Back Opinion Thursday, January 18, 2018
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The Rule of Shutdown Politics1h 8m Updated The Rule of Shutdown Politics
Democrats oppose a bill that reauthorizes children’s health care.
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Lessons for five-year-olds aren’t enough to curb knife crime | Letters2h Lessons for five-year-olds aren’t enough to curb knife crime | Letters
Teaching five-year-olds the dangers of knife crime won’t solve the problem, writes
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The Corbyn Revolution Advances2h Updated The Corbyn Revolution Advances
The left consolidates control over Labour as the Tories fumble.
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Why are Tories like Ben Bradley so hung up on poor people having babies? | Gaby Hinsliff2h Why are Tories like Ben Bradley so hung up on poor people having babies? | Gaby Hinsliff
Paranoia of an overly fertile underclass seems to be a particular strain of Conservative horribleness that refuses to dieIf you’re too poor to have children, get a vasectomy. Better that than leave the nation
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The great British Bayeux cover-up | Letters2h The great British Bayeux cover-up | Letters
Art loans | Bayeux tapestry | Trump’s test | Transfer window | CarillionManchester City Art Gallery was lending paintings to the public in the 1970s and 80s (
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The Guardian view on the private finance initiative: replace this failed model | Editorial3h The Guardian view on the private finance initiative: replace this failed model | Editorial
Forty years of increasingly dogmatic approaches to the financing of public services have led to the collapse of Carillion and a damning National Audit Office reportLong ago, in a political galaxy far away, privatisation and outsourcing in public services were not always dogmas but instead acts that could involve a degree of pragmatism and some balancing of interests. After the postwar Attlee government and before Margaret Thatcher’s long reign in British politics, decisions about the relationship between the public and private sectors were often practical compromises, not ideological fixations. Government’s role was always and necessarily central, but it could be flexible about forms of ownership and systems of regulation and governance. At first, even Mrs Thatcher only argued that it was reasonable for private companies to compete to provide public services. Since the Thatcher era, habits, assumptions and arguments have relentlessly ossified. Part of this is political – the post-Thatcher generation of politicians faced publics that could prefer private to public (in housing, notably), lower taxes to higher ones, and disliked overmighty trade unions. Part of it is economic – the decline of the industrially based, sometimes publicly owned, economy with strong collective bargaining and the growth, in its place, of a globalised and financially led service sector, often offshore, driven by shareholder value and characterised by hyper-rewards for management and low pay and insecurity for many employees. The upshot, nearly 40 years on, is that governments have behaved as though they are historically powerless to control the terms on which public goods are provided. In fact, only government is powerful enough to set those terms.
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The Guardian view on prayer: the heart of a heartless world | Editorial3h The Guardian view on prayer: the heart of a heartless world | Editorial
The British still pray, even if they don’t think that it can change anythingBritain may be an increasingly secular country, but that does not make it rational or atheist. Thank God, half the country will respond: a
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Don’t fixate on a second Brexit vote. Focus instead on trade | Simon Jenkins3h Don’t fixate on a second Brexit vote. Focus instead on trade | Simon Jenkins
Of course it’s possible to change our minds in a democracy. But we have to be realistic about what can and can’t be achievedThey wander Westminster with staring eyes. “Repent,” they cry, “or be doomed. We are all doomed.” They are the second-referendum adventists, the priests of the afterthought, the prophets of the second coming. They meet with decrepit peers in cobwebbed attics. They mix potions and spells, and stick pins in plasticine Theresa Mays. They are mad. As mad as the flat-earth leavers. Of course Britain could change its mind on Brexit by next March. May could evaporate. The Tory party could vanish in a cloud of waffle. Jeremy Corbyn could descend from the clouds on a golden swing, cooing gently and speaking French.
