He entered Holy Week this year battered by assaults from the right wing of the American church, the Italian government, and even his immediate predecessor, the former pope Benedict XVI, who published a
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The Guardian view on Tiger Woods’ return: golf needed some good news | Editorial 15 Apr 1:25pm The Guardian view on Tiger Woods’ return: golf needed some good news | Editorial
A new book shows that the American president cheats and lies on the golf course. On Sunday the game got its honour back It helps to enjoy golf, of course. But, in spite of the sport’s traducers, lots of people of all kinds do just that. Even those who don’t, though, could surely scarce forbear to cheer on Sunday as Tiger Woods
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All hail Michelle Obama: like Beyoncé, she has fully upstaged her husband | Yomi Adegoke 15 Apr 1:06pm All hail Michelle Obama: like Beyoncé, she has fully upstaged her husband | Yomi Adegoke
Genuine, progressive and stabilising, Obama is both a relic of a yearned-for past and signifier of a desired future
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Martin Rowson on Theresa May and her tenure at No 10 – cartoon 15 Apr 1:06pm Martin Rowson on Theresa May and her tenure at No 10 – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/apr/15/martin-rowson-on-theresa-may-and-her-tenure-at-no-10-cartoon">Continue reading...
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David Lammy was right to name and shame the ERG | Suzanne Moore 15 Apr 12:53pm David Lammy was right to name and shame the ERG | Suzanne Moore
The Labour MP was challenged over his forthright criticism of the Tory group, but let us just look at the evidence …They really don’t like it up ’em, do they? The horrific mutation of Eton, ego and the European Research Group (ERG) that produces the likes of Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg must not be called nasty names. Oh, no. It has been suggested that the Labour MP David Lammy went too far on The Andrew Marr Show when he said that comparing the ERG – a group of Tory MPs that supports a hard Brexit – to Nazis was “not strong enough”. Marr challenged Lammy on his language, pointing out that the MPs he was referring to were elected representatives. Lammy responded: “I don’t care how elected they were – so was the far right in Germany.” Lammy’s rhetoric has been criticised, but let’s join the dots. Johnson says he is pro-immigration, and says he has only met Steve Bannon twice. I haven’t got all day to rehearse the racist remarks Johnson has made over the years.
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Virgin Trains and avoiding chaos | Letters 15 Apr 12:30pm Virgin Trains and avoiding chaos | Letters
Iain Cameron Williams
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Unhappy the land that has Farage as a hero | Brief letters 15 Apr 12:29pm Unhappy the land that has Farage as a hero | Brief letters
Julian Assange | Emyr Humphreys’ 100th birthday | Tiger Woods | BrexitIt is hard to feel a lot of sympathy for the egotistical Julian Assange, but, if he is to be extradited to the United States (
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Niall Ferguson isn’t upset about free speech. He’s upset about being challenged | Dawn Foster 15 Apr 11:57am Niall Ferguson isn’t upset about free speech. He’s upset about being challenged | Dawn Foster
Powerful people used to express their views on others unopposed. Now their targets fight back, they find it intolerableI would pause, for at least a few seconds, if I found myself arguing that my freedom of speech was in a state of extreme jeopardy in this, my column in a national newspaper. The historian Niall Ferguson, it seems, did not pause when making such an argument in his column
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Extinction Rebellion protesters who want to be arrested: be careful what you wish for | Ben Smoke 15 Apr 11:34am Extinction Rebellion protesters who want to be arrested: be careful what you wish for | Ben Smoke
As one of the Stansted 15, I know that dealing with arrests sucks vast amounts of time and money from the cause When I was arrested I did not hear most of the words of the police caution. I was being led from the front wheel of a deportation charter flight that
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I’m a scientist studying laughter – and it’s funnier than you might think | Sophie Scott 15 Apr 9:34am I’m a scientist studying laughter – and it’s funnier than you might think | Sophie Scott
Parrots do it, rats do it, and we do it partly for social reasons. But to learn more, I need the help of comedy fansThe American writer EB White famously said, “Analysing humour is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it.” But is the same true of analysing laughter? I am a brain scientist who studies laughter, and I find it quite interesting, not least because scientific analyses tell us that pretty much everything we humans think we know about laughter is wrong. We think laughter is primarily something we do when we find something funny, but in fact most laughter is produced for social reasons – we are
