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Democrats Abandon the Constitution 15 Oct 11:41pm Updated Democrats Abandon the Constitution
The Kavanaugh battle lost, they claim the Electoral College, Senate and judiciary are illegitimate.
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Democrats for Big Money 15 Oct 7:21pm Updated Democrats for Big Money
Whatever happened to the corrupting influence of billionaires?
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What Hillsdale Can Teach Harvard 15 Oct 7:14pm Updated What Hillsdale Can Teach Harvard
Give up federal dollars, and you can run your admissions the way you want.
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Harness the Market to Manage the Climate 15 Oct 7:13pm Updated Harness the Market to Manage the Climate
The problem is dire, but the solution isn’t command and control.
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15 Oct 3:59pm Updated Did Elizabeth Warren Just Kill Identity Politics?
If the Massachusetts senator is now a person of color then the term has no meaning.
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Feel no pity for Theresa May – this Brexit bind is of her own making | Polly Toynbee 15 Oct 2:27pm Feel no pity for Theresa May – this Brexit bind is of her own making | Polly Toynbee
The prime minister will have to tell the Brexiteer bullies to put up with a Norway solution or shut up, and let the people voteTheresa May’s week began with an early-morning visit to a
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Martin Rowson on fracking/Brexit backstop controversies – cartoon 15 Oct 2:08pm Martin Rowson on fracking/Brexit backstop controversies – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2018/oct/15/martin-rowson-on-frackingbrexit-backstop-controversies-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on populism: belonging not believing | Editorial 15 Oct 12:58pm The Guardian view on populism: belonging not believing | Editorial
When religious and nationalist longings combine, progressives need a powerful counter-narrativeThe
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The Guardian view on rising infant mortality: a warning from data | Editorial 15 Oct 12:55pm The Guardian view on rising infant mortality: a warning from data | Editorial
Baby deaths cause untold sadness, and preventing them is a marker of civilisation. That’s why these statistics from England and Wales are devastatingSince the 19th century, infant mortality has been viewed as a marker of civilisation. In Victorian Britain between a quarter and a third of all babies died. Following a century and a half of progress in health, education and sanitation, the figure today is nearly 100 times better, 3.8 per 1,000. But infant mortality has risen for two years in a row. In 2016, 2,651 babies under one died in England and Wales, an increase of 134 in just two years. In 2016
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Fried chicken, chips and global warming | Letters 15 Oct 11:57am Fried chicken, chips and global warming | Letters
Readers discuss the rights and wrongs of eating meat when the world faces the challenge of climate changeSome of the last week’s news items paint a grim portrait of our world: a final warning about climate change (
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A shared passion for post offices | Letters 15 Oct 11:56am A shared passion for post offices | Letters
The chief executive officer of Post Office Ltd and several people who run small post offices join the debate on the future of an imperilled British institutionKeith Potter (
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Finding hope in the reign of a super-ego | Letters 15 Oct 11:56am Finding hope in the reign of a super-ego | Letters
Guardian readers respond to Gary Greenberg’s essay on Trumpian psychoanalysisGary Greenberg’s beautifully written but flawed account of the first two years of the Trump presidency highlights the limitations of using psychoanalytic concepts to explain wider political and social developments (
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For me, holiday hell is other people | Letter 15 Oct 11:56am For me, holiday hell is other people | Letter
I enjoy experiencing the world in my own way and at my own pace, writes solo traveller
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The best place to answer the call of nature? | Brief letters 15 Oct 11:55am The best place to answer the call of nature? | Brief letters
Referendums | Stupidity | National Trust land | The DUP | Public toiletsGary Younge makes the stark and startling revelation that roughly half of the few remaining Conservative party members support the death penalty (
