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Immigrants built Britain. Now their Conservative children are disowning them | Nesrine Malik4h Immigrants built Britain. Now their Conservative children are disowning them | Nesrine Malik
Priti Patel and Sajid Javid are backing new immigration rules that would have barred their ‘unskilled’ parents from the UKThere are few people who have done more work for recent Conservative immigration policy while not actually being in government than Sajid Javid’s father. In fact, he’s doing two jobs at once. The first is to advertise that the Tories are now the party of social mobility: Javid senior
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The Guardian view on Iran’s elections: a closing door | Editorial15h The Guardian view on Iran’s elections: a closing door | Editorial
The victory of hardliners in the parliamentary contest was engineered. But Donald Trump’s choices have destroyed faith in the promises of moderatesIran’s
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The Guardian view on the Parthenon marbles: not just a Brexit sideshow | Editorial15h The Guardian view on the Parthenon marbles: not just a Brexit sideshow | Editorial
A government that stresses the importance of national pride should understand Greek claimsBoris Johnson and his entourage are frequently accused of wishing to turn Britain into an insular, backward-looking place, obsessed with reliving past imperial glories. Their romantic counterclaim is that opting out of the European Union is a means of allowing Britain to regain control of its destiny. Pride restored, the country will be free to engage generously with the rest of the world. So what stance should this open, friendly and “global” Britain take towards
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Will Dominic Cummings’ reign bring the shadowy world of spads into the light? | James Butler15h Will Dominic Cummings’ reign bring the shadowy world of spads into the light? | James Butler
Not since Alastair Campbell has a special adviser exerted power so publicly. But the influence of these political appointees is overdue for scrutiny“You can be a successful poisoner, or you can be a famous poisoner. But you can’t be both.” That was Frank Dobson’s verdict on
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Tories ignored expert flood advice and courted austerity. Behold the results | Simon Wren-Lewis16h Tories ignored expert flood advice and courted austerity. Behold the results | Simon Wren-Lewis
The Pitt review predicted the current crisis in 2008. Why did Conservative governments refuse to listen?It has become an almost annual event. Heavy rain leads to widespread flooding, and people claim that we didn’t see it coming. Except we did. In 2007 the UK experienced a
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Immigration and how we value low-paid work | Letters17h Immigration and how we value low-paid work | Letters
Given the jobs are vital and the vacancies are high,
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After Caroline Flack’s death, it’s time to hold the press to account | Letters17h After Caroline Flack’s death, it’s time to hold the press to account | Letters
Freedom of the press should be balanced with the need for sensible regulations to protect vulnerable people, writes
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A rich seam of funding for charities | Letter17h A rich seam of funding for charities | Letter
We shouldn’t attack the richest in society who give away their money, says
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Oranges are not the only fruit | Brief letters17h Oranges are not the only fruit | Brief letters
New £20 note | Photographs of politicians and their aides | MarmaladeThe first banknote launched under Johnson’s government features Turner’s symbolic Fighting Temeraire (
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Letters: Nicholas Parsons obituary17h Letters: Nicholas Parsons obituary
“Of course I’ll do it.” With those words
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The ‘street food’ swindle: fake diversity, privatised space – and such small portions! | Dan Hancox21h The ‘street food’ swindle: fake diversity, privatised space – and such small portions! | Dan Hancox
Gentrified food halls are the latest culinary phenomenon – but their unstoppable spread has more to do with rents than ramenStreet food markets are the most extravagant swindle visited on the middle classes since the 2010 Lib Dem manifesto, and it’s hard to know whether to laugh or cry about it. On the one hand, the notion of scores of yuppies paying £14 for a gourmet “snack”, to be eaten out of a paper tray while balanced awkwardly on a wooden pub bench, in a car park, in February, accompanied by “crafties” from plastic pint glasses, while lining the pockets of millionaire landlords is pretty funny. On the other hand, they are hallmarks of everything that is going wrong in our big cities. What we eat and the way we eat it has always told us a great deal about politics and society. The explosion of trendy food courts and walled-off markets is no exception. They are exemplars of the financialisation and privatisation of urban space, of a middle-class ennui and yearning for authenticity, and a profits-first, pick-and-mix version of diversity. And such small portions!
