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Thursday, November 8, 2018
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Prince Charles is like a Shakespeare character – just not the one he thinks | Sian Cain 8 Nov 1:43pm Prince Charles is like a Shakespeare character – just not the one he thinks | Sian Cain
The Prince of Wales likened himself to Prince Hal, but he’s more like the high-rolling Richard IIJust as children like to pretend to be kings and queens, so royals love to flatter their own self-image. In the BBC’s documentary to mark his 70th birthday this week, Prince Charles invoked Shakespeare’s laddish take on Prince Hal to pooh-pooh the idea that as king he’d continue meddling in politics and bothering ministers with his thoughts. As an ageing prince, he has of course spent decades doing just that. “You can’t be the same as the sovereign if you’re the Prince of Wales or the heir,” Charles observed. “But the idea somehow that I’m going to go on in exactly the same way if I have to succeed is complete nonsense because the two situations are completely different. You only have to look at Shakespeare plays, Henry V or Henry IV Parts I and II, to see the change that can take place. Because if you become the sovereign then you play the role in the way that it is expected.”
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The Guardian view on the Armistice centenary: a missed chance to learn the biggest lesson | Editorial 8 Nov 1:33pm The Guardian view on the Armistice centenary: a missed chance to learn the biggest lesson | Editorial
A century after the guns finally fell silent, Britain is struggling to give itself a balanced account of the first world war’s past and present significanceOne hundred years ago this Sunday, at 11 o’clock on the morning of 11 November 1918, the guns fell silent in France. Nearly a million British combatants had died since August 1914; another eight million died from other nations. The occasion was so momentous that it is still marked each year with solemn ceremonies across the land and in the annual wearing of poppies. No one now survives who fought in what contemporaries called, without irony, the Great War. Only a handful now have any memory of the Armistice itself. Nevertheless, Sunday’s commemorations, including a
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In search of a fairer system of taxation | Letters 8 Nov 12:49pm In search of a fairer system of taxation | Letters
Readers respond to Polly Toynbee’s suggestion that the inability to raise tax has become Britain’s political diseasePolly Toynbee’s suggestion that higher taxes for all are inevitable (
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Child imprisonment is wrong – let’s end it | Letter 8 Nov 12:48pm Child imprisonment is wrong – let’s end it | Letter
Representatives of Article 39, Inquest, the Howard League and the National Association for Youth Justice join others to announce the launch this month of England’s first collaborative campaign to end the incarceration of under-18sMark Johnson is right that we should feel deeply uncomfortable about incarcerating children (
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Too late for Norris the Rubberman, alas | Brief letters 8 Nov 12:47pm Too late for Norris the Rubberman, alas | Brief letters
Lewes bonfire and dogs | Grimsby’s heritage | Nettle soup | Roald Dahl, Churchill and racism | BookTrust | Theresa May’s churchgoingThe reference to “the vanity of the bonfires” (
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Trump isn’t going anywhere. It’s time for ‘Europe First’ | Martin Kettle 8 Nov 12:21pm Trump isn’t going anywhere. It’s time for ‘Europe First’ | Martin Kettle
With America no longer a reliable ally, Britain must hug its natural partners close if it wants to defend its interestsFew things about British political culture are as characteristic and as demeaning as the collective cringe before the United States. The cringe takes many forms. It ranges from the inflated preoccupation with the
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Populism, Trump and the US midterms – Politics Weekly podcast 8 Nov 11:53am Populism, Trump and the US midterms – Politics Weekly podcast
Pippa Crerar is joined by Gary Younge, Matthew Goodwin, Stephen Booth and Rafael Behr to discuss the results of the US midterms, and what the results mean for the tide of national populism around the world It was a tale of two chambers: in Tuesday’s US midterms the Democrats’ so-called ‘blue wave’ won the House of Representatives, while Republicans expanded their majority in the Senate. So how bad were the results for Donald Trump? And in the wake of the midterm results, we discuss whether national populism is on the wane. Is populism a last protest vote from an ageing electorate, or is it more than that?