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Twitter’s ‘PC brigade’ aren’t killing comedy – they’re shining a light on bigotry | Jack Bernhardt 15 Apr 8:54am Twitter’s ‘PC brigade’ aren’t killing comedy – they’re shining a light on bigotry | Jack Bernhardt
The BBC comedy chief says social media is stopping comedy from testing boundaries. Has he seen Fleabag and Derry Girls?Great leaps forward in comedy happen by asking the big questions. What if you created a show that unapologetically showed the horror of war? You get M*A*S*H. What if you created a sitcom about nothing? You get
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Good news for UK renters at last – now here’s what else we can fight for | Alicia Powell 15 Apr 8:19am Good news for UK renters at last – now here’s what else we can fight for | Alicia Powell
Tenants have organised and campaigned and now ‘no-fault’ evictions are being abolished. This has to be just the startMonday marks a huge victory for private renters. Theresa May and the communities secretary, James Brokenshire, have announced that the government
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The Conservatives owe Britain’s Muslim community an apology | Afzal Khan 15 Apr 7:05am The Conservatives owe Britain’s Muslim community an apology | Afzal Khan
The Roger Scruton episode has laid bare the party’s lack of concern about the Islamophobia in its ranks
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‘No-fault’ eviction of tenants must end. But beware unintended consequences | Simon Jenkins 15 Apr 6:43am ‘No-fault’ eviction of tenants must end. But beware unintended consequences | Simon Jenkins
The government is right to curtail landlords’ section 21 powers. But too much regulation could end up hurting the poorestTheresa May’s government can get some things right.
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The numbers don’t lie: Labour must back a people’s vote to win the next election | Owen Smith 15 Apr 5:00am The numbers don’t lie: Labour must back a people’s vote to win the next election | Owen Smith
The party has tried to keep both leave and remain voters onside. But polls show support for a new vote is growingThe decision by the European Union to
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Our true crime fetish has nothing to do with the search for justice | Fiona Sturges 15 Apr 2:00am Our true crime fetish has nothing to do with the search for justice | Fiona Sturges
The entire genre has been built primarily on the abuse and murder of women. It’s time to move onIn A Very Fatal Murder, the New York journalist David Pascall investigated the killing of Hayley Price, a 17-year-old prom queen from small-town Nebraska with “big dreams and clear skin”. The unsolved case was the fruit of a lengthy search by Pascall and his production team for the ideal killing. They wanted, he said, “a murder that [was] engrossing and mysterious, a murder that perfectly reflects our nation’s current economic and social conditions … a murder in which a really hot white girl dies.” A Very Fatal Murder was the creation of the satirical organ the Onion, a magnificent sendup of the tropes of the true-crime podcast, from the tinkling soundtrack and the questing, Pulitzer-hungry host, to the big-city production crew crashing through provincial communities where “no one has HBO”. It should have
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Only rebellion will prevent an ecological apocalypse | George Monbiot 15 Apr 1:00am Only rebellion will prevent an ecological apocalypse | George Monbiot
No one is coming to save us. Mass civil disobedience is essential to force a political responseHad we put as much effort into preventing environmental catastrophe as we’ve spent on making excuses for inaction, we would have solved it by now. Everywhere I look, I see people engaged in furious attempts to fend off the moral challenge it presents. The commonest current excuse is this: “I bet those protesters have phones/go on holiday/wear leather shoes.” In other words, we won’t listen to anyone who is not living naked in a barrel, subsisting only on murky water. Of course, if you are living naked in a barrel we will dismiss you too, because you’re a hippie weirdo. Every messenger, and every message they bear, is disqualified on the grounds of either impurity or purity.
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Why is the left blinkered to claims about Assange and sexual assault? | Nesrine Malik 15 Apr 1:00am Why is the left blinkered to claims about Assange and sexual assault? | Nesrine Malik
In the hierarchy of progressive political causes, women seem to be relegated to the bottom of the pile In case you’ve forgotten, or have been confused by politicians who failed to mention it, let me remind you why I believe Julian Assange was in the Ecuadorian embassy for seven years before he was ejected and arrested last week. I don’t believe it was for being a journalist or a truth-teller to power, and it wasn’t for releasing evidence of America’s war crimes. He was in the embassy because, in 2010,
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