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The Jeffrey Epstein scandal - podcast1h 43m The Jeffrey Epstein scandal - podcast
The financier Jeffrey Epstein is back in court on charges of the sex trafficking of minors. Vicky Ward and Ed Pilkington discuss his case. Plus: Aditya Chakrabortty wonders why the French super-rich who promised to donate to Notre Dame haven’t paid up yet Jeffrey Epstein is a wealthy financier and one-time friend to the rich and famous, counting Donald Trump, Prince Andrew and Bill Clinton as acquaintances. In 2005 a 14-year-old girl reported that Epstein had molested her in Palm Beach. Others came forward, some of them also minors. But after plea negotiations between Epstein’s legal team and the then US attorney in Miami, Alexander Acosta, Epstein served just 13 months in prison. This month he was arrested on sex trafficking charges and last week federal prosecutors claimed that lewd photographs of girls as young as 14 had been discovered in a safe in his Manhattan
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Steve Bell on Boris Johnson and his kippers claim – cartoon8h Steve Bell on Boris Johnson and his kippers claim – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/jul/18/steve-bell-on-boris-johnson-and-his-kippers-claim-cartoon">Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on Ebola in the DRC: help needed – and dialogue too | Editorial10h The Guardian view on Ebola in the DRC: help needed – and dialogue too | Editorial
The second largest outbreak of the disease has already sickened thousands. WHO’s declaration of an emergency of international concern should prompt more and better supportAre we able to learn the right lessons when disaster strikes? Five years ago, a devastating outbreak of
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The Guardian view on lawns and verges: go wild | Editorial10h The Guardian view on lawns and verges: go wild | Editorial
Front gardens and roadsides reimagined as meadows offer a glimpse of the greener future we all must aim forIt was a startling picture. An eight-mile river of colour flows where once a dry bed of stubby grass grew – all because a local authority rewilding strategy brought country life back to an urban landscape. The stretch of roadside verges in and around Rotherham, South Yorkshire, planted with wild flowers for the third year running, created
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What I felt when I passed the benefits test | Frances Ryan10h What I felt when I passed the benefits test | Frances Ryan
My disability hasn’t changed – even so, I’m subject to invasive questioning to get the money I need. For many, it’s even worseCan you be lucky if you get something you deserve? I felt lucky last week as I read the letter informing me I’d been awarded personal independence payments (Pip). Like a couple of million other disabled people, for years I’d received Pip’s predecessor, disability living allowance, without any problems in order to pay for the extra costs of my disability – but it was recently reassessed in the name of “welfare reform”. It’s the oddest of things, “welfare reform”. You sit there, opposite a stranger, asked to detail the sort of intimacies you’d be reluctant to share with a lifelong friend. “Are there parts of your body you can’t reach to wash? Which ones?” “How do you put your bra on?” You wonder why exactly such lines of questioning are necessary, or how the tens of pages you filled out for hours beforehand weren’t enough, and then explain, as politely as you can, the extra painkillers it took in order to get dressed for this assessment this morning.
