Back Opinion Tuesday, March 7, 2017
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I went to jail for handing out feminist stickers in China | Li Maizi 7 Mar 2017, 8:59pm I went to jail for handing out feminist stickers in China | Li Maizi
The backlash is painful, but it coexists with progress as women activists manage – slowly – to bring about a change in attitudesI often think of the day I was detained in Beijing. On the night of 6 March 2015, the police knocked on my door and took me to the station, where I was questioned nonstop for 24 hours. Later I was sent to a detention centre, where I was held for 37 days.
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The Pyongyang-Beijing Axis 7 Mar 2017, 7:19pm The Pyongyang-Beijing Axis
U.S. and South Korean forces begin deploying new missile defenses.
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Populism Need Not Be Undemocratic 7 Mar 2017, 7:12pm Populism Need Not Be Undemocratic
Differences on policy aren’t the same thing as assaults on basic institutions.
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So Far, So Good, Mr. Trump 7 Mar 2017, 7:09pm So Far, So Good, Mr. Trump
Seven weeks in and he’s sticking to his promises to help the urban poor and improve school choice.
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Why don’t India’s feminists call out doctors doing unnecessary C-sections? | Mari Marcel Thekaekara 7 Mar 2017, 7:01pm Why don’t India’s feminists call out doctors doing unnecessary C-sections? | Mari Marcel Thekaekara
Caesareans have turned into a moneymaking racket. Surely, on International Women’s Day, we should be talking about pregnant women’s rightsIn India, childbirth has turned into a moneymaking racket, with caesarean sections pushed by unscrupulous medical practitioners in search of profit. Healthy young women who could easily have had normal, natural deliveries are lied to, told that they and their babies are at risk, and advised to have invasive surgery. Worried families feel helpless and afraid to refuse doctors’ orders. Thousands of women in even the smallest towns are put through this ordeal for no medical reason at all. Until 2010, C-sections were limited to 8.5% of all deliveries in India, just under the recommended level of 10-15%, according to a
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Trump, Trade and American Sovereignty 7 Mar 2017, 6:59pm Trump, Trade and American Sovereignty
The WTO’s process for settling disputes fails to deter violators and leaches national power.
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A Shiny Border Wall That Pays for Itself 7 Mar 2017, 6:57pm A Shiny Border Wall That Pays for Itself
Forget a traditional barrier and build a 2,000 mile solar field along the border.
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A Business Proposition for Federal Prisoner No. 1600 7 Mar 2017, 6:55pm A Business Proposition for Federal Prisoner No. 1600
Trump should treat his company the way an inmate must—meaning no day-to-day decisions.
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Nicola Jennings on grammar schools – cartoon 7 Mar 2017, 3:36pm Nicola Jennings on grammar schools – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2017/mar/07/nicola-jennings-grammar-schools-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on the Lords and Brexit: this is not the peers versus the people | Editorial 7 Mar 2017, 2:18pm The Guardian view on the Lords and Brexit: this is not the peers versus the people | Editorial
Last night’s Lords amendment to require parliament to have a meaningful vote on any Brexit deal is politically and constitutionally the right thing. It should not be overturned
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The Guardian view on domestic abuse: cuts cost lives | Editorial 7 Mar 2017, 2:13pm The Guardian view on domestic abuse: cuts cost lives | Editorial
The prime minister has shown a laudable commitment to tackling domestic abuse. But austerity has slashed the funding for essential servicesTomorrow
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First Dog on the Moon goes to south-west Tasmania (and totally freaks out) 7 Mar 2017, 2:00pm First Dog on the Moon goes to south-west Tasmania (and totally freaks out)
A happy confluence of things has meant this part of the world is just crap enough to keep people away. Just kidding, it’s actually unspeakably beautiful I went to south-west Tasmania and totally freaked out. Oh my goodness – simply one of the most beautiful, haunting, weirdy landscapes I have ever had the good fortune to go and look at. The Port Davey marine reserve is huge, three times the size of Sydney Harbour and that is just the wet bits. The landscape is dominated by numerous ridiculous golden grey green mountain ranges barging about, each covered with white quartzite rocks and cliffs and boulders thrusting out of them, from their tops right down to the harbours and bays and channels. Beautiful white quartzite sandy beaches and button grass plains covered in button grass. There is goddamn button grass everywhere you look, nothing wrong with that, though, there are worse plants – like the cactus I found in a plastic bag on the street a few years ago. I took it home and stuck it in a pot and it lived! I call it the Evil Space Cactus because it is the most ferocious prickly bastard you can’t go anywhere near it. It is getting huge.