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We need the Scotsman more than ever, but who will safeguard its future? | Lindsay Mackie 15 Oct 11:55am We need the Scotsman more than ever, but who will safeguard its future? | Lindsay Mackie
For 200 years, it has been the liberal voice of Scottish culture and aspiration. Long may that continueAround 1840, a distinguished editor of the Scotsman called Charles Maclaren proved, with the help of an equally distinguished Swiss geologist called Louis Agassiz, that there had been an ice age in Scotland 10,000 years before, and that the country had been shaped and marked by something that, until then, people had not been aware of. It was a worldwide scoop, and its central piece of evidence was a vast, scarred rock on Blackford Hill in Edinburgh. With the news that Scotland’s national newspaper, 200 years old last year, is
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Jeremy Hunt poses in a maze. Behind him lurks the Brexit Minotaur | Jonathan Jones 15 Oct 11:14am Jeremy Hunt poses in a maze. Behind him lurks the Brexit Minotaur | Jonathan Jones
The image of the foreign secretary with his EU counterparts looks comical at first, but there are dark echoes to itThe moment over the weekend when the foreign secretary, Jeremy Hunt, and his fellow European foreign ministers
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Hillary Clinton’s view on the Lewinsky affair reveals a huge blindspot that cost her the presidency | Suzanne Moore 15 Oct 11:06am Hillary Clinton’s view on the Lewinsky affair reveals a huge blindspot that cost her the presidency | Suzanne Moore
Clinton is right to say Trump should be investigated for sexual misconduct, but this does not excuse her husband. Now it is Monica Lewinsky who is emerging with class The last time I looked, Bill Clinton was leering at Ariana Grande as she was singing at
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The world can no longer ignore Saudi Arabia’s human rights abuses | Rodney Dixon 15 Oct 10:49am The world can no longer ignore Saudi Arabia’s human rights abuses | Rodney Dixon
After Jamal Khashoggi’s disappearance, it’s time to stop pretending that locking up dissidents is normalFor the
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Shaun Bailey is not the mayor London’s women need 15 Oct 10:33am Shaun Bailey is not the mayor London’s women need
His remarks in a 2007 Guardian interview make for chilling reading. Where does the Conservative party find its candidates? Not content with insulting
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Happy 60th birthday Blue Peter – from a proud former guest 15 Oct 10:19am Happy 60th birthday Blue Peter – from a proud former guest
As a young girl, Zoe Williams was invited on to the show to sing carols as a man threw fake snow in her face. She recalls her favourite moments, from the out-of-control Brownie bonfire – to Anthea Turner’s cardboard Thunderbirds island Blue Peter was created exactly 60 years ago by a man with a name like a limerick, John Hunter Blair. Despite its high formality – presenters buttoned up like teachers, voices like newscasters but more cheerful – the show had a radical format. It took a novel view of children, regarding them as an audience with their own tastes and interests, rather than as interim humans to be quieted while you waited for them to see sense. The one constant across the decades has been viewer participation, with its rather broad invitation to send in literally anything interesting – a poem perhaps, or a fascinating rock. Or even yourself: for to be invited into the studio for any purpose was, and perhaps remains, the most exciting thing that could happen to a child. And that’s what happened to me in 1983.
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Why ‘no surrender’ on Brexit is a bad strategy for the DUP | Bobby McDonagh 15 Oct 8:32am Why ‘no surrender’ on Brexit is a bad strategy for the DUP | Bobby McDonagh
I understand many unionists are not happy. But the alternative to compromise would not be stalemate, but a Brexit that does them no favoursRespect for unionist aspirations is a requirement of the Good Friday agreement. If we are to deepen friendship on our small island that respect should be written in our hearts. Parity of esteem, which requires equal respect for nationalist aspirations, must work in both directions. As a former Irish diplomat, I come from a different tradition from unionism, but it is with that awareness that I offer the following thoughts.
