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The Guardian

Thursday, March 14, 2019
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With Brexit now on hold, there’s only one option left: compromise | Simon Jenkins 14 Mar 4:21pm With Brexit now on hold, there’s only one option left: compromise | Simon Jenkins
The referendum vote must be honoured, but Theresa May’s red lines will have to fade. It’s time to reach out to LabourThe Brexit chasm has seemed unbridgeable. No path has appeared through the impasse. Tonight a glimmer of a route came into view. Parliament decided to ask the EU to postpone Brexit day and extend the negotiating phase, probably for three months. It asked for this phase to be extended, probably for three months. It did so, shamelessly, because it could not agree on what on earth to do next. The EU, reasonably, asks why. If the UK could not decide on Brexit in two and a half years, what difference will three months make? The answer is that Theresa May is refusing to give up on her red lines and her frantic efforts to appease the rightwing of her party. Yet her deal has not so far pleased them, and it has now
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Theresa May has finally got the Brexiters where she wants them | Jonathan Freedland 14 Mar 3:33pm Theresa May has finally got the Brexiters where she wants them | Jonathan Freedland
MPs have given her back control. And leave supporters now have the binary choice of her deal or months of delayMPs had the chance to take back control of Brexit – wresting this tortured process from a weak, flailing and moribund government – and they ducked it. Sure, it was by the narrowest of margins, losing by just two votes,
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The Guardian view on Brexit delay: time to let reality in | Editorial 14 Mar 3:28pm The Guardian view on Brexit delay: time to let reality in | Editorial
Theresa May came to office without answers to European questions and looked for them in the wrong places. Her way of doing Brexit is overFor nearly two years, Britain has known when it is supposed to leave the EU. Its politics have been consumed by the question of how. There has been less exploration of why. The simplest answer is that a majority voted to do so and that their preference should, on democratic principle, be respected. But when the government has failed to find a safe Brexit path, to proceed regardless of the consequences is to risk being wantonly destructive. Just such a point of failure has been reached.
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Steve Bell on the third day of Brexit votes – cartoon 14 Mar 2:49pm Steve Bell on the third day of Brexit votes – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/mar/14/steve-bell-on-the-third-day-of-brexit-votes-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on the Bloody Sunday prosecution: late but necessary | Editorial 14 Mar 2:28pm The Guardian view on the Bloody Sunday prosecution: late but necessary | Editorial
Northern Ireland’s director of public prosecutions is to charge one soldier with murder and attempted murder over the 1972 killings. But this is not just a question of historyIt is now approaching half a century since Bloody Sunday, when British troops fired on civil rights demonstrators in Derry. The killings not only left families distraught but, as the brother of one victim observed on Thursday, deepened and widened the conflict in Northern Ireland. The Widgery tribunal of the same year compounded anger. It took more than 25 years, and the peace process, for the British government to commission another inquiry. In 2010 Lord Saville finally delivered his devastating report. A lengthy police inquiry followed. Now one former paratrooper is to
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Brexit fantasies that left us staring into the abyss | Letters 14 Mar 2:25pm Brexit fantasies that left us staring into the abyss | Letters
Frank Field MP, Jon Bloomfield, Ron Glatter, Peter Clarke, Margaret Pelling, Anna Ford
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BBC’s well-received history of Ireland | Letter 14 Mar 2:25pm BBC’s well-received history of Ireland | Letter
In 1972 the BBC made a 10-part series entitled Ireland: Some Episodes From Her Past, writes
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Risks of privatising NHS scanner service | Letters 14 Mar 2:24pm Risks of privatising NHS scanner service | Letters
Concerns over the privatisation of cancer scanning services at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford are raised by
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We can’t afford to let local news fade away | Letters 14 Mar 2:24pm We can’t afford to let local news fade away | Letters
Local newsgathering is in crisis, but all is not lost, says
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Yet another spiffing gaffe from Johnson | Brief letters 14 Mar 2:23pm Yet another spiffing gaffe from Johnson | Brief letters
Boris Johnson | Period poverty | Jewish theatre | Skinny jeans | Cheltenham race cardWhat a spiffing fellow Boris Johnson is. I was left spitting and spluttering after reading his latest stupendous, stupid, statement (
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The problem is not so much Theresa May – it’s that Britain is now ungovernable | Aditya Chakrabortty 14 Mar 11:42am The problem is not so much Theresa May – it’s that Britain is now ungovernable | Aditya Chakrabortty
There can be no ‘genuine leadership’ from a political class that has become totally divorced from ordinary peopleDramas need characters, politics requires politicians and a storm must have an eye. Which is why at the dead centre of Brexit – the biggest and most multifaceted crisis to face this country in nearly 50 years – there is just one person. She stands at a Commons dispatch box in an elegant outfit day after day, knowing that the evening will cover her in yet another dung-heap of
