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Theresa May is truly on the ropes. But there may yet be life in her deal | Martin Kettle 13 Mar 5:35pm Theresa May is truly on the ropes. But there may yet be life in her deal | Martin Kettle
With the vote against no deal, power is passing to coalitions of MPs. But the prime minister may still be able to push her preferred Brexit throughAnd so the Brexit options facing Theresa May tighten again, remorselessly and painfully, and with more pain to come. A day after a second decisive defeat for her withdrawal deal with the EU, and amid threats and chaos in the Westminster lobbies, MPs narrowly wrested control from May by four votes over the possibility of no deal. Then in a second vote they drove the message home again, this time by an
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The Guardian view on Tory no-dealers: not serious, still dangerous | Editorial 13 Mar 4:25pm The Guardian view on Tory no-dealers: not serious, still dangerous | Editorial
MPs who embrace impossible, reckless Brexit ideas have forfeited their right to shape the debate about what happens nextRegardless of how many MPs reject the idea of a no-deal Brexit, or how often, the legal fact remains that Britain’s EU membership expires on 29 March. Parliament cannot unilaterally change the date, so the British government is as dependent on a functional dialogue with the EU in the aftermath of Theresa May’s deal having been rejected as it was when the deal was being negotiated. That should be obvious, but a remarkable number of MPs still appear not to understand basic facts about Brexit. Conservatives in particular struggle to process the point that a Brexit plan cooked up in a Westminster corridor is worthless if there is no prospect of it being viable in Brussels.
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Steve Bell on the spring statement – cartoon 13 Mar 3:37pm Steve Bell on the spring statement – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/mar/13/steve-bell-on-the-spring-statement-cartoon">Continue reading...
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MPs have voted against no deal. Now here’s how to make that decision stick | Jolyon Maugham 13 Mar 3:36pm MPs have voted against no deal. Now here’s how to make that decision stick | Jolyon Maugham
Revoking article 50 is the only way to definitively avoid crashing out of the European UnionMPs have just voted against a no-deal Brexit. But this vote doesn’t achieve much by itself, because it’s just an indicative vote. “No deal can’t be taken off the table; it is the table.” You’ll hear this
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The Guardian view on ending austerity: in rhetoric alone | Editorial 13 Mar 2:52pm The Guardian view on ending austerity: in rhetoric alone | Editorial
If the Tories want to end austerity, they will have to focus on ending the lived experience of it
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Sourdough is Silicon Valley’s latest craze – could I beat the coders and bake the perfect loaf? 13 Mar 1:54pm Sourdough is Silicon Valley’s latest craze – could I beat the coders and bake the perfect loaf?
Bread is back, baby! Tech bros are documenting their attempts to achieve the ideal crumb, but does the careful, scientific approach work?When in January the
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A price to be paid for open-access academic publishing | Letters 13 Mar 1:40pm A price to be paid for open-access academic publishing | Letters
The headlong rush towards further adoption of open-access models demands careful thought, says
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UN plan for Syria should take priority | Letters 13 Mar 1:39pm UN plan for Syria should take priority | Letters
While there is no clear picture of what next for the situation inside of Syria, donors should not write blank cheques for reconstruction, writes Cafod’s
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Not easy for women to plim plim wearing dungarees | Brief letters 13 Mar 1:38pm Not easy for women to plim plim wearing dungarees | Brief letters
Margaret Thatcher and the ‘Golden Acorn’ | UK drama schools | Corbyn’s inclusivity | Plim plims | Dungarees | A&E waiting times | Spicey riceyYour article (
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Hypnotised by cake and unicorns, the Brexit perfectionists have blown it | Oliver Norgrove 13 Mar 12:30pm Hypnotised by cake and unicorns, the Brexit perfectionists have blown it | Oliver Norgrove
Two clear chances to leave the EU have been squandered in dogged pursuit of an immaculate Brexit
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The US admissions scandal: have any mediocre students ever ended up at Oxbridge? 13 Mar 11:56am The US admissions scandal: have any mediocre students ever ended up at Oxbridge?