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Harry and Meghan’s baby news is lovely – but it’s a distraction from what the nation really needs | Suzanne Moore 15 Oct 7:47am Harry and Meghan’s baby news is lovely – but it’s a distraction from what the nation really needs | Suzanne Moore
The nation increasingly feels little connection to the old elites. Another royal isn’t the rebirth this country is crying out for Womb watch actually started a few weeks ago. I was pretty revolted when people started talking about how “chunky” Meghan looked in a leather pencil skirt on a visit to Sussex. For the royals, any woman with any kind of tummy either signals an appetite beyond all control (Fergie) or, more usually, that they are doing their duty and breeding in captivity. Don’t get me wrong: babies, happy couples, people being in love – I am not untouched by
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Don’t let Johnson and Rees-Mogg hold the UK to ransom | Simon Jenkins 15 Oct 6:47am Don’t let Johnson and Rees-Mogg hold the UK to ransom | Simon Jenkins
Post-Brexit Britain will be better off if it continues to trade with the EU. To claim otherwise puts tens of thousands of jobs at riskBrinkmanship needs a brink. Britain’s EU brink comes as border gates slam shut at Dover, the
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Would you eat insects to save the planet from global warming? | Jessica Brown 15 Oct 4:10am Would you eat insects to save the planet from global warming? | Jessica Brown
More people would give up meat for edible bugs if they believed they were tasty and trendyThe thought of rising sea levels and more intense heatwaves are enough to keep you up at night. But while we all know the situation is getting more serious, most of us are preoccupied with work, doctor’s appointments and paying bills – and these immediate, visceral worries win every time. There isn’t much time left to figure out how to bring global warming closer to the forefront of people’s minds and persuade us to reduce our carbon footprints. In fact, we have just 12 years left to keep global warming to 1.5C, according to
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Does Kanye West really deserve to be called an Uncle Tom? | Nadifa Mohamed 15 Oct 3:37am Does Kanye West really deserve to be called an Uncle Tom? | Nadifa Mohamed
He says slavery was ‘a choice’. Yet he’s just the latest in a long line of minorities who have stood against their communityLast week rapper Kanye West
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We need to talk about...Extinction 15 Oct 1:30am We need to talk about...Extinction
This episode of our monthly podcast focuses on the increasingly devastating impacts of human behaviour on fauna and flora, and what can be done to protect species, locally and globally In this monthly podcast, Guardian supporters share their experiences and put questions to a panel of journalists and industry experts. This episode focuses on the demise of many aspects of the natural world. How can conservation be rebalanced with development? With finite resources available, who decides which species should be saved, and how is that decided? How can governments better commit to implementing sustainable, collaborative and international policies? And what can
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What’s the point of growth if it creates so much misery? | Lynsey Hanley 15 Oct 1:00am What’s the point of growth if it creates so much misery? | Lynsey Hanley
Forget the ‘high-skill, hi-tech’ obsession: we should invest in everyday services to create a society run for collective goodThe late Prof Mick Moran, who taught politics and government at Manchester University for most of his professional life, had, according to his colleagues, once had “a certain residual respect for our governing elites”. That all changed during the 2008 financial crisis, after which he experienced an epiphany “because it convinced him that the officer class in business and in politics did not know what it was doing”. After his epiphany, Moran formed a collective of academics dedicated to exposing the complacency of finance-worship and to replacing it with an idea of running modern economies focused on maximising social good. They called themselves the Foundational Economy Collective, based on the idea that it’s in the everyday economy where there is most potential for true social regeneration: not top-down cash-splashing, but renewal and replenishment from the ground upwards.
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Don’t let tech giants bury public service TV | Letters 15 Oct 1:00am Don’t let tech giants bury public service TV | Letters
Public service television shows must remain easy for audiences to find, say the heads of ITV, the BBC, Channel 4, Channel 5, STV and S4CThere is a global commercial battle going on to shape and influence what we watch, listen to or buy from the comfort of our homes. Whether it’s Amazon’s search results determining what we buy when we shop online, Facebook deciding which stories and posts we see on social media, or Google controlling the results when we search the internet, global technology firms are shaping our choices and our influences. Technological change is fundamentally changing the way people watch TV – superfast broadband delivers streaming services to the home through connected TVs and streaming sticks, 4G mobile allows people to watch on demand wherever they are, whenever they like. TV is no longer national, it’s global. For Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google, television is increasingly the frontline in the battle for global influence.
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