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Has nobody told Dominic Raab that Britain is an island? | Rafael Behr 8 Nov 11:45am Has nobody told Dominic Raab that Britain is an island? | Rafael Behr
The baffling ignorance of the Brexit secretary further erodes the idea that a successful Brexit is possibleIn July 2016, on the eve of his appointment as secretary of state for Brexit,
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It is hypocritical to demand Kate Osamor’s son loses his job | Michael Segalov 8 Nov 9:58am It is hypocritical to demand Kate Osamor’s son loses his job | Michael Segalov
Some MPs have admitted taking drugs, so why do others want a man punished beyond what the courts decided? In July 2007, the then home secretary Jacqui Smith admitted to having
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Why do some schools still ban girls from playing football? | Anna Kessel 8 Nov 8:58am Why do some schools still ban girls from playing football? | Anna Kessel
Football is our national sport and yet some schools continue to offer it solely to boys Imagine a school that divided its subjects by gender. A school that didn’t allow girls to study chemistry or algebra, and the only way to access those subjects was to pursue private tuition outside of school hours at their own expense. There would, rightly, be outrage. When it comes to PE lessons, however, it remains perfectly acceptable for a school to offer different sports to boys and girls. The rationale? Archaic and gendered ideas about physical activity: football and rugby are best suited to boys; netball and dance are best for girls. At the same time that we have public health and sports governing bodies working to promote football and rugby to women and girls, we are turning a blind eye to a blatantly sexist and outdated practice in education that tells girls those very same sports are not for them.
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The US press corps has to learn to stand up to Trump | Suzanne Moore 8 Nov 8:15am The US press corps has to learn to stand up to Trump | Suzanne Moore
Journalists are too complicit in the ritual degradations at the president’s press conferences. Why not just walk out?What sort of person sits and watches a colleague being bullied and says nothing? Someone in a low-status job fearful of their boss, someone with low self-esteem who thinks they can do nothing, someone who feels powerless. Someone who is a coward? Maybe. This is the way the bully is sanctified and lives to fight another day. I wouldn’t say that my profession is full of people with low self-esteem or who are easily cowed. I like to think of all the noble and brave reporters out there; I know most hacks are egomaniacs. So how then do we explain the entire press corps at
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I am a refugee in a Libyan camp. Conditions are so bad, people are dying | Thomas Issak 8 Nov 7:55am I am a refugee in a Libyan camp. Conditions are so bad, people are dying | Thomas Issak
Even if UN inspectors see the guards beating us, they don’t intervene. All we want to do is get out of Libya I tried to reach Europe at the start of this year. We were in the boat for 26 hours, in the middle of the Mediterranean, and an Italian helicopter came to take photos. After that, the Libyan coastguards appeared to take us back to Libya, and they brought us to hell. Since then, I’ve been in a detention centre in Tripoli. As of today, infected people here have gone three weeks without tuberculosis medication, and now we think all the men and boys have it. Doctors stopped showing up, they stopped the medicine, and we all live together. Even the guards don’t come near us, they tell others not to come close. The place we are living in is like a cave. There are no windows. There is no fresh air. We share beds, cups, almost everything. To pass time we pray in the morning. We sit. We sleep. It’s dark inside all day.
