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Friday, November 9, 2018
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US democracy is in crisis. But Trump is only the symptom | Jonathan Freedland 9 Nov 1:00pm US democracy is in crisis. But Trump is only the symptom | Jonathan Freedland
A system that favours the white, rural minority over the diverse majority will soon lose legitimacy in the eyes of its citizensThe talk in the US is of constitutional crisis. It’s been looming for a while, thanks to the Mueller investigation into suspected collusion between the Trump campaign and Kremlin efforts to swing the 2016 election. At some point – perhaps when special counsel Robert Mueller
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The Guardian view on Mrs May’s Brexit: blocked by naysayers | Editorial 9 Nov 12:32pm The Guardian view on Mrs May’s Brexit: blocked by naysayers | Editorial
The prime minister has squandered opportunities to build bridges across parliament and is now paying a heavy priceIt is an unwritten rule of politics in Northern Ireland that everything proceeds from the word “no”. The establishment of trust in the dialogue that led eventually to the Good Friday agreement was a slow and meticulous business. The Democratic Unionist party never endorsed that deal, which is relevant to the difficulty Theresa May now has in persuading parliament to vote for any Brexit plan she might agree in Brussels. At the heart of the impasse is a historical fact that the leave campaign shamefully belittled: the Good Friday agreement was possible because both the UK and the Republic of Ireland were EU members. Brexit
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The Guardian view on black and white TV: a powerful blast from the past | Editorial 9 Nov 12:29pm The Guardian view on black and white TV: a powerful blast from the past | Editorial
More than half a century after the first colour broadcast, thousands of people are still watching television in monochrome. Why?The year’s
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Dominic Raab’s geography for dummies paves the way to an idiot’s Brexit | Marina Hyde 9 Nov 11:56am Dominic Raab’s geography for dummies paves the way to an idiot’s Brexit | Marina Hyde
Why does this government of the talentless have to be so brazen about demonstrating it every week?“I hadn’t quite understood the full extent of this, but if you look at the UK and if you look at how we trade in goods, we are particularly reliant on the Dover-Calais crossing.”
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Reflections on the first world war and Armistice Day | Letters 9 Nov 11:46am Reflections on the first world war and Armistice Day | Letters
On the 100th anniversary of the end of the first world war, readers share their thoughts on how the conflict shaped historyThe poppy is now a matter of controversy. Some claim it is a symbol of militarism and a glorification of war. In the parlance of today’s zero-sum dialogue, the poppy is tied to war, war is bad and should be ended, ergo sum the poppy is bad and should be eradicated. In a time when facts matter far less than feeling, this sounds like a convincing argument. So let’s look at some facts. The poppy as a symbol of remembrance was promoted by an American educator named
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Iceland’s Christmas ad was brave and necessary. It shouldn’t be banned | Jessica Brown 9 Nov 11:13am Iceland’s Christmas ad was brave and necessary. It shouldn’t be banned | Jessica Brown
The advert shone a light on the devastation caused by palm oil producers, a story TV viewers have a right to know about
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Justin Levene’s Luton airport protest should be a watershed moment for disabled people | James Coke 9 Nov 10:25am Justin Levene’s Luton airport protest should be a watershed moment for disabled people | James Coke
If all disabled people posted videos of being stuck on planes and trains, airlines and rail companies would have to change
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Why are there no asylum seekers in affluent Windsor, prime minister? 9 Nov 10:22am Why are there no asylum seekers in affluent Windsor, prime minister?
The UK’s most deprived wards, including several in Greater Manchester, are carrying a hugely disproportionate weight
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My kids have started school – and are giving me a lesson in class politics | Emma Brockes 9 Nov 10:12am My kids have started school – and are giving me a lesson in class politics | Emma Brockes
While the children usually resolve their disputes by the end of the day, we parents look at one another with murder in our eyesTwo and a half months ago, when my kids started school, I imagined the biggest challenge would be socialisation. At nursery they’d had “friends” in the way it might be imagined slow-moving animals in a field have friends – which is to say animals doing the same thing as them but several feet over there. At school, by contrast, they have to choose whom to sit with. And so the rigmarole of popularity begins. What I hadn’t realised was how much this process was going to involve me. The socialisation – or rather resocialisation of parents who experienced classroom politics approximately 300 years ago, and have to rapidly dust off the machinery – has been shocking. I am 42, and, like everyone else of that age, screen my calls, ignore my voicemail, use my children to get out of doing things I don’t want to do, and am extremely agile at avoiding those I dislike. Well, those days are over. In the interests of protecting my children’s social life, all of a sudden I have to play nice.
