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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s challenge: no change, no Brexit | Editorial 20 Jan 1:25pm The Guardian view on Theresa May’s challenge: no change, no Brexit | Editorial
At the weekend, two former prime ministers showed they understand the need for new Brexit approaches. Theresa May needs to learn the same lessonOn Monday afternoon in the Commons, Theresa May will update MPs about any progress she may have made on Brexit options following her conclusive parliamentary defeat last week. It is expected to be a holding statement, to enable her to carry on consulting as she hunts for the elusive formula that can win a Commons majority, retain EU agreement and keep her government alive. Given Mrs May’s approach and personality, this could be a long search. Don’t hold your breath for the outcome. One of Mrs May’s most disabling qualities in this situation is her political rigidity. In spite of last week’s defeat, she struggles to see that everything about her premiership has changed. She remains formally in charge of the government. But, on the issue that defines British politics, she is no longer in charge at all. She merely leads one of the many groups with no majority that make up the
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The need to breathe new life into adult education | Letters 20 Jan 1:19pm The need to breathe new life into adult education | Letters
Readers respond to a thought-provoking article by Laura McInerneyAs a former mature student who escaped a life of dead-end jobs thanks to Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) classes and Ruskin College, I welcome Laura McInerney’s case for revisiting adult education after 100 years and supporting mature students (
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Perspective on black knife crime | Letters 20 Jan 1:19pm Perspective on black knife crime | Letters
The causes of stabbings in the black community cannot be understood from intellectual or prejudicial positions, argues
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How to get over our Oxbridge obsession | Letters 20 Jan 1:18pm How to get over our Oxbridge obsession | Letters
The offers of Oxbridge places to 41 pupils at a single east London state school highlight the inequalities in our education system, say
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Rwanda, rights and the Commonwealth | Letters 20 Jan 1:18pm Rwanda, rights and the Commonwealth | Letters
The Commonwealth’s core values are compromised by allowing Rwanda to host its next summit, says
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Striving for pay parity for ethnic minorities | Letter 20 Jan 1:18pm Striving for pay parity for ethnic minorities | Letter
We all benefit by supporting each other to improve for our stakeholders and our employees, writes
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Desperately seeking Prince Philip’s fantasy car insurer | Brief letters 20 Jan 1:18pm Desperately seeking Prince Philip’s fantasy car insurer | Brief letters
British values | Duke of Edinburgh | Engagement rings | Personal anniversaries | Men shavingThe most shocking comment to feature in the Ofsted report of one “inadequate” Steiner academy was that “Pupils’ understanding of fundamental British values is underdeveloped” (
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Letter: Zhores Medvedev obituary 20 Jan 12:05pm Letter: Zhores Medvedev obituary
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/nov/23/zhores-medvedev-obituary" title="">Zhores Medvedev
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How admirable that MPs want to amend Brexit. It won’t work | Matthew d’Ancona 20 Jan 11:09am How admirable that MPs want to amend Brexit. It won’t work | Matthew d’Ancona
The Commons is coursing with radicalism, but there’s no way to break the impasse that doesn’t involve a fresh referendumConstitutional folklore is notoriously unreliable. Liberal statesman John Bright, for instance, did not, as is so often claimed, declare in 1865 that the British legislature was “the mother of all parliaments”. That particular distinction he accorded to England. Likewise, and more importantly, it is not true that parliament is sovereign. That authority is vested in “the Queen-in-parliament”: which is to say, ministers of the Crown acting in tandem with the Commons and the Lords. The question, always, is where the balance between government and parliament lies. Since the second world war, the general trend has been towards the aggregation of power in the executive. In 1976, former lord high chancellor Lord Hailsham went as far as saying we live in an “elective dictatorship”. Tony Blair’s chief of staff, Jonathan Powell, spoke of the creation of a “Napoleonic” state. Yet last week’s historic defeat of Theresa May’s Brexit deal in the Commons was a milestone in a quiet counter-revolution. Ever since Iraq, parliament has assumed that it has a right of veto over any significant declaration of military hostilities; select committees, though still no match for their US counterparts, have flexed their muscles.