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Millionaires v migrants: this low-pay battle says a lot about Britain | Owen Jones10h Millionaires v migrants: this low-pay battle says a lot about Britain | Owen Jones
Staff are fighting for a living wage at a Mayfair club owned by a man who funded the Brexit campaign. They need our supportIt is quite a scene. It’s a balmy summer afternoon, and 5 Hertford Street – described as
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All change at number 10 - Politics Weekly podcast10h All change at number 10 - Politics Weekly podcast
Jessica Elgot is joined by Polly Toynbee, Aditya Chakrabortty, Isabel Hardman and John Crace to discuss next week’s prime-ministerial reshuffle Next week, it is likely that Boris Johnson will be announced as the 77th prime minister of the United Kingdom. But after a career littered with lies, casual racism, affairs and fantasy bridges, is Johnson really cut out to be PM? Joining
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Antisemitism, Labour and Jeremy Corbyn | Letters10h Antisemitism, Labour and Jeremy Corbyn | Letters
Readers respond to an advertisement from 67 Labour peers claiming that the party’s leader had ‘failed the test of leadership’ over his handling of antisemitism complaintsThe advertisement from Labour peers (
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We must learn from mental health tragedies | Letter10h We must learn from mental health tragedies | Letter
We are disturbed that in-depth investigations into patient homicides are no longer undertaken, writes
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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez would be most welcome here | Brief letters10h Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez would be most welcome here | Brief letters
Trump’s racist comments | £50 notes | Holiday eating | Izal toilet paperThere appears to be some uncertainty as to which “home” the four congresswomen could go back to (
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Hi-de-Hi! repeats as the bad boys of Brexit meet Su Pollard11h Hi-de-Hi! repeats as the bad boys of Brexit meet Su Pollard
Arron Banks and Andrew Rosindell are supplying their own Brexit metaphors now, partying with the star of a show about a clapped-out 50s holiday camp full of scam artists Behold, a wonderful and warming snap from this week’s 31-year Hi-de-Hi! cast reunion. As someone who has watched every episode of the seminal 1980s holiday camp sitcom, it is a pleasure to see old castmates back together like this. Dear Su Pollard, who played hapless chambermaid Peggy Ollerenshaw, hasn’t changed a bit. Indeed, to caption this photo, we may as well use a line from her amusingly exhaustive character biography on
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Ofwat has a duty to protect our rivers | Letters12h Ofwat has a duty to protect our rivers | Letters
Ofwat’s proposal to reduce a penalty on Southern Water for its ‘deliberate misreporting of data’ on pollution incidents is wrong, say representatives of 10 river, fishery and wildlife organisationsAs river, fishery and wildlife organisations, we are concerned by
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This Commons vote shows how weak a Boris Johnson government would be | Rafael Behr12h This Commons vote shows how weak a Boris Johnson government would be | Rafael Behr
The rebellion doesn’t indicate opposition to a hard Brexit, but it is a warning not to torch parliamentary democracy on the wayIt is a measure of how far British politics has passed through the looking glass that MPs feel compelled to put in law that prime ministers should govern with the consent of parliament. There was a time, not too long ago, when that sort of thing was understood as a convention underpinning democracy. The imminent arrival of
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Trump and the Squad both want the same thing – and Pelosi is in the way | Geoffrey Kabaservice14h Trump and the Squad both want the same thing – and Pelosi is in the way | Geoffrey Kabaservice
They both want to make the progressive women the face of the Democratic party – to push the party further to the left – but Pelosi disagrees American politics makes some extremely odd bedfellows. That’s worth keeping in mind when trying to understand why Donald Trump Twitter-trolled four progressive, first-term congresswomen of color – Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan – in his now-infamous
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I reported on misogyny in parliament 29 years ago – shockingly little has changed | Jennifer Nadel15h I reported on misogyny in parliament 29 years ago – shockingly little has changed | Jennifer Nadel
To stamp out bullying, harassment and sexism in Westminster, we need to shift the whole way we do politics
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Jeremy Corbyn’s weak leadership betrays those Labour would lift from poverty | Polly Toynbee15h Jeremy Corbyn’s weak leadership betrays those Labour would lift from poverty | Polly Toynbee
John McDonnell’s bold policies will genuinely improve people’s lives. But they’re of little use if Labour cannot win an electionWith dexterity, decisiveness and a thwack of firm leadership, Jeremy Corbyn
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The political gaffe is dead, as bigots and liars triumph by spouting guff | Seamas O’Reilly16h The political gaffe is dead, as bigots and liars triumph by spouting guff | Seamas O’Reilly
Neil Kinnock fell over on a beach; Ed Miliband ate a bacon sandwich – how quaint that such missteps so damaged their careersThere was a time when the things our political leaders said and did carried with them the threat of censure or rebuke. The slightest misstep could presage disaster, while a proper, world-ending gaffe was like political kryptonite, something that could down even a seasoned heavyweight in seconds. They seemed to come less often back then, and the sillier ones we rejoiced in most of all. It’s widely accepted that Neil Kinnock’s time as Labour leader
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The Way to the Sea by Caroline Crampton review – the Thames, but no fond cliches16h The Way to the Sea by Caroline Crampton review – the Thames, but no fond cliches
More mud and shipwrecks than prosecco and punting … a personal, enjoyable celebration of the Thames from source to sea Early in the spring of 1984, four years before Caroline Crampton was born, her parents embarked on a journey that would shape her life and lead, several decades later, to this book. In a boat they had built themselves over three years of snatched evenings and stolen weekends, they set sail from Cape Town and bobbed up the Atlantic. Using paper maps and taking only short breaks at Ascension Island and the Azores, they headed north until, at 3am on 17 September, they Scherzo arrived in the mudflats of the Thames. They spent that winter basking not in the azure warmth of South Africa but 8,000 miles away at St Katharine Docks, where the waters froze around their boat and ducks trotted on ice past their cabin. Yet they stayed. Growing up, Crampton knew the Thames estuary was “the place I loved best”. Taken aboard the family boat at six weeks old, she went on to spend holidays travelling the North Sea and give directions not by road name, but by compass point (“Walk north-north-east from the station and turn west at the war memorial”). Even as a rebellious teenager doing the teenage thing of spurning all that her parents had given her, the Thames kept calling her back. When a student at Oxford, she “walked hundreds of miles up and down its banks, shivering in icy frosts and sweating in muggy dampness”.