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If children don’t join the climate strike, their schools are underachieving | David Reed 14 Mar 9:51am If children don’t join the climate strike, their schools are underachieving | David Reed
Activism is more important than grades. Any responsible teacher should be encouraging their pupils to walk outThere will be another large-scale school climate strike tomorrow, following a
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Marketing antidepressants as his and hers? This is ‘anxiety economy’ at its worse | Emily Reynolds 14 Mar 9:40am Marketing antidepressants as his and hers? This is ‘anxiety economy’ at its worse | Emily Reynolds
Highly gendered, Insta-friendly and sold online – medication is being peddled for first-date nerves and public speaking If you have ever spent more than five minutes on Instagram, you’ll probably be familiar with the sleek pink packages that indicate someone has bought something from Glossier. The company, an American cosmetics brand founded in 2010, has become famous not only for its products, but also for its aesthetic: cutesy, minimalist pastel packaging expertly targeted at the perfect millennial customer. As with many brands, what you are actually getting doesn’t always seem to matter: photographing it, being seen to have it, is what you are paying for. Legions of brands have followed Glossier’s example: at first, other cosmetic companies, then homeware, lifestyle and more. Now, it seems, the Glossierification of everyday life is finally complete, as the telemedicine brands Hims and Hers neatly show.
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A general election is now possible. To win it, Labour must back Europe | Polly Toynbee 14 Mar 8:03am A general election is now possible. To win it, Labour must back Europe | Polly Toynbee
Offering Brexit compromises is disingenous. Labour must tell voters the truth about this Tory disaster and support remainThe good, the mad, the dishonest and the cowardly – that’s roughly how the House split last night and probably will again tonight. The honours go to
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Wake up, Philip Hammond. The climate crisis needs action, not lip service | Caroline Lucas 14 Mar 5:30am Wake up, Philip Hammond. The climate crisis needs action, not lip service | Caroline Lucas
On green issues, this government dithers, delays and contradicts. However, our young climate activists are starting to be heard For once, Philip Hammond’s
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Austerity created this mental-health crisis. Brexit has sent it into overdrive | Frances Ryan 14 Mar 5:29am Austerity created this mental-health crisis. Brexit has sent it into overdrive | Frances Ryan
Calls not to politicise mental-health issues fall flat when an era of cuts and uncertainty sees our mental wellbeing plummetThere was something about the events in Westminster this week that made me think of the news that sales of self-help books in Britain
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Could Theresa May lose her way to a final Brexit victory? | Tom Kibasi 14 Mar 5:04am Could Theresa May lose her way to a final Brexit victory? | Tom Kibasi
It looks as if the prime minister is making progress. But it would take just a dozen rebel Tory MPs to defeat her dealIs Theresa May
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If black TV stars are treated so differently, what can the rest of us expect? | Afua Hirsch 14 Mar 2:00am If black TV stars are treated so differently, what can the rest of us expect? | Afua Hirsch
Hollywood invests endless money in on-set beauty teams. Yet black actors end up paying for their own hairstyling There are a lot of things that black movie stars don’t usually tell you. Like how, as one major LA agent told me, even the most famous have struggled for years to enjoy anything like the same level of income from brand endorsements as their white peers. A black Hollywood A-lister told me she got through an entire major big-budget movie with a £30 wig from a downmarket hair shop because on day one of filming, it was all she had on her; no one had thought to source anything better. And no one talks about the devastation of hair loss, and the damage and vanishing hairlines that come from years of bad styling on set. David Harewood – the black British actor who has made it big in the US on series such as Homeland and Supergirl – told me about his history of botched barbering attempts when I interviewed him for my book Brit(ish). “Every time I work in the States, I have had to have my hair cut outside of the set,” he said. “And I think to myself: ‘Surely this is wrong – why am I having to go and drive half an hour up to the road to a black barber?’ It’s not just principle, but a business case – think of the time I’m losing!”
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A chaotic Brexit is part of Trump’s grand plan for Europe | Natalie Nougayrède 14 Mar 1:59am A chaotic Brexit is part of Trump’s grand plan for Europe | Natalie Nougayrède
The president and his outriders want Europe weak and divided. Brexit will deliver some of thatIf Brexit is halted, both the UK and the rest of Europe will reap the benefit – and Donald Trump, for one, will suffer a defeat. The sect of Brexit has passionate adherents far beyond Britain’s hardline leavers. It includes vocal and influential preachers in the Trumpian world of Washington – and the reality of Trump is having a deep impact on Europe, with the Brexit mess a key part of it all.
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