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A day to strike a blow for women’s rights | Letters 7 Mar 2017, 1:44pm A day to strike a blow for women’s rights | Letters
In the wake of the intensifying war against women internationally and the growing resistance to it, there is a call for an international women’s strike on International Women’s Day, 8 March. Inspired by the women’s strikes in Iceland and then in Poland last autumn in response to the attempts to further criminalise abortion, women in Argentina who are part of the #NiUnaMenos (Not one less) protests against femicide launched a call for an international strike to protest against all violence against women – including economic violence. The magnificent women’s protests against Trump gave further impetus with the call being taken up in the US and more than 30 countries across the globe.
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Universities’ drive to tackle sex harassment | Letters 7 Mar 2017, 1:43pm Universities’ drive to tackle sex harassment | Letters
Your article is right to identify the need to do more to tackle sexual harassment and violence in our society (
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How decking drove wildlife from the city | Letters 7 Mar 2017, 1:42pm How decking drove wildlife from the city | Letters
Patrick Barkham’s remarks on garden decking and wildlife loss (
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Free-range cows are a modern invention | Letters 7 Mar 2017, 1:42pm Free-range cows are a modern invention | Letters
The overarching assumption in Joanna Blythman’s anthropomorphic
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The Lords can sort out themselves | Letters 7 Mar 2017, 1:41pm The Lords can sort out themselves | Letters
May I comment on two contributions to the debate about the future of the House of Lords published in the last two weeks? On 24 February, Meg Russell argued (
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Workers’ co-ops deserve a break | Letters 7 Mar 2017, 1:41pm Workers’ co-ops deserve a break | Letters
As the government strives to create a more inclusive economy, the chancellor would do well to consider who gets tax breaks in this week’s budget. Last year £220m from the public purse was given to just 40,000 high earners through two employee share schemes. So here’s an idea. We know that worker co-ops are a more effective way to give people a stake in the economy. What if this money were redirected and invested in helping low- and middle-income workers set up businesses they owned and ran themselves? That, surely, would be a real step the chancellor could make toward a more inclusive economy.
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Cycling in Welsh weather is no picnic | Letters 7 Mar 2017, 1:40pm Cycling in Welsh weather is no picnic | Letters
Welsh weather | Gunpowder cake | Jam | Soviet Winnie the Pooh | The spirit of footballClaire Armitstead (
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The Catholic church is ‘shocked’ at the hundreds of children buried at Tuam. Really? | Emer O’Toole 7 Mar 2017, 12:35pm The Catholic church is ‘shocked’ at the hundreds of children buried at Tuam. Really? | Emer O’Toole
The discovery of remains at a former home for unmarried mothers shows that Ireland is still in denial over a horrific legacyIt has been confirmed that significant numbers of children’s remains
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The town that pioneered multiculturalism | Nadifa Mohamed 7 Mar 2017, 11:46am The town that pioneered multiculturalism | Nadifa Mohamed
Long before the term for ethnic diversity had even been coined, Butetown in Cardiff was home to communities from all corners of the globeI have become a stalker of old men. I seek them out in community centres, cafes and mosques, in their cluttered flats and in dark alleys. I don’t want anything nefarious with them, just to capture their memories. My speciality is old Somali men, especially those in Cardiff. Having grown up in London, where it is anathema to turn up unannounced at a stranger’s door, it is always discombobulating to ring doorbells in Butetown and be met with a smile. This is a district
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Instagram is my haven from rage-filled social media | Rebecca Nicholson 7 Mar 2017, 11:24am Instagram is my haven from rage-filled social media | Rebecca Nicholson
The photo-sharing site still offers moments of kindness – and we all need a slice of rainbow cake once in a while Like many people, I have had the moment where I have turned my back on Facebook. I’ve given up on being so connected, frustrated at how difficult it is to sit through anything without the unthinking reflex of a diversionary scroll through what people I have met at parties or old jobs are up to. But in the past, my freedom from Facebook has only ever lasted for a few weeks. I’ve always been back, digital tail between my legs, tentatively liking a status update about something funny my nephew has done. This time, however, I’ve cracked it. It was almost inadvertent. Tired of my phone constantly running out of space for very important photos of my dog, I read a memory-saving recommendation that suggested deleting the hefty Facebook app. It was the clean break that I needed. Now, I check it, on my laptop, once or twice a day. I no longer get notifications. I don’t spend hours scrolling all the way down, because on the browser, it’s too easy to accidentally like a holiday snap from a schoolfriend you haven’t spoken to since 2001, and that is as creepy as it is mortifying.
