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The collapse of democracy in England’s schools | Letters3h The collapse of democracy in England’s schools | Letters
Readers respond to Aditya Chakrabortty’s article on Waltham Holy Cross primary school and the 7,000 other state schools in England that have been converted to academies since 2010Aditya Chakrabortty’s description of the process by which the private sector forces state schools into its net is very accurate (
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Act now to reduce health inequalities | Letters3h Act now to reduce health inequalities | Letters
Thirty senior public health experts from the north of England say cuts to public health grants should be reversedThere are substantial and growing health inequalities within England. These show that premature death rates are 20% higher for people living in the north than in the south and that a baby girl born in Wokingham can expect nearly 17 more years of healthy life than a baby girl born in Manchester. Health inequality is not only morally wrong but economically irresponsible. The Northern Health Science Alliance’s recent Health for Wealth report demonstrates that these north/south health inequalities cost the UK £13.2bn a year in lost productivity.
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We need a non-proliferation treaty for fossil fuels | Letter3h We need a non-proliferation treaty for fossil fuels | Letter
‘Peaceful use’ of fossil fuels could mean their continued but decreasing extraction, within enforceable limits constrained by the Paris agreement goals, writes
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Endless work leaves no time to volunteer | Letters3h Endless work leaves no time to volunteer | Letters
Many of today’s volunteers are pensioners, but where will tomorrow’s come from when people are expected to work into their late 60s, asks
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Naming mystery is a bit of a Cliff-hanger | Brief letters3h Naming mystery is a bit of a Cliff-hanger | Brief letters
Andrea Sutcliffe | Sense of proportion | Theresa May | Choirs | Cliff Richard | Novels in CornwallI am a lifelong reader of the Guardian. I have huge respect for David Brindle as a journalist who has consistently raised the profile and challenged the adult social care sector. Both the paper and David need to be better served by careless headline writers. I did not say that nursing needs to rediscover its humanity (
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This rotten government is too riven with division to unite parliament | Jon Trickett4h This rotten government is too riven with division to unite parliament | Jon Trickett
Regardless of whether Theresa May is ousted by her party, the facts of the situation will not changeAt this critical time for our country, with only a few months to go before the UK leaves the European Union, the government has been immobilised by Theresa May’s failure. Any other government would have fallen with the votes they have lost. And if
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Shamelessness: it’s the Conservatives’ superpower | Richard Godwin5h Shamelessness: it’s the Conservatives’ superpower | Richard Godwin
It allows Boris Johnson to lie and be found out, again and again. And it’s what makes a leadership contest thinkableI once knew a kid who had set his heart on a career in journalism. He didn’t have much of an in with the London media, so he decided to go the old-fashioned route: an entry-level reporting job on a local paper in a small market town. Not much pay. Bullying editors. Lots of stories about bins. But a job, nonetheless – at least until a solitary member of the public complained that he had embellished a quote. He was sacked for bringing shame on to the paper, a few months into his career. Such was the family shame, he never attempted to get a job on another paper. He is now a teacher. I often think about that when contemplating the career of Boris Johnson. Perhaps if my friend had failed on a grander stage – say, if he had been sacked by the Times for fabricating quotes – he might now be
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Labour must seize this moment to bring down May’s government | Zoe Williams7h Labour must seize this moment to bring down May’s government | Zoe Williams
Corbyn can no longer stand back and watch. This is the time to champion a vote of no confidence in the governmentYou know we’re in a crisis because the Today Programme was extended by 15 minutes this morning – it’s not long enough to get any clarity, because there is no clarity to be had. It was merely enough to signal the extremity of the situation by mucking up the schedule. Forty-eight letters have gone in to Graham Brady, which means
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What happened next? Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg: ‘I can’t sit back and grieve while so many people are dying’7h What happened next? Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg: ‘I can’t sit back and grieve while so many people are dying’
The students of Stoneman Douglas high school in Parkland, Florida, inspired a global movement for gun control with the March for Our Lives protest. One of the activists reveals why he never wants it to be forgottenOn 1 February 1960, 17-year-old
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What does this vote of no confidence mean? | Ian Birrell and others9h What does this vote of no confidence mean? | Ian Birrell and others
Our panel discuss the chaos in the Conservative party as Tory MPs trigger a vote of no confidence in Theresa May
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This is a national crisis – not the time for a pointless Tory feud | Jonathan Freedland11h This is a national crisis – not the time for a pointless Tory feud | Jonathan Freedland
As we approach the Brexit cliff edge, all the Conservatives can do is turn inwards and squander the precious time we have leftSo begins an epic waste of time and a monumental exercise in displacement activity. The Conservatives have taken a look at the scale of the crisis facing the country and decided their best response is
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I don’t want to tell alcoholic patients to keep drinking, but I have to | Mariam Alexander11h I don’t want to tell alcoholic patients to keep drinking, but I have to | Mariam Alexander
Although it goes against my instincts as a doctor, the lack of funding for drug and alcohol services means I have no choiceDoctors want good outcomes for our patients, but the reality is that this can’t always be the case. If something bad happens after we’ve done everything we possibly can, it’s hard, but we accept that it’s part of our work. It’s a very different experience if bad things happen when we know that more could have been done. As an NHS liaison psychiatrist, this is something I face regularly when I see alcoholics who are seeking help – I am often forced to advise them that they must keep drinking alcohol.