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Tomayto or tomahto? That is the question I wrestle with | Emma Brockes3h Tomayto or tomahto? That is the question I wrestle with | Emma Brockes
Working on UK and US versions of my book made me realise how much living in New York has affected my pronunciationI have lived in the US for 10 years, and although I take the elevator down to the lobby from my apartment, when I go outside I walk on the pavement. My children wear diapers but, by and large, I fill the tank with petrol, not gas, and throw out the rubbish not the trash. I wish I still ate sweets, but I don’t; “sweets” to my ears sound childish and wilfully obscure and, while I may cringe when I say it, there’s no question that if I ask someone to pass me the Skittles,
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I was an outsourced Carillion hospital worker. Here’s what I learned | Polly Toynbee9h I was an outsourced Carillion hospital worker. Here’s what I learned | Polly Toynbee
It’s low-paid workers who pay the price of shifting state debt off the Treasury’s books. I know: I’ve seen the process at workA while ago I worked for Carillion as a hospital porter. Or at least I worked for an agency that provided labour for Carillion – as these outsourcers always themselves outsource, to cut costs further. When I was researching my book
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A plea for children like my brother-in-law, who died on Britain’s doorstep | Samer Naveed11h A plea for children like my brother-in-law, who died on Britain’s doorstep | Samer Naveed
Refugee Masud died in a lorry on the way to join us in London. May and Macron can prevent deaths such as hisToday Theresa May and Emmanuel Macron
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The Conservatives’ problem with young members started way before Ben Bradley | Katy Balls12h The Conservatives’ problem with young members started way before Ben Bradley | Katy Balls
The new Tory vice-chair for youth made toxic remarks about the unemployed. No wonder the party’s drive to attract young voters has been faltering for years When Ben Bradley was appointed as the Tory vice-chair for youth in
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Now Norway’s decriminalised drugs, it’s high time the UK chose legalisation | Daniel Pryor12h Now Norway’s decriminalised drugs, it’s high time the UK chose legalisation | Daniel Pryor
The government must realise it’s hopelessly out of step with sensible drug policy. Legalisation would take the market out of the hands of criminalsIn 2001
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Through humility and understanding, we can still stop Brexit | Andrew Adonis13h Through humility and understanding, we can still stop Brexit | Andrew Adonis
A second referendum looks increasingly likely, and a new settlement addressing Britain’s inequalities could reverse our trajectory When President Macron meets Theresa May at the Franco-British summit at Sandhurst, the elite military academy, on Thursday, the vital “take away” for him is that Brexit is not a done deal. It can, and quite possibly will, be reversed by an increasingly likely referendum on May’s Brexit terms early next year – once the Brexit terms are clear, but before Britain is due to leave on 29 March 2019. It is essential, therefore, that Macron – who believes passionately in a strong and united Europe – continues to express his heartfelt support for continued British membership of the European Union, should that ultimately be the will of the British people.
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Emmanuel Macron’s Bayeux tapestry loan is one in the eye for Brexiters | Martin Kettle16h Emmanuel Macron’s Bayeux tapestry loan is one in the eye for Brexiters | Martin Kettle
France’s gesture, which will allow most Britons to see the work for the first time, is every bit as political as it is generous Although the word occasionally pops up in Tintin adventures, normally in the mouth of Captain Haddock, there are obvious reasons why a columnist shouldn’t utter the antique French cry of
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Fear now rules Trump’s US. It’s what drives the president too | Tony Schwartz16h Fear now rules Trump’s US. It’s what drives the president too | Tony Schwartz
Trump is angrier and more self-absorbed than when I first knew him. We must not let his culture of fear stop us speaking out
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Killing Nafta Would Ruin American Farmers21h Killing Nafta Would Ruin American Farmers
And given how many live in red states, it would doom the GOP in the 2018 elections.
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The Trump Paradox21h The Trump Paradox
This era’s most disliked president has produced a successful first year in office.
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The CBO Is the Tail Wagging the Dog21h The CBO Is the Tail Wagging the Dog
How the ObamaCare mandate sank repeal, then saved tax reform.
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The U.S. Navy Lowers Its Sights21h The U.S. Navy Lowers Its Sights
Has Trump given up on expanding the size of the fleet? If so, there’s still time to reverse course.
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No Wall Will Keep Visitors From Overstaying Their Visas21h No Wall Will Keep Visitors From Overstaying Their Visas
To stop illegal immigration will require more thorough screening by consular officers overseas.
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Sanders Proposes Medicare for None21h Sanders Proposes Medicare for None
His bill would abolish all forms of private insurance and almost all existing public programs.
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If the Oslo Accords Are Over, the Real Work of Peace Can Begin21h If the Oslo Accords Are Over, the Real Work of Peace Can Begin
Palestinians who work for Israeli companies or socialize with Israelis should not live in fear.