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Even Stephen Hawking says Corbyn has failed. This is no rightwing conspiracy | Sam Glover 7 Mar 2017, 11:14am Even Stephen Hawking says Corbyn has failed. This is no rightwing conspiracy | Sam Glover
When one of the smartest people in the world thinks you’ve had it, listen to them. Those of us who love the NHS need Labour in power, not exiled from itJohn McDonnell wrote an article on 26 February announcing that a “
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Breitbart’s click-hate echo chamber is a threat to Europe. Here’s why | Joe Mulhall 7 Mar 2017, 10:23am Breitbart’s click-hate echo chamber is a threat to Europe. Here’s why | Joe Mulhall
Our analysis of 500 articles on Breitbart London shows its attempt to subvert the postwar liberal consensus – and with it the protections offered to minorities Breitbart is not a news website. Nor is it a media outlet, and its staff are not ordinary journalists. Breitbart is a political project, with a specific political agenda, and staffed by willing propagandists. As Hope not Hate’s new report,
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Decking seemed a great idea in the 90s. But so did Tony Blair | Patrick Barkham 7 Mar 2017, 9:19am Decking seemed a great idea in the 90s. But so did Tony Blair | Patrick Barkham
Alan Titchmarsh regrets his role in popularising the wooden abominations – graves for generations of garden animals. But in decay there is an upsideDecking is like Tony Blair; widely embraced in the 1990s, now an embarrassing legacy of the bad old days. And neither look as splendid as they once did. Decking hasn’t simply decayed into a mildewed death-trap, it’s accused of being
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When will universities wake up to this epidemic of sexual harassment? | Eve Livingston 7 Mar 2017, 8:58am When will universities wake up to this epidemic of sexual harassment? | Eve Livingston
It’s shameful that coded glances and quiet words are still a female student’s best defence against predatory staffOn my first day as a student union vice-president, amid a flurry of introductory meetings, briefings and bits of paper, I was given the names. There was a tour of the office space, a demonstration of the annual leave booking system, and stuck somewhere in between a list of staff at the university with a reputation for inappropriate behaviour who I should avoid where possible. One, I was told, had invited two female officers to the pub under the guise of building a good working relationship. It was a bonding exercise that had ended with him following one of them home. It was recommended I didn’t attend his committee or accept the invitation for introductory drinks that would (and did) arrive on my desk within the first month of my term. Now, how to work the photocopier.
