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Friday, January 12, 2018
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Sexual abuse in Westminster won’t be ended by the revamped ministerial code | Kate Maltby 12 Jan 2:53pm Sexual abuse in Westminster won’t be ended by the revamped ministerial code | Kate Maltby
My complaint against Damian Green was deemed ‘plausible’. Without an independent body to look at victims’ claims, others can’t hope for the same resultI have been trying not to think about sexual harassment in Westminster. In October, I publicly described an uncomfortable experience with Damian Green, then the de facto deputy prime minister. Although others have since minimised my story as a tale of a “touch on a knee”, I perceived that he was suggesting sex while offering me a job. I expected an apology – the headline of my piece acknowledged that men such as Green rarely realise they’re doing anything wrong. His actions – threatening to sue for libel, briefing the Daily Mail to destroy my reputation, which he has denied – turned it into all-out war.
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Referendum II is coming. Farage just can’t bear being a Brexit misfit | Marina Hyde 12 Jan 2:18pm Referendum II is coming. Farage just can’t bear being a Brexit misfit | Marina Hyde
Nigel backed Steve Bannon, but that blew up. So he’s back for one last job, to settle this thing once and for all. And then perhaps do it again“So maybe, just maybe,”
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The Guardian view on Germany’s coalition deal: Merkel in the balance | Editorial 12 Jan 1:35pm The Guardian view on Germany’s coalition deal: Merkel in the balance | Editorial
The coalition agreement in Berlin is step towards giving Germany a new government. But Angela Merkel’s future rests in the hands of her prospective partner partyCrisis? What crisis? With its buoyant economy, increasing industrial output, renewed export boom and its record low unemployment,
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The Guardian view on Tunisia unrest: riots redux? | Editorial 12 Jan 1:34pm The Guardian view on Tunisia unrest: riots redux? | Editorial
In 2011 Tunisia was the first Arab country to oust its dictator. People power is now targeting democratsTunisia is starting
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If Oprah took on Trump, he would be the ultimate winner | Jonathan Freedland 12 Jan 1:30pm If Oprah took on Trump, he would be the ultimate winner | Jonathan Freedland
She’s better than him in so many ways but, whoever the victor, such a contest would confirm his view of the presidency as a celebrity postDonald Trump is a stone-cold racist. There was surely no doubt about that, not after he launched his presidential campaign by branding
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A hollow ring to Theresa May’s pledge on plastics | Letters 12 Jan 1:25pm A hollow ring to Theresa May’s pledge on plastics | Letters
Theresa May’s new green strategy lacks regulatory bite, says
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Goodbye Berliner, auf wiedersehen Berlin, so long Labour? | Letters 12 Jan 1:22pm Goodbye Berliner, auf wiedersehen Berlin, so long Labour? | Letters
Just as the Guardian is changing format, so can the EU, but Labour must also change its approach to Brexit, says
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Having one’s royal cake and eating it | Brief letters 12 Jan 1:18pm Having one’s royal cake and eating it | Brief letters
Meghan Markle handshake | Apple’s tax payment | No bull | Tabloid Guardian | Philip Hammond | Rude place namesMeghan Markle visits a community radio station and meets staff on a magazine collective, in response to their invitation. She provides both with masses of invaluable publicity and, it appears, generates a great deal of pleasure. But, oh dear me, the magazine’s deputy editor, Charlie Brinkhurst-Cuff, a republican, feels compromised at shaking Meghan’s soon-to-be royal hand (
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The company that runs Britain is near to collapse. Watch and worry | Aditya Chakrabortty 12 Jan 10:16am The company that runs Britain is near to collapse. Watch and worry | Aditya Chakrabortty
Carillion builds schools, roads, hospitals – and it’s meant to be a big part of HS2. What’s more, if it goes bust, the bill will be picked up by taxpayersYou may never have heard of Carillion. There’s no reason you should have. Its lack of glamour is neatly summed up by the name it sported in the 90s: Tarmac. But since then it has grown and grown to become the UK’s second-largest building firm – and one of the biggest contractors to the British government. Name an infrastructure pie in the UK and the chances are Carillion has its fingers in it: the
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Philip Dunne, sacked after his NHS remarks, must now face his constituents | Tess Finch-Lees 12 Jan 8:51am Philip Dunne, sacked after his NHS remarks, must now face his constituents | Tess Finch-Lees