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News from the I’m a Celebrity jungle: goodness thrives in strange places | Fiona Sturges13h News from the I’m a Celebrity jungle: goodness thrives in strange places | Fiona Sturges
Love Island, Strictly, Bake Off and the rest are the unlikely refuge of decency and democracy in these troubled timesIt is natural, in these testing times, that we should all seek moments of escape. Given
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If you want to understand the gilets jaunes, get out of Paris | Nora Bensaâdoune15h If you want to understand the gilets jaunes, get out of Paris | Nora Bensaâdoune
While some protesters are wreaking destruction in the capital, others are breathing life into rural France’s forgotten cornersWhen I left Paris four years ago to settle in the pretty Drôme valley in south-eastern France, I opted for a village not far from the city of Valence. I wanted to be close to a high-speed rail station, but remote enough to finally be able to enjoy the fresh air and rural surroundings. At the time, I didn’t expect I’d be moving from one world to another. I had reckoned on making regular trips back to the capital. But Paris has gradually become a distant, hazy concept. When I do go to visit friends, it feels cut off, like a city in a bubble, carefully concealing its pockets of poverty while proudly showing off its cultural trophies and temples of consumption.
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Andrzej Krauze on the gilets jaunes protests – cartoon15h Andrzej Krauze on the gilets jaunes protests – cartoon
Protests against Emmanuel Macron have brought Paris to a standstill
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How one man’s story exposes the myths behind our migration stereotypes | Aditya Chakrabortty15h How one man’s story exposes the myths behind our migration stereotypes | Aditya Chakrabortty
Robert, a Romanian law graduate, didn’t come to the UK to undercut wages. But he ended up in insecure low-paid workAmid all the true-blue backbench blowhards and armchair pundits who will occupy the airwaves this Brexit week, one thing is guaranteed: you won’t hear a word from Robert. Why should you? He commands neither power nor status. He has hardly any money either. And yet he is crucial to this debate, because it is people like him that Brexit Britain wants to shut out. Robert is a migrant, under a prime minister who keeps trying and failing to impose an arbitrary cap on migrants to this country. Born in Timişoara, Romania, he now lives in a democracy that barely batted an eyelid when Nigel Farage
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The EU’s response to Russia must be bold and unanimous | Norbert Röttgen15h The EU’s response to Russia must be bold and unanimous | Norbert Röttgen
All measures short of war should be taken into account when trying to solve the crisis in UkraineIt was always just a matter of time before the smouldering conflict between Russia and Ukraine in the Sea of Azov, a body of water to the north-east of Crimea, escalated militarily. After it
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Jacinda Ardern’s heartfelt apology spoke volumes about compassion | Afua Hirsch15h Jacinda Ardern’s heartfelt apology spoke volumes about compassion | Afua Hirsch
Nobody demanded that the New Zealand leader say sorry for Grace Millane’s murder. I can’t imagine British leaders showing such responsibilityThe story of
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20h U.S. Income More Equal than Advertised
Do the people who bought Piketty’s famous book realize how much of it has been debunked?
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Trump Defends the International Order21h Trump Defends the International Order
His administration is reasserting the nation-state’s role in a free and open multilateral system.
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What to Do About Huawei?21h What to Do About Huawei?
China’s turn toward totalitarianism should not shake Western confidence in freedom.
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Oval Office Pantomime21h Oval Office Pantomime
Shutdown melodrama: Act 1, Scene 1: Pelosi and Schumer enter.
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The Guardian view on MPs and Brexit: parliament must decide | Editorial26h The Guardian view on MPs and Brexit: parliament must decide | Editorial
If the sovereignty of parliament is to mean anything, it must mean that the House of Commons has to vote soon on Theresa May’s Brexit dealBritain’s raging argument about Brexit is increasingly morphing into a contest about more issues than just this country’s relationship with the European Union. It is also turning into a contest about the relationship between two sources of democratic power – referendums and parliament. Referendums claim to elevate the people’s will over parliament, which is expected to defer indefinitely and in detail. Yet Britain’s historic constitutional doctrine, still bred in the bone of most MPs, has traditionally been that parliament is
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The Guardian view on the Stansted 15: a sledgehammer prosecution | Editorial26h The Guardian view on the Stansted 15: a sledgehammer prosecution | Editorial
The activists who blocked a deportation flight from departing were charged under legislation introduced to counter terrorist threats. Their case sets a chilling precedentThe case of the 15 activists convicted on Monday over
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May’s cynical Brexit vote delay all about her keeping power | Letters27h May’s cynical Brexit vote delay all about her keeping power | Letters
Guardian readers share their views on the trials and tribulations of the Conservatives’ Brexit plansDespite disagreeing with her, I previously thought Theresa May a prime minister doing her best in what she considered the national interest. The cynical delay in Tuesday’s vote (
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Double standards on parental status | Letter27h Double standards on parental status | Letter
It was disappointing to find Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer described as a ‘mother of three’, writes
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Sterling plight shows racism still rife in UK | Letters27h Sterling plight shows racism still rife in UK | Letters
The only surprising aspect of this debate is that some people appear to be surprised by it, writes
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An anti-capitalist hack for TV ads | Brief letters27h An anti-capitalist hack for TV ads | Brief letters
Hope | Anti-capitalist tips | Richard Cooke | Seat offering | Meat allergyIn a desert of lunacy and lies, Monday’s Guardian was an oasis of honesty, humour and hope. Thank you.