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Teen magazines may be extinct, but their pernicious advice still lives online | Rachael Krishna22h Teen magazines may be extinct, but their pernicious advice still lives online | Rachael Krishna
Social media is giving bad guidance to girls – and there’s still a reluctance to talk about women’s bodies or their painIf there was anyone in need of clear information about the process of developing into a woman, it was my teenage self – raised by brothers and attending a faith-based school where discussions of sexual health were severely limited. Before social media the places where young people curious about their bodies and puberty could find information were few and far between. For peoPle like me, teen magazines were the logical place to look for answers. Magazines for teenagers existed long before the 1990s and 2000s, but there was a boom in titles during those two decades. Mizz was first published in 1985; Bliss followed 10 years later, and CosmoGirl arrived in 1999. Young people had more expendable income, and groups like the Spice Girls rose to prominence in an era that prized the idea of female empowerment. Young women had a plethora of titles we could purchase ourselves. Hidden behind covers displaying members of
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Ken Russell’s banned film about Richard Strauss finally comes to light | Richard Brooks25h Ken Russell’s banned film about Richard Strauss finally comes to light | Richard Brooks
A rare chance to see Russell’s controversial portrait of Strauss as Nazi sympathiser, Times Radio’s launch editor continues working for Radio 4, and Flowers Gallery at 50Banned 50 years ago after one screening, Ken Russell’s controversial TV documentary about the German composer Richard Strauss will finally be seen again on 29 February. In 1970, Russell was at the top of his game – by far the best arts documentary maker with garlanded films on Elgar, Delius and Isadora Duncan. He had also just shot
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Tony Blair and the left’s perverse preference for failure over success | Andrew Rawnsley25h Tony Blair and the left’s perverse preference for failure over success | Andrew Rawnsley
Even after such a crushing defeat, the Labour party will do anything but take advice from its only living winnerIt is many unhappy returns to the Labour party, which has just celebrated its 120th birthday. In all that time, it has only managed to produce three leaders capable of winning a parliamentary majority. Two of those leaders are deceased. The other is Tony Blair, who is sometimes wished dead by unpleasant people on the left of the party he once led. Before him, the party lost four consecutive elections. Under him, the party won three in a row, two by landslides. Since him, the party has reverted to its losing ways, going down to another four defeats on the trot. FAIL FAIL FAIL FAIL BLAIR BLAIR BLAIR FAIL FAIL FAIL FAIL. Were we talking about any field of endeavour other than Labour politics, were we talking about football management or medical research or space exploration or novel writing or filmmaking, Mr Blair would be hailed as a genius, the more so for being the sole winner amid so many losers. Yet he is disdained or denounced by much of the party to which he delivered so much electoral success. Even in the wake of a spectacularly crushing defeat, they would do anything but look to their only living winner for any inspiration and guidance about how Labour might one day return to power.
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Johnson’s Brexit flunkey sums up all that’s wrong with his master’s trade fantasies | Will Hutton26h Johnson’s Brexit flunkey sums up all that’s wrong with his master’s trade fantasies | Will Hutton
David Frost should drag himself out of the 18th century and address our perilous futureLast week, an unelected special adviser delivered one of the most political and controversial speeches made by a British public official in recent times. It claimed, in justifying Brexit, that 19th-century political notions – the nation state with absolute sovereignty and wholesale independence of action – extended unchanged into the 21st century and were
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Beware the politics of identity. They help legitimise the toxic far right | Kenan Malik26h Beware the politics of identity. They help legitimise the toxic far right | Kenan Malik
The vile ideas behind the Hanau attack have moved from the fringe to the mainstream“Hate is a poison that… is responsible for far too many crimes,”
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In 1970, driven by chaos and energy, we felt like pioneers in female protest | Sheila Rowbotham26h In 1970, driven by chaos and energy, we felt like pioneers in female protest | Sheila Rowbotham
Fifty years since the start of the Women’s Liberation Movement, one of its founders reflects on its progressOn Friday 28 February 1970, around 500 women, many clutching sleeping bags and babies, arrived at Ruskin, the trade union college in Walton Street, Oxford, for the first national gathering of the
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Comic capers in Bologna, magic mushrooms and farewell to the fridge | Rachel Cooke27h Comic capers in Bologna, magic mushrooms and farewell to the fridge | Rachel Cooke
Continuing our new series, our writer reflects on the beauty and intelligence of graphic novelsDoes Italian have an equivalent of the expression “
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Idlib’s despair won’t end bloodshed in Syria. It will provoke a rebel fightback | Hassan Hassan27h Idlib’s despair won’t end bloodshed in Syria. It will provoke a rebel fightback | Hassan Hassan
Freed from the need to defend their last stronghold, the jihadists there will be well placed to regroup and take the struggle undergroundOutsiders can be forgiven for being tired of the Syrian conflict. After all, the violence has lasted for nearly a decade and the worst chapters – for outsiders, at least – have come and gone: Islamic State (Isis) seized almost half the country, in addition to one-third of Iraq and launched a global network of terror in 2014. But the world has now caught its breath and the threat has all but ended. Refugees, too, flooded Europe some years ago but the influx has been contained. Also, expert warnings about a resurgence of violence or extremism did not materialise and the return of state control seems to be the steady trajectory of the conflict despite persistent problems. Most of the country is currently under the control of either the regime, Turkey or the United States-backed Kurdish forces in eastern Syria. Even in the Kurdish zone, many would concede that it might be just a matter of time before these areas are recaptured by Damascus, even without much fighting, if and when the US eventually ends its presence there.
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The Observer view on domestic violence | Observer editorial27h The Observer view on domestic violence | Observer editorial
How much longer must we tolerate male brutality against women and children?In Australia, a
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Charity clearly doesn’t begin at home for Jeff Bezos | Kenan Malik28h Charity clearly doesn’t begin at home for Jeff Bezos | Kenan Malik
If anyone is paying for the Amazon boss’s philanthropy it’s his low-paid workersLast year, Amazon gave $5m to
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The Observer view on Donald Trump’s criticism of the film Parasite | Observer editorial28h The Observer view on Donald Trump’s criticism of the film Parasite | Observer editorial
It is hard to take seriously the president’s attack on the Oscar-winning movie when his own choices are so oddIt is easy to imagine why Donald Trump
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The Observer view on the government’s immigration plans | Observer editorial28h The Observer view on the government’s immigration plans | Observer editorial
Britain claims to be open for business even as it makes the country an inhumane place for low-skilled immigrants“Britain is open for business,” Alok Sharma, the new business secretary,
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Boris Johnson risks it all with power grab | Observer letters28h Boris Johnson risks it all with power grab | Observer letters
He and Dominic Cummings might just have sown the first seeds of their own downfallAndrew Rawnsley is right: “With a monopoly of power comes a monopoly of responsibility. When the audience decides it doesn’t like the music, there is only one person to boo” (
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