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26h Cognition of a Conservative
Where does biased coverage end and fake news begin?
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Fed Should Unwind Its Asset Portfolio Quickly26h Fed Should Unwind Its Asset Portfolio Quickly
There’s no reason, now, to let Bernanke’s dubious rationales for QE be a basis for worry about stock prices now that the QE programs are finally being unwound.
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At the sharp end of the Carillion supply chain | Letters26h At the sharp end of the Carillion supply chain | Letters
Readers on the fallout from the collapse of Carillion. Letters from
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The myth of Stoke’s Tory turnaround | Letters26h The myth of Stoke’s Tory turnaround | Letters
The claim that Stoke-on-Trent is better off under the Tories is rejected by
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The BBC isn’t the only place where male egos and pay are overblown | Letters26h The BBC isn’t the only place where male egos and pay are overblown | Letters
Male presenters at the BBC need to learn some humility, says
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A divided Kosovo | Letters26h A divided Kosovo | Letters
The outlook for Kosovo looks bleak, unless its peoples are allowed to go their separate ways, writes
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The killer question for Donald Trump | Letters27h The killer question for Donald Trump | Letters
The coronation coach | Brian Ferneyhough | Tabloid Guardian | Macron in Calais | Hunt for Baghdadi | Trump’s health testsLucy Mangan’s
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The Guardian view on Anglo-French relations: Brexit’s entente cordiale | Editorial27h The Guardian view on Anglo-French relations: Brexit’s entente cordiale | Editorial
A weakened British prime minister and a dynamic French president may not see eye to eye over everything, but they can learn from one anotherThe recent history of relations between British prime ministers and French presidents is characterised by a gap in
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The Guardian view on China’s spreading influence: look in the gift horse’s mouth | Editorial27h The Guardian view on China’s spreading influence: look in the gift horse’s mouth | Editorial
There is growing concern about Beijing’s attempts to shape the thinking of politicians and the public overseasThe
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Outsourcing and the Carillion collapse – Politics Weekly podcast27h Outsourcing and the Carillion collapse – Politics Weekly podcast
Anushka Asthana is joined by Andrew Adonis, Polly Toynbee, John Crace and Laura Parker to discuss the collapse of Carillion and the changes to Labour’s national executive committee. Plus James Murray, the deputy mayor of London, on getting to grips with the city’s housing crisis The collapse of Carrillion, one of Britain’s biggest outsourcing firms, has left thousands at risk of unemployment, roads and hospitals partially built and a pension fund half empty.
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Are there any fashion photographers not accused of sexual harassment?28h Are there any fashion photographers not accused of sexual harassment?
The suspension of Bruce Weber and Mario Testino, along with Terry Richardson, after multiple accusations, means Vogue has to find some new snappers
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The right has a quasi-mystical belief that the poor are inferior – sterilis​ation​ is the logical next step29h The right has a quasi-mystical belief that the poor are inferior – sterilis​ation​ is the logical next step
What to make of Tory vice-chair Ben Bradley’s 2012 blog calling for the unemployed to have vasectomies? Plus: Trump’s problem with bad plumbing and advice from Greater Good magazineEugenics gets a bad rap because of its unfortunate Nazi heritage and antiquated, confusing language – “purity”, “bloodlines” – where you can never immediately tell whether they are talking about people or horses. The more commonplace eugenicist, who merely wants poor people to stop breeding, barely gets a look in. Yet they can ascend quite high, quite fast, up the ranks of the party of government. Ben Bradley, vice-chair of the Conservative party, fretted in 2012 that the nation was “drowning in a sea of unemployed wasters” – metaphors from the natural world (floods, seas, insects, tides, swarms) are an absolute staple of the eugenics diet, as they are for racists. It is always hard to conjure a proper, full-blooded hatred for other people on a case-by-case basis. You have to transform them into a vast force, united by a shared, destructive agenda. Conundrum: wasters, presumably, have no agenda. But tolerate enough wasting, and soon there is a sea of it
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Why the Bayeux Tapestry’s loan to Britain is a homecoming | John Lichfield30h Why the Bayeux Tapestry’s loan to Britain is a homecoming | John Lichfield