What’s the best path to a top education in the UK if your grades fall short? History suggests family ties, a private education and a lot of rugby practice It is hard to say what’s most epic about the
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Silicon Valley is erecting a monument to itself. Will it be a giant robo-phallus? | James Felton 13 Mar 11:19am Silicon Valley is erecting a monument to itself. Will it be a giant robo-phallus? | James Felton
How will today’s noble tech titans honour their achievements in a single statue? We run through the obvious optionsEvery city has a landmark that celebrates what its people love. France has the Eiffel Tower, which is both astonishingly beautiful and admittedly a bit penisy. New York has the Empire State Building, which is the same but bigger. Rome has the Colosseum, to celebrate
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Did no one tell Philip Hammond that austerity is raging outside? | Aditya Chakrabortty 13 Mar 11:10am Did no one tell Philip Hammond that austerity is raging outside? | Aditya Chakrabortty
Public services are in tatters, interest rates are negligible, and yet in his spring statement the chancellor gives us ‘reviews’ instead of policiesListen to Philip Hammond and it’s easy to get lulled into a false sense that he is an adult making sober, cautious decisions. Not blessed with the (ahem) charisma of a Boris Johnson, he is happily less given to spouting headline-grabbing rubbish. While his colleagues have spent the past two and a half years promising voters the moon on a stick, the chancellor has kept his cool. The
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The only thing holding the Brexit-riven Tories together now is Corbyn | Katy Balls 13 Mar 10:33am The only thing holding the Brexit-riven Tories together now is Corbyn | Katy Balls
May’s uneasy truce has failed. As fault lines widen between MPs, a general election is no longer unthinkableThe scene in the division lobby
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With Theresa’s ‘turd’ deal flushed away, pray for an EU invasion | Marina Hyde 13 Mar 8:30am With Theresa’s ‘turd’ deal flushed away, pray for an EU invasion | Marina Hyde
We need competency, and quick. Not this bunch of MPs who are finding out in real time the consequences of their actions“It … sends a message … to the whole world,” croaked Theresa May to the Commons on Tuesday night, “about the sort of country … the United Kingdom will be … in the years and decades ahead.” Fairly sure the world has got the message by now. They are “up to speed” and “across the detail” of the sort of country the UK is. The question of whether Brexit represented a midlife crisis or the descent into senility appears to have been answered. The land that likes to picture itself as a David Niven world war two movie is in fact a look-away episode of The Jeremy Kyle Show. On close inspection, the “beacon of democracy” turns out to be a bin fire.
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Parliament is betraying voters, but a clean Brexit is the best option | John Redwood 13 Mar 7:30am Parliament is betraying voters, but a clean Brexit is the best option | John Redwood
Britain should offer the EU a trade agreement similar to those with Japan and Canada, and leave on 29 March
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May and Corbyn will never back a second referendum – but MPs must | Anna Soubry 13 Mar 7:15am May and Corbyn will never back a second referendum – but MPs must | Anna Soubry
It is parliament’s duty to stop both main party leaders colluding to deny voters a final say on Brexit
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The Conservatives have left Britain with no real government | Jonathan Freedland 13 Mar 6:42am The Conservatives have left Britain with no real government | Jonathan Freedland
Theresa May is so consumed by her mismanaged Brexit she has no energy for anything elseIt’s been true for a while that the Conservative party has become fundamentally ungovernable, its warring factions so far apart it’s all but impossible to have them marching in the same direction, at least when it comes to Europe. It’s a condition that afflicted the Tories under Theresa May’s predecessors, spelling doom for
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Here’s our plan for an orderly no-deal Brexit, and delivered on time | Owen Paterson 13 Mar 5:31am Here’s our plan for an orderly no-deal Brexit, and delivered on time | Owen Paterson
The Malthouse B plan, backed by a group of Conservative MPs, would restore the public’s faith in parliament
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Why Labour must not fall for the charms of a Norway-style deal | Michael Chessum 13 Mar 4:00am Why Labour must not fall for the charms of a Norway-style deal | Michael Chessum
Delivering a Brexit of any kind will be ruinous for the party – including this softer ‘compromise’ optionThis ought to be a time for the flourishing of big ideas in politics. For those who drove it, Brexit is about reasserting Britain’s imperial role in the world, and stripping out the modest social democratic reforms on workers’ rights and regulatory standards now enshrined in EU law. Under new leadership, Labour has been presented with an opportunity to mount the concerted, principled defence of immigration and internationalist politics that the party, and the wider left, have been avoiding for decades.
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These gaffes expose British politics’ real issue with race | Gary Younge 13 Mar 2:00am These gaffes expose British politics’ real issue with race | Gary Younge
Blunders by MPs from Angela Smith to Andrea Leadsom reveal a political class that has no grasp of Britain’s racial dynamicsAmong the unremarkable racial experiences in my life, I have been chased off a train as a teenager by men twice my age and size shouting “nigger”; pursued down a main street in Edinburgh by two men with baseball bats shouting the same word; had racist graffiti scrawled on my house; and had countless people shout at me in the street. Unremarkable not because they weren’t terrifying or upsetting at the time but because such stories are relatively common among black people of my age who grew up in Britain.
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