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Sadiq Khan has rejected the Tulip. But that won’t save London’s skyline | Simon Jenkins18h Sadiq Khan has rejected the Tulip. But that won’t save London’s skyline | Simon Jenkins
The mayor has been as bad as Boris Johnson in bowing down to speculators. If only his interest in design had kicked in soonerTulipmania is no more. London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan,
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The government is rubbish at social media. And no, a new PM won’t change that | Jack Bernhardt19h The government is rubbish at social media. And no, a new PM won’t change that | Jack Bernhardt
Even if @10Downing Street did get a personality, the needs of the state and the messy habits of the internet just don’t matchIn unsure political times, one has to cling to particular certainties. Mark Francois’s face will grow redder and angrier the longer we delay Brexit. By January 2020, he should be visible from space. Chuka Umunna will, at some point, leave the Lib Dems to create a party called Alternative Change Politics, which he will leave within 45 minutes of registering it. Jeremy Corbyn will keep finding new and exciting ways to disappoint you. And regardless of who the new prime minister is, the government will continue to be absolutely rubbish at social media. Last week the government announced it was setting up the adorably pathetic
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Raising the steaks: how to have a fancy barbecue20h Raising the steaks: how to have a fancy barbecue
Tired of guests taking you for granted while you slave over a hot grill? Try your hand at marinated goat, deconstructed ratatouille or boozy poultry There is a lot to be said for barbecues, including smell, taste, poignant memories of summers past, licensed overeating and the ubiquity of coleslaw, but I have noticed one thing: the chef never gets any credit. It is a bit of reverse sexism: men usually take over, in what we can call “manflipping” or “pyromannia”, so if you praise the chef, you are shoring up the patriarchy, even if a woman did all the marinating or, for once, the chef is actually a woman. It is mainly the sense that he or she does jack-all, beyond opening some packets. Which is fundamentally unfair, since knowing what is what on an open flame that you use twice a year is far more technically demanding than using an oven. Maybe you don’t care about credit. But if you do, here are a few suggestions. Try interesting cuts of meat. Classic barbecue fare tends towards the banal (chicken breasts) or at best workaday (the sausage). What you want is meat round a complicated bone, to give it some structure and slow-release flavour against the suddenness of the heat, and what you get is a load of steaks that have very few defences. I would never barbecue steaks again, having discovered that you can cook them in an air fryer, which locks in flavour without leeching out moisture. The best barbie cut, meanwhile, flash-fried, perfect unadorned, is the Barnsley chop. The nubbly central bone that gives it that butterfly shape makes it unusually juicy, while the fat turns to lamb crackling, which you almost never see in domestic life.
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The lesson from the ruins of Notre Dame: don’t rely on billionaires | Aditya Chakrabortty22h The lesson from the ruins of Notre Dame: don’t rely on billionaires | Aditya Chakrabortty
The French super-rich promised to dig deep, but such philanthropy comes at a steep price You remember the story, of course you do. One of the most ancient and holy buildings on Earth,
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African lives are measured in fighting UK visa rejections | Nesrine Malik22h African lives are measured in fighting UK visa rejections | Nesrine Malik
The Home Office’s hostile handling of visiting African professionals doesn’t bode well for Global Britain An African passport is the most egalitarian of documents, in that if you have one then class, employment status and professional invitations from the country you are visiting all count for nothing. From university professors to unskilled labourers, anyone holding a passport issued by a country in Africa will be treated the same by UK border officers. They will also show no compassion for or recognition of the need for people to be reunited with family or to see friends. In fact it’s not too far-fetched to say an African passport is a no-travel document. Even countries within Africa are miserly with each other. I am a veteran visa applicant, and I can tell you there is no respite. A European visa is as prohibitively hard to secure as one to a neighbouring African country. My Sudanese passport meant that I had to become an Olympian visa-applier in order to visit, study and settle in the UK. You can’t slouch with a passport from a country on a terror watchlist.
