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Powell to Markets: Take That 19 Dec 2018, 7:21pm Powell to Markets: Take That
The Fed says more rate increases are coming, so get used to it.
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Women Who Love Trump 19 Dec 2018, 7:13pm Women Who Love Trump
His approval among female Republicans is 93%—higher than among GOP men.
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The Real Story of the Flynn Hearing 19 Dec 2018, 7:11pm The Real Story of the Flynn Hearing
‘I’ve never presided over a treasonous offense and couldn’t tell you what the elements are anyway.’
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Shut Down, Reopen---Then What? 19 Dec 2018, 7:09pm Shut Down, Reopen---Then What?
Republicans need a vision. It isn’t enough to wait around for Democrats to foul up.
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19 Dec 2018, 3:16pm The Gift of Work
Investors wonder if the economy will get worse; for job seekers it could hardly be better.
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This epic fight in parliament could lead to a new, better democracy | Martin Kettle 19 Dec 2018, 1:50pm This epic fight in parliament could lead to a new, better democracy | Martin Kettle
Over-mighty ministers and party whips are about to have their power challenged as never before over BrexitRevolutions do not always take place violently in public squares, in the streets around the bourses or in front of the palaces. Sometimes they take place quietly, slowly, unobserved and indoors. Sometimes they even happen without the revolutionaries themselves quite understanding what they are doing that is so transformative. It may seem hard to believe, and there is undoubtedly a seasonal element of hope exceeding expectation in saying this, but something of this kind may be happening in front of our Brexit-battered eyes. As the Brexit argument grinds on into Christmas and the new year, we may in fact be living through the start of a quiet constitutional revolution.
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The Guardian view on the immigration white paper: still a hostile environment | Editorial 19 Dec 2018, 1:40pm The Guardian view on the immigration white paper: still a hostile environment | Editorial
With a divided cabinet, a dysfunctional government and a stalled Brexit plan, the attempt to map out a future migration regime looks like badly scripted political theatreBritain’s economy and society benefit from immigration, and British politics routinely denies that fact. There will one day be a moment of reckoning, when a government renounces as unfair and unworkable the rhetoric associated with Theresa May’s tenure at the Home Office and in Downing Street. It will one day be widely accepted that cross-border labour flows can be managed without tilts into xenophobia; without government vans inviting people to “
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The Guardian view on DRC’s presidential poll: an unconvincing act | Editorial 19 Dec 2018, 1:36pm The Guardian view on DRC’s presidential poll: an unconvincing act | Editorial
A government which has been at war with its own people and siphoned off vast sums looks set to return to power in dubious circumstances. The world ought not let an election be stolenThe Democratic Republic of the Congo has never had a peaceful, democratic transition of power since independence from Belgium in 1960. It had been hoped that the
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A good bookshop is not just about the books – at last we realise that | Sian Cain 19 Dec 2018, 1:07pm A good bookshop is not just about the books – at last we realise that | Sian Cain
Amazon may have lower prices, but it can never replace a real shop with a book lover on hand to guide usWhen asked to think of a bookshop, most of us are likely to conjure up an ineffable sense of calm and cosiness, a general notion of wisdom and aspiration, rather than an actual place. Why we have such emotional links to bookshops, and what distinguishes them from, say, a shoe shop or a supermarket, is hard to define. Perhaps it is the inherent value of books and, more widely, knowledge, or the sense that reading can better us. Philip Pullman once described independent bookshops as “the lantern bearers of civilisation”; perhaps it is that bookshops, like libraries, feel like sanctuaries. (Except perhaps on Christmas Eve.) Or, the niggling sense that all those Mr Men and Enid Blytons somehow shaped us into who we are today, and the possibility that picking up any book on the next three-for-two table might even shape who we are tomorrow.