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A citizens’ assembly is now the only way to break the Brexit deadlock | Gordon Brown 20 Jan 10:12am A citizens’ assembly is now the only way to break the Brexit deadlock | Gordon Brown
Let’s extend article 50, and use 2019 to engage with the British people on Britain’s futureParliament must inflict a second defeat on the government – by voting next Tuesday
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There’s one thing that really puts me off veganism: Peta | Arwa Mahdawi 20 Jan 8:00am There’s one thing that really puts me off veganism: Peta | Arwa Mahdawi
I’m a would-be vegan and longtime vegetarian, but the animal rights campaigners’ vegetable genitalia stunt turns my guts
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The idea that Britain can develop an independent trade policy is absurd | Will Hutton 20 Jan 5:30am The idea that Britain can develop an independent trade policy is absurd | Will Hutton
When selling across borders is ever harder, life without European allies will be parlousSo devastated is the British economy beyond Greater London that only two regions are strong enough to be net contributors to the exchequer – the south-east and the east of England. The rest of the country depends on the buoyancy of London’s service-based economy and accompanying tax revenues to support their schools, hospitals and social benefits. It is this same economic and trading weakness that explains our current account deficit, estimated to be £85bn in 2018, with a deficit in goods approaching £150bn. Without the surpluses Greater London earns in services, including finance, education, consultancy and law, much of Britain would be flat on its back. Of course there should have been an industrial policy to benefit the whole country and a reshaping of our capitalism decades ago, but Thatcherite Tories and New Labour failed us. We are where we are and the dangers are stark and little understood.
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Pity the little darlings if they are being raised by parents who like to share | Catherine Bennett 20 Jan 4:30am Pity the little darlings if they are being raised by parents who like to share | Catherine Bennett
There’s little to stop social media obsessives exploiting children who are too young to say noAs one of Instagram’s most highly regarded influencers, with 24 million followers, Victoria Beckham will of course have thought hard before posting a photograph of her seven-year-old daughter, Harper, eyes closed, enjoying a professional facial. It was captioned by Beckham – almost as if she knew something terrifying about soap that she is not, alas, at liberty to disclose – “We MUST use CLEAN products on our children!!” What kind of message would this send out, Beckham must have considered, particularly to parents cruelly reminded that they are at least a decade too late to extract any value from their own flesh and blood? Try getting anyone interested in a 21-year-old’s pores.
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Its compass smashed, the ghost ship Brexit sails into ever darker waters | Andrew Rawnsley 20 Jan 3:00am Its compass smashed, the ghost ship Brexit sails into ever darker waters | Andrew Rawnsley
We are weeks from crashing out of the EU, but there’s no sign that anyone is prepared to compromise, least of all Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn The curse on the crew of the Flying Dutchman damned them to sail the seas for eternity with no hope of ever reaching port. It came to mind during the dark tempests in which parliament first dismasted the government by
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Council houses were once a glory of the public realm. Let’s return to those days | Rowan Moore 20 Jan 2:00am Council houses were once a glory of the public realm. Let’s return to those days | Rowan Moore
It’s scandalous that local authorities are being forced to rent from private landlords the same properties they once owned… before right to buyBuild more council homes. Not so long ago, this idea was, although not new, radical. So thoroughly had
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Cut tuition fees and you shut the door to poor students | Anne-Marie Canning 20 Jan 1:00am Cut tuition fees and you shut the door to poor students | Anne-Marie Canning
Universities rely on income from fees to fund the outreach activities essential to make them more diverse Last week, universities in England were preparing reports on how they have diversified their student populations. These reports will be submitted to the director of fair access at the
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The Observer view: the Hitachi fiasco confirms that our energy policy is in ruins | Observer editorial 20 Jan 1:00am The Observer view: the Hitachi fiasco confirms that our energy policy is in ruins | Observer editorial
Ministers must act quickly to make up for the firm’s decision to axe its Wylfa nuclear power plantBy any standards,
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The Observer view on why our leaders are neither bold nor flexible | Observer editorial 20 Jan 1:00am The Observer view on why our leaders are neither bold nor flexible | Observer editorial
As Theresa May flounders, the Labour leader should rise to the occasionIn one respect at least, Brexit Britain has already adopted the Norway model. Last week’s drama in parliament most closely resembled the maelstrom (
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May I have a word about… Marcelo Bielsa | Jonathan Bouquet 20 Jan 12:59am May I have a word about… Marcelo Bielsa | Jonathan Bouquet
Old timers might balk at the actions of the Leeds coach, but his mea culpa was pure poetry – of a kind What a truly extraordinary week in the febrile world of the B-word. I refer not to the pustulant Bercow or the vexatious Brexit, but the Leeds United head coach,
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Private schools are a very public problem | Letters 20 Jan 12:59am Private schools are a very public problem | Letters
We know the system is unfair, but is the best solution really to make fee-paying schools accessible to ‘state-subsidised’ pupils?In their piece about Britain’s private school problem, David Kynaston and Francis Green start, thankfully, by owning up to their own privileged education and that of their children (“
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