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The Guardian view on Theresa May’s farewell speech: she threw away her shot | Editorial34h The Guardian view on Theresa May’s farewell speech: she threw away her shot | Editorial
The prime minister had the opportunity to tell her party some hard truths about the Brexit choices it is making, and she missed itBritish culture reserves affection for failure if it is heroic, or even dogged, and in that spirit it is possible that history will not be as unkind to Theresa May as politics has been. The prime minister’s tenure in Downing Street ends next week with few policy accomplishments to her name and the single most important task – Brexit – messily incomplete. There is no evidence that the nation thinks warmly of her, although there is respect for her tenacity, stamina and probity. It is easy to find critics of her judgment, but no one thinks she has been venal. Critics who think her principles were the wrong ones acknowledge at least the aspiration to be principled. The contrast with her successor could hardly be starker.
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The Guardian view on Xinjiang: speak out, or be complicit | Editorial34h The Guardian view on Xinjiang: speak out, or be complicit | Editorial
An estimated 1 million Uighurs and other minorities are held in China’s camps. But Beijing’s power has silenced many of those who one might expect to criticise itWhat does it take to make people speak out? A growing number of Uighurs overseas are
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Steve Bell on Donald Trump and accusations of racism – cartoon34h Steve Bell on Donald Trump and accusations of racism – cartoon
a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/picture/2019/jul/17/steve-bell-on-donald-trump-and-accusations-of-racism-cartoon">Continue reading...
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What role can religion play in modern Britain? | Letters34h What role can religion play in modern Britain? | Letters
Guardian readers respond to our editorial on the decline of organised mainstream ChristianityYour editorial (
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The value of an English degree in the graduate job market | Letters34h The value of an English degree in the graduate job market | Letters
Leading figures from major organisations that support the discipline of English say graduates in the subject are successful in a broad range of careers, while
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The hypocrisy of Trump’s racism | Letters34h The hypocrisy of Trump’s racism | Letters
Adam Slee, Duncan Grimmond, Norman Miller
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Anorexia, DNA, and false distinctions | Letters34h Anorexia, DNA, and false distinctions | Letters
All psychiatric conditions are caused by an interaction between a person’s mind and body, writes
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The Turing test for those in the money | Brief letters34h The Turing test for those in the money | Brief letters
Wahhabi Islam | Boris Johnson | Alan Turing £50 note | Izal toilet paperWhile I agree with the points made by your correspondents (
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We shouldn’t have to live in a world where women are afraid to say no | Ellie Mae O’Hagan37h We shouldn’t have to live in a world where women are afraid to say no | Ellie Mae O’Hagan
The assault on a Manchester teen who refused a man’s advances shows why we need a new set of valuesSome years ago, I worked for a man several decades older than me who consistently made oleaginous and sexualised comments to me and the other young women in our workplace. He was completely oblivious to the fact that our disgust towards him was a shared point of bonding, and that we would wince every time he was in the building; I expect because every time he said something we would force a smile, entrenching his delusion that we actually enjoyed his behaviour. I thought about him again this week when I read that the
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The pesticide industry is harming our health and the planet. MPs must act now | Caroline Lucas38h The pesticide industry is harming our health and the planet. MPs must act now | Caroline Lucas
The FFCC report shows only radical change will free farmers from a system focused on cheap food and agrochemical profitsA profound ecological transformation of food and farming is achievable, desirable and urgently needed. That’s a
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The military has recognised its harassment problem. Now it must talk about it | Sophy Gardner39h The military has recognised its harassment problem. Now it must talk about it | Sophy Gardner
