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Tuesday, March 26, 2019
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The Guardian view on segregated playgrounds: sand and fury | Editorial 26 Mar 2:30pm The Guardian view on segregated playgrounds: sand and fury | Editorial
New flats where the children of social tenants have separate swings is a reminder of everything that is wrong with housing policy Our report about a housing development in south London with
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Efforts to unpick the constitutional crisis that is Brexit | Letters 26 Mar 2:25pm Efforts to unpick the constitutional crisis that is Brexit | Letters
Readers air their views after MPs voted to seize control of the parliamentary timetable to allow backbenchers to hold a series of votes on alternatives to Theresa May’s Brexit dealIt is the referendum that has paralysed parliament: presented as the mandate of the people, it reduces members from representatives to delegates, fearful of “dishonouring” it. So far this has been the main reason given for not revoking article 50. Leaving aside whether it was flawed, by interference or misinformation, it was absurd to embark on it without putting before the people any clear indication of what our future relationship with Europe would be, or the difficulties of unpicking the years of our membership.
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Double standards on oil spills in Nigeria must end | Letters 26 Mar 2:25pm Double standards on oil spills in Nigeria must end | Letters
Oil companies must respect human lives and clean up the damage their industry does wherever they operate, say
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Shrewd rebranding of stations and bus stops | Letters 26 Mar 2:24pm Shrewd rebranding of stations and bus stops | Letters
Renaming Bicester Village was a canny move, says
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How to share a bed? Listen carfully to your partner | Brief letters 26 Mar 2:24pm How to share a bed? Listen carfully to your partner | Brief letters
Prince Charles | Children’s playgrounds | Sharing a bed | Scott Walker | Mobile phone useSomebody in this incompetent government failed to tell the Prince of Wales that this was not the time to visit Cuba (Photo, 26 March), which provides much of the security that maintains Venezuela’s dictatorial Maduro regime. This confirms my view that among those who aspire to rule Global Britain, no one has the least idea of a coherent diplomatic strategy towards Latin America.
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Get set for Brexit: Indicative Day – the one where the Grand Wizards turn on each other | Marina Hyde 26 Mar 2:07pm Get set for Brexit: Indicative Day – the one where the Grand Wizards turn on each other | Marina Hyde
On Sunday it was all looking so good for the Brexit ultras. Then came Monday, and that parliamentary vote Draw near, true believers, for these are dark days for the ERG Brexit ultras. The Fellowship of the Ringpieces finds itself divided on their next move, and may yet be bitterly sundered as they ponder the big question: could they honestly have played it worse? Before we help them answer it, a quick update on which bit of Blunderland we’ve tumbled into now. Late on Monday night, the House of Commons voted to take control of the parliamentary agenda and attempt to break the Brexit deadlock via a series of indicative votes masterminded by former Tory minister Oliver Letwin. A clue, a clue! Our kingdom for a clue! Like all initiatives handled by Oliver Letwin since the 1980s, it promises to go spectacularly wrong in ways we haven’t even thought of yet, but let’s pretend otherwise before the shitstorm gets properly under way on Wednesday.
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Letter: Bill Sellars obituary 26 Mar 12:17pm Letter: Bill Sellars obituary
I will always be grateful to
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Jamie Dimon, spare us your crocodile tears about inequality | Robert Reich 26 Mar 11:37am Jamie Dimon, spare us your crocodile tears about inequality | Robert Reich
If the CEO of JPMorgan Chase really cared about American workers, he would put an end to corporate executives like him rigging the system If I may be so bold as to try to lure your attention away from Trump and Mueller for a moment, consider Jamie Dimon’s lament, delivered a few days before Mueller delivered his report. Dimon is CEO of JPMorgan Chase, and wrongdoing by him and the CEOs of other big corporations is more responsible for Trump’s election than anything Russia dreamed of, as I’ll explain.