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This Christmas, beware evangelical Christians bearing gifts | Polly Toynbee 8 Nov 7:06am This Christmas, beware evangelical Christians bearing gifts | Polly Toynbee
The Samaritan’s Purse charity sends gift boxes to children in Muslim countries. They contain a pernicious, hidden agendaAll over the country,
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Spare a thought for Britain’s veterans left to battle their demons alone | Andy Price 8 Nov 7:03am Spare a thought for Britain’s veterans left to battle their demons alone | Andy Price
As Armistice Day nears, we shouldn’t forget the struggles of those from other conflicts whose mental scars go untreated It’s late afternoon and once again I find myself in the family room of the A&E unit at our local hospital, attempting to reassure an armed forces veteran that he won’t be turned away and that we will get him the support he so desperately needs. This isn’t the first time I’ve been here under these circumstances and it won’t be the last. This former soldier had come to the veterans’ support project that I run earlier in the day; eyes wide and frightened, barely able to talk. One arm was crisscrossed with self-inflicted lacerations made with an old army lock knife to distract from the traumas that relentlessly haunt him. This once proud man, who served his country for almost a decade and a half, being deployed on numerous operations and reaching the rank of sergeant, is now living in a low-dependency residential unit for veterans who require extra support. All these men are diagnosed with mental health difficulties; some are dependent on alcohol and drugs.
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Nostalgia is on the rise in Europe – and it needn’t be a bad thing | Julian Baggini 8 Nov 6:11am Nostalgia is on the rise in Europe – and it needn’t be a bad thing | Julian Baggini
We can’t return to the past, no matter what populist politicians promise. But we can learn from it to build a better futureThere’s a lot of truth in the old joke that nostalgia ain’t what it used to be. The word itself has a sense that has been largely lost. Its original 17th-century coinage was as a kind of mental illness, a homesickness suffered by soldiers on foreign campaigns. Only lately did it morph into a warm, indulgent enjoyment of how things used to be. Now nostalgia seems to be changing once again, turning into a different kind of pathology, one that infects not individuals but society. Bertelsmann Stiftung, a German foundation,
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National populism is unstoppable – and the left still doesn’t understand why | Matthew Goodwin 8 Nov 5:05am National populism is unstoppable – and the left still doesn’t understand why | Matthew Goodwin
It’s not about immigration, the financial crisis, globalisation or inequality, but evidence of a broader, older social fragmentationFor a number of years Europe has been in the midst of a significant challenge from national populism, as a succession of recent elections have shown in
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The government is dealing out gagging clauses – and stifling the truth | Nick Dearden 8 Nov 3:57am The government is dealing out gagging clauses – and stifling the truth | Nick Dearden
From Brexit experts to Grenfell inspectors, non-government organisations are being told not to create ‘adverse publicity’
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Fines for partying won’t make students better neighbours | Coco Khan 8 Nov 3:00am Fines for partying won’t make students better neighbours | Coco Khan
Learning to socialise is an important aspect of university life. So cut the kids some slack Spare a thought for the UK university student forever locked in a losing battle against
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Listening to the gambling industry is terrible economics | Larry Elliott 8 Nov 1:00am Listening to the gambling industry is terrible economics | Larry Elliott
Philip Hammond has got his sums wrong in backing jobs in bookies over fixed-odds betting terminals Philip Hammond makes an unlikely defender of the gambling industry. The chancellor is a frugal man who rather relishes his nickname of Spreadsheet Phil. He is certainly not a politician you would ever find pumping £100 a time into a fixed-odds betting terminal (FOBT) at a high street bookies. Yet,
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The UK-France alliance is crucial to Europe’s security. Brexit must not threaten it | George Robertson and Bernard Cazeneuve 8 Nov 1:00am The UK-France alliance is crucial to Europe’s security. Brexit must not threaten it | George Robertson and Bernard Cazeneuve
As Europe’s foremost military powers, we have forged a strong relationship. But we need to nurture itWith the clock ticking and 29 March 2019 approaching ever closer, Brexit negotiations are entering their final, frantic stage. While the EU27 and Britain continue to disagree over the
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Joyless bores? No, today’s young are quiet revolutionaries | Dorian Lynskey 8 Nov 1:00am Joyless bores? No, today’s young are quiet revolutionaries | Dorian Lynskey
The younger generation have been caricatured as easily offended puritans. But they just want to expand freedom for all The natural process of generational change was memorably summed up by Grampa Simpson in The Simpsons episode
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