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The Play-Date Police 16 Nov 2018, 7:02pm The Play-Date Police
D.C. regulators give new meaning to the ‘nanny state.’
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New Hope for the Truth of 2016? 16 Nov 2018, 6:46pm New Hope for the Truth of 2016?
Hints that congressional investigators may finally pull back the lid on James Comey’s actions.
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Why Central Bankers Missed the Crisis 16 Nov 2018, 6:41pm Why Central Bankers Missed the Crisis
The lesson of 2008, a top economist says, is that monetary maestros don’t pay enough attention to financial markets. Are they making the same mistake again?
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Sorry, Feminists, Men Are Better at Scrabble 16 Nov 2018, 6:40pm Sorry, Feminists, Men Are Better at Scrabble
Nothing stops women from competing at the game’s highest levels, but almost none of them do.
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16 Nov 2018, 5:36pm Art of the Deal: 2020
No matter who becomes Speaker of the House next year, the President enjoys a remarkable political opportunity.
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As a Labour MP, if it’s a deal or no-deal Brexit I know where my duty lies | Caroline Flint 16 Nov 2018, 1:00pm As a Labour MP, if it’s a deal or no-deal Brexit I know where my duty lies | Caroline Flint
Voters want to know why we haven’t left the EU yet. We in Westminster have a duty to restore public trustParliament’s approach to the
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The Guardian view on the Tories and Brexit: the fantasy is finished | Editorial 16 Nov 2018, 12:29pm The Guardian view on the Tories and Brexit: the fantasy is finished | Editorial
The rightwing Brexiters have been exposed. They lied. They had no practical solutions. So they resigned. There is very little time left to rescue Britain from the damage they inflictedMidway through Theresa May’s three-hour
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The Guardian view on Sir Ian McKellen’s tour: truly national theatre 16 Nov 2018, 12:29pm The Guardian view on Sir Ian McKellen’s tour: truly national theatre
The actor’s one-man shows, marking his 80th birthday, will take him back to old hauntsMany people seek unusual ways to celebrate a big birthday, but it’s unlikely that anyone has beaten Sir Ian McKellen to the idea of marking 80 years on this earth with an
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In this Westminster battle of the bastards, we’re all going down with the ship | Marina Hyde 16 Nov 2018, 11:57am In this Westminster battle of the bastards, we’re all going down with the ship | Marina Hyde
MPs playing the Brexit game of thrones couldn’t give one-eighth of a toss about boring little car-plant workers
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Facing the problems with children’s homes | Letters 16 Nov 2018, 11:35am Facing the problems with children’s homes | Letters
Readers respond to our report on vulnerable children in the care home systemThe Guardian’s investigation on children’s homes (
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Whiplash bill is ruse to harm workers’ rights | Letters 16 Nov 2018, 11:34am Whiplash bill is ruse to harm workers’ rights | Letters
Increasing the small claims limit to £2,000 would mean that workers suffering injuries that include a collapsed lung, a fractured wrist or elbow and loss of front teeth, are denied access to justice, write five trade union general secretariesOn Tuesday of next week, the civil liability bill is expected to complete its passage through parliament. The government say that the bill will tackle a whiplash “epidemic”, but it hides a £1.3bn annual gift to the insurers, a loss to government coffers of £146m a year, and an assault on access to justice that will impact hundreds of thousands of people whose claims have nothing to do with whiplash. By statutory instrument, the government plans to sneak through a doubling of the small claims limit, below which injured people don’t get their legal fees paid. Up to 40% of those injured at work will lose their rights. Thousands of workers will be left fighting insurers on their own and in their own time. Injured people whose claim has a value of up to £2,000 – thousands of people a year – will be expected to take on well-funded insurers on their own.
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Perils and ethics of new driverless cars | Letters 16 Nov 2018, 11:33am Perils and ethics of new driverless cars | Letters
Guardian readers respond to David Edmond’s article about the moral arguments surrounding driverless carsI was disappointed that David Edmonds (
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Doctor Who’s race-time continuum | Letters 16 Nov 2018, 11:33am Doctor Who’s race-time continuum | Letters
The show has always valued every human (and intelligent alien) life, writes author
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A problem with no nipples in the office | Brief letters 16 Nov 2018, 11:33am A problem with no nipples in the office | Brief letters
Khrushchev’s wine | Bras at work | Organ donation | HoneybeesKhrushchev may have sent wine to the Irish chair of the UN assembly (
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The epitaph for Tory austerity has been written, and it’s damning | Aditya Chakrabortty 16 Nov 2018, 10:43am The epitaph for Tory austerity has been written, and it’s damning | Aditya Chakrabortty
The UN report is harshly critical of government policy, saying it’s been driven by social re-engineering rather than economicsBritain’s government has today been held up in front of the world and comprehensively damned for the misery and chaos it has inflicted on its own people. Its defining policy of austerity is revealed to the international community
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Why schools are right to ban pupils from wearing designer coats 16 Nov 2018, 10:43am Why schools are right to ban pupils from wearing designer coats
A headteacher in Merseyside has ruled that jackets by the likes of Canada Goose, Moncler or Pyrenex are off limits. Is she interfering unnecessarily or maintaining a valuable principle? Just when I thought my trust in authority had hit the skids and would never be restored, a story popped up to remind me: I love headteachers. Woodchurch high school in Birkenhead has banned its pupils from wearing designer coats – the named brands are Canada Goose, Moncler and Pyrenex. It is not because kids are stupid, lose things or steal off each other (or that a big-ticket item more or less guarantees the worst possible result: mothers fighting in playgrounds). Rather, it is because of inequality. If some kids are walking around in £1,000 coats, those who cannot afford to “feel stigmatised, they feel left out, they feel inadequate”, says the