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The UK has always prided itself on its tolerance. What have we become? | Letters 19 Dec 2018, 1:00pm The UK has always prided itself on its tolerance. What have we become? | Letters
Supportive letters from Britain’s friends in Europe brought tears to
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How bookshops can take on Amazon | Letters 19 Dec 2018, 12:59pm How bookshops can take on Amazon | Letters
Readers respond to a Guardian article on showrooming, where bookshop customers visit stores only to research their online purchasesI retired from bookselling 12 years ago and, far from being the newest threat to bookselling, showrooming had been going on long before that (
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After José, it’s olé Ole, but should it be ooh aah Cantona? | Letters 19 Dec 2018, 12:59pm After José, it’s olé Ole, but should it be ooh aah Cantona? | Letters
Readers respond to the sacking of José Mourinho at Manchester UnitedJosé Mourinho is “safe from the sack for the immediate future”, writes Jamie Jackson (
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Giving six-year-olds the vote isn’t such a bright idea | Brief letters 19 Dec 2018, 12:59pm Giving six-year-olds the vote isn’t such a bright idea | Brief letters
Child development | The village Ikea | Moscows in Cumbria and AyrshireWith the great Donald Winnicott welcome flavour of the month in the Guardian, his classic 1949 paper on the psyche-soma clearly shows why David Runciman’s proposal to give six-year-olds the vote is preposterous (
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This white paper doesn’t ‘change the debate’ It treats migrants as things | Maya Goodfellow 19 Dec 2018, 11:48am This white paper doesn’t ‘change the debate’ It treats migrants as things | Maya Goodfellow
The lessons of Windrush have not been learned. This dehumanising document seeks to level down people’s rightsThey claimed it would change. As the news of the
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I’m a care worker. The £30k immigration rule would decimate the sector | Karolina Gerlich 19 Dec 2018, 10:16am I’m a care worker. The £30k immigration rule would decimate the sector | Karolina Gerlich
Under these post-Brexit plans, hard-working Europeans like me will not be welcome. The government is blind to the UK’s needsI have a question for the government. I was born in Poland and I moved to the UK in 2007. I came here to learn the language and start my working life. Ever since, I have worked very hard, paid my taxes and done my best to assimilate and embrace the British culture.
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Yes, a deer poacher should watch Bambi. Films can transform us all | Ryan Gilbey 19 Dec 2018, 10:12am Yes, a deer poacher should watch Bambi. Films can transform us all | Ryan Gilbey
A Missouri judge was right to prescribe the Disney classic. From Philadelphia to Babe, cinema has the power to change us “If there’s any test that can be applied to movies,” said the late
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I occupied Hungary’s state TV studios with other MPs. This is only the start | Ágnes Vadai 19 Dec 2018, 9:08am I occupied Hungary’s state TV studios with other MPs. This is only the start | Ágnes Vadai
The streets and parliamentary opposition are united in protest: we will continue to resist until the Orbán regime is goneOn
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Posh Brits in romcoms? I’ve fallen out of love, actually, thanks to Brexit | Pauline Bock 19 Dec 2018, 8:31am Posh Brits in romcoms? I’ve fallen out of love, actually, thanks to Brexit | Pauline Bock
Each Christmas, growing up in France, I loved watching Hugh Grant and co. Now they just remind me of Jacob Rees-MoggThis week a text from my sister arrived. It was both a question and an expression of dismay. “Did you know the actor who played Edmund in The Chronicles of Narnia is now a parliamentary assistant to a Conservative MP?!” I hadn’t known and was surprised, so I checked. He is – and the
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The only honest thing to do with student debt? Write it off | Liam Young 19 Dec 2018, 8:05am The only honest thing to do with student debt? Write it off | Liam Young
The ONS is right not to count all student loans as financial assets. But Labour must pledge to erase this historical burdenA mental health crisis
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No-deal Brexit is a national disaster. It is every politician’s job to avert it | Jonathan Freedland 19 Dec 2018, 6:28am No-deal Brexit is a national disaster. It is every politician’s job to avert it | Jonathan Freedland
No government, or opposition, should countenance inflicting the hardships of war on its country. This is collective madnessLate on Tuesday, the Labour MP David Lammy
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The people can prevent a no-deal Brexit – with a general strike | Jolyon Maugham 19 Dec 2018, 6:01am The people can prevent a no-deal Brexit – with a general strike | Jolyon Maugham
Crashing out of the EU would imperil hundreds of thousands of jobs. Here’s how we can force the government to change courseTo fail to deliver Brexit would be to “break faith with the British people” said
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Real Christmas Trees are the greener choice | John Rudolf 19 Dec 2018, 6:00am Real Christmas Trees are the greener choice | John Rudolf
Unlike their plastic counterparts, real Christmas trees are a product of nature, and easily recycled, with no toxic afterlife A fake Christmas tree has some obvious advantages over the real thing. There’s no sticky sap. No needles shedding everywhere. It never needs watering, and at the end of the season, it can be folded up, or disassembled (depending on the model) and stowed away in a closet, basement or attic until next year’s Yuletide rolls around. What’s more, machine-made pines are evolving, steadily gaining ground on their biological forebears. Every year, more realistic models emerge, with fuller branches, softer needles and subtler, more life-like colors. One day, it may take the arboreal equivalent of a Voight-Kampff test [brief explanation of test?] to separate the real from the faux.