Pride in the uniform prevents many service personnel from speaking out about sexist and racist behaviours. It’s a culture that has to changeRecently I had coffee with a fellow veteran. She recalled her experience of going to sea with the Royal Navy for the first time. On being shown which compartments she could use to dry laundry, she had her attention drawn to special cages for her underwear “so it wouldn’t get stolen” by men on board. She thought at the time this was thoughtful treatment of women at sea. She and I have together come to see these sorts of behaviours very differently. I experienced being told explicitly “I wasn’t welcome” as a woman in a new role, “it wasn’t a problem that I was a woman” in another more senior role; the former comment openly hostile but the latter more subtly demeaning. These comments came from men ranked above me at different points in my career. I felt at the time I had “to suck it up” and I, like my friend, struggled with recognising unacceptable behaviour for what it was. This, I believe, is part of the problem identified by the
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Democrats are right to condemn Trump’s race-baiting, but they could walk into his trap | Jonathan Freedland40h Democrats are right to condemn Trump’s race-baiting, but they could walk into his trap | Jonathan Freedland
Trump is banking on his race-baiting winning him votes. And Democrats will have to navigate a tricky course to stop himYou’d think it would happen all the time. Given how often they’re drawn from different parties, it should be routine for the US House of Representatives to condemn the president. In fact, it’s rare. Until last night, the House had not made that formal move since it admonished William Howard Taft more than a century ago. So Donald Trump has earned himself yet another place in the history books,
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Millennials won’t let go of children’s toys and films – and kids are paying the price | Emily Beecher42h Millennials won’t let go of children’s toys and films – and kids are paying the price | Emily Beecher
From Toy Story 4 to the David Bowie Barbie, marketers are rehashing old favourites in place of creating anything newLast week
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I challenged Corbyn on antisemitism a year ago. Things have only got worse | Margaret Hodge43h I challenged Corbyn on antisemitism a year ago. Things have only got worse | Margaret Hodge
I won’t walk away from the fight to root out antisemitism in the party. But the leadership remains in denial Today marks one year since my
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Revealed: the three-word question consuming the world’s biggest brains | Tom Clark44h Revealed: the three-word question consuming the world’s biggest brains | Tom Clark
A new survey of leading intellectuals shows many of them are preoccupied by trying to answer: who are we?What is preoccupying the world’s leading minds? It is an audacious question for sure. Some might say leading physicists will be concentrating on physics, leading philosophers on philosophy, historians on history and so on. And yet when we look back on different eras, we can sometimes spot a thread – the preoccupation with truth in ancient Athens, with beauty in Renaissance Europe, with political “reason” during the Enlightenment, with scientific progress during the industrial age. There is, I believe, likewise a new preoccupation lurking in the biggest brains of our time, and that theme is summed up in one word – identity.
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Poor tenants pay for landlords to have a good time. It doesn’t have to be this way | George Monbiot46h Poor tenants pay for landlords to have a good time. It doesn’t have to be this way | George Monbiot
Britain has enough housing – it’s just that a series of outrageous policies make it accessible only to the rich I have a friend who works almost every waking hour, mainly to pay the rent. Her landlord lives on a beach, 4,000 miles away. He seldom responds to her requests, and grudgingly pays for the minimum of maintenance. But every so often he writes to inform her that he is raising the rent. He does not have to work because she and other tenants work on his behalf. He is able to live the life of his choice because they give their time to him. As there is a shortage of accessible housing, they have no choice but to pay his exorbitant fees. People say, ‘I work for Tesco' or, ‘I work for Deliveroo', but the reality for many is that they work for their landlord
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Boris Johnson could hide as a columnist and at City Hall. He can’t in No 10 | George Pitcher46h Boris Johnson could hide as a columnist and at City Hall. He can’t in No 10 | George Pitcher
Behind the artfully tousled hair and clownish exterior is an indolent narcissist who will be found out in Downing StreetAhead of the London mayoral election of May 2012, I was invited to chair a hustings at St James’s Church in Piccadilly. The main attractions were Boris Johnson, seeking his second term, and his doughty detractor Ken Livingstone, alongside their good-natured warm-up acts of Jenny Jones for the Green party and Brian Paddick for the Lib Dems. Before we took the stage, there was a drinks reception in the rectory. Boris Johnson was holding court, but greeted me to listen to my proposed rules of engagement and graciously remembered that we shared a comment page at the Daily Telegraph at the time. What struck me was that he was softly spoken, genial and engaging.
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