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Philip Hammond ought to dispel the economic myths that hold women back | Ann Pettifor 7 Mar 2017, 8:37am Philip Hammond ought to dispel the economic myths that hold women back | Ann Pettifor
The budget falls on International Women’s Day this year. Sadly it is unlikely to be marked by economic orthodoxy stacked against women being overturnedThere are two economic myths that fail the interests of women. The first is the fallacy that government budgets conform to “the household analogy”: that, as with family budgets, a state’s outgoings cannot exceed its income. The second is that “there is no money” for the services women use and need. On the first, the public are told that
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Social care is on its knees. We all have a stake in its future | Barbara Keeley 7 Mar 2017, 8:02am Social care is on its knees. We all have a stake in its future | Barbara Keeley
The funding crisis in social care goes beyond money. It’s about the type of support we would expect for our own loved onesIt seems we are running out of ways to convey to the government the level of crisis that now exists in social care. The care system has been described as “at a tipping point”, in “a deeper existential crisis”, part of a “humanitarian crisis” and, more recently, “
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Labour’s reinvention needs to come from the bottom up | Deborah Hermanns 7 Mar 2017, 7:32am Labour’s reinvention needs to come from the bottom up | Deborah Hermanns
Replacing Jeremy Corbyn wouldn’t solve Labour’s long-term problems. What the party needs is cultural renewal in areas neglected for decadesLabour is one of the biggest political parties in Europe, and yet it is struggling to maintain support in its heartlands. While the party’s ground game, with considerable support from Momentum, was key in
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It’s not soft on crime to look at young offenders’ histories. It’s common sense | Owen Jones 7 Mar 2017, 6:46am It’s not soft on crime to look at young offenders’ histories. It’s common sense | Owen Jones
Surely our aim should be to reduce crime, not just to exact vengeance. These new sentencing guidelines should help achieve thatIs
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Brexit doesn’t mean pulling up a drawbridge. We must make pacts now | Chris Leslie 7 Mar 2017, 6:13am Brexit doesn’t mean pulling up a drawbridge. We must make pacts now | Chris Leslie
Our cross-party committee recommends rejoining Efta and seeking alternatives to hard Brexit isolationism. It’s vital we show commitment for global cooperationBrexit is a cloud hanging over the UK economy. Businesses are unsure what our trading relationships will be, workers are uncertain about the long term and investors are waiting to see what sort of access to markets the UK will have worldwide. Britain isn’t just on the verge of a leap into the unknown – we are sending signals to the wider world that once-valued alliances are no longer our priority. So it is vital that the UK takes steps now to demonstrate our commitment to internationalism and alliance-building; that Britain may have said “no” to the institutions of the EU, but we are still up for pacts and deals and cooperation with the wider world.
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We managed tax transparency in Pakistan. Why not everywhere else? | Umar Cheema 7 Mar 2017, 5:07am We managed tax transparency in Pakistan. Why not everywhere else? | Umar Cheema
Five years ago, I exposed how few Pakistani MPs were paying any taxes. Now I’m part of a campaign to get 7,000 politicians worldwide to disclose their tax records At a time when the world is witnessing a wave of mistrust over the true interests of ruling elites, it may seem strange that Pakistan – a country
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Stand up, Labour – the Tories don’t have the 2020 election in the bag | Abi Wilkinson 7 Mar 2017, 4:00am Stand up, Labour – the Tories don’t have the 2020 election in the bag | Abi Wilkinson
Opinion has turned against austerity with a sense we’ve been taken for fools. Labour has internal problems, but May’s policies will make the country worseTheresa May is not a particularly skilled politician. She’s evasive in interviews, awkward at prime minister’s questions and
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7 Mar 2017, 3:21am Updated President Trump’s Blinkered Fiscal Vision
Excessive tax cuts and smaller social programs will hurt the poor and the working class.
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7 Mar 2017, 3:21am Updated Smothering Speech at Middlebury
All ideas need testing in open debate, or they become mere prejudices.
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A new party of the centre? It makes fixing Labour seem easy | Rafael Behr 7 Mar 2017, 2:00am A new party of the centre? It makes fixing Labour seem easy | Rafael Behr
As Corbyn and May head off to the dogmatic nostalgia of left and right, a political space in the middle seems appealing. But be careful what you wish for In a crisis there are always people saying something must be done. Most of their plans are worse than doing nothing. I’d like to have coined that maxim but I borrowed it from a former Downing Street adviser – someone who has seen first hand how the attraction of doing something drastic in politics conceals the risk of doing something stupid.
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Don’t fall for Philip Hammond’s budget trickery. There is an alternative | Polly Toynbee 7 Mar 2017, 1:00am Don’t fall for Philip Hammond’s budget trickery. There is an alternative | Polly Toynbee
As the chancellor prepares to slash the state he claims there’s no cash. Yet he’s preparing to give billions away to the richHow perfectly their faces fit the parts they play, this pair of graveyard undertakers to public services. Chancellor and prime minister use their grim solemnity to persuade the nation that there is no alternative. It’s all a charade – and they are, of course, play-acting – but they do it alarmingly well. Polls show they still convince voters that this extreme punishment is a doleful necessary.
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