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Westminster is so bloated on Brexit, it can’t even manage its bread and butter | Anne Perkins 19 Dec 2018, 4:00am Westminster is so bloated on Brexit, it can’t even manage its bread and butter | Anne Perkins
Debates aren’t happening. Potential new laws are stuck in the pipe. All because of one monstrous bit of legislationThis week in parliament, MPs have considered just one small piece of government legislation. They have also heard a statement from the prime minister about the weekend’s disastrous European council, and on Wednesday, it’s prime minister’s questions. On Thursday, they are off on their Christmas holidays. Another week gone, another four legislating days padded out – with apologies to the backbenchers raising important constituency issues in one-off short debates – with nothing more significant than an
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Why Britain needs a national grief awareness day | Professor Green 19 Dec 2018, 3:00am Why Britain needs a national grief awareness day | Professor Green
My latest song is about regrets over the deaths of my family members. It’s healthy to publicly honour the lives of loved onesWhen I think about my childhood, I often think about my great-grandmother’s blue blanket, because every morning I’d wake her up by jumping underneath it. While my grandmother worked, my Nanny Edie became my greatest companion, and sitting with her under that blanket made everything feel, when things were going wrong, like the world was crumbling apart a little less. As a kid, my Nanny Edie and her blanket were twin symbols of safety for me, and as children do, I thought she was invincible – until she wasn’t. She died when I was 13 years old, and without her there to coax me through it, my world really did crumble apart. We all deal with grief in different ways. My grandmother, Edie’s daughter, responded to her loss by throwing away all of her possessions, unable to manage looking at her things without ever seeing her there again. But as a young boy, coming home from my great-grandmother’s funeral without a trace of her left to hold on to was difficult, and meant I didn’t get to process the gravity of her loss. My great-grandmother’s death was my first real experience of grief, but looking back on it now, I realise that I never got the opportunity to truly mourn her.
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Dolphins’ TV-watching habits confirm what gentle creatures they are. Unlike cats … | Stuart Jeffries 19 Dec 2018, 1:00am Dolphins’ TV-watching habits confirm what gentle creatures they are. Unlike cats … | Stuart Jeffries
Scientists have established that the mammals are stimulated by television images, and enjoy an episode of SpongeBob SquarePants What, you’ll be wondering, should you get a dolphin for Christmas? Socks will clearly get regifted; the latest volume of
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We can break the Brexit deadlock: with a citizens’ assembly | Neal Lawson 19 Dec 2018, 1:00am We can break the Brexit deadlock: with a citizens’ assembly | Neal Lawson
These forums are used around the world to solve political impasses – most recently in Ireland on abortion law. It should be Britain’s turn next Brexit is the rock on which our democratic system has run aground. But really the ship has been holed beneath the waterline for some time. Some are content to shuffle the deckchairs and
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I lived on a lonely street. Could I convince my neighbours to socialise? | Margaret Murphy 19 Dec 2018, 1:00am I lived on a lonely street. Could I convince my neighbours to socialise? | Margaret Murphy
When I realised most people didn’t know each other, I organised a party. Success was not immediateAfter moving into my flat a few years ago, I was keen to meet the neighbours and make new friends. I sensed a lack of neighbourly spirit, however. The nature of the street – Victorian terraced houses, many converted into multiple flats – precludes natural neighbourliness. There are no common areas, and no play areas for children or even gardens where you can casually talk to others. But I think we should be friendly to our neighbours. We are all interconnected in our immediate environment, and we should look after and extend goodwill to one another. Benefits such as safety, sharing knowledge about reliable tradespeople, or support when sick, are some advantages of a shared community. In the first few years, I befriended my two immediate neighbours, who live in the same converted house. But after a while I was ready to meet others – so I began a social group for the road. One cold Saturday afternoon I knocked on my neighbours’ doors to find out if they would like to be part of it. As I started to meet them, I realised the
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