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Don’t knock the humble vox pop. It’s a vital tool of journalism | John Domokos 26 Mar 10:49am Don’t knock the humble vox pop. It’s a vital tool of journalism | John Domokos
Street interviews can be abused by lazy reporters. But in Anywhere But Westminster, we’ve found them to be revelatory A lot of people, it seems, are sick of vox pops. With British politics becoming ever more bitterly dysfunctional, debate becoming more polarised and the media less trusted, the humble vox pop has become a symbol of what has gone wrong with the way we talk politics. The comedian David Baddiel
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You can give all your money away, but it won’t solve poverty | Masuma Rahim 26 Mar 10:09am You can give all your money away, but it won’t solve poverty | Masuma Rahim
A Kenyan teacher who donates 80% of his income is amazingly generous. But such acts alone cannot tackle inequalityGlobally, income inequality is rising. Poverty remains a very real and very visible, ill in most of the world. It is humbling, then, to hear of
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Playgrounds only for the rich kids? What grotesque social apartheid | Gaby Hinsliff 26 Mar 8:03am Playgrounds only for the rich kids? What grotesque social apartheid | Gaby Hinsliff
A developer has fenced off social housing residents from a playground outside their homes. This is society at its most mean-spiritedOne playground for the children of the rich, another for the poor. It’s hard to think of an idea more crassly offensive than a supposedly mixed housing development where even
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After Mueller, the need for oversight of Trump is as urgent as ever | John Mulholland 26 Mar 8:00am After Mueller, the need for oversight of Trump is as urgent as ever | John Mulholland
Trump believes the Mueller report represents ‘total exoneration’. It does not – and we at the Guardian will keep holding him to account
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Michael Jackson’s life showed us the journey from abused to abuser | Hadley Freeman 26 Mar 7:57am Michael Jackson’s life showed us the journey from abused to abuser | Hadley Freeman
The maltreatment he suffered was devastating but not sexual. Did that help fans believe in his harmless, ‘lost boy’ persona?Jimmy Savile. Harvey Weinstein. R Kelly. Kevin Spacey. We are not exactly short these days of celebrities accused of exploiting their fame to mask predatory behaviour. Yet the Michael Jackson case is different. And that’s not just because he is, still, so passionately defended by some – including, most recently, Barbra Streisand and
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Wales is right to ban smacking. But it’s not the whole solution | Nell Frizzell 26 Mar 6:00am Wales is right to ban smacking. But it’s not the whole solution | Nell Frizzell
Legal remedies alone won’t protect children when the support services that parents need to cope are being destroyedWhen you’ve been awake since dawn, you haven’t spoken to another adult for six hours, you’re having your first period in two years and your baby is refusing to go to sleep despite having been awake since 4.22am, there is a very fine line between playfully flicking bits of sheepskin out of your child’s hand before they eat it, and just hitting your child. I know, because a few months ago I found myself alone, in a park, bathed in golden springtime sunshine, genuinely worried that I was about to hit my son. This was not some theoretical musing about the nature of “reasonable force” but the frayed-nerve feeling of a parent reaching the very end of their ability to cope. Had I grown up in an environment where smacking had been part of my family’s emotional language, if I’d been smacked as a child and lived to tell the tale, if slapping, smacking, pinching or hitting children had been considered normal during my childhood, then I might very well have smacked my own child that day. Luckily, very luckily, I was able to walk into a nearby children’s centre, plonk him by a miniature sandpit full of plastic dinosaurs, watch him wave cheerfully to the play worker laying out a rainbow of jumbo felt tip pens, walk into the corner, out of sight, and let out all the fury and fatigue that had been welling up inside me all day in one huge sigh.
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If Jacinda Ardern was in No 10, imagine how different Brexit would be | Jonathan Powell 26 Mar 4:00am If Jacinda Ardern was in No 10, imagine how different Brexit would be | Jonathan Powell
Unlike Theresa May, New Zealand’s prime minister has the leadership qualities to bind a crisis-struck nation togetherThey are the second and third female prime ministers of their countries. They both preside over minority governments. They have both spent most of their lives in politics. Both have a long-term interest in policing and home affairs. And they have both had to lead as their countries confront one of the greatest man-made crises they have ever faced. That is where the comparisons end. One has become an international heroine and the other is about to leave office in humiliation as the second worst prime minister ever. In New Zealand,
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Beneath the fabulous superficiality of Pose there is something truly deep | Suzanne Moore 26 Mar 3:00am Beneath the fabulous superficiality of Pose there is something truly deep | Suzanne Moore
The BBC2 drama revolves around the 1980s New York underground ballroom scene at the height of the Aids crisis. Movingly, it shows families formed in the face of rejection TV, you are really spoiling us at the moment. The world and its wife are in love with a celibate who drinks gin in a tin:
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The caliphate is over, but Isis will be back in another form | Alia Brahimi 26 Mar 2:00am The caliphate is over, but Isis will be back in another form | Alia Brahimi
Amid the despair and the trauma in the region, Islamic State will create a fresh narrative and spread further afieldUnited States-backed fighters
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Is it too soon, too unsettling, for pro-IRA chants to be trivialised? | Una Mullally 26 Mar 2:00am Is it too soon, too unsettling, for pro-IRA chants to be trivialised? | Una Mullally
Slogans such as the one used by footballer Declan Rice are more about cultural identity than sectarianismWhen does “Up the RA” not mean “Up the RA”? When the England footballer, Declan Rice, who played for the Republic of Ireland before switching allegiance, apologised for
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