I was not surprised by my MP’s callous comments about patients without beds using seats instead. Look at what has been happening in his own backyardThe sacked health minister Philip Dunne was booed and heckled at a local meeting recently, for hiding behind his ministerial role as a pretext for abandoning constituents (of whom I’m one) to the ravages of NHS cuts. His callous
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With sexual abuse rife in my industry, how can I vote in the Baftas? | Bridget Lawless 12 Jan 7:31am With sexual abuse rife in my industry, how can I vote in the Baftas? | Bridget Lawless
Until films can guarantee that nobody was harmed in their making, I do not want to risk allowing even one casting couch perpetrator to bask in momentary glory The film business is in an almighty mess – caught between a past it was shimmeringly proud of, a present where everyone in it is affected by
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The fabulous new US embassy is best not tainted by a Trump visit | Oliver Wainwright 12 Jan 6:49am The fabulous new US embassy is best not tainted by a Trump visit | Oliver Wainwright
The president has cancelled his visit, blaming the Obama administration for a ‘bad deal’ – but actually the new building is a progressive beaconRaised on a hill, surrounded by a moat and bristling with all the anti-terrorist measures known to man, the
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Cameroon’s heartbreaking struggles are a relic of British colonialism | Eliza Anyangwe 12 Jan 5:25am Cameroon’s heartbreaking struggles are a relic of British colonialism | Eliza Anyangwe
The southern Cameroonians’ right to self-determination was thwarted by British imperial arrogance. The violent, anti-democratic fallout continues today
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Trump’s cut to funding for Palestinian refugees could lead to disaster | Mick Dumper 12 Jan 4:39am Trump’s cut to funding for Palestinian refugees could lead to disaster | Mick Dumper
Although a final decision is still pending, the loss of UN money would have a catastrophic affect on Middle East security in both the short and long termHaving survived the recent cabinet reshuffle the
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Inspired by Momentum, Labour can transform the heartlands – and itself | Laura Parker 12 Jan 2:59am Inspired by Momentum, Labour can transform the heartlands – and itself | Laura Parker
Ordinary people helping neglected communities – Corbyn’s vision spells the end of top-down New Labourism, and the start of a mass movement to power For too long, towns at the end of train lines and cities that once were bustling manufacturing hubs have been left behind by politics. In their glory days, places in my home county of Yorkshire such as Sheffield and Hull were heartlands of British industry. Building ships to protect the nation, making steel that was sold worldwide – these places thrived. Deindustrialisation and a lack of government investment have robbed these communities of well-paid jobs, opportunities and, for many, hope. They are scarred by job losses and unemployment; shops have fled from their high streets; and the lives of their young people are marred by uncertainty. These communities have been failed by politicians on both sides of parliament’s benches.
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A threatened species? No, but it’s true that men will lose out | Gaby Hinsliff 12 Jan 1:00am A threatened species? No, but it’s true that men will lose out | Gaby Hinsliff
It’s not possible to ditch a system that held women back without consequences for some men, especially mediocre onesSometimes it’s hard to be a man. No, honestly. Sometimes it really is, especially if you’re a certain sort of man; the sort for whom maleness would, a few decades ago, have been their biggest trump card.
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Mme Deneuve, whatever happened to female solidarity in France? | Kim Willsher 12 Jan 1:00am Mme Deneuve, whatever happened to female solidarity in France? | Kim Willsher
The anti-#MeToo letter shows little has changed in French feminism since the Dominique Strauss-Kahn scandalFeminism in France is as old as the revolution. It’s just not feminism as many of us know it. The anti-#MeToo letter signed by French national treasure
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Tech bosses limit their kids’ time on smartphones: why shouldn’t we? | Jean Twenge 12 Jan 1:00am Tech bosses limit their kids’ time on smartphones: why shouldn’t we? | Jean Twenge
Parents fret about harmful content, but reducing device use to 90 minutes a day would be good for mental healthWe’ve all seen it – teenagers glued to their phones, not even glancing up when their parents talk to them; kids immersed in tablets at airports; young friends around restaurant tables staring at their phones instead of each other. As children and young people spend an increasing amount of time with screens – more than six hours a day
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