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We can’t let poorer pupils be frightened off higher education | Claire Hynes 9 Nov 9:47am We can’t let poorer pupils be frightened off higher education | Claire Hynes
University offers tremendous benefits, to the individual and for society. It must not be so costly that it is only for the privilegedBack in the days when higher education was mostly for the benefit of a select group of middle-class kids, I had a meeting with my school careers teacher, who asked me what I wanted to do in the future. When I told her I was thinking about furthering my studies and finding a job that involved writing, she declared that a suitable plan for me was to leave school at 16 and train to become a secretary. Apparently I didn’t look like the sort of person who should attend university. Over time I’d come to believe these attitudes belonged to the past – a bygone age of middle-class privilege now thankfully over. Now, though, it seems that thinking has become core government policy.
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Why bookshops are unexpected beneficiaries of Brexit | Natalie Haynes 9 Nov 8:26am Why bookshops are unexpected beneficiaries of Brexit | Natalie Haynes
In the face of disaster, the public is arming itself with literary analysis to try to make sense of our scary new political worldOver the past two years, the nation has felt deeply divided. May, Corbyn, Brexit: supporters and detractors alike have seemed less capable than ever of seeing things from each other’s perspectives. The only thing on which we all seem to agree is the molten toxicity of
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As former Northern Ireland secretary I support the Irish backstop | Peter Hain 9 Nov 7:56am As former Northern Ireland secretary I support the Irish backstop | Peter Hain
Nothing is more important than the peace process – Theresa May must reject the hardline Tory dogma and abide by the lawIt comes as no surprise that the EU withdrawal negotiations are going to the wire on the Irish border. That’s because hardline Tories are actually demanding Theresa May ignore legal commitments she has already made – and that even they went along with. This issue has
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Britain is chronically overworked. A four-day week would liberate us | Owen Jones 9 Nov 6:52am Britain is chronically overworked. A four-day week would liberate us | Owen Jones
Free-market fundamentalism hasn’t freed us – it has trapped us. It’s time for the left to embrace a workplace revolutionWe are unlikely to spend our last moments regretting that we didn’t spend enough of our lives chained to a desk. We may instead find ourselves rueing the time we didn’t spend watching our children grow, or with our loved ones, or travelling, or on the cultural or leisure pursuits that bring us happiness. Alas: the average full-time British employee
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Black and white TVs are a lo-fi rebuke to a world gone wrong | Stuart Jeffries 9 Nov 5:50am Black and white TVs are a lo-fi rebuke to a world gone wrong | Stuart Jeffries
The UK has 7,000 households that shun colour television. They may be on to somethingWhen Lord of the Rings director Peter Jackson released the first world war documentary
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Twenty years on, the Human Rights Act has proved its worth | Scott Dawes 9 Nov 4:32am Twenty years on, the Human Rights Act has proved its worth | Scott Dawes
For soldiers’ families, Hillsborough relatives and victims of John Worboys, the act has been vital in their quest for justice
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Why I’ll be choosing poems instead of poppies this Armistice Day | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett 9 Nov 4:00am Why I’ll be choosing poems instead of poppies this Armistice Day | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
In this time of nationalism and bombast, the works of the war poets cut through – and remind us of our shared humanity There is so much fixation on the poppy as a symbol of remembrance these days that it seems almost forgotten that there can be other ways to pay tribute to those lost in war. A red poppy – which can now be obtained in various sizes and at various levels of bling – is an outward display, a signal to others that you care in the correct fashion. Over the past few years, what was once a humble paper token has become, for some people at least, a way of sniffing out patriot from traitor. Satirical Twitter account
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Commercial broke: the Christmas adverts that got it wrong | Hannah Jane Parkinson 9 Nov 3:00am Commercial broke: the Christmas adverts that got it wrong | Hannah Jane Parkinson
From plagiarism rows to a David Lynch-esque nativity, the ads that have failed to spread seasonal goodwill Happy Christmas! Or it will be for those of us who hate festive ad campaigns and the social media buzz that goes with them.
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Can’t get a pension, can’t get work: a special dystopia for older women | Gaby Hinsliff 9 Nov 1:00am Can’t get a pension, can’t get work: a special dystopia for older women | Gaby Hinsliff
Older women face considerable prejudices at work, and now they are being forced to retire later. Old-held assumptions must be challenged Emile Ratelband wants to be younger. He wouldn’t be the first 69-year-old man to say so but what makes Ratelband unusual, to put it mildly, is that he has
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We now know it’s folly to rage against Trump | Simon Jenkins 9 Nov 1:00am We now know it’s folly to rage against Trump | Simon Jenkins
The president will never be out-ranted. These elections show that his supporters still want to be heardIn the
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Let’s stop lining housebuilders’ pockets and tax them instead | Aditya Chakrabortty 9 Nov 1:00am Let’s stop lining housebuilders’ pockets and tax them instead | Aditya Chakrabortty
Jeff Fairburn’s £75m bonus has sharpened focus on the vast windfalls generated by help to buy When historians seek to understand just how blatantly warped British capitalism became in the early 21st century, they will turn to a recent edition of
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