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Thursday, January 10, 2019
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Cutting tuition fees will turn universities into vassals of the state | Simon Jenkins 10 Jan 1:55pm Cutting tuition fees will turn universities into vassals of the state | Simon Jenkins
Lowering the cost of degrees will devastate university budgets. The state will bail them out – in exchange for more controlMeanwhile, back at the ranch – or in this case the campus – the mice are running riot. Ignored by Brexit, Britain’s universities are facing financial meltdown. I predict that within a decade they will become institutions wholly owned by the state, their academic autonomy unrecognisable. A few weeks ago, three universities were reported to be on the
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The Guardian view on the Brexit endgame: talking at, not with, each other | Editorial 10 Jan 1:30pm The Guardian view on the Brexit endgame: talking at, not with, each other | Editorial
Jeremy Corbyn says he might cooperate on Brexit. Theresa May has belatedly decided to see if they can. But there is little basis of trust between the two leaders and their partiesLast autumn, Jeremy Corbyn
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Trump and the Brexiters should own the mess they lied us into | Gary Younge 10 Jan 1:28pm Trump and the Brexiters should own the mess they lied us into | Gary Younge
Finally, their cheap rhetoric and empty promises are butting up against hard realitiesThree years ago, shortly after I arrived back in Britain after 12 years in the US,
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London’s gangs have changed, and it’s driving a surge in pitiless violence | Andrew Whittaker and James Densley 10 Jan 1:26pm London’s gangs have changed, and it’s driving a surge in pitiless violence | Andrew Whittaker and James Densley
Jayden Moodie, 14, was killed in Waltham Forest, where gangs have moved focus from postcodes to drugs profits The
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The Guardian view on the DRC election: a very unlikely result | Editorial 10 Jan 1:25pm The Guardian view on the DRC election: a very unlikely result | Editorial
Voters hoped for their country’s first democratic transition. Officials named an opposition candidate as the victor – but could this be another win for President Joseph Kabila?People in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have been waiting a long time – since independence from Belgium in 1960 – for a democratic transition of power. They waited two years for this election, and they waited days for its result. Early on Thursday, the country’s electoral commission
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‘Do I look pretty?’ is my daughters’ favourite question and it’s worrying me | Emma Brockes 10 Jan 1:23pm ‘Do I look pretty?’ is my daughters’ favourite question and it’s worrying me | Emma Brockes
Too many pre-teen girls are anxious about how they look. Fairytale princesses with tiny waists don’t helpAs I do most years, I watched the
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The misery, despair and pain of universal credit | Letters 10 Jan 12:30pm The misery, despair and pain of universal credit | Letters
Readers offer their views on – and personal first-hand testimony of – the government’s troubled benefits systemRay Taylor (
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Creating a cultural future for all of us | Letters 10 Jan 12:28pm Creating a cultural future for all of us | Letters
A national map of creativity is making local activities more visible, says
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Putting the migrant ‘crisis’ in perspective | Letters 10 Jan 12:27pm Putting the migrant ‘crisis’ in perspective | Letters
Readers respond to reports and commentary on the recent boat crossings in the English ChannelNo, the offer of citizenship to Poles after the second world war did not go “almost unnoticed” (
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Straight from the horse’s mouth | Brief letters 10 Jan 12:25pm Straight from the horse’s mouth | Brief letters
British universities | The dispossessed | When horses don’t neigh | If your glass is half empty | Long livesIs there any hard evidence that leads a group of academics to state “British universities are the strongest and most attractive in Europe” (
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Ocasio-Cortez has shown ‘shameless’ women are a powerful force | Suzanne Moore 10 Jan 10:33am Ocasio-Cortez has shown ‘shameless’ women are a powerful force | Suzanne Moore
Of course the rising Democratic star terrifies men who would oppress her – she has shown she is unafraid of themAlexandria Ocasio-Cortez has feet. And she washes sometimes. In order to do this she takes off her clothes, the brazen hussy. I presume this to be the case, although the picture of feet in the bath that the Daily Caller published seems to have been
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Why your chicken wings mean we’ve entered a new epoch | Max Elder 10 Jan 8:02am Why your chicken wings mean we’ve entered a new epoch | Max Elder
Our future in the Anthropocene, the new age now we live in, looks just like the lives of the 66 billion chickens consumed every year: nasty, brutish and short Have you ever thought much about the bones that remain littered in front of you after finishing a plate of chicken wings? New research suggests that
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If Jeremy Corbyn gets his election, it would be a nightmare for Labour | Polly Toynbee 10 Jan 7:39am If Jeremy Corbyn gets his election, it would be a nightmare for Labour | Polly Toynbee
Forget speculation that Labour MPs in leave seats might back May’s Brexit deal: they would never support this government Jeremy Corbyn called for a general election in a speech in
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Social care is ageist – and the new NHS plan doesn’t even try to fix it | Frances Ryan 10 Jan 4:11am Social care is ageist – and the new NHS plan doesn’t even try to fix it | Frances Ryan
The 10-year plan must address the damaging generational divide, foster fair funding and devise a way to share the burden“We are taking a big step to secure the future of the NHS for our children and their children,” Theresa May told an audience in Liverpool on Monday as she
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He’s been president a week – and already Bolsonaro is damaging Brazil | Eliane Brum 10 Jan 2:00am He’s been president a week – and already Bolsonaro is damaging Brazil | Eliane Brum
Jair Bolsonaro’s messianic brand of capitalism threatens minorities and the rainforest that protects the planetThe world needs to understand what Brazil has become, before it’s too late. Jair Messias Bolsonaro’s Brazil is not just another country that
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It’s not perfect, but Norway plus may be Labour’s least worst option | Owen Jones 10 Jan 1:00am It’s not perfect, but Norway plus may be Labour’s least worst option | Owen Jones
The party must push for an election. But a Norway-type deal could be the only one that commands a parliamentary majority There are no good options for Labour on Brexit. Accepting this fact is both depressing and liberating. Being on the left is supposed to be about unbounded optimism, a belief that what is deemed politically impossible by the “sensible grownups” of politics can be realised, with sufficient imagination and determination. But recognising that there is no magic button that will end the Brexit debate is to be freed of the stress of searching for the impossible. Supporters of every position on Brexit should be honest about the downsides of their chosen strategies. Labour’s priority is, rightly, a general election. When Theresa May declared from a Downing Street podium that she was seeking to dissolve parliament in April 2017, she wanted to make the election entirely about Brexit. Labour did not allow her to do so, shifting the conversation on to domestic issues, where it was strong, from hiking taxes on the rich to investing in public services to public ownership: issues that unite remainers and leavers. Even though voters have priorities other than Brexit, such as stagnating wages, housing and the NHS, repeating the 2017 strategy this time would be far more challenging, to put it mildly. Labour’s electoral coalition, which encompasses both pro-remain Kensington and pro-leave Ashfield – will be placed under severe strain. The fact that Brexit dominates political debate is bad for Labour because it suppresses its anti-establishment politics; its leading figures are left looking like triangulating politicians, the same as the all the rest.
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| Jonathan Haidt and Pamela Paresky 10 Jan 1:00am | Jonathan Haidt and Pamela Paresky
Of course we want to keep children safe. But exposure to normal stresses and strains is vital for their future wellbeing
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More power to James Graham: drama is where we find the truth about Brexit | Sarah Helm 10 Jan 1:00am More power to James Graham: drama is where we find the truth about Brexit | Sarah Helm
Brexit: The Uncivil War was a bold attempt to bring an impossible story into focus The playwright James Graham has
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