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In Britain, the hi-vis bib has become a badge of shame | Zoe Williams27h In Britain, the hi-vis bib has become a badge of shame | Zoe Williams
The gilets jaunes have co-opted the yellow vest as a symbol of rebellion. But, thanks to New Labour’s ‘community payback’ initiative, here it has become a mark of infantilisationI don’t know the significance of the
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Letter: Peter Boizot obituary28h Letter: Peter Boizot obituary
When he was a player with Hamp- stead Hockey Club,
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Guys, it’s 108 shopping days till Brexit, and we’re grabbing maces | Marina Hyde29h Guys, it’s 108 shopping days till Brexit, and we’re grabbing maces | Marina Hyde
A cancelled vote, a nearly nicked shiny thing – Monday’s debacle was a tour de force in parliamentary faffing I wonder if a female MP will ever grab the mace, as Labour’s
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I’m proud I grabbed the parliamentary mace. Here’s why | Lloyd Russell-Moyle30h I’m proud I grabbed the parliamentary mace. Here’s why | Lloyd Russell-Moyle
The rod represents parliament’s authority – which the government made a mockery of by delaying the Brexit voteOur country has arrived at a moment of profound political significance. For some time, the prime minister knew her deal would not pass in parliament, and all along she has mocked members of all parties with her blathering blandishments. A good deal. The only deal. A deal that is in the national interest. Even behind closed doors, Theresa May’s government has excluded MPs – including successive Brexit secretaries – from the details of the negotiations.
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‘Brexit plot twists to come’: after May’s vote meltdown, what should happen next? | Martin Kettle and others32h ‘Brexit plot twists to come’: after May’s vote meltdown, what should happen next? | Martin Kettle and others
Our writers react to the prime minister’s last-minute decision to postpone the parliamentary vote on her unpopular Brexit deal
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Police have spied on thousands of us. Let the spotlight now fall on them | Alison32h Police have spied on thousands of us. Let the spotlight now fall on them | Alison
I shared my life with an imposter for five years, believing him to be my partner. This public inquiry into the secret state is crucialThe latest publications on the website for the
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Nicola Sturgeon’s clarity on Brexit reminds us what a leader looks like | Gaby Hinsliff32h Nicola Sturgeon’s clarity on Brexit reminds us what a leader looks like | Gaby Hinsliff
May’s current disaster should be Corbyn’s chance, but instead it is the SNP leader who is displaying purpose, energy and guts Why can’t there be an English Nicola Sturgeon? That was the cry three years ago, in the wake of her stellar performance during the
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The gilets jaunes have cowed Macron. But for them, that’s just the start | John Lichfield33h The gilets jaunes have cowed Macron. But for them, that’s just the start | John Lichfield
Despite winning major concessions from the president, the French rebels now eye a bigger cause – to bring down the governmentThe French have a word for pressing on to the bitter end without considering the consequences:
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Watership Down should be about death and destruction, not fluffy rabbits | Stephanie Merritt37h Watership Down should be about death and destruction, not fluffy rabbits | Stephanie Merritt
I loved the 1978 film as a child, even though it terrified me. The remake should have kept the wild darkness, not toned it downWe don’t like to think about death too much at Christmas these days, especially when it comes to children’s stories. This is a shame, because dwelling on the proximity of darkness has been a significant part of our collective storytelling tradition at this time of year, since long before the
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Brexit is a failed project. Labour must oppose it | Paul Mason39h Brexit is a failed project. Labour must oppose it | Paul Mason
The opposition should get behind a second referendum – and vote to remain Sometimes, in politics, you just have to fight for what you believe in. I believe that – amid the current geopolitical meltdown – staying in the European Union and reforming it is safer than casting ourselves adrift with a bunch of rightwing Tory xenophobes at the helm. But since the referendum, I’ve understood that a leftwing Labour government can only be achieved by building a coalition of voters across the Brexit divide. It’s a belief based on the experience of the 2017 general election, when I campaigned in solidly working-class areas where, to keep a doorstep conversation going for more than 30 seconds, the first sentence had to be: “We will deliver Brexit.”
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Jimmy McGovern’s Care has shed light on a crisis. Now we need a solution | Dawn Foster39h Jimmy McGovern’s Care has shed light on a crisis. Now we need a solution | Dawn Foster
A ‘Grey New Deal’ for Britain could halt the crisis in elderly care – budget cuts are ruining livesEarly in Jimmy McGovern’s
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