The tapestry does not, as commonly perceived, depict the last time Britain was invaded and subjugated. It’s as much about our invasion of ourselves As a British-born, adopted Norman, I am delighted that the
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The IMF has choked Tunisia. No wonder the people are rioting | Jihen Chandoul31h The IMF has choked Tunisia. No wonder the people are rioting | Jihen Chandoul
Since the 2011 uprising, the IMF – backed by the G8 – has imposed economic reforms on Tunisia, at a cost to ordinary peopleTunisia has been
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London’s museums should send more of their treasures north | Ian Blatchford32h London’s museums should send more of their treasures north | Ian Blatchford
Stephenson’s Rocket and Tim Peake’s spacecraft are blasting out of the cultural comfort zone to inspire people all over the UK – and more should follow
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How should young women react as #MeToo moves into dating? Female writers discuss | Anne Perkins, Iman Amrani, Marie Le Conte, Rachel Shabi,and Ash Sarkar32h How should young women react as #MeToo moves into dating? Female writers discuss | Anne Perkins, Iman Amrani, Marie Le Conte, Rachel Shabi,and Ash Sarkar
Aziz Ansari and Cat Person are taking the #MeToo debate into today’s dating scene, showing gender disparity and raising consent issuesPart of me wants to give “Grace” a really good shake. What did she expect,
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Neither the girthers nor a white knight will eject Trump. It’s down to democracy | Jonathan Freedland33h Neither the girthers nor a white knight will eject Trump. It’s down to democracy | Jonathan Freedland
Online conspiracy theorists may question Trump’s doctor’s pronouncement that the president is fit for office. But Congress is the only route to end this nightmareBehold, the
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May’s Brexit pledges have turned to ashes. Was she deluded or dishonest? | Hugo Dixon35h May’s Brexit pledges have turned to ashes. Was she deluded or dishonest? | Hugo Dixon
There was no plan behind the promises she made at Lancaster House a year ago – yet the prime minister still triggered article 50. Now we deserve some realismOne of the unanswered questions about the Brexit talks is whether Theresa May is deluded, dishonest or both. Exactly one year ago, the prime minister stood in Lancaster House and gave a speech
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Does the answer to Britain’s rise in teenage killings lie in Hong Kong? | Dev Maitra36h Does the answer to Britain’s rise in teenage killings lie in Hong Kong? | Dev Maitra
For a young person trying to stay off the streets, an all-night youth club could change their life – or even save it. Hong Kong understands thisIt has been reported that 2017 was
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Why is my baby crying? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Nell Frizzell37h Why is my baby crying? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Nell Frizzell
Every day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queriesAccording to Dr Caroline Fertleman, “a perfectly healthy baby can cry up to 12 hours, pretty much non-stop.” Just let that sink in for a moment. Let that twist through your shoulder muscles like concrete, let it wind around your heart like poison ivy, let it pour across your cheeks, heave across your chest and run through your blood like lead. The cries of a baby, specifically of
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Migration targets are a form of calculated inhumanity | Nesrine Malik39h Migration targets are a form of calculated inhumanity | Nesrine Malik
Unlawful detention by the Home Office has reached a new level – and it’s being done on purpose Buried on page 89 of the
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Creativity can be taught to anyone. So why are we leaving it to private schools? | Rufus Norris39h Creativity can be taught to anyone. So why are we leaving it to private schools? | Rufus Norris
The UK’s creative industries are world leading. Excluding state-educated people from the arts will throw that excellence away The myth goes that the true artist is born, mysteriously fully formed in their own exceptional talent. A second myth holds that creativity thrives in adversity; a third that creative sorts are somehow morally wayward, something to be tolerated as long as the results are diverting, but not a model for citizenship. These three combine gloriously in the icon of a lascivious and poverty-stricken Mozart, writing sonatas while still in the womb.
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Britain is being stalked by a zombie elite – time to take them on | Aditya Chakrabortty40h Britain is being stalked by a zombie elite – time to take them on | Aditya Chakrabortty
What to do when our economy benefits only the few, but politicians seem powerless to change it? This new series follows communities who are working out their own answersThis is the age of the zombie. The undead maraud around our popular culture. Stick on the telly, and they’re attacking Jon Snow in
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