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Trump’s economic war on Iran is doomed to failure | Richard Dalton 16 Nov 2018, 9:59am Trump’s economic war on Iran is doomed to failure | Richard Dalton
With demand for Iranian oil holding firm and no international support for sanctions, the US’s harsh approach has no future The US has declared economic war on Iran: after having
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Don’t be a juggins – why some words deserve to fall out of use | Sam Leith 16 Nov 2018, 9:43am Don’t be a juggins – why some words deserve to fall out of use | Sam Leith
We shouldn’t worry when a word falls into obscurity. There’s usually a good reason, and a new one will always fill its placeConservationists are all around us, forever appearing on our televisions with their pleas for this noble, endangered mountain lion or that cute, imperilled subspecies of vole. But 70-year-old Edward Allhusen is one of a slightly different stripe. Instead of trying to prevent creepy-crawlies going extinct, he is trying to save the lives of words. In a new book, Betrumped: The Surprising History of 3,000 Long-Lost, Exotic and Endangered Words, he has included a sort of highly endangered list of 600 vocabulary items, culled according to no more systematic criterion than personal preference, from
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Kweku Adoboli had served his time. Deporting him was unspeakably cruel | Luke Butterly 16 Nov 2018, 8:00am Kweku Adoboli had served his time. Deporting him was unspeakably cruel | Luke Butterly
Britain was the former City trader’s home from childhood – yet he has been sent ‘back’ to Ghana Kweku Adoboli came to the UK at the age of 12, and has lived his life here for the past 26 years, attending school and university. Yet on Wednesday night
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Theresa May personifies the UK: lonely, exhausted, her power ebbing away | Suzanne Moore 16 Nov 2018, 7:47am Theresa May personifies the UK: lonely, exhausted, her power ebbing away | Suzanne Moore
If she could just once play human and let go of the delusional burden, we might all sigh with reliefThe doors remained shut for a good while as the assembled journalists waited for
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Bullying has an impact that lasts years. I know - I’ve been a victim | Anita Sethi 16 Nov 2018, 7:24am Bullying has an impact that lasts years. I know - I’ve been a victim | Anita Sethi
Depression, anxiety, panic attacks - it’s a major risk factor for mental health in adulthood. This Anti-Bullying Week, let’s encourage empathy and kindnessA scene that often replays in my mind is being 13 years old, curled up in the foetal position on the floor and being kicked in the ribs. I’m screaming but then my voice catches and becomes a silence that sticks as a lump in the throat that stays there for years.
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Labour must force a general election by not backing May’s Brexit deal | Owen Jones 16 Nov 2018, 7:12am Labour must force a general election by not backing May’s Brexit deal | Owen Jones
The Tories have caused this mess, but they are unable to fix it. Britain urgently needs a new governmentThe Conservatives have plunged Britain into a state of chaos unprecedented in the postwar era. From a party that fought the last two general elections as a bulwark of
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I had my baby in prison, so I know how jails are risking mothers’ lives | Anonymous 16 Nov 2018, 6:30am I had my baby in prison, so I know how jails are risking mothers’ lives | Anonymous
I have never felt so alone. To the staff, you are just another face, another number – and they don’t think about your baby I was 16 weeks
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Jewish history can be used as a weapon to fight antisemitism | Hella Pick 16 Nov 2018, 5:00am Jewish history can be used as a weapon to fight antisemitism | Hella Pick
We can commemorate the 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht by applying its memory to improve civil society The cruel treatment of
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Bullying has an impact which lasts years. I know - I’ve been a victim | Anita Sethi 16 Nov 2018, 4:00am Bullying has an impact which lasts years. I know - I’ve been a victim | Anita Sethi
Depression, anxiety, panic attacks - it’s a major risk factor for mental health in adulthood. This Anti-Bullying Week, let’s encourage empathy and kindnessA scene that often replays in my mind is being 13 years old, curled up in the foetal position on the floor and being kicked in the ribs. I’m screaming but then my voice catches and becomes a silence that sticks as a lump in the throat that stays there for years.
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UK must commit to ban on preventive use of antibiotics in animals | Letter 16 Nov 2018, 1:00am UK must commit to ban on preventive use of antibiotics in animals | Letter
The government must place public health at the heart of its farm antibiotic policies, say representatives of medical royal colleges and othersLast month the European parliament voted by over 97% for new legislation which will ban preventive antibiotic treatments of groups of healthy animals by 2022. We warmly welcome this major step towards responsible use of antibiotics in livestock. The UK government played an active role in the drafting of the new regulations and says it plans to implement them. However, the government is refusing to accept that the legislation contains a clear ban on preventive group treatments. If the government allows group prevention to continue, the UK will have some of Europe’s weakest regulatory standards. This could seriously undermine progress being made in reducing UK farm antibiotic use. The government must place public health at the heart of its farm antibiotic policies and to commit unequivocally to banning preventive antibiotic group treatments in livestock.
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The British state has given up on the children who need it most | Gary Younge 16 Nov 2018, 1:00am The British state has given up on the children who need it most | Gary Younge
From knife crime to special needs and mental health, a lack of care caused by austerity is undermining the fabric of society Shirley (not her real name) tried her best. As her son grew into adolescence and became increasingly wayward she sought help. She enrolled in parenting classes, asked the council to relocate her family out of the London borough of Brent and had endless meetings with social workers and psychologists. She sought referrals for mental health assessments but was told her son Sean (not his real name) did not meet the threshold. She sent an email to her MP with the heading “
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